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C AMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER

CARRYING A TUNE

World Choir Games start July 4 B1

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate 50¢

THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Police work to combat heroin epidemic By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Police agencies throughout the county are working to deal with, and stop, what has become an epidemic in this area. In the past couple years, cases, arrests and deaths involving heroin have steadily been on the rise, with its reach touching people throughout the county. “It’s something that’s reached epidemic proportions, and unfortunately that epidemic in centered in Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties,” said Bill Mark, director of the Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force. Currently, heroin accounts for 63 percent of arrests in Northern Kentucky, with the region leading the state in heroin-related ar-

rests. In the local police departments, the number of heroin-related cases have continued to increase. “The complexity of crimes facing the police department and the tsunami of heroin-related drug cases are quickly consuming the police department’s current resources,” said Bellevue Police Chief Wayne Turner. In Fort Thomas, Lieutenant Rich Whitford said a lot of cases and arrests they are dealing with are related to drugs, in particular, heroin. “Heroin is definitely the drug of choice right now because it’s so readily accessible and cheap,” Whitford said. “It’s unbelievable See HEROIN, Page A2

Wilder garage caters to motorcycle riders in area By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

WILDER — Two long-time motorcycle riders have teamed up to open the area’s first motorcycle garage. Steve Griffith and Steve Reed recently open their new business, Steves’ Garage, off the AA Highway in Wilder, offering full service repairs, parts, accessories, apparel and more. For the past several years, Griffith has been helping friends with their bikes at his home in Alexandria, but when Reed found out the space in Wilder was available, the two starting thinking about renting the space. Originally the plan wasn’t to open a full-service garage, but other local riders convinced

them to do it. “It was an opportunity we just couldn’t pass up,” Griffith said. “Other people were telling us that we couldn’t let this location go to waste.” In its location, the garage is near many routes that are frequented by motorcycle riders, like Rt. 10, Rt. 8, Rt. 22, making it convenient for local residents and riders visiting the area. “People come from all over just to ride the roads we have in our backyard,” Griffith said. Since both Reed and Griffith work full time elsewhere, they hired certified Harley technician Gino Laney to work full-time at the garage, which opened earlier this month. See GARAGE, Page A3

SPICE STORIES

BUILDING PLANS

Rita shares the biblical roots of spices commonly used today. B3

Campbell School’s facilities committee met to discuss their four-year plan. A5

CE-0000511862

Unique, Educational, Cultural, Family Fun!

A February 2012 view of Lakeside Terrace in Highland Heights, the only senior living residence owned by Campbell County. Campbell County plans to close the complex and sell it by February 2013. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

County closing, selling seniors home Residents must move by February By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

NEWPORT — Campbell County will close Lakeside Terrace senior apartments in Highland Heights by February, forcing the remaining residents to move. The county is working to sell the six-story building rather than pay for an estimated $5 million renovation, said Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery. The county has advised residents they have until February to find someplace else to live. “As tough as it is to say, as hard as it is to hear, that’s too much to invest in the building,’ Pendery said. About 43 people still live in the apartments, and almost a dozen residents plus their relatives attended the June 20 fiscal court meeting in Newport to speak against the county’s

plans. The county has offered to pay up to $300 in moving expenses per resident. The building is in such poor shape that the plumbing or heating/air conditioning might go out at any time and require the county to put residents in a hotel, he said. Pendery informed residents of the county’s decision to close the building during a May 22 meeting at Lakeside. They were provided with printed packets containing information about senior housing assistance. Residents of Lakeside and their supporters consistently said closing the building down is all about selling the building to Northern Kentucky University. “I know it’s the college,” said Mary Webster, a resident of Lakeside for 10 years. The county is holding Lakeside until NKU is ready to buy it, Webster said. See LAKESIDE, Page A3

Robert Houston, a resident of Lakeside Terrace senior apartments in Highland Heights, pleads with Campbell County Fiscal Court leaders at the June 20 meeting in Newport not to force him to move out. "All we're asking is to die where we're at," Houston said. "We're happy where we're at." Campbell County plans to close Lakeside Terrace by February. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Vol. 16 No. 19 © 2012 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Continued from Page A1

what an epidemic it has become.” Cities like Fort Thomas and Newport, that are easily and quickly accessible from Interstate-471, have been dealing with drug users passing through the area who pull off into the cities to do their drug before getting back on the road.

Newport Police Chief Tom Collins said police have known for a while that the Newport Pavilion parking lots are a hotspot for people to pull over and use drugs. Collins said in some cases, people heading back from buying heroin in Cincinnati won’t even be able to wait until they can get off the exit and park, and will shoot up intravenously while coming across the bridge into Kentucky. The evidence of this,

Collins said, can be found almost any day of the week along the highway and ramps, where it isn’t uncommon to find hypodermic needles. Newport has had about 60 heroin arrests so far this year, compared to 73 for all of last year, Collins said. Compared to when he started his policing career in 1977, heroin and its users have changed a lot. “Back then, you never saw heroin, and if you did, it was a major deal,” Collins said. Today, with the government more strictly regulating pain medicine, people who can no longer feed their pain pill addiction are turning to heroin, Collins.

Newport City Manager Tom Fromme said along with the pain pills, the bad economy and cheapness of heroin have also played a role in the increased usage.

Overdose deaths

Police officers are finding users who have overdosed and died everywhere from personal residences and businesses to parking lots. In some cases, overdose victims have been dropped off in front of the St. Luke Fort Thomas Emergency Room by friends or family members afraid of getting in trouble, Whitford said. In cases throughout the cities, drug overdose investigations are complicat-

Newport officer Jeff Hood patrols the Kroger Marketplace parking lot in the Newport Pavilion, a known hotspot for people to pull over and use heroin. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY R

ed by other users, friends or family members cleaning up the scene prior to emergency medical services arriving. Turner said the overdose victims investigated by the Bellevue Police Department have range from teenagers to someone in their 60s. “Dealers are increasingly peddling a form of ultra-potent heroin that sells for as little as $10 a bag and is so pure it can kill unsuspecting users instantly, sometimes before they even remove the syringe from their veins,” Turner said.

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue • nky.com/bellevue Cold Spring • nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights • nky.com/highlandheights Newport • nky.com/newport Southgate • nky.com/southgate Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

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For some people, heroin use is thought of as a victimless crime, but police say the recent issues facing the area have shown that not to be the case. Fromme said while using heroin may not directly hurt someone else, like an assault or murder, what happens because of the heroin use does. “Drug use has really affected the amount of theft we’ve been having throughout this area,” Fromme said. “A lot of thieves that have been caught have had drug problems.” Whitford said in one case, a woman caught stealing told officers in the interview about how she has tried to get off heroin,

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and how the physical pain and sickness from withdrawals almost killed her. For most addicts, they need to find money to do the drug in the morning to get out of bed, during the day to not feel sick and at night to be able to sleep, Whitford said. “It’s just a vicious cycle” Whitford said. “Most addicts will do anything for (heroin).” Newport Corporal Paul Kunkel said he deals with the effects of the area’s heroin problem all the time. Beyond the thefts and robberies committed by addicts needing money for heroin, the affect the addiction has on their families, particularly their kids, is very evident. Kunkel said all too often, he deals with juveniles in the city who are getting into trouble and stealing, whose parents are in and out of jail and rehabilitation for drugs. “Heroin is everywhere and it can affect everyone, no matter who they are or where they live, in some way,” Kunkle said.

Cracking down

In Newport, police have increased patrols of hotspots like the Newport Pavilion and have actively sought out charges when people are caught dealing drugs in the city. “The police department has been very proactive and jumped all over this,” Fromme said. Kunkel said unlike many other drugs, like marijuana, that Newport residents in a sense put up with, pretty much no one wants to deal with heroin. “Our residents deal with a lot of issues, but they don’t want heroin in their city,” Kunkel said. This disapproval by residents has helped the department combat the heroin issue because it has led them to work with the police by reporting suspicious things when they see them, Kunkel said. “With support from the city, Newport has taken a very aggressive approach to keeping heroin out of our city,” Collins said.

Education key for future

In Newport, the city is bringing back the DARE program to teach children about drugs and the dangers of doing them. “Education is the key,” Collins said. “We need to show these kids what we’ve learned and how these drugs can affect their lives.” Whitford said educating parents is equally important. Parents who know what signs to look for, like things going missing from their home and needle marks on their children’s arms, have a better chance of getting their children help. “Parents need to keep an eye out for this and catch it before it’s too late and they lose their child,” Whitford said. “I’ve seen too many parents go through overdoses and deaths, and it’s just horrible.”


NEWS

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Boone, Conner plan joint reunion

Continued from Page A1

“We have the building and they’re taking it away, that’s what it comes down to,” Webster said of the county’s decision to close and sell the building. Lakeside is not in NKU’s acquisition plan, and the university’s policy is not to comment on properties it might purchase in the future until the sale is final, said Chris Cole, NKU’s director of marketing and communications. “We have not put any kind of pressure on any-

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Sharonville, OH

RECORDER

more custom bikes for sale and opening a winter bike storage area. “There is really no point

in starting a business unless you plan to grow unless it’s just a hobby,” Reed said. “We have invested a whole

lot for this to be a hobby.” For more information call 441-7838 or visit www.stevesgarageky.com.

body to sell any property,” Cole said. Pendery said rumors of NKU eventually buying Lakeside have persisted for years, and the county has met with residents to address residents’ concerns. “We truthfully told them that the rumors aren’t true – NKU’s not buying the building,” Pendery said. “That was out there it might be several years ago, and it worked against us trying to rent the building as they pointed out.” Seniors living at Lakeside walk easily to the county’s senior center

next-door, and to a grocery store and restaurants across the street, said Vivian Houston speaking on behalf of her ex-husband Robert Houston, a Lakeside resident. They don’t want to move, she said. The residents are grandfathers, fathers, mothers and grandmothers – and they have paid their taxes, Houston said. “They’re not junk, and they need a helping hand,” she said. “And all they are asking for is how you would probably treat your parent.” Lakeside resident Frank Redden, 78, said he wants the county to have a

heart when it comes to dealing with residents instead of just telling them the news as if it’s only a business decision. “This is stress with a capital ‘S,’” he said. “People are so stressed they’re getting sick over it.” Pendery said the county will do everything it can to help people, and believes people will find new homes by February. “I’m more optimistic, and I think that there are places for them that if they’re honest with themselves they might like it better,” he said.

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On Sept. 15 the Boone County High School and Conner High School classes of 1971 and 1972 will reunite for a fun-filled event. The reunion will take place 4 p.m. to1a.m. at Turfway Park in Florence, in the fifth-floor Racing Club. Alumni are invited to come at 4 p.m. to socialize and catch the last few races of the day. Dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by DJ Donna playing 1970s music, doorprizes, split-the-pot and karaoke. There will be a cash only bar, betting window

and professional photo op. Cost is $27 per person with early RSVP before July 1. Cost is $30 per person between July 1 and Sept. 1. There will be no door sales. For more information, go to bchs.rebels72@yahoo.com or j_a_wolfe@yahoo.com or call Winnie Jewell Walston 859-5862998.

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Lakeside

Community Recorder

Bring this ad to enter a $100 drawing!

Since they work with all the major dealerships, they are able to get pretty much any part someone may need for their bike and do almost all the work in house, Reed said. “If there is something we can’t do here, we have relationships with folks who can do it for us,” Reed said. Reed said they have been working with their neighbor, Longneck’s Sports Grill, to promote both the businesses and refer customers to each other. With help from the garage, Longneck’s is starting Biker Sundays, featuring group rides, drink specials and live music, with reserved parking for motorcycles. While business has been good so far, Reed said they have some plans for expansion, including opening up a bigger showroom to add

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Votruba after 15 years: Few regrets By Cliff Peale cpeale@enquirer.com

HIGHLAND

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Boosting Northern Kentucky University’s graduation rate is the biggest job Jim Votruba feels he has left only partially done in 15 years leading NKU. The campus here has been transformed with a new student union, arena and hightech showplace for the College of Informatics. NKU will move to Division I athletics this fall, and it has installed a new general education curriculum, a move still generating controversy here. Changes like those have left Votruba beloved here as he plans to retire July 31, making way for new NKU President Geoff Mearns. But only about 37 percent of the NKU undergraduates who started as freshmen in 2005 graduated within six years, a rate that has improved about 5 percentage points but that Votruba wishes could be higher. About two-thirds of freshmen in fall 2010 returned for fall 2011. “I do have a regret, and that is that we aren’t making more progress on retention and graduation rates,” Votruba said from his eighth-floor office overlooking the campus. “There’s no magic bullet for that. “I think I’m processing it (retirement),” he added. “I’m very pleased with the progress of the last 15 years. It’s a good feeling.” Votruba has been through dozens of farewell events since he announced his retirement last fall. The new student

union now bears the name of Votruba and his wife Rachel, and NKU has collected about $523,000 for a scholarship fund in their name. His name has become synonymous with growth at NKU. During his tenure, enrollment increased by about 4,000 students to nearly 16,000 per year and the NKU endowment jumped to $68 million from about $12 million. Off campus, he has put the university in a leadership role throughout the region, from work force development to high school preparation for college. “He was able to make NKU not only an integrated part of the community but a driving force in all of Northern Kentucky,” said Terry Mann, chairman of NKU’s board of regents. “I don’t think anyone foresaw the capacity for the university to do the things it accomplished under Jim.” Votruba, 67, will take a year’s leave, remaining in his Lakeside Park home. That will include more time with his three children and six grandchildren. He’ll also work on community projects – he’s on the St. Elizabeth Healthcare board – as well as national education groups. That includes a parttime venture consulting with college presidents. He attended a full-day retreat with education faculty last month. When he returns, he’ll teach doctoral courses in educational leadership. He sounds like he’s ready for that less frenetic workload and public responsibility. “This job really owns you,

at least the way I’ve done it,” Votruba said. “I would not want to start over now.” Those responsibilities will belong to Mearns, 52, the current provost at Cleveland State University. Mearns will make the call on a potential capital campaign that some have pegged to be as much as $100 million, and also will renew NKU’s constant battle to get attention and taxpayer dollars from the legislature in Frankfort. Votruba acknowledges the level of that funding is largely out of NKU’s control and depends on the state’s economy. But he says the state should reopen the groundbreaking higher education bill that took effect at about the same time he arrived at NKU, and substitute a formula that rewards research, work force development and degrees in high-impact fields such as health care and information technology. In short, with a formula that would reward the investments NKU has made. For example, NKU pays two full-time professors who spend half their time helping early-childhood education centers gain accreditation. “A lot of water has gone under the bridge,” Votruba said. “If we had it to do over again, I would do something different. Rather than a general allocation, I’d direct it strategically. (Equity) is a tough case to make. What’s not a tough case to make is that we can’t turn out IT graduates fast enough.” In Greater Cincinnati, the landscape has changed in another way. Both NKU and the University of Cincinnati now

Trauma study doesn’t require prior consent By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

James Votruba, who is retiring July 31 as president of Northern Kentucky University, in his office on the eighth floor of the Lucas Administration Building. PATRICK REDDY/THE ENQUIRER

have metropolitan tuition rates that encourage students to cross the river at slightly higher than in-state rates. That has made all of the region’s universities, as well as fellow Kentucky institutions, real competitors for students. “If you ask me what forces are going to shape our future, UC is much more aggressive now,” Votruba said. “I would challenge anyone to tell me where there’s needless duplication. As long as programs have demand, we’re going to offer them. When I came here, there was an unspoken rule that regional universities owned their regions. Not anymore.” Votruba’s expression brightens when talking about the doctoral courses he will teach. He’ll pose questions to students directly relevant to his last 15 years. “What makes a good leader? What makes a good organization? How do you form leaders? “I’ve had an opportunity to have an impact on the university and on the region,” he said. “My intention is to continue to have an impact.”

TOLL FREE

Northern Kentucky trauma patients have a chance to help future trauma patients all over the nation. Dr. Travis Gerlach, a surgeon at University Hospital, visited Florence City Council to share information about a research study he and the hospital are conducting and how it could affect Northern Kentucky residents. Gerlach and his group are conducting the Pragmatic, Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) study. The study is taking place at Level 1 trauma centers, like University Hospital, across the nation and is studying the best ratio of blood products in massive blood transfusions to trauma patients. In transfusions, blood products are made of three parts: platelets, plasma and red blood cells, and they can be given in varying ratios, Gerlach said. “It is unclear what ratio is needed,” he said. Because PROPPR is studying trauma situations, it has clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to use patients who are unable to give prior consent. “Consent will be attempted to be obtained as soon as possible,” Gerlach said. However, because of the urgent nature of trauma injuries, the experimental transfusions will be given if a patient is unable to respond, he said. Although the ratio of the three blood parts will be experimental, all transfusions are approved by the FDA and the American Association of Blood Banks. Those who don’t want to participate in the study, in the event of a trauma injury, can opt out by calling 513-558-6332 or emailing PROPPR@uc.edu. Emergency department staff will know patients have opted out of the study by the plastic bracelet given to those who opt out. The PROPPR study is scheduled to begin in July and last 18 months.

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NEWS

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Scottish Rite moves speech services

Arcadia wild card in school’s plans By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

SCHOOL FACILITY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Facility planning committee members each represent a different sector of the school district and wider community. The following are the state-required positions comprising the committee. » Superintendent Glen Miller. » Parents (four): Nicole Ponting, Andrea Schumacher, Jeni Hedger, and Michelle Raney » Teachers (four): Roseann McCafferty, Deron Hitch, Donna Schneider, and Jill Sowards. » Building administrators/principals (four): Renee Boots, Dave Sandlin, Kim Visse, and Amity Kukla. » District facilities director: Sharon Alexander. » Central office staff: Kerry Hill (committee chairperson). » Community leaders: Chuck Heilman, Carol Kaiser, and Mike Bates. » Board of Education member: Susan Fangman. » Local Planning and Zoning: Peter Klear, director of planning and zoning at Campbell County Fiscal Court. » Additional non-voting members attend the meetings and provide their input including: Ehmet Hayes, the district's architect, Sam Jones, assistant director of special education, and community member Jeff Smith. » Mike Oder with the Kentucky School Boards Association serves as a facilitator at meetings. Source: Connie Pohlgeers, director of school improvement and community education for Campbell County Schools.

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell

County Schools has formed its facilities committee to create a new four-year plan listing priorities for major repairs to buildings and possible new schools. The committee’s meetings are open to the public, and the next one is scheduled at the Alexandria Education Center board room, 51 Orchard Lane, at 6 p.m. Monday, July 23. “It’s the big ticket items,” said Kerry Hill, director of student services, and chairperson of the facility planning committee. The district is required to create a new plan and have it approved by the state every four years, Hill said. The district expects the population of 11,000 students to decrease about 1 percent during the next four years, he said. Something that might change those projections is how fast the planned 916-unit Arcadia housing development is built out, Hill said. Arcadia is a joint development between the Drees Co. and Fischer Homes approved by Alexandria in 2006. Dirt grading began on the 327-acre development this spring. “I think Arcadia is something we will be keeping a close eye on,” Hill said. Even if there is growth at Arcadia, the district always has the option of reconvening the facility committee to redo the plan in two years, he said. Work is under way at Arcadia, and a permit for 50 “patio homes” have been approved, said John Jewell, chairman of the Alexandria Planning and Zoning Commission. Engineers on the Arcadia project have indicated they might want to move rapidly for-

ward and seek approval to start work on one or possibly both sets of condo complexes, Jewell said. The 2006 plans for Arcadia approved by the city included Drees eventually building 224 units of condos, and Fischer building 353 condo units, he said. Jewell said nothing in the Arcadia plan has been changed to his knowledge, and no requests for changes have been filed with the city. Based on an impact study provided by the developers, a total of 212 school-aged children are expected to live in Arcadia once all 916 units are complete, he said. The top remaining need from the school district’s existing facility plan is for more middle school space. However, conditions have changed since that plan was drawn up, Hill said. Development has occurred

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Candy Land is a favorite game many children pick, she said. When dealing with younger children, ages birth to 3 years old, the strategy is to bombard them with language playing with things in their everyday environment at home including blocks or puzzles to learn things that comes naturally to most people. “These children have to have things literally spoken to them to help learn the language and say the language,” she said. “Oh, we need to pull the top off, you know we’re going to put it in the cup. For example Play-Doh, you know push–push.” They receive a homework folder and they are instructed on what strategies and techniques they can use at home the rest of the week until they come back the following week,” she said. Sell said the Scottish Rite picked Waters’ service because she is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. It is important to have a set schedule so families can work the services around their schedule, he said. Typically between five to 10 children use RiteCare each month, Sell said. RiteCare works by covering the difference in costs for speech and language services for people who aren’t fully covered by insurance, but are not eligible for free services because they live above a federal poverty level, he said. Waters said she works with parents on payment plans and rates and her first priority is getting the children in for the service. For information about RiteCare call Speech/Language Services at 859-572-0430.

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COLD SPRING — The Covington Scottish Rite Foundation wants people to know the group’s RiteCare speech and language services are now being offered out of a Cold Spring office. Families had been referred to Cardinal Hill in Florence for the RiteCare services for a decade, said Kevin Sell of Alexandria, chairman of the Scottish Rite’s clinical services committee. Cardinal Hill was bought by the Community Foundation, and the RiteCare service was discontinued June 2, Sell said. RiteCare services have been offered in Northern Kentucky since 1991, and it is aimed at children ages 3-5, but sometimes children as old as 7 are in the program, he said. Beginning July 2, the services will be offered in Cold Spring through “Speech/Language Therapy Services” owned and operated by California resident Susan Waters. “We did not discontinue RiteCare, we just moved it,” he said. Waters, a licensed speech and language therapist, said she works with children one-on-one. Children are initially assessed for strengths and weaknesses in areas including speech, receptive or expressive language, voice therapy, fluency and stuttering, she said. Waters said she then develops one or two goals for each child. “And then to work on those, we try to do it through play because children love to play,” Waters said. “So, the more you can engage them in play activities and not let them think that they are actually learning or having to do work, the more that it is a play activity the better it goes.”

at a slower pace in recent years than originally expected because of economic conditions, so the projected student growth has not occurred, he said. The biggest number gradelevel student class populations were the middle grades of 6-8 in recent years. Now the elementary grades for the entire district are smaller by around 25 to 30 children for each grade, Hill said. So, the number of students at the middle school is expected to decrease by as much as 100 students in coming years, he said. The district has one of the largest middle school’s in Kentucky by student population and it was starting to have capacity issues, he said. The larger classes are now headed to the high school, he said. “We have capacity at the high school,” Hill said.

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

New Campbell County turf courtesy of NFL By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County Schools has received a $200,000 grant from the Cincinnati Bengals the NFL for a new turf football field at the district’s new high school athletic complex in Alexandria. The $200,000 savings will be put back into the general fund for the Board of Education to reallocate elsewhere in the budget in September, said Connie Pohlgeers, the district’s spokesperson and director of school improvement and community education. “In this financial downturn where we’re trying to tap into every resource available, we’ve really been going after a lot of grants because that really helps us bridge the gap,” Pohlgeers said. The facility building project started in July 2011

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with a target completion date of December 2012 – following this year’s football season, she said. “We will be working with the Bengals organization to publicize the field for the new sports complex,” Pohlgeers said. The grant is from the NFL Grassroots Program. The program is a partnership between the NFL Youth Football Fund and the Local Initiatives Support Corporation. LISC is the largest community development support organization in the U.S., and was started in 1979, according to the LISC website www.lisc.org. Campbell County’s grant was part of $2.5 million in grants awarded this year by the Bengals, the NFL Youth Football Fund, and LISC, according to a news release from the Bengals. The field will accommodate Campbell County

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JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A7

Wrong ‘valedictorian’ gives speech wcroyle@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Megan Rauch stood before a crowd of her fellow graduates, teachers, family and friends to make the prestigious valedictorian address on May 24. She found out this week the honor should have gone not to her but to her fellow Campbell County High School graduate Christina Heilman. Christina gave the salutatorian speech. Turns out that honor should have gone to Olivia Davis. These three young women, among other students, have been through a wave of emotions since they graduated after finding out Campbell County Schools used the wrong report to determine the final student rankings. Christina, who moved up to the No. 1 spot and at least got to give a salutatorian speech at the commencement, was more concerned about how Megan,

Davis

Heilman

Olivia and school administrators were affected by the error. “I’m disappointed that I didn’t get recognized as valedictorian, but I’ll get over it,” Christina said. “I just feel bad for everybody else.” Superintendent Glen Miller said the computer program the district uses produces three reports on class rankings, with each one calculating them in a slightly different manner. Some students recognized by the district as finishing in the top 10 percent actually did not. Three students who didn’t think they finished in the top 10 percent – William Carson, Jason Crigler and Mary Mar-

and I know they felt bad, but it just left a bad taste in my mouth.” Olivia also had mixed emotions. While she ended up ranked three spots higher than she thought, she did not get to give a salutatorian speech. “I was obviously very happy to find out I was ranked higher because it had been a goal of mine to get as high of a rank as I could,” Olivia said. “I’m glad they did the right thing and told me, but I was angry that I wasn’t recognized for it.” Miller said those who were given trophies or honor cords in error will still keep them. Those who should have been honored and weren’t will be recognized at Monday’s 6 p.m. school board meeting in the AEC Building next to the district office. He said Olivia will give her salutatorian speech at the meeting. Her mom, Lori Davis, hopes to have a lot of family members in attendance to

Children’s Home hosts World Choir event By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

COVINGTON — The Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky is built on the foundation of building bridges, so it’s fitting that the Free Friendship concert the organization is hosting at its Devou Park location will overlook the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge that connects Covington to Cincinnati. On July 7, the concert, which is part of the World Choir Games, will be held at

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fitting for the group’s mission. “The Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky can build bridges for better futures for abused, neglected kids,” Wurth said. Grilled food and beverages will be available for purchase and concert-goers should bring blankets to sit on, he said. Although the event is free, the Children’s Home is asking those interested to reserve tickets at http:// chnkfriendshipcon cert.eventbrite.com.

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and exciting venue, because the front of the Children’s Home in Northern Kentucky here in Devou Park, we have one of the most stunning views in the region,” he said. “The most exciting part of the view is that from our front lawn, you can see almost every bridge that connects Northern Kentucky to Ohio.” The Children’s Home was funded by Amos Shinkle, who also funded the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge, Wurth said, adding that the location is

4 p.m. A free event, it features three children’s choirs that are participating in next month’s World Choir Games and will bridge what the home does for area children to residents, said Rick Wurth, vice president for development. The “Melodia” Children’s Choir from Russia, The Morten Boerup Choir from Denmark and the St. Micheal’s Children Choir, from Sharonville, Ohio, are set to perform. “It’s going be an unusual

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help make the best of an awkward situation. “I think Olivia has accepted the fact that it is what it is, and at this point, there isn’t much more we can do about it,” Lori Davis said. “People make mistakes, and I told Olivia it won’t be the last time in her life that someone makes a mistake that she will have to deal with.” Olivia will be attending Northern Kentucky University in the fall to study genetics. Megan will head to Lindsey Wilson College in Columbia, Ky., as a biology/pre-med student. Christina will go to the University of Kentucky to study engineering. Christina’s father, Chuck Heilman, said what happened shouldn’t have happened, but it wasn’t done maliciously and will be something all of those

affected will overcome. “Could it have been avoided? Yes. Is it going to make a long-term difference in their lives? No,” he said. “They are all great kids who worked very hard, and they are all going to be very successful.” The girls do hope, though, that the lesson learned is long-term. They all had the same simple advice for the school to make sure this never happens again. “They just need to be sure they double-check,” Megan said.

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tin – did. District and school officials spent the week meeting individually with students and their families, apologizing for the errors. “An employee ran the wrong report. It’s an unfortunate mistake, and we are trying to make it right,” Miller said. “We are so sorry this happened.” Megan, who ended up ranking third, said she was called into school this past Monday and was told about the mistake by Principal Renee Boots and Assistant Principal Dan Franzen. “I was really at a loss for words,” Megan said. “I was frustrated and really didn’t want to talk to them after that.” She said there was no doubt their remorse was sincere, but it was still difficult to accept. “I got up in front of 1,000 people to give my speech – and then it was like I’d been slapped in the face by my own school,” Megan said. “It’s a really good school,

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NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

NKU, Vision 2015 partner for paddle boat tour Community Recorder The Northern Kentucky University Center for Environmental Education will partner with Vision 2015 and the Covington Neighborhoods, Parks and Recreation Department to host a guided river tour of the Licking River on June 30 at 9 a.m. The tour, called "Rediscovering the Licking River," is a paddle boat tour to help educate the public on the importance of two local initiatives. The Licking River Watershed is an organization that works to protect, improve and restore the waters for the Licking River basin by

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promoting water quality monitoring, public education and citizen action. The Licking River Greenway is an effort to create an urban greenway from the mouth of the Licking River to the Interstate-275 loop. The seven-mile tour will begin at Knotty Pine of the Bayou (6302 Licking Pike, Cold Spring) and conclude with a celebration at the Covington Landing. The cost per participant is $20 and proceeds will benefit the NKU Center for Environmental Education’s K-12 and community programs. Awards and prizes will be announced at the celebration ceremony along with raffles and educational booths, which are available for sponsorships. For more information, contact Steve Kerlin at 859-572-6380 or kerlins1@nku.edu.

Check Exchange

Sakura Chorus shares culture through song By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

CRESTVIEW HILLS —

The World Choir Games will bring the Greater Cincinnati area several opportunities to share different cultures through song, but a local chorus has been been doing that for years. Made up of residents of Northern Kentucky as well as Southern Ohio, the Sakura Ladies Chorus is led by Sayuri Jones of Crestview Hills and Emi Akiba of Mason, Ohio. The group has worked along with the Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati to promote Japanese music and culture since 1998. Jones said initially, the chorus was going to perform non-competitively, but then found out they would only be performing for the judges. “We love the audience. We love people,” said

Jones, a local music teacher whose background is in opera. The chorus performs at various cultural events throughout the year, and will host a Woodsongs concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at Willis Music, 7567 Mall Road, Florence. Admission is $5 for adults and proceeds will help the group fund their World Choir Games entry. Jones said the group has been very well supported by the store, where they also practice. “They just have a big heart for music,” she said. “It’s unbelievable. Many of the choruses involved in the World Choir Games sing gospel music at their church, so there’s already a community behind them. We just come here to sing. They support anyone who loves music.” “I think it’s cool that they all live here, but it’s a Japanese chorus,” said

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Willis Music Store manager Denise Smith. “They love all types of music and it’s good to have their singing next door.” Smith said the concert will be recorded. Sakura Ladies Chorus will have copies to sell for more fundraising. While many of the chorus members are from Japan, it’s not a requirement of the group. Members can be from any nationality, said Lydia Coyle. She taught Japanese at Northern Kentucky University for 19 years and lived in Japan as a child. She said she was naturally drawn to the group and it’s “been a lot of fun.” “It keeps us busy, and it’s a lot of fun for everybody to have an opportunity to do something they wouldn’t ordinarily be able to do, like sing at Music Hall or the World Choir Games,” said Coyle. She said the group will

perform a Japanese folk song medley that is about 15 minutes long for the World Choir Games competition, but the group also sings everything from traditional Japanese songs to contemporary pop music, as well as songs from the mid-20th century by Misora Hibari and Kyu Sakamoto, who hit the U.S. pop charts with “Sukiyaki.” The Sakura Ladies Chorus will perform in the Folklore Competition 8 p.m. Thursday, July 5, at Procter & Gamble Hall at the Aronoff Center. The ticketed event will include choirs from Puerto Rico, Iran, China, Venezuela and Atlanta, and a Chinese chorus from Princeton, N.J. A complete schedule and tickets are available online at 2012worldchoirgames.com, and tickets can be purchased in person at the venue or at 513977-6363.

Items needed for food pantry By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

Northern Kentucky seniors are in need of more than just snacks this summer. The shelves at the Northern Kentucky Senior Services Center Food Pantry are bare and the organization is asking for donations to fill empty spaces. Last year, SSNK fed 5,400 Northern Kentucky seniors. The outreach touches eight counties, and allows anyone over 60 to visit the pantry once a month to grab some eats. “Nobody realizes that food pantries and services like that get hit really hard in the summer,” said Sarah Siegrist, advancement as-

sociate with SSNK. Despite it, Kentuckians are asked to donate, specifically items like canned meats, canned fruits, spaghetti sauce, boxed macaroni and cheese and Depends. “These are the items we really need, things that folks, seniors in their homes, can prepare,” she said, adding that items high in protein are in need because of seniors with specific diets. The pantry is open on Thursdays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Last year, 300 seniors utilized the services at the pantry, located at 1032 Madison Ave. in Covington.

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NEWS

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A9

Sweet shops inspire new store cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Steve Field will revive his sweet childhood memories of oldtime ice cream shops making fresh malts and shakes with the opening of Candy & Cones in Alexandria June 16. The store, located at 7505 Alexandria Pike, serves multiple varieties of hand-dipped ice cream and soft serve vanilla ice cream, ice balls filled with ice cream and “retro” packaged candies including Goo Goo Clusters, Cracker Jack boxes, salt water taffy and Lemonheads. Field said he moved back to his childhood home of Alexandria five years ago, and immediately missed the old-time ice cream and shake shop experiences he had growing up. Field said he has dreamed for 20 years of opening up an ice cream shop, and toyed with the idea until he sold off his home and pest inspection businesses last year. Field and his wife Cathy run the store, and own it with his brother and business partner Steve Field. The shop, almost directly across from where Ky. 709 intersects with Alexandria Pike, has been completely renovated inside with a color-scheme of pastel pink, blue, green and yellow on a main wall set against a white background. “My dad came in and said this looks like a children’s playhouse, and that’s what we’re shooting for,” said Dave. Dave, a dis-

play designer with a background in art and graphic design, designed the shop’s decor. Steve also designed and drew the store’s mascots, a child named “Roscoe” holding an ice cream cone and his dog Sparky. “Roscoe is inspired by a childhood friend of mine,” said Steve Field. Steve, who wears a bright red pastry hat, describes himself as “the scientist working in the back” who makes up new ice cream flavor mixtures and creations. The shake used crushed ice with soft serve ice

HOURS AND INFORMATION

Candy & Cones, 7505 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday; and from 11 a.m. to 10 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Phone: 859630-3045.

cream and an array of ice ball flavors mixed in to create a swirl-effect, Steve said. Steve has also brought back an old favorite flavor of his known simply as

“nectar.” “Let’s call it our ‘musttry flavor,’” he said. The store also offers a mix of newer candies children already know to go along with the retro candies, and will make ice cream and shake requests to order in addition to what’s on the menu, Steve said. The store will also sell diabetic-friendly, sugarfree candies, he said. “Our goal is for everyone to leave here with a smile,” he said.

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SCHOOLS

A10 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Grandview says goodbye to Simpkins By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Retiring Grandview Elementary School principal Candice Simpkins and incoming principal Jamie Baker pose for a picture. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

New principals start work July 1 Three schools hire new leaders By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Of seven schools in the Campbell County School District, three will start the school year with new principals. The district now has principals in place for all schools with the mid-June hiring of new leaders for Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria and Reiley Elementary School south of Alexandria. Starting July 1, Susan Rath will take over as principal of Reiley, and Jason Smith will take over as principal at the middle school. “We are thrilled to have Mr. Smith and Mrs. Rath as part of our team,” said Connie Pohlgeers, director of school improvement and community education. “Both bring experience and a passion for education.” A new principal was also hired for the district’s alternative school, Campbell County Day Treatment, in May. Alvin Elsbernd, a counselor at the district’s alternative program, was promoted to principal. His first day is also July 1. The district also announced on June 20 the hiring of a new district finance director. Susan Bentle, an accounting supervisor for Boone County Schools, will start at Campbell County on July 1. Rath was principal of Florence Elementary School, and before that worked as an elementary school teachers at Lincoln Elementary School in Dayton from 1996 to 2003, according to a news release from Campbell County Schools. Rath is a native of Campbell

County. “It has been a personal goal to return to Campbell County Schools where I grew up, graduated high school, Smith and have remained a lifelong resident,” she said in a news release. Superintendent Glen Miller said he was thrilled with Rath’s selection. Rath “Mrs. Rath is an obvious leader and her skill set closely matches what we expect of the administrators here in our district,” Miller said. Smith started his career at Campbell County Middle School as a math teacher in 1997. He was an assistant principal at Grant County Middle School since 2006. Smith has also earned superintendent, director of pupil personnel and supervisor of instruction certifications from Eastern Kentucky University. He has also previously served as an administrator for Southgate Elementary School, and as a math and science teacher at Tichenor Middle School in Erlanger. Miller said in a news release that he was excited about the middle school site-based council’s hiring of Smith, and that he brings a “wealth of experience” and a strong desire to do what is best for students. “Having been a former middle school teacher and administrator, Mr. Smith is well aware of the unique challenges related to preparing middle school students for high school and beyond,” Miller said.

BELLEVUE — Grandview Elementary School in Bellevue will be under new leadership starting July 1. Principal Candice Simpkins, who has led the school for the past11years, is retiring at the end of the fiscal year. Simpkins, 58, said with all the new standards and assessments, she didn’t feel she could adequately fulfill the role of principal anymore. “I felt like I wasn’t being fair with the staff and students,” Simpkins said. “This community really embraced me, so this was not an easy decision, but it was the right one.” The decision also wasn’t easy on the students and staff of the school, who each wrote a note to Simpkins and threw her a party to say goodbye. Simpkins said while she’ll

miss everyone in the school and community, the timing was just right to leave. “With so much changing right now, I felt it was the perfect time for someone new to take over,” Simpkins said. That someone is Jamie Baker, the current principal at Silver Grove Independent School. Baker, who has worked in Silver Grove since 2010 after leaving her assistant principal position at Carroll County Middle School, said she has always liked challenges and is ready to meet the new school standards head on at Grandview. Her plan, Baker said, is to get to know the staff and work with them to meet the new standards and understand new assessments. “I plan on working together with the staff a lot,” Baker said. “None of us are as smart as all of us together.” Baker said Simpkins has been

a great leader at Grandview and is leaving her with a solid foundation to build from. “Grandview is a school on the move, and they’re moving in the right direction,” Baker said. While in the past, Baker’s experience included working at the high school and middle school levels, she said she got her first exposure to elementary school students in Silver Grove, where the school is pre-school through 12th grade. Though she enjoyed working with the higher grades, Baker said she is thrilled to have the chance to concentrate on elementary school. “In Silver Grove, I fell in love with elementary school grades from the students to the curriculum,” Baker said. “The students are in such a molding phase of their lives, and it’s really exciting to be a part of it.”

Soldier meets students

FORT THOMAS — After sending him cards and care packages for the past year, kindergarten students at Moyer Elementary School got the chance to meet Cold Spring soldier Zachary Rawlings Tuesday, June 19. Rawlings, 23, who is home on a two week leave from Afghanistan, meet with the students, teachers and parents for a Popsicle Party on the school’s playground. Throughout the school year, the students not only sent him packages and cards, but had the chance to Skype with him while he was overseas.

Zachary Rawlings talks to Moyer Elementary students about his experience in Afghanistan. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Friends have a studious pact By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Dozens of eighth-grade students took home awards and honors upon graduation from Campbell County Middle School this year, and two best friends’ studyfirst pact helped them earn their fair share. Knowing they have to do well in school, students Eric Bingham and Matthew Bell, both of Alexandria, said homework and studying is always their top priority. Ginsel Bell, Matthew’s mother, said Bingham was “up and down on awards night.” Bingham took received 16 awards including being the top student in math, language arts and U.S. history. Bingham's awards also included the Spirit Award voted upon by the 8th grade students, and were winner of the Stumpy Award. The Stum-

py Award is given to a student who displays a positive attitude and displays a strong work ethic, qualities exemplified by former school resource officer Jim “Stumpy” Sticklen who died in 2011. Bingham took home a $500 savings bond good toward college costs for winning the Stumpy Award. Bingham's mother Karen Bingham, said her son as received straight 'A' grades since he started his first day in school. Both Bingham and Bell were also presented with a Commonwealth Award for leadership from Sen. Katie Stine, R-Southgate, and a President’s Outstanding Academic Excellence award. Bingham said he has always taken his schoolwork seriously, and he never puts it second to anything. “In life I want to go somewhere,” he said. “I feel like I have to do good.” Bingham said his mother is an

accountant, and math seems to come easy to him, and he enjoys being very descriptive and indepth when writing pieces for language arts. Both of the students, who will be freshmen at Campbell County High School in the fall, are also athletes. Bingham plays football, basketball and baseball, and Bell plays football and wrestling. Both Bingham and Bell also received the school's Outstanding Scholar Athlete Award. Bell hasn’t received anything less than a grade of “A” since he was in fourth grade, Ginsel said. Bell said science is his favorite subject, and he wants to work in a job as a chemical engineer or in a related field. Looking forward to becoming a freshman in high school, Bell said he and Bingham will take Advance Placement Human Geography together.


SPORTS

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

NCC senior Seth Connelly hits the ball during his match at second singles against Simon Kenton April 12 in Independence. JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Newport senior Robert Washington hurdles to victory in the 110 hurdles for a state title. The Class 1A state track meet was May 17 at the University of Louisville. JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

NCC senior catcher Matt Broering, right, celebrates with teammates after he ended a double play. NCC lost 1-0 to Henderson County in nine innings in the state baseball quarterfinals June 7 at Whitaker Bank Ballpark in Lexington. JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

NCC’s Chandler Cain runs to the state title in the 100 at the Class 1A state track meet May 17 at the University of Louisville. JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Summer starts with spring memories The spring season had several highlights for schools in Campbell County. Here are some of the best moments from the varsity teams.

Campbell County sophomore Joe Kremer celebrates after getting a game-saving out at home plate in the bottom of the seventh. Campbell beat Brossart 4-3 in 10 innings in baseball April 26 at St. Mary in Alexandria.

From left, Eli Nienaber (Brossart), Michael Caldwell (Brossart) and John Michael Griffith (Highlands) run the 1,600. Caldwell won the race at the Campbell County track and field championships April 10 at Campbell County Middle School in Alexandria. JAMES

Campbell County senior Megan Rauch long jumps at the 3A, Region 5 track and field championships May 10 at Scott High School in Taylor Mill. JAMES

JAMES WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER


VIEWPOINTS A12 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Celebrate the noble experiment

First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen, George Washington, born in relative affluence, resisted the monarchy of his past from England to embrace the democracy of the newborn United States of America. He was our first General of the Army of the newly formed rebellion by the Continental Congress. He was first in peace as he brought about the surrender of the British commander Cornwallis. The first in the world of commerce and conquest, the British Empire was pre-eminent in the world. George Washington is first in the hearts of his countrymen. He was and is the eternal model for this new idea of democracy. It may seem simple now, but then he was charting new

ground with almost each new step he took. He surrounded himself with the best and brightest who worked togethHerbert Booth er for the comCOMMUNITY mon good of RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST the new nation. He was first to assume command, to craft a peace, and to purchase his place in the pantheon of princes in our collective consciences. John Adams was second, but not to those who knew him well. He was irascible, outspoken, and often ignored because of his strong opinions and will. He was one of our first ambassadors to France and to England. He was

one who crafted the peace treaty with England to end the Revolutionary War. He was our second president and first vice-president of this new United States. Yes, Thomas Jefferson was third in the line of presidents of this new nation, but he lives in the minds of many as the principal author of the Declaration of Independence. He was chosen to author the Declaration of Independence. Several changes in his original document were made by Congress, but the historical authorship goes to Jefferson. President Thomas Jefferson believed in the republic but acted as a despot when he fortuitously bought the Louisiana Purchase from the French for $15 million without any consultation with or consent of Congress.

Why did you fight for freedom? Grandpa was stunned by his granddaughter’s question. He replied: “Sweetheart, I fought to make sure you have the opportunity to be free.” “But Grandpa, Americans don’t want to be free,” she said. “We want the government to take care of us. Grandpa, are you sure you even won the war? Did you fight so we couldn’t say ‘Merry Christmas’ or have a nativity scene at school? Did you fight so our school’s Christmas tree would be replaced with a holiday tree? Did you fight so we couldn’t pray in school? Did you fight so we could celebrate ‘Earth Day’ instead of Christmas Day? "Did you fight so the government would remove the Ten Commandments from public property? Did you fight so a principal in New Your City could ban the song ‘God Bless the USA’ from a kindergarten graduation program? Did you fight so our government could worry more about meatless Mondays than what students learn? “Did you fight so our libraries could provide free cartoon movies and books about vam-

pires and murderers at the expense of their neighbors? Did you fight so the TSA could fondle your grandkids at Tom Wurtz the airport? Did COMMUNITY you fight so our RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST government could control and regulate our water, air, food, education, healthcare and businesses? Did you fight so only 12 percent of high school seniors would be proficient in U.S. history? Did you fight so our government could control where you’re permitted to smoke outside of the battlefield? “Did you fight so the government could require you to get permission to cut down a tree on your own property? Did you fight so government could tell you what kind of light bulb you could buy? Did you fight so foreign invaders could freely enter our country and live off the American taxpayers? Did you fight so the government could make us dependent on

foreign oil? Did you fight so the government could prohibit kids from working on their family’s farms? Is that what you fought for Grandpa? “See Grandpa, you didn’t need to go to war. Didn’t you hear? America’s uneducated voters surrendered to the Marxists, socialists and Communists a long time ago. America’s freedoms are just an illusion. The government controls everything. It must be OK with Americans because no one fought back.” Grandpa was shocked by his granddaughter’s heartbreaking speech. With tears in his eyes he said: “Sweetheart, I didn’t fight for any of those things. You’re right. I didn’t need to go to war in a foreign country. I was fighting the wrong enemy. I should have been fighting the enemies of freedom inside America.” It’s time we teach our children that Independence Day is about minimal government with maximum freedoms so we may pursue our American dreams. Tom Wurtz of Fort Mitchell is president of Tom Wurtz Consulting.

Keeping student loan rates low The life of a typical college student is complicated enough without being used as a political football during campaign season. Unfortunately, that’s just what President Obama is doing by playing politics with the issue of student loan rates at a time when students can least afford it. For weeks, the president has been running around ginning up college students and late-night television audiences over an impending interest rate increase for student college loans and pointing the finger at Republicans. However, not only are Republicans seeking to solve this problem, it is only Republicans who have passed legislation to keep student loan interest rates low. In addition, I and other Republican leaders in Congress recently sent the president a letter pledging our support to prevent the student loan interest rate from going up and laying out two separate proposals to ensure that those rates stay low. Both of the proposals we outlined are common-sense,

bipartisan solutions. In fact, they both should already have the support of the president, because they Mitch are both based McConnell on policies from the presiCOMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST dent’s own COLUMNIST budget proposals. These two solutions are in addition to an initial one Republicans passed in the House of Representatives several weeks ago. There’s no reason Congress and the president cannot work together to pass legislation quickly and in a bipartisan manner to give college students the certainty they need about their loan payments. On this student loan issue, it is Republicans who’ve been working on solutions. It’s the president who’s been totally AWOL. That’s a shame. Even though it’s obvious this president is already in full-bore campaign mode, it is still his responsibility

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER

A publication of

to govern. It is particularly important we provide a fix for this problem in light of the poor economy. Unemployment in Kentucky is 8.3 percent above the national average. The unemployment rate for those under age 24 is 16.7 percent, more than double the national average. The job market for recent college graduates is daunting as they face looking for work in the Obama economy. More than half of bachelor’s degree holders under the age of 25 are unemployed or underemployed. Eighty-five percent of new college graduates are moving back in with their parents. The starting salary for those graduates lucky enough to find a job has decreased 10 percent from what it was as recently as 2007. College graduates facing such an uphill climb don’t need the added burden of increased interest rates on their student loans too. Mitch McConnell is the Senate Republican Leader serving as senior U.S. Senator for Kentucky.

He will sit as one in the pantheon of presidents and in the hearts and minds of his countrymen. All which brings us to the Fourth, the Fourth of July, of course. On this day we celebrate the founding of our nation, the independence declared from England, and the noble experiment which has lasted into three centuries. This is not to demean our fourth president, James Madison, who is the primary author of our Constitution and our Bill of Rights. What our founders brought forth that allows us to celebrate our Fourth of July, Independence Day, has been purchased and prized by many that have followed in their footsteps. Jefferson said that the nation’s

liberty is purchased by the blood of patriots, and that our freedom requires eternal vigilance. No generation of our last century was able to escape the defense of our heritage and human values. We can only pray that those who follow us will not forget there is no cheap victory nor peace without price. In remembrance of our past, we must also honor the fallen who paid the ultimate price . Let our praises ring forth as we celebrate another Fourth of July. And let us all be constantly aware that our mutual future resides in us, you and me, are the future of our great and noble experiment in the governance of mankind. Dr. Herbert R, Booth is a Boone County resident.

Empty promises will not restore our economy

Since taking office in January 2009, President Obama has spoken of a sweeping agenda with promises of a stronger economy, fiscal discipline, improved health care and cheaper energy from the full-range of our energy resources. Unfortunately, these were empty promises. The promises started with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or the “stimulus” bill, which the president’s economic advisers said would hold the unemployment rate below 8 percent. Instead, the unemployment rate has stayed above 8 percent for 40 straight months. By the first half of 2012, the administration expected the stimulus-fed economy to have unemployment at 6 percent and falling. Despite an $831 billion stimulus binge, the unemployment rate is still 0.6 percent higher now than it was in January 2009. The stimulus has hardly been the president’s only unfulfilled promise with a steep price tag. In February 2009, he said: “I’m pledging to cut the deficit we inherited by half by the end of my first term in office.” What we got instead was four consecutive years with deficits of more than $1 trillion. During the 2009 State of the Union address, the President stated his belief that we have a “responsibility to ensure that we do not pass on to (our children) a debt they cannot pay.” Instead of following through on that commitment, he has persisted in proposing unserious budgets that have not garnered a single vote in Congress the last two years. His most recent budget calls for new spending, raising taxes by nearly $2 trillion, and adding $11 trillion to our national debt. By failing to address our debt burden, the president has overseen more than $5 trillion in new debt in fewer than four years. The Congressional Budget Office

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

projects that our debt will reach a crushing $16 trillion this year. The president also told us that “if you like your Geoff Davis health care COMMUNITY plan, you can RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST keep your health care plan” under his new health care law. According to the Budget Office, however, the health care law’s regulatory burdens will actually force three million Americans off of their employer-sponsored coverage by 2022. A recent survey of 71 Fortune 100 companies found that they could save nearly $30 billion in 2014 by eliminating employersponsored insurance. The president’s health care reform law actually creates incentives to take away employees’ health care. In his 2012 State of the Union address, the president said: “This country needs an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy that develops every available source of American energy.” Instead, he has actively opposed coal, as well as opportunities to increase our supply of oil. According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s own numbers, his regulatory onslaught against coal will cost utilities and consumers billions of dollars. His repeated denial of the Keystone XL pipeline leaves 20,000 direct jobs, 118,000 spin-off jobs and 500,000 daily barrels of oil on the sidelines. Actions speak louder than words. The president’s broken promises have led us down a failed path. The House has passed legislation laying out another direction to empower our economy, impose fiscal discipline and promote energy independence by using our resources. U.S. Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Hebron, is a member of the House of Representatives.

Campbell Community Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Members of the Northern Kentucky University Vocal Jazz Ensemble sing under the direction of Randy Pennington, far left, director of choral studies at the Newport on the Levee NKU Jazz Festival in September. From left are students, Carly Weidlich, Kyle Keinrich and Gabby Jones. THANKS TO RANDY PENNINGTON

The St. Andrew's Episcopal Church practices for the World Choir Games. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Members of the Northern Kentucky University Chamber Choir perform at a Tri-State Concert Tour prior to leaving for an international competition in Bulgaria in May. From left are students Kaitlen Kelley, Michelle Asher, Adam Seibert, Maya Bcleric, Amberly Winfrey, Brian Bulter, and Mac Wilburn. THANKS TO RANDY PENNINGTON

Campbell choirs prepare for World Choir Games By Chris Mayhew and Amanda Joering Alley cmayhew@nky.com, ajoering@nky.com

W

hen the World Choir Games start in Cincinnati July 4-14 Northern Kentucky University choirs will be among the international groups vying for the overall champion’s spot. NKU’s Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Chamber Choir will be among five Campbell County choirs participating in the World Choir Games. It’s the first time the world games have been held in the United States. NKU’s choirs will perform in friendship concerts, the championship competition, and has been selected as one of four other university choirs to be part of a special “Celebration Concert.”

Competing internationally is something NKU choirs have done for a while in addition to performing concerts throughout the Cincinnati area, said Randy Pennington, director of choral studies. “We are the biggest secret in town,” Pennington said. NKU is sometimes overshadowed locally by the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, he said. “I think sometimes people forget NKU has 16,000 students and our choral area is already Division I,” Pennington said. NKU just returned from taking second place in a May competition in Bulgaria, he said. Other choirs in the competition hailed from countries including Slovakia, Ukraine, Indonesia, Hungary, Moldova, Romania and Poland. There are five different choirs at NKU, and two of them

will perform at the World Choir Games, Pennington said. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble is a 12-member group plus a rhythm section, and the Chamber Choir has 30 members, he said. Students must audition to be members of each group. “Both of those are very elite groups,” Pennington said. Another Campbell County choir competing in the games is the St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church choir out of Fort Thomas. The choir, directed by Diane Keeler, has been part of the church for decades, singing at the church’s services and events. “We’ve never done anything like this before,” Keeler said about competing in the games. “We’ve barely even performed outside of our church.” The group, made up of the church’s two adult choirs, jumped on the chance to be part

of the games when they heard about them. “To have something like this going on right here in our area is a once in a lifetime experience,” Keeler said. “It’s such a great opportunity to sing with people from all over the world.” The 40 member choir has been practicing since January, devoting a lot of time and energy to getting ready for the event, Keeler said. Other Campbell County choirs competing in the World Choir Games include the Fort Thomas Youth Choir and the Korong Pilipino from Newport. To hear NKU’s Chamber Choir and meet its members search “NKU Choir Sneak Peek” on www.youtube.com. For more information about the World Choir Games, visit www.2012worldchoirgames.com.

Diane Keeler, director of the St. Andrew's Episcopal Church choir from Fort Thomas, leads the choir during practice. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Art Exhibits Liquids in Motion, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Unique collection of liquid collisions and splashes caught in the blink of an eye, occurring in less than one ten-thousandth of a second. Using specialized high speed digital studio lighting and highly accurate timing devices, various liquids are caught colliding with solid surfaces and other materials creating dramatic displays of art. Free. Through Sept. 15. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Dance Classes Belly Dance A-Z with Maali Shaker, 8:30-9:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Beginner dancers follow Maali’s class progression to develop beautiful and fluid exotic belly dance moves. Intermediate and advanced dancers shown layering, spins, turns and arm techniques to improve their dance. $12. Through Dec. 14. 859-261-5770; www.cincinnatibellydance.com/maalishaker. Newport.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 5-9 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 6570 Vineyard Lane, Stonebrook is on the Northern Kentucky Back Roads Wine Trail. Pick up passport at one of five wineries and get it validated at each winery for a gift. Five for $5 on Saturday and Sundays. $2.50 Friday: two free wineglasses with case purchase. Family friendly. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs.

Holiday - Independence Day Union Celebrates America Parade and Fireworks, 6-10:30 p.m., Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road, Music by Gundpowder Acoustic Society at 6:30 p.m. and 113th US Army Band Dragoons at 8 p.m. Free U.S. flags to first 1000 people. Free. Registration required for parade participation. Presented by City of Union. 859-384-1511; www.cityofunionky.org. Union.

Music - Jazz JD Allen Trio CD Release Party, 8 p.m. Doors open 7 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $20. 859-261-7469; www.ticketweb.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Tip Jar and the Bar Stars, 9 p.m., Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway, Free. Presented by Riverside Marina. 859-442-8111. Dayton, Ky..

On Stage - Comedy Vince Morris, 8-10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater The Producers, 7:30 p.m., Highlands High School, 2400 Memorial Parkway, Performing Arts Center. Musical based on Mel Brooks’ classic cult comedy film. $10. Registration required. Presented by Fort Thomas Independent School District. Through July 1. 859-815-2512; www.showtix4u.com. Fort Thomas.

Recreation

Society. $100. Reservations required. Presented by American Cancer Society Northern Kentucky. 859-372-7885; www.acskentuckybaronsball.org. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Moon and Stars Family Scavenger Hunt, 1 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Complete challenges to collect stars. Family friendly. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-5725033. Fort Thomas.

Music - Blues Ralph and the Rhythm Hounds, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave., $3. 859-581-0100. Newport.

Music - Rock Danny Frazier Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. XFACTOR1 Jagermeister Party, 10 p.m. With Killbox and Sacarii. OMEB Dance Party in Heaven’s Parlour., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-2617469; www.ticketweb.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Vince Morris, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

The Producers, 7:30 p.m., Highlands High School, $10. Registration required. 859-815-2512; www.showtix4u.com. Fort Thomas.

Recreation The Yearlings Stallions Co-ed Golf Outing, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Shotgun start 1 p.m., A.J. Jolly Golf Course, 5350 Ky. 27, Lunch at registration, 18-hole scramble format, beer, soft drinks, snacks, gifts, games and prizes. Benefits I Have Wings Breast Cancer Foundation. $80. Presented by The Yearlings. 513-315-1662; www.theyearlings.org/ events.html. Alexandria. When “Whoa" Isn’t Enough: Staying on Top of Your Horse, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., First Farm Inn, 2510 Stevens Road, Riding arena. Learn how to keep from hitting the ground when something unusual happens and how to be safer riding using easy-tolearn techniques. Free. Reservations required. 859-586-0199; www.firstfarminn.com. Petersburg. Fort Thomas Classic Car Show, 3-7 p.m., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Accepting 1979 and older cars, trucks, fire trucks, boats and motorcycles. Registration begins 2 p.m. Beer, wine, games, 100-game cornhole tournament and DJ. Music by Hot Wax Band at 7 p.m. Fireworks at 10 p.m. Free. Presented by City of Fort Thomas. 859-750-9532; www.ftthomas.org. Fort Thomas.

Tours Newport Gangster Tour, 4:306:30 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Twohour tour begins with two gangster guides leading highenergy presentation inside old casino followed by walking tour of historic sites. $20. 859-4918000. Newport.

SUNDAY, JULY 1

Saturday, June 30

On Stage - Comedy

Liquids in Motion, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Benefits Kentucky Baron’s Ball: Stetson and Stilettos, 6-11:30 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Dinner, dancing, country music, live and silent auctions and more. Ages 21 and up. Benefits American Cancer

Rural Treasures Farm Tour will be held 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, June 30. Featuring Benton Family Farm, Broken M Farm, Dinsmore Historic Farmstead, Eagle Bend Alpaca Farm, First Farm Inn Bed and Breakfast, Kinman Farms, Potter Ranch, Schwenke Farms, Verona Vineyards, Wheelrim Alpacas, Thistlehair Farm, Sandyland Acres, McGlasson Farms, and Sandy Run Stables. For more information, visit www.boonecountyfarmtour.org. Pictured is the Thistlehair Farm located on Big Bone Church Road near Burlington. THANKS TO MARY KATHRYN DICKERSON

On Stage - Student Theater

The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Bistro 737, 7373 Turfway Road, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/ hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Florence.

Art Exhibits

An Independence Day Celebration will be 3-10 p.m. Saturday, June 30 at Tower Park in Fort Thomas. For more information, call 859-781-1700 or visit www.ftthomas.org. Pictured is Jim Heuple looking in the window of a 1934 Lincoln V-12 featured at last year's car show during the event. FILE PHOTO

Art Exhibits Liquids in Motion, noon-6 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Vince Morris, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $15-$17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater The Producers, 2 p.m., Highlands High School, $10. Registration required. 859-815-2512; www.showtix4u.com. Fort Thomas.

Pets Pits Rock Northern Kentucky Fun Walk, 4:15-5 p.m., Tractor

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Supply Co., 5895 Centennial Circle, Open to responsible pit bull owners willing to walk their well-behaved pit bulls together in public parks to show positive side of the breed. Free. Presented by Pawzitive Petz Rescue. Through Oct. 28. 859-746-1661. Florence.

Special Events Humanity Outpost, 1 p.m. Opening ceremony., World Peace Bell Center, 425 York St., Sculptural celebration of peace and humanity. Cultural event to revitalize communities through the celebration and appreciation of the arts. Presented by Malton Art Gallery. 513-3218614; humanityoutpost.com. Newport.

Monday, July 2 Art Exhibits Liquids in Motion, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Literary - Libraries The Life and Work of Russel Wright: Collectibles of American Modern Design, 7 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Learn about the designer of most widely sold American ceramic dinnerware in history and manufactured in Steubenville, Ohio. Author and historian Michael Williams discusses the life and work of gifted industrial designer. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-7816166; www.cc-pl.org. Cold Spring.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Registration required. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Crescent Springs.

TUESDAY, JULY 3 Art Exhibits Liquids in Motion, 11 a.m.-9

p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Clubs & Organizations Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. Through Feb. 19. 859-652-3348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., All In Cafe, 480 Erlanger Road, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/ hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Erlanger.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Business Meetings Campbell County Rotary Meeting, noon-1 p.m., Highland Country Club, 931 Alexandria Pike, Weekly meetings include presentations for local organizations and discussions on how to provide service to those in Campbell County and beyond. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Campbell County Rotary Club. 859-635-5088. Fort Thomas.

Festivals Newport Motorcycle Rally, noon-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Music, food, games, motorcycle show, contests and prizes. Free. Presented by City of Newport. 859-912-2509; www.newportmotorcyclerally.com. Newport.

Holiday - Independence Day Park Hills Fourth of July Festival, 2-7 p.m., Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food and major raffle of $2,590. Benefits Notre Dame Urban Education Center. Free. 859-392-8228. Covington. Independence Day at Creation

Museum, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Free admission to all retired members of the military. A state-of-the-art 60,000-square foot museum of the Bible. $24.95 ages 13-59, $19.95 ages 60 and up, $14.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Karaoke and Open Mic Always a Star Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Raniero’s, 28 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., 859-4427437; www.ranierospizzeria.com. Cold Spring.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Saddle Club, 2487 Dixie Highway, Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Fort Mitchell.

THURSDAY, JULY 5 Art Exhibits Liquids in Motion, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

Auditions Katalyst Talent Agency Open Call, 4-7 p.m., Katalyst, LLC, 3037 Dixie Highway, Suite 214, All experience levels seeking representation with Katalyst. First come, first served. Requirements at website. Family friendly. Free. 859-581-4555. Edgewood.

Festivals Newport Motorcycle Rally, 5-11 p.m., Festival Park Newport, Free. 859-912-2509; www.newportmotorcyclerally.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Olde Fort Thomas Pub, 1041 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Free. Through Dec. 20. 859-441-1927. Fort Thomas.

Music - Choral Friendship Concert, 2:30 p.m., Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG),

2939 Terminal Drive, Free performance by World Choir Games participants. Free. Presented by 2012 World Choir Games. 513977-6363; www.2012worldchoirgames.com. Hebron. Friendship Concert, 7:30 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Free performance by World Choir Games participants. Free. Presented by 2012 World Choir Games. 513-977-6363; www.2012worldchoirgames.com. Newport.

Music - Concerts Live at the Levee, 6:30-9:30 p.m. World Choir Games Friendship Concert., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Summer concert series. May 17-July 19 events benefit The WAVE Foundation. Free. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - World Alpen Echos, 7:30-11:30 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Tommy Davidson, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater The Foreigner, 8 p.m., NKU Corbett Auditorium, Nunn Drive, While accompanying his friend, "Froggy" LeSeuer on a weekend fishing trip in Georgia, Charlie soon finds himself in way over his head in this non-stop, hilarious play. Dinner begins 1 1/2 hours before show. $30. Presented by Commonwealth Theatre Company. Through July 22. 859-572-5464; theatre.nku.edu/boxoffice. Highland Heights.

Recreation The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour, 7-10 p.m., Buffalo Wings & Rings, 2440 High St., Nightly qualifier. Winner receives certificate to semi-finals. Cash and prizes including seat to 2013 WSOP in Las Vegas including airfare/hotel/spending money. Ages 21 and up. Free for spectators. Presented by The Northern Kentucky Poker Tour. 440-2180559; www.playnky.com. Crescent Springs.


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Many herbs, spices are living links to biblical times

Rita grows basil in a cast iron kettle she inherited from her mother. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD tithing herbs, was carefully nurtured during the long voyage to America. We used Bible herbs and spices in everyday cooking in our traditional Lebanese household. All nine of us children learned at an early age how to distinguish oregano (the hyssop of the Bible) from marjoram, which mint was to be picked for kibbee, and how many sprigs of thyme it took for a kettle full of dolmathas. (Thyme grew wild in the Jerusalem hills). Some of the herbs doubled as medicines, as well. Mom gave us anise tea for cramps, and babies recovering from illness were given barley water sweetened with honey and anise. Barley was a popular

This bean salad is chock full of ingredients mentioned in the Bible. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

grain during Bible days and honey was the main sweetener. She came upon this naturally, learning from her mother holistic ways to heal. To this day, my Aunt Margaret still cooks with Bible herbs and spices. She is in her 90s and going strong! One of my most prized

possessions is the huge ancient cast iron “spider” kettle that I inherited from my mother. She grew enough herbs for our family of 11 in that kettle. It now sits in a place of honor in my garden, and my “hobbit”/basil grows happily there. (The legend is that basil sprang up in the ground near Christ’s tomb after the resurrection). I ask the Lord to bless her as I scatter seeds on the surface, patting them into the soil with bare hands. There is a burgeoning interest in holistic health and aromatherapy, and many herbs and spices mentioned in the Bible are included in natural remedies. There is dill, another tithing herb, for “gripe

water” to soothe colicky babies; mint tea for digestion and in spritzers to refresh and cleanse the air; cilantro/coriander (analogous to Biblical manna) for removing heavy metals from the body. Flax, out of which linen was made, helps lower cholesterol and cinnamon helps stabilize blood sugar. Bay (athletes were crowned with bay) shows promise in research for diabetes and heart health and is used in steam facials. You could say they’re good for body and soul!

ence’s 90-minute poster session Saturday, July 14. The title of their poster session is “Graphic Narratives as Learning Tools in Higher Education: A Case of Kabuki: The Alchemy.” “Kabuki: The Alchemy,” was Northern’s 2011 Book Connection selection, read by more than 1,000 freshmen. The Book Connection seeks to bring faculty and freshmen together through a shared reading experience while focusing on issues addressed in a popular fiction or nonfiction book. Every

MARRIAGE LICENSES Lauren Youtsey, 21, of Hamilton and Talon Deinlein, 22, of Edgewood, issued May 23. Cristy Jaspers, 26, and Matthew Lobaugh, 25, both of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Athena Brewer, 20, of Cincinnati and Thomas Overstreet, 26, of Fort Thomas, issued June 11. Amy Fries, 35, of Scott and Sean Emmett, 36, of Cincinnati, issued June 11. Jessica Gregory, 33, of Cincinnati and Ali Almasri, 35, of Kuwait, issued June 12. Amanda Bardo, 26, of Belgium and Kevin Kubiak, 26, of Pittsburgh, issued June 12. Melissa Greenlea, 42, of Lexington and Harvey Reed, 58, of Cincinnati, issued June 13. Stephanie Matson, 25, and Adam Moler, 28, both of Cincinnati, issued June 13. Katherine Huntoon, 23, of Norfolk and Christopher Greenland, 23, of Canton, issued June 13. Amy Schomaker, 27, and Drew Wagers, 29, both of Cincinnati, issued June 13. Brenda Franks, 53, of Fort Thomas and Robert Lunsford Jr., 44, of Covington, issued June 13. Christina Jones, 32, of Fort Thomas and Luis Chapeta, 40, of Guatemala, issued June 13. Jill Brooks, 36, and Todd Hettersimer, 35, both of Cincinnati, issued June 13. Cheri Self, 53, of Lexington and Joseph Amann, 54, of Fort Thomas, issued June Taramarie McPherson, 25, of Cincinnati and Bryan Thomas, 31, of Louisville, issued June 14. Christine Wassler, 27, of Covington and Andrew Mack,

27, of Philadelphia issued June 14. Marla Hoskins, 47, of Cincinnati and David Matthewson, 43,

of Elkhart, issued June 15. Danielle Lakes, 30, of Kettering and Bradley Chaney, 41, of Wilmington, issued June 15.

make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

year, a committee of faculty, staff and students selects a book for the program.

3 cans beans: your choice, drained and rinsed 1 bunch green onions, chopped 3 tomatoes, chopped Handful chopped parsley 2-4 ribs celery or more to taste, diced 1 large bell pepper, diced

Whisk together dressing ingredients. Set aside while mixing salad ingredients. Pour dressing over salad. Toss gently to blend.

I adapted this from a chick pea salad daughterin-law Jessie shared. Perfect for that July 4 gathering. Note all the Bible foods and herbs included: vinegar, olive oil, cumin, garlic (which was eaten as a vegetable during Bible times), oregano, beans, onions and, of course, salt. Remember Lot’s wife turned to salt. Healthy, too. Dressing: Go to taste on this, adding more vinegar, etc. if you like.

How’s Your

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

& AFTER!

¼ cup red wine vinegar ½ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon cumin or more to taste ½ teaspoon chili powder or more to taste 2 teaspoons garlic

Bath Tub & Tile Reglazing Tile Regrouting & Sealing LIFE TIME WARRANTY

Rent-To-Own from

iPads per 99 week

14

$

CE-0000509213

Northern Kentucky University faculty from English, visual arts and firstyear programs will present research at the country’s largest comic book and pop culture convention, ComicCon International Wednesday through Sunday, July1115 in San Diego. Originally showcasing comic books, science fiction/fantasy, film and television and related popular arts, Comic-Con has expanded over the years to in-

clude a larger range of pop culture elements such as horror, animation, anime, manga, toys, collectible card games, video games, webcomics and fantasy novels. It is the largest such convention in North America. John Alberti, Candice Van Loveren Geis and Rich Shivener will present during the convention’s Comics Arts Conference, a series that advocates comics scholarship and criticism. After submitting an abstract, they were invited to present during the confer-

Salad:

“Bible” bean salad

Northern faculty to present at Comic-Con Community Recorder

1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt to taste Red pepper flakes to taste (optional go easy on these)

(78 wks)

CE-0000514406

Did you know that many of the common herbs and spices we use today have Biblical roots? I have always been fascinated with the historical significance of Biblical herbs and spices so often mentioned throughout the Old and New Testaments. They’re living links to our past, and many of the trendy herbs and spices common to cuisines all around the world trace their roots to Biblical Rita and preHeikenfeld Biblical RITA’S KITCHEN times. Even before people could write, they used herbs and spices to season and preserve their foods. The people of Bible days were herbalists out of necessity. Herbs and spices were also used in cosmetics, dyes and medicines. All households, whether rich or poor, cultivated an herb garden and the plants were highly valued. My own Lebanese cooking and healing heritage is rich with facts and folklore regarding herbs of Bible days. I remember my parents telling stories of their families who immigrated from “the old country,” Lebanon. Mint, one of the

Lease Zone Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

513-507-1951 859-341-6754

WHAT ARE YOU WADING FOR? Discover the Y - It’s so much more than a swim club! Join any YMCA of Greater Cincinnati location by June 30th and get a summer membership for only $224 for a family or $149 for an adult - and get the month of September FREE. Visit MyY.org or call (513) 362-YMCA.

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Northern Kentucky

JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball Boot Camp is designed to get you ready for volleyball try-outs or your upcoming school season. This is a high intensity camp geared toward high repetitions on basic drills. The camp will train all basic skills for hitting, setting, passing/serving as well as stressing the importance of defense in the game, with focus on technique. The camp will also incorporate intense conditioning and agility work into drills. JULY 9 - 11

At Better Bodies Fitness Center on the third floor. Grades 5-12: 2hr sessions • 9-11 am Grades K-4: 1hr session• 11-12 pm COST: $30 grades K-4 $ 75 for grades 5-12 Registration required. See www.nkjv.net for registration form. For questions contact Coaching Director Jen Woolf at jen_woolf@nkjv.net or 859.620.6520 CE-0000513275

JOIN BY

JUNE 30

CE-0000516039


LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

Cucumber beetles can attack garden Question: Last year, my cucumbers and cantaloupes wilted and died before they yielded any fruit. How can I prevent that from happening again this year? Answer: When those plants wilt and die in the garden, it’s usually due to a bacterial wilt disease that’s spread by cucumber beetles. Striped and spotted cucumber beetles can cause serious losses in cucumbers, muskmelons, and watermelons in Kentucky. Cucumber beetles are a major concern to muskmelon and cucumber growers because they carry and spread the bacteria that results in the eventual death of those

cucurbits. Striped cucumber beetle adults feed mainly on foliage, pollen and flowers of Mike several Klahr vegetables HORTICULTURE and flowCONCERNS ers, but their feeding on melon rinds late in the season may reduce fruit quality. Larvae of these insects feed on roots and stems, but this damage is minimal compared to the potential losses due to bacterial wilt. Striped cucumber beetles are yellow-green with three black stripes down the back and are 1/4

Art show, sale planned Community Recorder Gayle Laible and friends are having an art show and sale, 1-6 p.m. Sunday, July 1, at the

HDTV’s

Latonia Turfway

from

99 11 Lease Zone $

per week (91 weeks)

859-431-8666 859-647-2160

Bellevue Vets in Bellevue. The show and sale features works from artists and craftsmen in the tristate area. Original watercolors, oils, acrylics, sterling jewelry, clay, greeting cards, prints, crafts, and much more will be available to purchase. The show is free and there will be light refreshments.

Consignments Wanted M.I. Hummel Collectors!

UPCOMING AUCTION!!

CE-0000516181

Early/Late Hummel Figurines and related.

Be Part of this Live and Simulcast Interactive Bidding Auction!

Michael Angelo Auction Company 513-310-5118

inch long. The spotted cucumber beetle (whose larvae is also known as the southern corn rootworm), is also a 1/4 inch long beetle, yellow-green with 12 black spots on its back. The first symptom of bacterial wilt on cucumber and muskmelon is a distinct flagging or wilting of lateral and individual leaves. Beetle feeding is not always obvious on wilted leaves. Soon, adjacent leaves and finally the entire vine will wilt. The wilting spreads as the multiplying bacteria move within the vascular system of the plant. Eventually, the entire plant wilts and dies. There is nothing you can do to save an infected

Upcoming Classes & Events: *** “Families in the Garden”, Thursday, June 28, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. Meets at the Boone Co. Arboretum. Free, but please register calling 859-586-6101, or enroll on-line at www.ca.uky.edu/boone *** “Vegetable Gardening 101”, Tuesday, July 3, 1:002:00 pm. Meets at the Boone Co. Arboretum. Free, but please register calling 859-586-6101, or enroll on-line at www.ca.uky.edu/boone *** “Enhancing Landscape Design with Garden Art: Mosaic Workshop”, Thursday, July 12, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, $15 fee includes lunch and materials. Call 859-586-6101 to register, or for more information.

plant. The only way to avoid bacterial wilt is to prevent the beetles from feeding on the plant. Fruit produced on a wilting plant will be of poor quality. One way to determine if bacterial wilt has infected

a plant is to cut the stem and squeeze both cut ends. A sticky sap will ooze from the water conducting tissues of the stem. If you push the cut ends of the stem together and slowly pull them apart, you will be able to see a roping

effect of stretchy sap if bacteria are present. This sap contains millions of bacteria. Begin cucumber beetle control as soon as the cucumber or melon seedlings emerge. For the home gardener, plants can be protected when they are small by mechanical means. Row covers, screens or cones put on early over small plants are effective means of excluding cucumber beetles in home plantings. Chemical controls may also be used, including Malathion, Sevin (on cucumbers), and BugB-Gon. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

Shelter gets a car for free Community Recorder Family Promise of Northern Kentucky (formerly the Interfaith Hospitality Network of Northern Kentucky), recently received a 2002 Toyota Highlander car for free. Charity Cars, a national nonprofit that donates cars to assist struggling families in their transition from dependency to selfsufficiency, notified Family Promise in January of their intention to give the agency a free car. Charity Cars then worked closely with local Auto Body Shop, CarStar Collision Care of Newport on 2350 Alexandria Pike in

Family Promise executive director Lisa Desmarais is shown with the donated 2002 Toyota Highlander. PROVIDED Southgate, to repair the car and ready it for use by the agency. Family Promise is a faith-based collaborative that empowers Northern Kentucky children and their families experiencing temporary homeless-

ness to attain sustainable independence. “This is such a blessing to the families we serve,” said Lisa Desmarais, executive director. The car has an estimated value of $9,000. Family Promise plans

to use the car to transport families in its programs to doctor’s appointments, social services appointments and job interviews. The car will also pick up families who lack their own private transportation to get to the shelter.

Library earns 16 top 10 statistical rankings NON-DENOMINATIONAL Family Worship Center 97 Three Mile Rd. Wilder, Ky. 41076 859-441-5433

SERVICE TIME Sunday, 10:45 a.m.

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

The Campbell County Public Library achieved rankings in the top 10 in 16 categories in the The Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives annual statistical summary for the 2010-2011 fiscal year. The summary includes county-to-county library statistics of the Commonwealth’s119 library systems, and covers 81 categories. In the most important categories the library consistently ranks in the top 10 year to year. Using the latest county

No matter who you are, or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here! 15 South Fort Thomas Ave. • Fort Thomas, KY 41075

859-441-2565

Christian Education For All Ages 10:10-10:50 a.m. Traditional Service Contemporary Service Sunday 9:00-10:00 a.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

www.christchurchuccft.org Rev. Dave Schwab, Pastor Dr. Randy Pennington, Director of Music Ministries CE-0000510773

CE-0000495296

population estimates from the Kentucky Data Center, the library had the sixth largest total book collection in the Commonwealth with 210,780 books, adding more than 2,000 books to its collection during the fiscal year. The library has 263,955 items in its total collection. More than half a million people visited the library’s three branches in the last fiscal year, and 978,802 items were checked out by patrons, ranking the library fifth in both categories. The library loaned more than 4,100 items to other library systems across the nation, ranking it fourth for total materials loaned. The library used the Interlibrary Loan system 6,583 times to locate requested items for its patrons, securing the number one ranking in the category. The Children’s Department hosted more than 32,000 attendees for 1,264 programs, ranking the library the sixth and eighth respectively. The library has the seventh largest supply of public computers with 146 among the three branches. Year-over-year usage of public computers increased by 29 percent to 137,674 unique log-ins. Each branch averaged 45,891 public computer uses during the fiscal year. The library completed more than 10,900 annual public service hours within the fiscal year.


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B5

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Kentucky Utilities Company seeks approval by the Public Service Commission, Frankfort, Kentucky of an adjustment of electric rates and charges proposed to become effective on and after August 1, 2012, subject to the “Stay-Out” Commitment in Article I.1.1 of the Settlement Agreement approved in September 30, 2010 Public Service Commission Order in Case No. 2010-00204, under which the change in rates may be filed with the Public Service Commission during 2012, but not take effect before January 1, 2013. KU CURRENT AND PROPOSED ELECTRIC RATES Residential Service - Rate RS Current Basic Service Charge per Month: $8.50 Energy Charge per kWh: $0.06987

Proposed $13.00 $0.07235

Volunteer Fire Department Service - Rate VFD Current Proposed Basic Service Charge per Month: $8.50 $13.00 Energy Charge per kWh: $0.06987 $0.07235 General Service - Rate GS Current

Proposed Basic Service Charge per Meter Per Month: Single-Phase $17.50 $20.00 Three-Phase $32.50 $35.00 Energy Charge per kWh: $0.08332 $0.08678 Availability of Service: Text changes clarify that demand component of eligibility for taking service under this rate will be calculated on 12-month average of monthly maximum loads. Also clarifies that a customer taking service under this rate schedule who ceases to take service hereunder must meet eligibility requirements of new customer to again take service under this rate schedule. Determination of Maximum Load: New provision states how maximum load will be measured. All Electric School - Rate AES Current

Proposed

Basic Service Charge per Meter Per Month: Single-Phase $17.50 $20.00 Three-Phase $32.50 $35.00 $0.06670 $0.07060 Energy Charge per kwh: Availability of Service: Text change clarifies that customer taking service under this rate schedule who later ceases to take such service may not again take service under this rate schedule because it is closed. Power Service – Rate PS Secondary Service Current Basic Service Charge (per Month) $90.00 $ 0.03300 Energy Charge (per kWh) Demand Charge (per kW per month of billing demand) Summer Rate (May through September) $13.90 Winter Rate (All Other Months) $11.65

Proposed $90.00 $ 0.03349 $14.40 $12.10

Primary Service Current Proposed $90.00 $125.00 Basic Service Charge (per Month) Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.03300 $ 0.03349 Demand Charge (per kW per month of billing demand) Summer Rate (May through September) $13.72 $ 14.75 Winter Rate (All Other Months) $11.45 $ 12.73 Availability of Service: Text changes clarify that demand component of eligibility for taking service under this rate will be calculated on 12-month average of monthly maximum loads. Also clarifies that a customer taking service under this rate schedule who ceases to take service hereunder must meet eligibility requirements of new customer to again take service under this rate schedule. Time-of-Day Secondary Service Rate TODS Proposed Current Basic Service Charge (per Month) $200.00 $200.00 Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.03490 $ 0.03590 Maximum Load Charge (per kW per month) Peak Demand Period $ 3.89 $ 4.50 Intermediate Demand Period $ 2.43 $ 2.80 Base Demand Period $ 3.05 $ 3.50 Availability of Service: Text changes clarify that demand component of eligibility for taking service under this rate will be calculated on 12-month average of monthly maximum loads. Time-of-Day Primary Service Rate TODP Current Proposed Basic Service Charge (per Month) $300.00 $300.00 Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.03522 $ 0.03557 Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period $ 3.67 $ 4.30 Intermediate Demand Period $ 2.31 $ 2.70 Base Demand Period $ 1.28 $ 1.60 Availability of Service: Text changes clarify that demand component of eligibility for taking service under this rate will be calculated on 12-month average of monthly maximum loads. Retail Transmission Service Rate RTS Current Proposed Basic Service Charge (per Month) $500.00 $750.00 Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.03414 $ 0.03408 Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period $ 3.54 $ 3.90 Intermediate Demand Period $ 2.30 $ 2.90 Base Demand Period $ 0.85 $ 1.30 Availability of Service: Text changes clarify that demand component of eligibility for taking service under this rate will be calculated on 12-month average of monthly maximum loads.

CE-1001712149-01

Fluctuating Load Service – Rate FLS Primary Service Current Basic Service Charge (per Month) $500.00 Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.03419 Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period $ 2.30 Intermediate Demand Period $ 1.41 Base Demand Period $ 1.57

Proposed $750.00 $ 0.03419 $ $ $

2.40 1.44 1.75

Transmission Service Current Proposed Basic Service Charge (per Month) $500.00 $750.00 Energy Charge (per kWh) $ 0.02947 $ 0.03092 Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period $ 2.30 $ 2.40 Intermediate Demand Period $ 1.41 $ 1.44 Base Demand Period $ 0.82 $ 1.00 Current: Where: 1) the monthly billing demand for the Primary Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 60% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Primary Base Demand Period is the greater of:

a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 20,000 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. 2) the monthly billing demand for the Transmission Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 40% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Transmission Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 20,000 kVA, or b) a minimum of 40% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 40% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Proposed: Where: the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 20,000 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Street Lighting Service - Rate ST. LT. and Private Outdoor Lighting - Rate P. O. LT. Street Lighting Service (Rate ST.LT. – Sheet No. 35) and Private Outdoor Lighting Service (Rate P.O.LT. – Sheet No. 36) are being reorganized into two rate schedules. The first schedule will be named Lighting Services (Rate LS) and will be a consolidation of lighting fixtures currently offered. The second schedule will be named Restricted Lighting Service (Rate RLS) and will be a consolidation of lighting fixtures that are in service but no longer available for new or replacement installations. The current and proposed rates are presented below based on the lights to be included in Rate LS and Rate RLS. The lights proposed to be contained in the specific schedule are shown in bold type with the current light and rate sheet shown below the proposed light. Proposed Lighting Service Rate LS

OVERHEAD SERVICE High Pressure Sodium 462 Cobra Head, 5800 Lum. Std 5800 Lum. HPS Std 472 Cobra Head, 5800 Lum. Orntl 5800 Lum. HPS Orntl 463 Cobra Head, 9500 Lum. Std 9500 Lum. HPS Std 473 Cobra Head, 9500 Lum. Orntl 9500 Lum. HPS Orntl 464 Cobra Head, 22000 Lum. Std 22000 Lum. HPS Std 22000 Lum. Cobra Head HPS Std 474 Cobra Head, 22000 Lum. Orntl 22000 Lum. HPS Orntl 465 Cobra Head, 50000 Lum. Std 50000 Lum. HPS Std 50000 Lum. Cobra Head HPS Std 475 Cobra Head, 50000 Lum. Orntl 50000 Lum. HPS Orntl 487 Directional, 9500 Lum. Std 9500 Lum. Directional HPS 488 Directional, 22000 Lum. Std 22000 Lum. Directional HPS 489 Directional, 50000 Lum. Std 50000 Lum. Directional HPS 428 Open Bottom, 9500 Lum. Std 9500 Lum. Open Bottom HPS Metal Halide 450 Directional, 12000 Lum. Std 12000 Lum. Fixture Only Dir. MH 451 Directional, 32000 Lum. Std 32000 Lum. Fixture Only Dir. MH 452 Directional, 107800 Lum. Std 107800 Lum. Fixture Only Dir. MH

UNDERGROUND SERVICE High Pressure Sodium 467 Colonial, 5800 Lum. Decorative 5800 Lum. Colonial HPS UG 5800 Lum. Colonial Decor. UG 468 Colonial, 9500 Lum. Decorative 9500 Lum. Colonial HPS UG 9500 Lum. Colonial Decor. UG 401 Acorn, 5800 Lum. Smooth Pole 5800L Acorn Dec. Pole HPS UG 5800L Acorn Dec. Pole UG 411 Acorn, 5800 Lum. Fluted Pole 5800L Acorn Hist. Pole HPS UG 5800L Acorn Hist. Pole UG 420 Acorn, 9500 Lum. Smooth Pole 9500L Acorn Dec. Pole HPS UG 9500L Acorn Dec. Pole UG 430 Acorn, 9500 Lum. Fluted Pole 9500L Acorn Hist. Pole HPS UG 9500L Acorn Hist. Pole UG 414 Victorian, 5800 Lum. Fluted Pole 5800 Lum. Coach HPS UG 415 Victorian, 9500 Lum. Fluted Pole 9500 Lum. Coach HPS UG 476 Contemporary, 5800 Lum. Fixt./Pole 5800 Lum. Contemporary HPS UG 5800 Lum. Contemporary HPS UG 492 Contemporary, 5800 Lum. 2nd Fixt. 5800L Contemp/Fixt. Only/HPS/UG 477 Contemporary, 9500 Lum. Fixt./Pole 9500 Lum. Contemporary Decor. UG 9500 Lum. Contemporary HPS UG 497 Contemporary, 9500 Lum. 2nd Fixt. 9500 Lum. Contemp/Decor/ Fix Only

Current Rate Sheet

Rate Per Light Per Month Current Proposed

St. Lt. 35

$ 7.90

St. Lt. 35

$10.73

St. Lt. 35

$ 8.41

St. Lt. 35

$11.45

St. Lt. 35 P.O.Lt. 36

$13.04 $13.04

St. Lt. 35

$16.08

St. Lt. 35 P.O.Lt. 36

$20.95 $20.95

St. Lt. 35

$22.51

P.O.Lt. 36

$ 8.27

P.O.Lt. 36

$12.45

P.O.Lt. 36

$17.70

P.O.Lt. 36

$ 7.16

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$13.04

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$18.45

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$38.48

Current Rate Sheet

Rate Per Light Per Month Current Proposed

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$ 9.93 $ 9.93

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$10.35 $10.35

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$13.86 $13.86

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$20.14 $20.14

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$14.39 $14.39

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$20.78 $20.78

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$29.24

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$29.65

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$15.66 $21.81

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$14.35

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$18.19 $21.85

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$14.38

$ 8.33 $11.32 $ 8.87 $12.08 $13.75 $16.96 $22.10 $23.74 $ 8.72 $13.13 $18.67 $ 7.55

$13.75 $19.46 $40.58

$10.47 $10.92 $14.62 $21.24 $15.18 $21.92 $30.84 $31.27 $16.58 $15.13 $20.87 $15.17


LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012 478 Contemporary, 22000L Fixt./Pole 22000 Lum. Contemp. Decor. UG 22000 Lum. Contemporary HPS UG 498 Contemporary, 22000 Lum. 2nd Fixt. 22000 Lum. Contemp. Add Fixture 479 Contemporary, 50000L Fixt./Pole 50000 Lum. Contemp. Decor. UG 50000 Lum. Contemporary HPS UG 499 Contemporary, 50000 Lum. 2nd Fixt. 50000L Contemp. Decor. Fixt. Only 300 Dark Sky, 4000 Lumen 4000 Lum. HPS DSK Lantern 301 Dark Sky, 9500 Lumen 9500 Lum. HPS DSK Lantern 360 Granville Pole and Fixture, 16000L Granville Pole and Fixture Granville Pole and Fixture (Granville Accessories) Single Crossarm Bracket Twin Crossarm Bracket (Inc. 1 Fixture) 24 Inch Banner Arm 24 Inch Clamp Banner Arm 18 Inch Banner Arm 18 Inch Clamp On Banner Arm Flagpole Holder Post-Mounted Receptacle Base-Mounted Receptacle Additional Receptacles Planter Clamp On Planter

Metal Halide 490 Contemporary, 12000L Fixt. Only

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$22.11 $27.84

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$16.37

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$28.13 $31.12

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$19.65

DSK 39

$21.31

DSK 39

$22.22

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$51.00 $51.00

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$17.78 $17.78

St.Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$19.79 $19.79

St.LT. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 3.09 $ 3.09

St.Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 4.26 $ 4.26

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 2.84 $ 2.84

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 3.52 $ 3.52

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 1.31 $ 1.31

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2 St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$18.46 $18.46 $17.81 $17.81

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 2.52 $ 2.52

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 4.28 $ 4.28

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.2

$ 4.75 $ 4.75

12000 Lum. Contemp. Fix. Only MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$14.21

12000 Lum. Cont. Fix. w/M Pole MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$26.62

32000 Lum. Contemp. Fix. Only MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$20.12

494 Contemporary, 12000Lum. Fixture w/Smooth Pole 491 Contemporary, 32000 Lum. Fix. Only 495 Contemporary, 32000 Lum. Fixture w/Smooth Pole 32000 Lum. Cont. Fix. w/M Pole MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$32.53

107800 Lum. Contemp. Fix. Only MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$41.70

107800 Lum. Cont. Fix. w/M Pole MH

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$54.11

493 Contemporary, 107800L Fixt./Only 496 Contemporary, 107800 Lum. Fixture w/Smooth Pole

$26.55 $17.27 $32.54 $20.72 $22.48 $23.44 $53.79

Eliminated Eliminated $20.87 $ 3.26 $ 4.49

OVERHEAD SERVICE High Pressure Sodium 461 Cobra Head, 4000 Lum. Fixt. Only 4000 Lum. HPS Std 471 Cobra Head, 4000 Lum. Fixt/Pole 4000 Lum. HPS Orntl 409 Cobra Head, 50000 Lum. Fixt. Only 50000 Lum. HPS Special Lighting 426 Open Bottom, 5800 Lum. Fixt. Only 5800 Lum. Open Bottom HPS Std

$ 3.71 $ 1.38 $19.47 Elminated Eliminated $ 2.66 $ 4.51 $ 5.01

Metal Halide 454 Direct, 12000 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 12000L Fixt/Pole Dir. MH 455 Direct, 32000 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 32000L Fixt/Pole Dir. MH 459 Direct, 107800 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 107800L Fixt/Pole Dir. MH

CE-1001712189-01

Mercury Vapor 446 Cobra Head, 7000 Lum. Fixt. Only 7000 Lum. MV Std 456 Cobra Head, 7000 Lum. Fixt/Pole 7000 Lum. MV Orntl 447 Cobra Head, 10000 Lum. Fixt. Only 10000 Lum. MV Std 457 Cobra Head, 10000 Lum. Fixt/Pole 10000 Lum. MV Orntl 448 Cobra Head, 20000 Lum. Fixt. Only 20000 Lum. MV Std 20000 Lum. MV Special Ltg. 458 Cobra Head, 20000 Lum. Fixt/Pole 20000 Lum. MV Orntl 20000 Lum. Cobra Head MV Std 404 Open Bottom, 7000 Lum. Fixt. Only 7000 Lum. Open Bottom MV Std Incandescent 421 Tear Drop, 1000 Lum. Fixt. Only 1000 Lum. Incand. Std 422 Tear Drop, 2500 Lum. Fixt. Only 2500 Lum. Incand. Std 424 Tear Drop, 4000 Lum. Fixt. Only 4000 Lum. Incand. Std 434 Tear Drop, 4000 Lum. Fixt. /Pole 4000 Lum. Incand. Orntl 425 Tear Drop, 6000 Lum. Fixt. Only 6000 Lum. Incand. Std

$ 6.93

St. Lt. 35

$ 9.76

P.O.Lt. 36

$10.25

P.O.Lt. 36

$ 6.72

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$17.27

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$22.68

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$42.71

St. Lt. 35

$ 8.72

St. Lt. 35

$10.94

St. Lt. 35

$10.29

St. Lt. 35

$12.26

St. Lt. 35 P.O.Lt. 36

$12.57 $ 7.85

St. Lt. 35 P.O.Lt. 36

$14.14 $12.57

P.O.Lt. 36

$ 9.69

St. Lt. 35

$ 3.08

St. Lt. 35

$ 4.09

St. Lt. 35

$ 6.08

St. Lt. 35

$ 7.00

St. Lt. 35

$ 8.11

410 Acorn, 4000 Lum. Fluted Pole 4000L Acorn (Hist Pole) HPS UG 4000L Acorn (Hist Pole) HPS UG 466 Colonial, 4000 Lum. Smooth Pole 4000 Lum. Colonial HPS UG 4000 Lum. Colonial Decor. UG 412 Coach, 5800 Lum. Smooth Pole 5800 Lum. Coach Decor. UG 413 Coach, 9500 Lum. Smooth Pole 9500 Lum. Coach Decor. UG

Energy Charge per kWh:

Rate Per Light Per Month Current Proposed

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$ 25.45

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$ 30.86

P.O.Lt. 36.3

$ 50.89

P.O.Lt. 36.1

$12.77

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$19.16 $19.16

St. Lt. 35.1 P.O.Lt. 36.1

$ 8.93 $ 8.93

St. Lt. 35.1

$ 29.24

St. Lt. 35.1

$ 29.65

Lighting Energy Service Rate LE Current $0.05647

Traffic Energy Service Rate TE Current Basic Service Charge per Month: $3.14 Energy Charge per kWh: $0.07182 Dark Sky Friendly Rate DSK Current Rate DSK Lantern 4,000 .050 DSK Lantern 9,500 .100 Proposed Rate This rate schedule is proposed to be included in Lighting Service Rate LS.

$26.84 $32.55 $53.67

$13.47 $20.21 $ 9.42 $30.84 $31.27

Proposed $0.05958 Proposed $3.25 $0.07614

$21.31 $22.22

Cable Television Attachment Charges – Rate CTAC Current Proposed Attachment Charge per year $5.40 $10.01 for each attachment to pole: Curtailable Service Rider 10 – Rider CSR10 Current Proposed (per kW) (Per kVA)

$14.99 $28.08 $21.22 $34.31 $43.98 $57.07

Rate Per Light Per Month Current Proposed

St. Lt. 35

High Pressure Sodium 440 Acorn, 4000 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 4000L Acorn (Decor) HPS UG

$ 3.00

Proposed Restricted Lighting Service Rate RLS Current Rate Sheet

UNDERGROUND SERVICE Metal Halide 460 Direct, 12000 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 12000L Fixt. w/M. Pole Dir. MH 469 Direct, 32000 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 32000L Fixt. w/M. Pole Dir. MH 470 Direct, 107800 Lum. Flood Fixt/Pole 107800L Fixt. w/M. Pole Dir. MH

Current Rate Sheet

$ 7.31 $10.29 $10.81 $ 7.09

$18.21 $23.92 $45.05

$ 9.20 $11.54 $10.85 $12.93 $12.19 $14.49 $10.22

$ 3.25 $ 4.31 $ 6.41 $ 7.38 $ 8.55

Monthly Demand Credit: Primary ($5.50) ($2.80) Transmission ($5.40) ($2.75) $16.00 $16.00 Non-Compliance Charge: Proposed Contract Option: Removes restriction that KU may only use physical curtailment during system reliability events. Also changes contract options’ demand from a 15-minute demand basis to the one the customer’s standard rate schedule uses. Curtailable Service Rider 30 – Rider CSR30 Current Proposed (per kW) (Per kVA) Monthly Demand Credit per kW: ($4.40) ($2.30) Primary Transmission ($4.30) ($2.25) Non-Compliance Charge per kW: $16.00 $16.00 Proposed Contract Option: Removes restriction that KU may only use physical curtailment during system reliability events. Also changes contract options’ demand from a 15-minute demand basis to the one the customer’s standard rate schedule uses. Current Rate Proposed Rate

Load Reduction Incentive Rider – Rider LRI Up to $0.30 per kWh This rate schedule is proposed to be eliminated.

Standard Rider for Excess Facilities – Rider EF Current Rate Customer shall pay for excess facilities by: Monthly Charge for Leased Facilities: 1.54% Monthly Charge for Facilities Supported By a One-Time CIAC Payment: 0.74% Proposed Rate No adjustment in the monthly charge for a replacement of facilities will be made during the initial five (5) year term of contract. Customer shall pay for excess facilities by: (a) Making a monthly Excess Facilities charge payment equal to the installed cost of the excess facilities times the following percentage: Percentage with No Contribution-in-Aid-of-Construction 1.28% (b) Making a one-time Contribution-in-Aid-of-Construction equal to the installed cost of the excess facilities plus a monthly Excess Facilities Charge payment equal to the installed cost of the excess facilities times the following percentage: Percentage with Contribution-in-Aid-of-Construction 0.49% Standard Rider for Redundant Capacity Charge – Rider RC Current Proposed (per kW) (Per kVA) Capacity Reservation Charge per Month: Secondary Distribution $0.85 $1.55 Primary Distribution $0.68 $0.99 Standard Rider for Supplemental or Standby Service – Rider SS Current Proposed (per kW) (Per kVA) Contract Demand per month: Secondary $6.54 $12.91 Primary $6.17 $12.35 Transmission $5.99 $11.17 Availability of Service: Text addition clarifies that KU has no obligation to supply non-firm service to a customer-generator unless the customer seeks supplemental or standby service under Rider SS. This requirement does not apply to Net Metering Service (Rider NMS). Temporary and/or Seasonal Electric Service Rider TS Availability of Service: Text change clarifies that service is available when it is not necessary for KU to install permanent facilities. Conditions: Customer will pay for non-salvageable materials plus a monthly charge for the salvageable equipment at the Percentage With No Contribution in-Aid-of-Construction specified on the Excess Facilities Rider. Current Rate: Proposed Rate:

Real-Time Pricing Rider RTP Billing under this Rider is formulaic. This rate schedule is proposed to be eliminated.


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B7

CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-07-12 AN ORDINANCE UPDATING THE OFFICIAL LIST OF ROADS IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, THAT WILL BE CONTROLLED AND MAINTAINED BY THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT, AND AMENDING ORDINANCE O-03-11 TO ADD THE FOLLOWING ROADS TO SAID OFFICIAL LIST: ALEXANDRIA PIKE, BUD POGUE WAY AND COOPER BAIN. ALSO MODIFYING THE LENGTHS OF THE FOLLOWING EXISTING COUNTY ROADS: BOB HUBER DRIVE AND S. LICKING PIKE. The full text of Ordinance O-07-12 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-07-12. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1001712498

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2012-06-07 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 50 OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, CODE OF ORDINANCES RELATING TO WASTE COLLECTION, ESTABLISHING REGULATIONS AND A SERVICE FEE; AND AMENDING THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS OF ORDINANCE 95-6-3 AND AMENDING ORDINANCE 2007-10-01. WHEREAS, Chapter 50 of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, Code of Ordinances establishes waste collection regulations and a service fee; and WHEREAS, a new contract was signed by the City of Bellevue for waste collection services for the City. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Bellevue, Campbell County, Kentucky, that: SECTION I That Chapter 50 of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, Code of Ordinances shall be amended as follows: § 50.05 SERVICE CHARGE FOR OWNERS OF IMPROVED REAL ESTATE AND CERTAIN BUSINESSES. The owners of real estate and businesses, firms, corporations, and individually operated businesses shall pay a public service charge as follows: (A) For owners of improved real estate occupied or unoccupied and shall include immediately adjacent property owned by the primary landowner shall pay one hundred forty one dollars and seventy eight cents ($141.78) one hundred forty six ($146.00) per unit per year. (B) For owners or occupants of real estate containing two (2) or more apartments - one hundred forty one dollars and seventy eight cents ($141.78) one hundred forty six ($146.00) for the first unit, per year, plus one hundred and seven dollars and eighty eight cents ($107.88) one hundred and twelve dollars and twenty cents ($112.20) for each additional unit per year. (C) For all businesses located within the city corporation limits one hundred forty one dollars and seventy eight cents ($141.78) one hundred forty six ($146.00) per year.

LEGAL NOTICE The Cold Spring Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Cold Spring City Building at 5694 East Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky, on WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2012, at 7:30 PM. The purpose of this public hearing is to hear any interested party who wishes to speak or present any pertinent information relative to the following described item(s): CASE NUMBER: CS-12-04-01 APPLICANT: Robert Moore LOCATION: 5671 AA Highway; an approximate 6.4-acre area located on the north side of the AA Highway between Pooles Creek Road and Dry Creek Road, approximately 1,500 feet east of Pooles Creek Road in Cold Spring REQUEST: Request A: a Stage I Development Plan for the described area; the applicant proposes to construct 3,500 square foot structure to warehouse recyclable materials. The property is currently zoned HC-2 Request B: to seek a variance from Section 10.16, C., 3., (minimum front yard depth in the HC-2 Zone) of the Cold Spring Zoning Ordinance; the applicant proposes to erect the 3,500 square foot structure 10 feet from the front property line along AA Highway where 50 feet is required Information submitted with this request is available for review at NKAPC between 8 AM and 5 PM, Monday through Friday. A synopsis of the request, a map and aerial photograph of the area, and information from the comprehensive plan are available online at www.nkapc.org. If you or anyone planning to attend this hearing has a disability for which we need to provide accommodations, please notify staff of your requirements at least seven days prior to the public hearing. This request does not have to be in writing. Andrew M. Videkovich, AICP NKAPC Senior Planner

ATTEST:

1st Reading:

6/13/2012

2nd Reading: 6/20/2012 Publication:

June 28, 2012 CCR

CE-1001712548-01

__________________________ Mary Scott, City Clerk / Treasurer

CANCELLATION OF CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS COUNCIL MEETING

Peter J. Klear /s/ Peter J. Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning 1712536

Current Rate Proposed Rate

$25.00 $28.00

Meter Test Charge

Disconnecting and Reconnecting Service Charge

Kentucky Utilities Company proposes to change the text of the following electric tariffs: General Service Rate GS, All Electric School Rate AES, Power Service Rate PS, Time-of-Day Secondary Service Rate TODS, Time-of-Day Primary Service Rate TODP, Retail Transmission Service Rate RTS, Fluctuating Load Service Rate FLS, Street Lighting Service Rate ST. LT, Private Outdoor Lighting Rate P.O.LT, Cable Television Attachment Charges Rate CTAC, Curtailable Service Rider CSR10, Curtailable Service Rider CSR30, Excess Facilities Rider EF, Redundant Capacity Rider RC, Supplemental/ Standby Service Rider SS, Rider IL for Intermittent Loads, Temporary/Seasonal Service Rider TS, Large Green Energy Rider LGE, Low Emission Vehicle Service Rate LEV, Fuel Adjustment Clause FAC, Demand Side Management Cost Recovery Mechanism DSM, Environmental Cost Recovery Surcharge ECR, and the Terms and Conditions. Changes to the Terms and Conditions include proposed clarifications on terms and conditions for determining customer rate assignments, as well as when standby or supplemental service must be purchased if customer desires non-firm service. Although KU is not proposing to change the text of its Fuel Adjustment Clause (“FAC”), other than the correction of a minor typographical error in Paragraph (3), it is proposing to recover certain costs through the FAC to ensure that the correct amounts are collected through base rates and the FAC. Complete copies of the proposed tariffs containing text changes and proposed rates may be obtained by contacting Lonnie E. Bellar, Kentucky Utilities Company at 220 West Main Street, Louisville, Kentucky, 502-627-4830, or visiting Kentucky Utilities Company’s website at www.lge-ku.com. The foregoing rates reflect a proposed annual increase in revenues of approximately 6.5% to Kentucky Utilities Company. The estimated amount of the annual change and the average monthly bill to which the proposed electric rates will apply for each electric customer class is as follows: Electric Rate Class

1712525

Residential General Service All Electric School Power Service TODS (Secondary) TODP (Primary) Retail Transmission Fluctuating Load Outdoor Lights Lighting Energy Traffic Energy CTAC

CITY OF BELLEVUE ORDINANCE 2012-06-06

2584

$60.00 $75.00

Customer Deposits Kentucky Utilities Company is proposing no change to the required Customer Deposit for residential electric customers served under Residential Rate RS from the current amount of $135.00 (0% increase), and the required Customer Deposit for general service customers served under General Service Rate GS from the current amount of $220.00 (0% increase). Text change states when Rate GS deposit may be wavied in conjuction with taking service under Rate RS.

MAYOR, Edward Riehl ATTEST: ______________________ CITY CLERK, Mary H. Scott 6/13/2012 6/20/2012 629/2012

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Meter Pulse Charge Current Rate: $9.00 per month per installed set of pulse-generating equipment Proposed Rate: $15.00 per month per installed set of pulse-generating equipment

SECTION 1 There shall be levied against all motor vehicles registered in the City, on each $100.00 of assessed valuation, duly assessed in accordance with KRS 132.487 an ad valorem tax at the rate of $.385. SECTION 2 This ordinance shall become effective on January 1,2013, after its adoption and publication according to law.

1st Reading: 2nd Reading: Publication:

Date: June 21, 2012 Published:June 28, 2012 Campbell County Recorder

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2012-04 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary ofOrdinance 2012-04 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, adopted by City Council on June 21, 2012: ORDINANCE NO. 2012-04: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2012 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2013, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES, AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT . This Ordinance was approved on June 21, 2012; and adopts the City’s budget for the 2012/2013 fiscal year. This Budget anticipates $3,888,487 in revenues for the General Fund Budget; and appropriates $3,888,487 for General Fund expenses. *************************************************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2012-04 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, its Exhibits, and other information relative to the Ordinance, are on file at the office of the City Clerk, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C. 1001712741 City Attorneys

Standard Rate for Low Emission Vehicle Service – Rate LEV Current Proposed Basic Service Charge per Month: $8.50 $13.00 Energy Charge per kWh: Off-Peak Hours $0.04904 $ 0.05078 $0.07005 $ 0.07254 Intermediate Hours Peak Hours $0.13315 $ 0.13788 Availability of Service: Clarifies that rate is available to customers eligible for Rate RS or GS where the GS service is used in conjunction with an RS service to provide service to a detached garage and energy usage is no more than 300 kWh per month.

ORDINANCE LEVYING AND ASSESSING AD VALOREM TAXES FOR GENERAL FUND AND MUNICIPAL PURPOSES FOR THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FOR FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2012 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2013, OF ALL MOTOR VEHICLES ASSESSED WITHIN THE CITY AND SETTING THE TAX RATE AT .385 PER $100.00 VALUATION. WHEREAS, pursuant to the pertinent section of the constitution of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the general laws thereof and KRS 132.487 the Board of Council is required to pass an ordinance, annually, levying and providing for the collection of ad valorem taxes of the assessed valuation of motor vehicles registered within the city at a rate not to exceed that which could have been levied on the January 1, 1983 assessments, and WHEREAS, after due consideration and deliberation, the Board of Council has determined the required tax rate for the fiscal year. NOW, THEREFORE, be it ordained by the Board of Council of the City of Bellevue, Campbell County, Kentucky:

First Reading: 6/13/2012 Second Reading: 6/20/2012 Publication: 6/28/2012

__________________________ Edward Riehl, Mayor

Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY. Monday-Friday during normal business hours.

ORDINANCE 2012-06-05

THE NEXT REGULARLY SCHEDULED MEETING IS TUESDAY, JULY 17, 2012 AT 7:30 PM. 1001712563

SECTION III This Ordinance shall become effective upon its approval, adoption and publication according to law.

109-12-TXA-01 FILE NUMBER: APPLICANT: Campbell County Planning & Zoning Department on behalf of the CC&MP&ZC REQUEST: Adoption of new Fee Schedule relating to the New Subdivision Regulations

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY

THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS COUNCIL MEETING SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY, JULY 3, 2012 IS CANCELED.

SECTION II That all ordinances and parts of ordinances in conflict herewith are hereby repealed to the extent of such conflict.

FILE NUMBER: 108-12-TXA-01 APPLICANT: Campbell County Planning & Zoning Department on behalf of the CC&MP&ZC REQUEST: Proposed update to all sections of the Subdivision Regulations.

1711571

AN ORDINANCE UPDATING THE ANNUAL CLASSIFICATION AND COMPENSATION PLAN OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE. WHEREAS, the City Council and the Administration of the City of Bellevue recognize that a classification and compensation system which is designed to recruit and retain a quality, motivated workforce is indispensable to effective city government; and W H E R E A S , it is essential to have equal-pay-for-equal-work provisions for all city employees; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of Council of the City of Bellevue, Campbell County, Kentucky, that: SECTION 1 The classification and compensation plan attached hereto shall be the plan for administering the classification and compensation functions of the City of Bellevue. The classification and compensation plan may be waived, altered or suspended only by a change of ordinance. SECTION 2 This Ordinance shall become effective upon its approval, adoption and publication according to law. Edward Riehl, Mayor ATTEST: Mary H. Scott, City Clerk

(D) For all unimproved real estate forty percent (40%) of the service fee shall be charged.

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 7:00 P.M. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Ky. for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following:

Annual $ Increase $37,381,886 $ 9,061,201 $ 635,467 $ 6,849,989 $ 1,907,198 $12,380,611 $ 5,128,398 $ 1,417,956 $ 1,267,776 $ 124 $ 6,388 $ 681,722

Annual % Increase 8.03% 4.97% 5.81% 2.53% 6.59% 6.62% 6.50% 6.25% 5.41% 5.42% 5.40% 85.37%

Mthly Bill $ Increase $ 7.41 $ 9.20 $ 82.81 $ 96.29 $ 1,160.80 $ 6,159.51 $ 11,982.24 $118,163.01 $ 0.62 $ 11.27 $ 0.79 N/A

Mthly Bill % Increase 8.03% 4.97% 5.81% 2.53% 6.59% 6.62% 6.50% 6.25% 5.41% 5.42% 5.40% N/A

The rates contained in this notice are the rates proposed by Kentucky Utilities Company; however, the Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from the proposed rates contained in this notice. Notice is further given that any corporation, association, body politic or person with a substantial interest in the matter may by written request, within thirty (30) days after publication of the notice of the proposed rate changes, request to intervene. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P. O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, and shall set forth the grounds for the request, including the status and interest of the party. Intervention may be granted beyond the thirty (30) day period for good cause shown. Any person who has been granted intervention may obtain copies of the application and any other filing made by the utility by contacting Lonnie E. Bellar, Vice President – State Regulation and Rates, Kentucky Utilities Company, c/o LG&E and KU Energy LLC, 220 West Main Street, Louisville, Kentucky, 502-627-4830. A copy of the application and testimony shall be available for public inspection at the office of Kentucky Utilities Company, 100 Quality Street, Lexington, Kentucky, or the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, Frankfort, Kentucky. A copy of this Notice and the proposed tariff, once filed, shall also be available for public inspection on Kentucky Utilities Company’s website at www.lge-ku.com.

CE-1001712193-01

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a special meeting to be held on Thursday, July 5, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the June 20, 2012, regular meeting of the Court.

Kentucky Utilities Company c/o LG&E and KU Energy LLC 220 West Main Street P. O. Box 32010 Louisville, Kentucky 40232 502-627-4830

Public Service Commission 211 Sower Boulevard P. O. Box 615 Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 502-564-3940


LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

How to store fruits, vegetables

No matter where you purchase your fresh products how you care for them when you get them home will affect their keeping quality. FILE

Many of us are buying more fresh fruits and vegetables as more items come into season. You can already find some locally grown produce at the local farmers markets. Nothing quite beats the thrill of buying fresh from a Diane Mason EXTENSION NOTES market.

PHOTO

ORDINANCE NO. O-06-2012 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING A GENERAL FUND BUDGET, MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND BUDGET, DEBT SERVICE FUND BUDGET, TOWER PARK ENTERPRISE FUND BUDGET, CAPITAL PROJECTS CBD FUND, AND WASTE DISPOSAL FUND BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2012 – 6/30/2013, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and copies delivered to the Board of Council; and WHEREAS, a Public Hearing has been conducted and the Board of Council has reviewed the proposed budget for FY 2012 – 2013 and made any necessary modifications; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the Fiscal Year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 for the following funds is hereby adopted: RESOURCES GENERAL MUNICIPAL TOWER PARK FUND ROAD AID FUND FUND AVAILABLE Estimated $2,824,590 $559,599 $567,107 Carry-Over Balance REVENUES Taxes 4,638,900 Licenses/Permits 4,527,500 Fines/Penalties 81,655 Investment Income 233,327 500 500 State/Fed/Reimb Rev 244,368 280,000 Current Services 561,628 Projected Assessments 77,664 82,181 5,000 5,000 Miscellaneous Transfer Funds Franchise Tax 75,200 TOTAL REVENUES 10,369,559 438,364 5,500 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 13,194,149 1,037,962 572,607 EXPENDITURES General Administration 1,109,526 Police Department 3,186,396 2,712,414 Fire Department 555,205 Recreation Department General Services Dept. 2,136,234 Grants and Subsidies Capital Improvements 364,920 Transfer Funds 654,176 12,301 Current Services 15,800 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 10,353,951 364,920 28,101 ESTIMATED SURPLUS 2,840,198 673,043 544,506 SECTION II That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 for the following funds is adopted as follows: RESOURCES DEBT SERVICE AVAILABLE FUND Estimated Carry-Over Bal. $0 REVENUES Interest Income Subscriber Fees Transfer Funds 889,847 TOTAL REVENUES 889,847 TOTAL AVAILABLE REVENUES 889,847 EXPENDITURES Debt Principal Payments 777,043 Debt Interest Payments 112,804 Program Fees Transfer Funds Capital Expense TOTAL EXPENDITURES 889,847 ESTIMATED SURPLUS 0 SECTION III That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 for the following funds is adopted as follows: CAPITAL RESOURCES PROJECTS AVAILABLE FUND CBD WASTE FUND Estimated Carry-Over Balance $1,174,410 $5,470 Current Services 782,530 Transfer Funds 472,000 Lease Revenue 25,000 Interest Income 500 Miscellaneous 12,500 TOTAL REVENUES 510,000 782,530 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 1,684,410 788,000 EXPENDITURES Midway Project Expense Transfer to Debt Service 695,370 Transfer to General Fund Personnel 77,537 Professional Services 17,500 Waste Collection Expenses 788,000 Misc. Operation Funds 56,450 Parks Project 250,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 1,096,857 788,000 ESTIMATED SURPLUS 587,553 0 This Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, published according to KRS Chapter 424, and shall be in effect at the earliest date provided by law. APPROVED: _____________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: June 4, 2012 ADOPTED: June 18, 2012 Published: June 28, 2012 ATTEST: _____________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk CE-1001712457-01

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING. DECEASED EARL HUGHES

FIDUCIARY ATTORNEY JANET HUGHES N/A 921 YORK ST. NEWPORT, KY 41071 MARGARET SCHACK GERALD BENZINGER ARTHUR SCHACK 207 THOMAS MORE PKW 371 DEEPWOODS DR. CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY HIGHLAND, OHIO 41076 RICHARD TEEGARDEN MARY SUE TEEGARDEN HARRY RUST 670 CLAY RIDGE RD PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001 ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001 GLADYS MCCARTER PEGGY THOMAS LEONARD ROWEKAMP 141 KINCAID LANE 502 GREENUP ST. ERLANGER, KY COVINGTON, KY 41011 CYNTHIA JONES PHILLIP KING HATTIE STEPHENS 19 PEARSON ST. 3612 CAROLINE ST COVINGTON KY 41015 FT THOMAS, KY 41075 TIMOTHY BROWN JENNIFER LEONARD LEIGH BROWN 105 E 4TH ST. STE. 300 50 ROSSMORE AVE. CINCINNATI OH 45202 FT THOMAS KY 41075 JACQUELINE DRAPER DAVID DRAPER JAMES LUERSEN 660 S GRAND AVE. 515 MONMOUTH ST. FT THOMAS KY 41075 NEWPORT KY 41071 BARBARA STREHLE KEVIN STREHLE JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE. 332 WARD AVE. BELLEVUE KY 41073 FT THOMAS KY 41075 5/3 BANK JANN SEIDENFADEN VIRGINIA MEYER 122 N FT THOMAS AVE. 38 FOUNTAIN SQ. FT THOMAS KY 41075 CINCINNATI OH 45202 PAUL TARVIN WANDA BELL EDWARD JACOBS 30 REDBUD LN. 26 AUDOBON PL ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 FT THOMAS KY 41075 ROSELLA SEARP KEVIN SEARP JOHN FISCHER 6843 HIGHRIDGE AVE. 308 6TH AVE. FLORENCE KY 41042 DAYTON KY 41074 ELIZABETH WAHLBRINK STEPHEN WAHLBRINK DAVID BENDER PO BOX 75346 40 ROCK HILL LANE FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 PETER DEDHAM JANICE DEDHAM KELLY BROWN 1131 HARRISON AVE 1037 MADISON AVE HARRISON OH 45030 COVINGTON KY 41011 OTTO LAKER ALOYSIUS LAKER JAMES LUERSEN 116 EVERGREEN AVE. 515 MONMOUTH ST SOUTHGATE KY 41071 NEWPORT KY 41071 DONNA COLEMAN GREG KRIEGE GEORGETTA DURKIN 11 VETERANS DR. 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076 COLD SPRING KY 41076 ROBERT LEMLICH EDWARD BUECHEL ELIZABETH LEMLICH 6900 HOUSTON RD. STE 43 346 BONNIE LESLIE AVE. BELLVUE KY 41073 FLORENCE KY 41042 SUSAN MURPHY JULIE DIERIG JANN SEIDENFADEN 134 MAN O WAR 122 N FT THOMAS AVE CRESTVIEW HILLS KY 41017 FT THOMAS KY 41075 THELMA SEBASTIAN JERRY SEBASTIAN JEFFREY BRUNK 222 E 1ST ST. 300 MADISON AVE. STE 200 SILVER GROVE KY 41085 COVINGTON KY 41011 ANNA HERBY JOHN HERBY WILLIAM WILLIAMSON 20 WINSTON HILL 50 E RIVERCENTER BLVD FT THOMAS KY 41075 COVINGTON KY 41011 MARGARET CASSON RICHARD CASSON HARRY RUST 11406 PLEASANT RIDGE RD PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 HELEN MAHONEY EUGENE MAHONEY HARRY RUST 8584 LICKING PIKE PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 EUGENE MAHONEY JR. EUGENE MAHONEY HARRY RUST 8584 LICKING PIKE PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 FRANK LEHMAN VELMA LEHMAN N/A 1122 MADELINE CR. CINCINNATI OH 45231 HAROLD LUERSEN JAMES LUERSEN JAMES LUERSEN 2 JAMES DR. 515 MONMOUTH ST. COLD SPRING KY 41076 NEWPORT KY 41071 WILLIAM BIDDLE WILLIAM C. BIDDLE N/A 4532 PEBBLE BROOK CR. LEXINGTON KY 40509 JOANN DITTRICH FREDERICK DITTRICH JOHN BANKEMPER 1032 N FT THOMAS AVE 30 MT PLEASANT LN FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 MANILUS GOODRIDGE R KEITH GOODRIDGE JEFFREY BAKST 654 MEADOW WOOD DR 2406 AUBURN AVE. CRESENT SPRINGS KY 41073 CINCINNATI OH 45219 WILLIAM SANDLIN BARBARA SANDLIN HANS TINKLER 1027 TAYLOR AVE. #2 PO BOX 75076 BELLEVUE KY 41073 FT THOMAS KY 41075 JUNE NELSON MICHELLE WORKS MOTT PLUMMER 2237 UPPER LICK BRANCH 53 VILLAGRANDE BLVD ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 FT THOMAS KY 41075 WALLACE JACKSON NANCY KUEBEL STEPHEN DASENBROCK 824 E 7TH ST. 26 AUDUBON PL. NEWPORT KY 41071 FT THOMAS KY 41075 GLADYS MARTIN LAURA MARTIN-THOMAS GREG KRIEGE 209 GLAZIER AVE. 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK BELLEVUE KY 41073 COLD SPRING KY 41076 ARVIL HUFF JEANETTE HUFF N/A 2217 UHL RD COLD SPRING KY 41076 JOHN DEAN COLLEEN DEAN JAMES GALBREATH 104 MARY INGLES HWY 50 N FT THOMAS AVE DAYTON KY 41074 FT THOMAS KY 41075 JAMES FIELD TAMMY SHORT HARRY RUST 449 HARRISBURG HILL PO BOX 312 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

However, no matter where you purchase your fresh products how you care for them when you get them home will affect their keeping quality. Knowing what to store on the counter and what to refrigerate can make a big difference in the taste of the end product. As a general rule, produce should not be washed until just prior to use. Unless there are large clumps of wet or damp soil on the product wait until you are ready to use the item. Wash your produce in cold, running water. It is generally not a good idea to allow items to soak in water. If the produce has a thick skin, you can scrub it with a vegetable brush to remove all soil. Otherwise, carefully rub the outer skin of the items to dislodge any soil that might be on them. It is important to wash fruits and vegetables prior to use even if the outer

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New Perceptions to host autism events Community Recorder Rising Star Studios, a program of New Perceptions in Northern Kentucky, is excited to collaborate with the Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati on Autism Conversations, a series for families who have children with autism. “After the Diagnosis: Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders and Moving Forward,” will be 5:30-7 p.m. Monday, July 23, at New Perceptions, 1 Sperti Drive, Edgewood. Parents of preschool and early school-aged students can come to learn more about the symptoms and characteristics associated with autism spectrum disorders, common treatment approaches, services and supports within the community, and the grieving and coping process experienced by parents and caregivers. Both parents and professionals will be providing their experiences and perspectives. There

will be a question and answer session following the presentation. Parents may bring their children as there will be activities especially for them. For ages 8 and up, Rising Star’s mosaic artist, Jane Bresser, will help students work cooperatively and creatively to craft beautiful mosaic art to be installed outside New Perceptions. This event is part of Rising Star’s Arts & Socialization Series, which addresses two symptoms that distinguish autism: difficulties in social interaction and communication. Each event encourages social interaction and understanding through an arts activity. Simpler art activities will be available, as well, for those too young for mosaics. Admission is $10 per family. Art activities will be held 5–7 p.m. Reservations are requested for both events. Call 859-344-9322, ext. 15 or e-mail info@risingstarstudios.org.

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BY: CK. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT PROBATE COURT. TAUNYA NOLAN JACK C CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK. CE-1001712182-01

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peel will be removed. Germs and bacteria can be easily transferred from the outer layers to the edible portions. Tomatoes, pears, peaches and nectarines should be kept at room temperature until fully ripe so they can become sweeter. After they are fully ripe, use them or store them in the refrigerator. Most vegetables are best if used within a reasonable time after harvest. Celery, cabbage, carrots and bell peppers will keep a week or two in the refrigerator vegetable drawer. Taking some time to properly store the items you purchase will help you keep money in your wallet and allow you to enjoy the fresh vegetables and fruits of the season.

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LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B9

SUMMER FESTIVALS

JULY Independence Day Celebration, July 3 5-10 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence. Rides, food, a raffle, kids zone, demonstrations, music, concludes at 10 p.m. with fireworks. Presented by city of Florence. Free. Park Hills Fourth of July Festival, July 4 2-7 p.m., Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Covington. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food and major raffle of $2,590. Benefits Notre Dame Urban Education Center. Free. 859-3928228. Sisters of Notre Dame Fourth of July Festival, July 4 2-7 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Hwy., Park Hills. Games for children and adults, petting zoo, pony rides, entertainment, flea market, silent auction, food, $2,590 raffle. Supports the Notre Dame Urban Education Center and the Sisters Mission in Uganda. 859-392-8228 or 859-392-8229. America’s Celebration – Newport Motorcycle Rally, July 4-8 Noon-11 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, 5-11 p.m. Thursday, July 5, 5-11 p.m. (Cincinnati Reds fireworks) Friday, July 6, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, July 7, noon-7 p.m. Sunday, July 8, Newport Riverfront. Fireworks on the riverfront, games, live entertainment, food, contests and prizes. Motorcycle awards given at 5 p.m. Saturday. www.newportmotorcyclerally.com. 859-912-2509. Independence Celebration, July 6-7 5-11 p.m. Friday, July 6

with a silent auction at the senior center from 5-9:30 p.m. and music by Mike Heile at 7 p.m.; Parade will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 7, starting at Summit View Middle School and ending at Memorial Park, Jack Woods Parkway, Independence. Events at the park will be 4-11 p.m. Saturday with music by Seth Michael at 7 p.m. and fireworks at10 p.m. Rides, food vendors, music. Queen City Sausage Festival, July 13-15 5-11 p.m. Friday, July 13, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, July 14, noon-11 p.m. Sunday, July 15, Festival Park Newport, Riverboat Row, Newport. Food vendors, retail sausage shop, daily brat eating contest, games and entertainment. Presented by Queen City Sausage and Provision Inc. Free. 513541-5581; www.queencitysausage.com.

Boone County Fair, Aug. 4-11 Pre-fair events Saturday, Aug. 4. Rides will be 6 p.m. to close Monday-Friday, Aug. 6-10, and 1 p.m. to close Saturday, Aug. 11, at the Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, Burlington. Cost is $8 ages 3 and up and includes parking and unlimited rides. www.boonecountyfair.org. Great Inland Seafood Festival in Newport, Aug. 9-12 6-11 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, 6-11 p.m. (Cincinnati Reds fireworks) Friday, Aug. 10, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, Newport Riverfront. Premium seafood dishes from Greater Cincinnati/Northern Ken-

tucky restaurants. www.greatinlandseafood fest.com. End of Summer Celebration, Aug. 10-12 6 p.m.-midnight Friday and Saturday, Aug. 10-11, 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, St. Joseph Parish, 2470 Lorraine Court, Crescent Springs. www.stjosephcrescent.com. Alexandria Fair and Horse Show, Aug. 29 – Sept. 3

SEPTEMBER Riverfest, Sept. 3 Noon-10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3, Newport Riverfront. Live entertainment on Riverboat Row from noon-9 p.m., food, beverages and Rozzi’s largest and oldest fireworks dis-

play at dark. www.WEBN.com. Merchants & Music Festival, Sept. 22 3-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, Tower Park Amphitheater in Fort Thomas. Featuring female singer JoDee Messina and locals Tupelo Honey and The Danny Frazier Band. Presented by Fort Thomas Renaissance. Free.

$

Newport Oktoberfest, Sept. 28-30 5-11 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, Newport Riverfront. Each tent will have food, beer and music. 513477-3320.

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Kenton County Fair and Horse Show, July 16-21 Erlanger Lions Carnival, July 19-21 6 p.m. to midnight Thursday-Saturday, July 19-21, Erlanger Lions Club, Sunset Avenue in Erlanger. Ride bracelets for all three nights will be $12; $15 each night. Food and refreshments. The How Wax Show Band will perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, July 21. Coolers prohibited. 859-282-9969. Browngrass Festival, July 21 Noon-11 p.m. Saturday, July 21, Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, Rabbit Hash. Twenty local and regional bands, food, vendors, a raffle. Benefits local radio station WNKU. $15. Dogs Day of Summer Art Fair, July 28-29 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 28, noon-5 p.m. Sunday, July 29, Rabbit Hash General Store, 10021 Lower River Road, Rabbit Hash. Artists and live music. Free.

AUGUST Glier’s Goettafest, Aug. 2-5 5-11 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Aug. 2-3, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, noon-9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, Newport Riverfront. Goetta prepared in many ways: reubens, omelets, pizza and more. Live music, games and rides. www.goettafest.com.

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 10-2012 INVITATION TO BID Date: June 28, 2012 PROJECT: NKWD’s Barrington Road Water Tank Property Asphalt Pavement Improvements, City of Ft. Wright, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: July 12, 2012 Time: 10:00 p.m., local time

WHEREAS, a budget amendment has been prepared and delivered to the Mayor and City Council; and WHEREAS, Mayor and City Council have reviewed such budget amendment and made necessary modifications; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY: Section I That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2011 and ending 6/30/2012 is amended as follows: General Fund FY 11-12

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of asphalt pavement improvements at the District’s Barrington Road Tank located at Dixie Highway and Barrington Road in the City of Ft. Wright, Kenton County, Kentucky. This work includes pavement removal, rotomill existing areas, approx. 155 SY of base bituminous pavement, approx. 452 SY of leveling course, 204 linear feet of extruded concrete curb, approx. 522 SY of surface course, fence removal and replacement, together with related site and restoration work. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Viox & Viox, Inc. 466 Erlanger Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Viox & Viox, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 35.00 Mailing and Handling (if requested) $ 15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. On request 72 hours in advance, Owner will provide each Bidder access to the site to conduct such investigations and tests as each Bidder deems necessary for submission of a Bid. Arrangements for site visits shall be made by calling John Scheben with the Northern Kentucky Water District at (859) 426-2717. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Contract Documents basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated “A” by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid.

NOTICE OF BOND SALE The Secretary of Fort Thomas Independ ent School District Finance Corporation, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will until 11:30 A.M., E.T., on July 11, 2012, receive at the Office of the Executive Director of the Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission, 229 West Main St., Suite 102, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, sealed competitive bids for approximately $2,945,000 of the Corporation’s School Building Revenue Bonds, Series 2012, dated July 1, 2012, maturing as to principal in varying amounts on August 1 in the years 2013 through 2032. Bonds maturing on or after August 1, 2023 are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturities on or after August 1, 2022. Electronic bids may be submitted via the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system. The Corporation reserves the right to increase or decrease the amount of Bonds to be purchased by the successful bidder by an amount not to exceed $295,000, in increments of $5,000 at the sale price per $1,000 of Bonds; such increase or decrease to be made in any maturity. Sale on tax exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. FORT THOMAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT FINANCE CORPORATION By: Gene Kirchner, Secretary 1712545

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2011 THROUGH 6/30/2012, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RECOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT.

The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated “A” by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001712490

Municipal Road Fund FY 11-12

RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund balance carried forward $1,699,034.00 1,937,623.00 $41,803.00 50,000.00 Estimated Revenues: Property Tax Licenses & Permits Intergovernment Fines & Forfeits Charges for Services Other

$474,000.00 $2,599,700.00 $ -0$ -0$210,000.00 $51,000.00

452,500.00 2,764,870.00 $144,000.00 140,000.00 183,500.00 73,800.00

Transfer from General Fun

$0

Total Estimated Revenue $3,334,700.00 3,474,670.00 140,000.00

$144,000.00

Total Resources Available for Appropriation $5,033,734.00 $5,412,293.00 $185,803.00 190,000.00 Appropriations: Administration Dept. Police Dept. Maintenance Dept. P&Z Expenses Streets Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Bond Expenditures Total Appropriations $65,000.00

$714,900.00 $1,232,107.00 $521,800.00 $86,400.00 $10,800.00 $816,156.00$ -0$ -0-

682,092.00 1,396,099.00 401,186.00 80,800.00 $144,000.00 $65,000.00 $35,960.00 $816,156.00

$3,382,163.00 $3,412,293.00

$144,00.00

Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations $47,463.00 $62,377.00 $0 $75,000.00 Estimated Fund Balance End of Fiscal Year $1,656,571.00 $2,000,000.00 $125,000.00

$41,803.00

See attached summary of finances. Sections II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading this 5 day of June, 2012 Second reading this 19 day of June, 2012 Publish CCR June 28, 2012 ATTESTED: _________________________ JEAN A. RAUF CITY CLERK/TREASURER Ord12.10

____________________________ MAYOR GREGORY V. MEYERS CE-1001712541-01

JUNE Union Celebrates America Parade and Fireworks, June 29 6-10:30 p.m., Union Community Building, 10087 Old Union Road, Union. Music by Gunpowder Acoustic Society at 6:30 p.m. and 113th U.S. Army Band Dragoons at 8 p.m. Free U.S. flags to first 1,000 people. Presented by city of Union. Free. Registration required for parade participation. 859-384-1511; www.cityofunionky.org.

Public Notice Notice is hereby given that the Sisters of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059, have filed an application with the Energy and Environment Cabinet to construct small wetlands for educational and habitat purposes on their property in an old farm field. The property is located off Harrison Road, off Anderson Road, near Melbourne. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Surface Water Permit Branch, Flood Plain Management Section, 200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, KY 40601. Phone: 501-5643410. 1001712112


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012 ORDINANCE NO. O-05-2012 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING A GENERAL FUND BUDGET, MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUND BUDGET, DEBT SERVICE FUND BUDGET, TOWER PARK ENTERPRISE FUND BUDGET, CAPITAL PROJECTS CBD FUND, AND WASTE DISPOSAL FUND BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2011 – 6/30/2012, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message have been prepared and copies delivered to the Board of Council; and WHEREAS, a Public Hearing has been conducted and the Board of Council has reviewed the proposed budget for FY 2011 – 2012 and made any necessary modifications; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the annual budget for the Fiscal Year beginning 7/1/2011 and ending 6/30/2012 for the following funds is hereby amended:

TOTAL REVENUES TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS EXPENDITURES General Administration Police Department Fire Department Recreation Department General Services Dept. Grants and Subsidies Capital Improvements Transfer Funds Current Services TOTAL EXPENDITURES ESTIMATED SURPLUS

$2,913,902 4,473,551 4,419,049 66,500 203,355 181,500 773,887 546,355

$514,674

$526,863

500 280,000

5,000

96,000 5,000

66,580 250,000

5,000

75,200

10,206,890 10,874,277

456,700

10,000

13,120,792 13,788,179

971,374

536,863

GENERAL FUND 1,205,151 3,109,338 2,663,400 3,458,456 569,120 2,106,194

MUNICIPAL TOWER PARK ROAD AID FUND FUND

6,500 10,000 50,000 12,990 25,800

371,775 644,999

10,298,202 11,093,258 2,822,590 2,694,921

371,775

55,290 95,290 481,573 441,573

599,599

SECTION II That the annual budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2011 and ending 6/30/2012 for the following funds is amended as follows: DEBT SERVICE FUND $ -0-

REVENUES Interest Income Subscriber Fees Transfer Funds

%(+*''*"*)#&!+'*

RESOURCES AVAILABLE Estimated Carry-Over Bal.

900,913

TOTAL REVENUES TOTAL AVAILABLE REVENUES

900,913

Incidents/investigations Second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument, fraudulent use of a credit card Report of checks taken from

Laptops from

1599

$

per week

78 weeks

Lease Zone Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations See POLICE, Page B11

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

SERVICE DIRECTORY To place an ad call 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com

LAWNBOYS

& MOWING LANDSCAPING L LANDSCAP ANDSCAP

764,647 136,266

900,913 -0-

SECTION III That the amended budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2011 and ending 6/30/2012 for the following funds is amended as follows: CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND CBD $210,851

TOTAL REVENUES TOTAL AVAIL. FUNDS

2,675,500 2,886,351

823,000 834,257

-0705,612 70,737 33,500 55,200 2,000,000 2,865,049 21,302

820,000 820,000 14,257

This Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, published according to KRS Chapter 424, and shall be in effect at the earliest date provided by law. APPROVED: ______________________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor 1st Reading: June 4, 2012 ADOPTED: June 18, 2012 Published: June 28, 2012 ATTEST: _________________________________ Melissa K. Kelly, City Clerk

SECTION 00 11 00 - INVITATION TO BID LEGAL NOTICE REVISED MAY 22, 2012 REVISED JUNE 6, 2012 The Clifton Hills Limited Partnership will be accepting sealed bids for a General Contract for the construction, including mechanical, plumbing and electrical work, of a 32 unit residential building for senior citizens located at 18th Street in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 3:00 p.m., local time, July 10, 2012, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "Clifton Hills Senior Housing #11-18". General Contractors submitting a bid for general construction may obtain a maximum of two (2) complete sets of Contract Documents from Hub + Weber Architects, 200 West Pike Street, Covington, Kentucky, (859) 491-3844 - for a deposit of $100. Checks shall be made out to Clifton Hills Limited Partnership. Deposit will be refunded with the return of the two sets in good condition. Access to electronic copies of drawings and specs via ftp site will also be available to Contractors submitting deposit. Contract Documents may also be purchased from Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd, P.O. Box 36172, Cincinnati, OH 45236-0172, Tel: 513.793.1030. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to the public inspection and may be examined at the following offices: FW Dodge Corporation Allied Construction Industries 265 Kenwood Road Suite 200 3 Kovach Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45236 Cincinnati, Ohio Clifton Hills Limited Partnership will conduct a pre-bid informational meeting at 3:00 p.m. local time, June 26, 2012 at the office o the Housing Authority of Newport. Construction would begin within ninety (90) days of execution of contract. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Clifton Hills Limited Partnership, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory Performance and Payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred (100) percent of the contract price. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. Clifton Hills Limited Partnership reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of Clifton Hills Limited Partnership to do so. It is the intent of Clifton Hills Limited Partnership to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. Clifton Hills Limited Partnership is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1710015

Great Rates! G Commercial & Residential C

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EXPENDITURES Midway Project Expense Transfer to Debt Service Transfer to General Fund Personnel Professional Services Waste Collection Expenses Misc. Operation Funds Parks Project TOTAL EXPENDITURES ESTIMATED SURPLUS

462,000 2,200,000 1,000 12,500

WASTE FUND $11,257 823,000

%(+*''*"*)$##+'*

Estimated Carry-Over Bal. Current Services Transfer Funds Lease Revenue Interest Income Miscellaneous

Hrudayesh Ahir, 24, 25 Louisville Road, no operators license, speeding, DUI - aggravated circumstances, careless driving at Johns Hill Road, June 2. Delfon Montario Blair, 24, 12089 Madison Court, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 4. Ashlee Jean Liles, 26, 908 Monterey Lane, fraudulent use of credit card under $500, seconddegree criminal possession of forged instrument, receiving stolen property under $500 at 908 Monterey Lane, June 7. Bodie J. Sams, 18, 2777 Audobon, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, receiving stolen property under $500 at 395 Crossroads Blvd., June 7. Nobert D. Stacey, 25, 3737 Lovell Ave., Apt. 2, failure to wear seat belts, receiving stolen property under $10,000 -vehicle at 3725 Alexandria Pike, June 10. Nicholas R. Walpole, 24, 3907 South Clerose Circle, failure to wear seat belts, receiving stolen property under $10,000 -vehicle at 3725 Alexandria Pike, June 10.

residence and cashed without permission at 908 Monterey Lane, June 7. Theft by unlawful taking or purse snatching Report of purse taken from shopping cart at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 8. Theft by unlawful taking Report of fishing poles and GPS taken from vehicle at 200 Sonoma Court, June 21. Report of GPS taken from vehicle at 202 Sonoma Court, June 21. Theft by unlawful taking and third-degree criminal mischief Report of credit card taken from vehicle and used and trunk and locks on vehicle damaged at 100 Crossroads Blvd., June 5. Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting Report of items taken from grocery without paying at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., June 6. Report of juvenile took computer software without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 7. Report of juvenile took jewelry and perfume without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., June 11. Report of man took cell phone case without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, June 17. Third-degree burglary Report of man took two plaques off wall of restaurant at 16 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., June 5. Third-degree criminal mischief Report of truck keyed at 108 Orchard Terrace, June 13.

900,913

EXPENDITURES Debt Principal Payments Debt Interest Payments Program Fees Transfer Funds Capital Expense TOTAL EXPENDITURES ESTIMATED SURPLUS

RESOURCES AVAILABLE

CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. 09-2012 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 7/1/2012 THROUGH 6/30/13, BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND RESOURCES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. WHEREAS, a budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the Mayor and City Council; and WHEREAS, Mayor and City Council have reviewed such budget proposal and made necessary modifications; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, KENTUCKY: Section I That the budget for the fiscal year beginning 7/1/2012 and ending 6/30/2013 is hereby adopted as follows: General Municipal Fund Road Fund FY 12-13 FY 12-13 RESOURCES AVAILABLE: Fund balance carried forward $2,000,000.00 $125,000.00 Estimated Revenues: Property Tax $453,000.00 Licenses & permits $2,775,800.00 Intergovernment $37,212.00 $140,000.00 $ -0Fines & Forfeits Charges for Services $183,000.00 Other $69,200.00 $ Transfer from General Fund $ Total Estimated Revenue $3,518,212.00 $140,000.00 Total Resources Available for Appropriation $5,518,212.00 $265,000.00 Appropriations: $ 701,345.00 Administration Dept. Police Dept. $1,496,300.00 Maintenance Dept. $ 421,000.00 P&Z Expenses $ 81,100.00 Streets $140,000.00 Capital Outlay $ 60,000.00 Debt Service $ 815,125.00 $ -0Transfers Bond Expenditures $ -0$3,574,870.00 $140,000.00 Total Appropriations Excess of Resources Over/Under Appropriations $< 56,658.00> -0Estimated Fund Balance End of Fiscal Year $1,943,342.00 $125,000.00 See attached summary of finances. Section II That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk/Treasurer, recorded and published. Same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. First reading this 5 day of June, 2012. Second reading this 19 day of June, 2012. Published CCR June 28, 2012

Arrests/citations

$'*)&&)")&+(!*&)

Current Services Projected Assessments Miscellaneous Transfer Funds Franchise Tax

MUNICIPAL TOWER PARK ROAD AID FUND FUND

COLD SPRING

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REVENUES Taxes Licenses/Permits Fines/Penalties Investment Income State/Fed/Reimb Rev

GENERAL FUND

POLICE REPORTS

$'*)&&)")(#("*&)

RESOURCES AVAILABLE Estimated Carry-Over Balance

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE FOLLOWING SETTLEMENTS HAVE BEEN PRESENTED TO THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT PROBATE COURT, WRITTEN EXCEPTIONS TO THE BELOW SETTLEMENTS MUST BE FILED NO LATER THAN 20 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT. IF NO EXCEPTIONS ARE FILED SAID SETTLEMENTS WILL BE CONFIRMED AND ORDERED RECORDED. DECEASED FIDUCIARY SETTLEMENT TYPE LENA SANDFOSS MICHAEL FEDERLE FINAL ESTHER SCHACK THERESA EAGAN FINAL FINAL TERENCE SMITH SYLVIA SMITH PERIODIC JOAN RAWE IRENE HAUBNER FINAL JAMES MOHER MARLANE MOHER FINAL LESLIE BALCH VIRGINIA BRINKER FINAL WALTER HERTZENBERG GREGORY HERTZENBERG MARY HERTZENBERG GREGORY HERTZENBERG FINAL VIRGINIA SCHILLING JACK DAVIS FINAL EXCEPTIONS CAN BE MAILED TO ATTENTION PROBATE CLERK C/O 330 YORK STREET NEWPORT, KY 41071 BY: C.K. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT TAUNYA NOLAN JACK, CAMPBELL CIRCUIT CLERK %(+*''*"*)',&+'*

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WHATEVER YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE — LIST IT IN THE NORTHERN KENTUCKY BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY! To advertise contact Terri Gilland at 513.768.8608, fax 513.768.8632 or email tgilland@enquirer.com


LIFE

JUNE 28, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B11

DEATHS Carol Bales Carol Bales, 67, of Dry Ridge, died June 20, 2012. A brother, Jerry Baker and two sisters, Jeanie Bristow and Donna Derby, died previously. Survivors include son, Greg Rapp of Dry Ridge; daughter, Tami Vater-Curry of Lawrenceburg; brother, Marvin Bake of Alexandria; sisters, Marlene Gerding of Cold Spring; Wanda Davis of Grants Lick; one grandchild; and one great-grandchildren.

Evy Buckler Evy Buckler, 86, of Cold Spring, died June 19, 2012, at her residence. She was a retired employee of the Palm Beach Company in Erlanger and Wal-Mart in Alexandria. Three brothers, Walker, Chester and Ray Buckler and a sister, Dorothy Bluhm, died previously.

Survivors include her husband, Robert Gray of Melbourne; daughter, Destanee Baker of North Carolina; mother, Betty Jo Freeman of High Point, N.C.; father, Nathaniel DeKelaita of San Francisco; and one grandchild.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Kenneth Immergart

Survivors include her brothers, Dan Buckler and Fred Buckler and sisters, Opal Walters and Elsie Fink. Interment was in Grandview Cemetery in Mentor.

Survivors include daughter, Teena Devoto; son, Wayne Carrier; brothers, Ronald and George Tillett; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Lillian Carrier

Lanyle Gray

Lillian Gilkey Carrier, 79, of Highland Heights, died June 15, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her husband, Carl and a brother, Roy Tillett, died previously.

Lanyle Gray, 47, of Melbourne, died June 14, 2012, at her residence. She enjoyed fishing and gardening, and was a fan of University of Kentucky basketball.

Kenneth L. Immergart, 86, of Venice, Fla., formerly of Southgate, died June 16, 2012. Survivors include his wife, Julia; children, Roy, Richard, Sharyn and Debra; stepchildren, Judith and Marie; 18 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Tidewell Hospice or American Cancer Society.

Edward Jordan Edward S. “Ted” Jordan, 80, of Independence, died Monday, June 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth

See DEATHS, Page B12

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B10 Amy Nell, 34, 105 Morris Road, DUI at U.S. 27 at Highland, June 17. Fraiser Butts, 21, 969 Whirlaway Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 10 Gettysburg Square Road, June 16. James Michael Martin Richmond, 59, 1314 Findlay St., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 300 block of Elm St., June 16.

Incidents/investigations Second-degree burglary At 49 Woodfill Ave., June 15. At 38 Grandview Ave., June 15. Second-degree disorderly conduct At 128 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 15. Theft by unlawful taking At 30 Shaw Lane, June 15. At 336 River Road, June 16. Theft by unlawful taking from auto At 129 Hartweg Ave., June 11. Theft by unlawful taking, third-degree criminal mischief At 20 Hunteman Lane, June 18. Third-degree criminal mischief At Highland Hill Park, June 12.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. Marcus Johnson, 26, 882 Rockdale Ave., first-degree trafficking a controlled substance at East Sixth St., June 14. Robert Reynolds, 41, 3324 Hanna Ave., receiving stolen property at 1 Riverfront Place, June 14. Bryan Carter, 25, 4096 Dela Palma Road, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 14. Allison Angell, 35, 401 Cory Lane, theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 13. Jessica Hanna, 29, 4504 Carter Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 160 Pavilion Parkway, June 13. William Hanna, 26, 2220 Berry Road, improper registration

evading, tampering with physical evidence At 700 York St., June 11. First-degree robbery At 927 East Seventh St., June 15. At Central Avenue, June 8. Fourth-degree assault At 907 Hamlet Ally, June 11. At 221 10th St. No. 2, June 8. Fraudulent use of a credit card At Fort Beech Drive, June 8. Receiving stolen property At 1914 U.S. 27, June 8. Second-degree burglary At 429 East Fifth St., June 10. At 303 Lindsey St., June 9. At 713 Saratoga St., June 8. At 420 West Ninth St., June 6. Second-degree burglary, third-degree criminal mischief At 407 10th St., June 8. Second-degree criminal mischief At 7312 Willey Road, June 8. Theft by unlawful taking At Newport Shopping Center, June 19. At 817 Isabella St., June 10. At 160 Pavilion Parkway, June 10. At 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 8. At 109 Main St., June 9. At 160 Newport Pavilion, June 9. At 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 8.

plate, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, theft by unlawful taking at 160 Pavilion Parkway, June 13. Suzanne Smith, 31, 2823 Madison Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 1743 Newport Shopping Center, June 12. John Ande, 46, 203 Bluegrass Ave. No. 179H, fourth-degree assault at 203 Bluegrass Ave. No. 179H, June 12. Steffan Wills, 34, 211 Trapp Court, first-degree fleeing or evading, tampering with physical evidence at 700 York St., June 11. Donna Dooley, 36, 10 21St St., third-degree assault, alcohol intoxication in a public place, second-degree disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana at 636 Monmouth St., June 7. Eric Delfin, 25, 131 East 10th St. No. 1, possession of marijuana, unlawful transaction with a minor, loitering at Central Avenue, June 7. Clarence Smith, 38, 234 East Eighth St., theft by unlawful taking at 130 Pavilion Parkway, June 4.

Incidents/investigations First-degree fleeing or

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS Arrests/citations Jeffrey Hoskins, 20, 235 Salmon Pass, warrant at Alexandria Pike and Bramble, June 11. Elliott Brockman, 20, 3934 Lincoln Ave., possession of drug paraphernalia at Alexandria Pike and Bramble, June 11. Jermey Turner, 29, 2730 State Route 222 Lot 54, warrant at I-275 at I-471, June 9. Joshua Iker, 35, 1910 Hall Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-275 at I-471, June 9. Garry Bussell, 37, 219 Meadow Trail Drive, warrant at 219 Meadow Trail Drive Apt. 219, June 5. Joshua Lynch, 27, 5340 Anderson State Road, warrant, thirddegree burglary at 225 Johns Hill Road, June 1. Kevin Webster, 21, 475 Piccadilly Square C, giving officer false name or address at I-275 at I-471, May 30.

Payroll Tax

Incidents/investigations

Transfers From Other Funds

$ 395,000 $

Total Est. Revenue

$4,219,800 $3,824,800

Total Resources

$5,819,800 $5,424,800

WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed the proposed amendments to the budget, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, that: SECTION 1 - That the budget of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2011 and ending June 30, 2012 is hereby amended as follows: Resources Available: BAL. CARRIED 7/1/2011 Estimated Revenues: Property Tax

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Calin Carlisle, 28, 442 Ballyclare Terrace, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, first-degree promoting contraband, possession of marijuana at Central Ave., June 18. Mary Stull, 51, 64 Harold St., first-degree possession of a controlled substance, thirddegree possession of a controlled substance at 10th Street, June 16. Tonya Young, 22, 106 Promontory G, first-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument at 845 Monmouth St., June 16. Dushawn Sanders, 35, 310 Lindsey St., trafficking within 1,000 feet of a school at 310 Lindsey St., June 15. Deonte Pitts, 18, 5209 Carthage Ave. Apt. 2, first-degree possession of a controlled substance at East Sixth St., June 14.

The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, hereby states that on the 13th day of June, 2012, the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, adopted Ordinance No. 2012-06-02 titled O R D I NANCE REQUIRING ALL GASOLINE AND DIESEL FILLING STATIONS TO RECEIVE PREPAYMENT FOR FUEL PURCHASES. In summary this is an ordinance that mandates gasoline filling stations to require prepayment for gasoline and diesel fuel. All businesses that sell gasoline or diesel fuel shall require payment in advance of actual fuel distribution and prior to activation or authorization of any fuel dispensing unit or fuel pumping device. Exempted from the Ordinance are full service fuel stations where an attendant pumps the fuel. The Ordinance provides that a violation is a misdemeanor and the penalty for violation thereof shall be a fine of not less than one hundred ($100) dollars and no more than five hundred ($500) dollars, and/or imprisonment of not more than twelve (12) months or both. Each day of any violation shall constitute a separate offense. The occupation license of any business in violation of this Ordinance may be suspended or revoked after proper notice and a hearing before the City’s Administrative Officer. The City Clerk of the City of Bellevue hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way to inform the public of its contents. Full text of the above Ordinance is available in the Office of the Clerk-Treasurer, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky. Mary H. Scott City Clerk / Treasurer

WHEREAS, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to City Council, and

Appropriations:

General Fund

General Fund

Special Appropriations

$ 657,100 $ 645,100

Police

$1,366,360 $1,326,360

Miscellaneous Fire

$ 730,000 $ 712,320

Total Appropriations

$4,219,120 $4,149,120

Total Fund Balance

$1,522,030 $1,197,030

Rental Conversion

Off Street Parking

$ 3,900 $ 398,900

$ 40,578 $

$ 15,519 $ 9,000

$ 3,900 $ 398,900

$ 70,898 $ 30,120

$ 20,519 $ 14,000

Sewer Fund

Sewer Fund

$ 3,900 $ 398,900

Rental Conversion

$ 70,698 $ 25,000

$ 20,519 $ 10,000

$ $

$ $

-

4,000

SECTION 2 - This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, approval and publication. ATTEST: ________________________________ Mary H. Scott, City Clerk / Treasurer 1st Reading: 2nd Reading: Publication:

BY:

APPROVED AS TO FORM:

________________________ Edward Riehl, Mayor ________________________ Paul Alley, City Attorney

LEGAL NOTICE The Bellevue Board Adjustment will of hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 10, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. in the Callahan Community Center, 322 Van Voast Avenue, Bellevue, Kentucky. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: Application 12-002 submitted by Thomas New, requesting Conditional Use Light Industrial Facility located at 246 Grandview St. Bellevue, KY 41073. For more information please contact John M. Yung, Zoning Administrator, at (859) 431-8866. 1711604

LEGAL NOTICE Dollar General Partners, a general partnership, mailing adMission 100 dress Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072, hereby declares its intention(s) to apply for Malt Beverage Retail Beer license(s) no later than July 6, 2012. The business to be licensed will be located at these sites 1841 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071, 1841 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071, 4908 Mary Ingles Highway, Silver Grove, KY 41085 and 9809 US Highway 27, Alexandria, KY 41001, all doing business as Dollar General: The Principal (owner(s); Officers and Directors; Limited Partor Members) ners; are as follows: DG Strategic VI, LLC, a Tennessee limited liability company, whose officers are William C. Bass, Chief Executive Officer, John W. Feray, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Robert R. Stephenson, Secretary, all with the mailing address 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072 and DG Promotions, Inc., a Tencorporation, nessee officers are whose William C. Bass, Chief Executive Officer, John W. Feray, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Robert R. Stephenson, Secretary and whose Directors are David M. and Susan Tehle Lanigan, all with the mailing address 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic protest the may of the granting license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1711901

NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE

CE-1001712570-01

Theft by unlawful taking At 511 North Miller Ave., June 11.

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2012-06-03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY, AMENDING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2011 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2012. BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT

Legal Notice a Inc., Jazzman, CorporaKentucky tion, mailing address 1407 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, 41075, hereby KY declares intention(s) to apply for a Retail Liquor by the Drink license(s), no later than July 13, 2012. The business to be licensed will be located at 1109 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075, doing business as Fort Thomas Pizza. The (owner(s); Principal Officers and Directors; Limited Partners; or Members) are as follows: President, Peter Casey of 1407 South Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075; Joumana Secretary, Feghali of 1407 South Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY 406018400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication. 1712383

The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, certifies that he prepared the above Summary of Ordinance and that it represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the Ordinance adopted. /s/ Paul Alley City Attorney 1712562


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • JUNE 28, 2012

DEATHS CITY OF WILDER, KENTUCKY Ordinance No. 12-0601 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CITY OF WILDER, KENTUCKY’S ANNUAL BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 07/01/12 THROUGH 6/30113 BY ESTIMATING REVENUES AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF CITY GOVERNMENT. Whereas, an annual budget proposal and message has been prepared and delivered to the City Council, and Whereas, the City Council has reviewed each budget proposal and made necessary modifications: Now, Therefore be it ordained by the City of Wilder, Kentucky SECTION I General Frederick’s Municipal Construc. RESOURCES Fund Landing Road Aid Fund AVAILABLE: Fund Balance Forward 800,000 100,000 163,255 1,173,774 Estimated Revenues 1,512,000 Taxes Licenses & Permits 1,823,000 16,000 Intergovern. Revenue 64,600 60,000 Fees and Fines 1,400 Charges and Services 78,000 Other 49,960 100 Total Est. Revenues 4,328,960 116,000 60,100 16,490 Total Est. Revenues for 4,328,960 116,000 223,355 1,190,264 Appropriation APPROPRIATION: General Government Police Fire Public Works Streets Parks and Recreation Total Appropriations Excess Resources O/Appropriations

1,456,329 1,034,075 1,141,368 676,984 20,204 4,328,960

116,000 116,000

0

0

223,355 223,355

0

0 1,190,264

That this ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk. recorded and published. Same shall be in effect July 1,2012.

PASSED: June 4, 2012 at first reading PASSED: June 18, 2012 at second reading PUBLISHED: CC Recorder June 28,2010

Continued from Page B11 PUBLIC NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court at a regular meeting of the Court on Wednesday, June 20, 2012 at the Campbell County Administration Building, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading. First reading of the ordinance, with title read and summary given took place on Wednesday, May 16, 2012. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ORDINANCE NO. 0-06-12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT RELATING TO THE ANNUAL BUDGET AND APPROPRIATIONS OF CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 (FY-13) WHEREAS, the proposed budget of the Campbell County Fiscal Court was tentatively approved by the Fiscal Court on the 16th day of May 2012. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE FISCAL COURT OF CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION ONE The following budget is adopted for the fiscal year 2012-2013 (FY-13) and the amounts stated are appropriated for the purposes indicated: 01-General Fund General Government $ 3,622,250 3,173,220 Protection to Persons & Property General Health & Sanitation 467,160 Social Services 687,560 Recreation & Culture 549,220 Debt Services 972,880 Capitol Projects 481,500 Administration 3,799,210 Total General Fund 02-Road Fund Roads Debt Services Capital Projects Administration

$ 2,058,120 164,530 624,000 510,850 Total Road Fund

ATTEST:

&'#"))"%""$!(#)"

03-Jail Fund Protection to Persons and Property Debt Services Capitol Projects Administration Total Jail Fund

INVITATION TO BID Date: June 28, 2012 PROJECT: Water Main Replacement for Avon Drive and Avon Court in Ft. Mitchell, Ky. SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT:

Date: Time:

04-L.G.E.A. Fund Total L.G.E.A. Fund

75-Jail Commissary Fund Protection to Persons and Property Administration

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Roads

Total Commissary Fund

July 12, 2012 9:00 AM Local Time

Roads

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1535’ of 8” and 6” PVC water main and other related pertinent items along Avon Drive and Avon Court. There are also approximately 62 services to be installed on the new water main. The existing water main and services will be abandoned. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at:

76-Developers Road Escrow Fund Total Dev. Road Escrow Fund

86-Senior Citizens Tax Fund General Government Social Services Administration Total Senior Citizens Tax Fund 87-Mental Health Tax Fund General Government General Health and Sanitation Administration Total Mental Health Tax Fund

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Hwy. Florence, Ky. 41042

88-Payroll Tax Fund General Government Bus Services Administration

Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis:

Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) Mailing and Handling (FED EX) (if requested)

Charge $ 30.00 $ 15.00 $ 15.00

Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded.

The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated “A” by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001712469

$ 3,357,500

Leroy Kiskaden

Doris Rife

Leroy Kiskaden, 54, of Newport, June 16, 2012, at his residence. Survivors include his wife, Judy; daughters, Gina Schneider, Erica Belford and Teri Kiskaden; son, Nicholas Cope; four grandchildren; two brothers, Roger and Ricky Kiskaden; and sister, Debbie.

Elizabeth Luersen

11,000

$

11,000

$

126,800 21,870

$

148,670

$

115,000

$

115,000

$

4,000 618,350 72,920

$

695,270

Marion Lydon

$

6,000 829,000 35,200

$

870,200

$

73,000 4,581,100 212,000

$10,011,660

Total Payroll Tax Fund

$ 4,866,100

Grand Total All Funds

$33,828,400

SECTION THREE This Ordinance becomes effective upon passage and publication. ty Fiscal Court this 16th day of May Approved by the Campbell County 2012. By:_____________________________ Campbell County Judge/Executive NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY All interested persons and organizations in Campbell County are hereby notified that a copy of the County’s adopted budget in full is available for public inspection at the Office of the County Judge/ Executive during normal business hours. May 16, 2012

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– County Judge/Executive Approved as to Form and Classification Date:____________________, 2012. ______________________________ State Local Finance Officer I certify that this budget, incorporating the changes, if any, as required by the State Local Finance Officer, has been duly adopted by the Campbell County Fiscal Court of Campbell County, Kentucky on this _____ day of ____________, 2012. _______________________________ County Judge/Executive Attest: __________________________ CE-1001712539-01

June Sheanshang Reed, 87, of Cold Spring, died June 19, 2012, at Carmel Manor in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Ronald Reed and son Terry Reed, died previously. Survivors include her brotherin-law, Irvin Reed; sister-in-law, Ruth Sheanshang; and many nieces and nephews. Memorials: Point-Arc of NKY, 104 Pike St., Covington, KY, or Hospice of the Bluegrass.

$

$ 5,746,260 925,100 1,505,000 1,835,300

SECTION TWO

Date Submitted:

Fort Thomas. He was a graduate of Newport Catholic High School, a U.S. Army veteran, and a pipefitter for Cincinnati Pipefitters Local 392. Survivors include his wife, Jean Reed Jordan; daughters, Lisa Guess of Alexandria, Amy Halderman of Crittenden, Karen Thoerner of Covington and Lori Jordan of Burlington; sons, Jerry Jordan of Morning View, Tim Jordan of Crittenden and Eric Jordan of Independence; 14 grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: Family of Ted Jordan Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051 or the Alzheimer’s Association , Greater Cincinnati Chapter, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Elizabeth L. Luersen, 77, of Cold Spring, died June 16, 2012, in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and a member of St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring and volunteered at the former St. Luke Hospital. Her husband, Harold A. Luersen, died previously. Survivors include her children, Susan Luersen of Melbourne, Jim Luersen of Cold Spring, Amy Luersen of Highland Heights; sisters, Mary Vennemann of Independence, Lois Neltner of Cincinnati, Barbara Keller of Greenwood, Ind.; seven grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in the Mother of God Cemetery in Covington. Memorials: Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

This Ordinance shall be published in the Campbell County Recorder by title and summary within (30) days following adoption.

Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated “A” by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid.

$13,753,000

of Villa Hills; brother, Paul King of Bellevue; and six grandchildren. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center, 500 Ferrell Dr., Covington, Ky. 41011; Madonna Manor, 2344 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017; or the Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Marion Lydon, 90, of Alexandria, died June 20, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a retired secretary for St. Elizabeth Covington. Her husband, Joseph W. Lydon and son, Jimmy Lydon, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Patricia Heck; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Interment was in Alexandria Cemetery in Alexandria. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 85 North Grand Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Florence McCaffrey Florence Louise McCaffrey, 86, of Fort Thomas, died June 19, 2012, at Select Specialty Hospital in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her husband, Thomas McCaffrey of Fort Thomas; daughters, Debbie Bach of Fort Thomas, Patti Huismann of West Harrison, Ind., Kathy McCaffrey of Pensacola, Fla., and Becky Bursk of Anderson Township, Ohio; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; sister, Nancy Boher of Charlotte, N.C., and her brother, Ron Schaffield of Jacksonville, Fla. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Memorials: Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Greater Cincinnati, 522 Cincinnati Mills Road, Suite B248, Cincinnati, OH 45240; Carmel Manor Nursing Home, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.; or Fairhaven Rescue Mission, P.O. Box 12761, Covington, KY 41012.

Elizabeth Osterhage Elizabeth M. “Betty” Osterhage, 77, of Villa Hills, died June 18, 2012, at Madonna Manor Nursing Home in Villa Hills. She was a homemaker. Her husband, William Jr., died previously. Survivors include daughter, Barbara Rawe of Fairfield, Ohio; sons, William J. Osterhage III of Fort Wright, John P. Osterhage

June Reed

Doris Ruth Rife, 97, of Suttons Bay, formerly of Fort Thomas and Tavares, Fla., died June 10, 2012, at Tendercare of Leelanau. She enjoyed nature and was able to transfer her vision to canvas, wood, clay or needlework. Her husband, Dale Rife; son, David; sisters, Ethel Williams and Sarjenna Thompson; brothers, Van Porter and Bud Porter, died previously. Survivors include three grandchildren. Memorials: Shriners Hospitals for Children-Cincinnati Burn Unit, 3220 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229-3095.

John Rothwell John C. Rothwell, 82, of Bellevue, died June 18, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He graduated from Woodward High School and Xavier University, was a member of Divine Mercy Parish in Bellevue and while attending Xavier University, worked for the Federal Reserve in Cincinnati. He was a professor of finance at Xavier University. His wife, Rosemary Rothwell, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Beverly Rothwell of Fort Thomas and Becky Wimmers of Bellevue; and two grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Campbell County Relay for Life, In Memory of John C. Rothwell, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Frank Stadtmiller Frank Stadtmiller, 77, of Newport, died March 10, 2012, at St. Elizabeth. He was a lithographer with Steinhauser, and enjoyed his farm, hunting and camping. His wife, Martha; four sisters, Marie Welsh, Laverne Donlin, Margret Zeigler, and Julia Gladson; and brothers, Bob Stadtmiller and Bill Stadtmiller, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Jeffrey Stadtmiller of Fort Wright and Chris Stadtmiller of Newport; daughters, Lisa Stadtmiller of Newport and Patty Seifert of Alexandria; sisters, Catherine Bonhaus and Barb Johnson, both of Cold Spring; and four grandchildren. The body was donated to University of Cincinnati Medical Center. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY. 41017.

Elaine Tiemeier Elaine Viola Tiemeier, 91, of Alexandria, died June 15, 2012, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. She was a cashier and accountant for Super X Drugs. Her husband, George “Yatz” Tiemeier, a daughter, Sue Ann Dorgan; three brothers, Charles Spreter, Harry Spreter and Morris Spreter; and sister, Florence Myers, died previously. Survivors include, sons, Kenneth Tiemeier of Newport and Don Tiemeier of Alexandria; daughter, Linda Boimann of Erlanger; 11 grandchildren; and 28 great-grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Joseph Cemetery in Cold Spring. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.


XU

1/2

OFF U.S.A.! + for made in the

delivery

WE PAY YOUR SALES TAX!

Buy items made in America and receive 1/2 off your delivery fees!

+ 48 _& a'

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

MONTHS!*

You will receive a discount equal to the amount of your sales tax.

Dura Espresso

Assembled A bl d in the USA!

Hogan

onn pu purc purchases cha hase sess of $$3500 se 35500 oorr mo more re m made ad adee oonn your Furniture Fair Gold Card through July 9th, 2012. 25% deposit required. (not eligible for credit promotion) .&!%+ ,123 *()"0+/ payments required. Account fees apply. 633-"-()%+ ,)%)52 ('"-()# %4%-+%$+2 -) store. See store for details

YOUR CHOICE ^_-D YPTDH(H(L X'N-! "!!P)+DPR H( aJP VX"2

$498

b>

Made M d iin th the USA!

Shown in merlot. Also available in white and cherry CDDH(La'( `'DDPTaH'( Z_PP( XH<P bPR

$697

8-RP H( VX"2 ;(TD_RP!* %_PP( !H<P JP-R+'-#R1 N''a+'-#R -(R #-HD!

Ask about our Interior Design Services and Locations Ohio, call 513-774-9700 or in Kentucky, 859-572-6800 and talk to one of our designers!

proud sponsor of the Cincinnati Redsâ&#x201E;˘ $ `\9^ X[Y;7?1 :6 $ C"XW?"WC

QIU, "DP@-(R#H- [HEP OQKQ C-!aL-aP X%. ^#H]P

GMF0MIS0KG,, MUQ0IMQ0GMMM

$ CY9"7?CY `DP-#-(TP `P(aP# $ A";YA;C9^ $ A;C9^X CYWC9

QFQS ^H@HP =B> IS,, ^H@HP =B> 5Ya O4 FMFU AHPDR! C#aPD YR.

GMF0QOS0ISSU MUQ0GIO0MMMQ MUQ0IIO0FMFU

OUR DELIVERY GUARANTEE

We will e-mail you with a two hour window for delivery. If we are late for your delivery, you will receive a Gift Card for the amount of your delivery charge. You can also go to our website and click on the blue truck in the top right hand corner. You will need the 11 digit sales order number from your original sales receipt.

$ A9\YC7`C1 :63 M,UM ='_!a'( YR $ 7\YW=?"WC GIK, `'DP#-H( "]P. * Also features a Thomasville store

MSM0IFUU GMF0MSM0IFUU MUQ0QGM0KK,,

convenient budget terms

,KSGUS C7Z/`[

Prior Sales Excluded. +With credit approval for qualifying purchases made on the Furniture Fair Gold Card. Monthly payments equal to the promotional purchase amount divided by 48 months are required until expiration but no interest will be assessed if all minimum monthly payments on account, including debt cancellation, paid when due. If account goes 60 days past due, promo may be terminated early and standard account terms will apply. As of 06-28-2012 Purchase APR 29.99% Penalty APR 29.99% Monthly maintenance fee $0.99 each month account has balance$11.88 maximum annually. Minimum interest $2.00 Existing cardholders refer to your current credit agreement for rates and terms . Offer valid for consumer accounts in good standing; is subject to change without notice; see store for details. Offer expires 7/9/2012. May not be combined with any other credit promotion offer. Discontinued and clearance merchandise excluded from promotions and credit term offers. Not responsible for typographical errors.

CE-0000513963


S2

1/2

OFF U.S.A.! + for made in the

delivery

WE PAY YOUR SALES TAX!

Buy items made in America and receive 1/2 off your delivery fees!

+ 48 up to

NO INTEREST if paid in full in

You will receive a discount equal to the amount of your sales tax.

MONTHS!*

onn purchases purcha pu chase sess of $3500 $3500 500 00 or or more mooree made m e on mad ma on your Furniture Fair Gold Card through July 9th, 2012. 25% deposit required. (not eligible for credit promotion) .&!%+ ,123 *()"0+/ payments required. Account fees apply. 633-"-()%+ ,)%)52 ('"-()# %4%-+%$+2 -) store. See store for details

M d in Made i OHIO!

Amish Handcrafted Headboards Starting as low as

$199

Made M d in i the th USA!

Atwood 5pc Casual Dining Set

Made in the USA!

American Hardwoods pedestal table with matching side chairs

$787

Made in USA! Includes: double pedestal table and four castered arm chairs

Made in USA!

Design your own dining room! Choose your own wood, style, and hardware!

American Hardwoods 60â&#x20AC;? gathering table with matching side chairs

Shown with optional underbed storage unit.

Made in USA! available in

Solid oak, cherry, & maple!

CE-0000513962

Made in the USA!

Solid Wood Twin over Twin Bunk Bed

Made in USA!

$199


T1

30 to

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5petc

e stor the n e o d i S s k in VALUE rt, c e lA Ch REAT Wal ry for G a Rugs, ccesso e A r A nd ps a ems! Lam It

5 pc bedroom

s

dresser, mirror & queen size bed, (headboard, footboard and rails)

*2I@FI<> ;2IIC 61#G2F +1C@>I I2@ 6>1C>=!A 1@ 2I$ 1@ '''''''''''''''''''''''' '

5 pc dinette

Pub table with four matching stools

,1>>CF@@F@ 6>1C>=!A 1@ 2I$ 1@'''''''''''''''''''''''' '

5petc s

6ID1@ 1@ 2I$ 1@'''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '

OUR DELIVERY GUARANTEE

Real hometown people... Real fair prices...

Real brand names... Guaranteed LOWEST PRICES!

We will e-mail you with a two hour window for delivery. If we are late for your delivery, you will receive a Gift Card for the amount of your delivery charge. You can also go to our website and click on the blue truck in the top right hand corner. You will need the 11 digit sales order number from your original sales receipt.

CE-0000513964

convenient budget terms

www.furniturefair.net

062812ENQ CP


T2

30 to

$ )DFAGG# 9:A!;<:AD $ ';!;!? 8GG# 9:A!;<:AD $ 4GB/> $ (=/;A> $ ';!D<<D> $ 1G#D @B5HD $ */<<AD>>D>

$ -;F> 8GG# 9:A!;<:AD $ @HH/>;G!/0 </.0D> $ 1G#D +HHD!<> /!F *GAD% $ ,;#;<DF C:/!<;<;D> $ /00 ;<D#> >G0F 6/> & ;>2 $ */!" @!D&GB&/&3;!F ;<D#> $ /00 >:.7DH< <G EA;GA >/0D

7petc

2pc

s

7 pc bedroom set

dresser, mirror, queen size bed,(headboard, footboard and rails) drawer chest and matching nightstand

Recliners

starting as low as

CE-0000513961

set

2 pc sofa and matching loveseat sets as low as

Sofas... starting at

campbell-community-recorder-062812  

Vol.16No.19 ©2012TheCommunityRecorder A LL R IGHTS R ESERVED News.........................283-0404 Retailadvertising .......513-768-8196 Cla...

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