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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Patrick Dougherty

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate Volume 14, Number 8 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

Web site: NKY.com B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

T h u r s d a y, A p r i l 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

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Cold Spring man in running for TV ad

Online community

Find your community’s Web site by visiting NKY.com/ community and looking for “Community News” near the top of the page. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool.

Petting zoo attracts wildlife

Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo, in its 12th year as a haven for animals big and small, opens April 15 this year with an unplanned attraction of a wildlife rookery of a nesting colony of great blue herons. Wanda Wanner and Buddy Teke keep the farm at 3269 Koehler Road in California. The nesting colony of great blue herons in the tops of trees lining one of the farm fields has been a surprise that’s been growing in recent years and has grown over several years from five to 14 and finally 21 nests by this spring. LIFE, B1

Candidate forum set

A candidate forum for the county commission race and debate for judge-executive hopefuls in Campbell County will be held April 28 at the Southgate Community Center, 301 W. Walnut St. in Southgate. The commission forum is scheduled for 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by the judgeexecutive debate from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. The forums are sponsored by the Community Recorder, Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Legacy, The Kentucky Enquirer and NKY.com. There is no charge for the event.

Election deadline

The deadline for all letters or guest column submissions concerning the May 18 primary is noon Thursday, May 6. The limit for letters is 200 words; for guest columns, 500 words. Guest columns must include a color head shot. E-mail letters and columns to mshaw@nky.com, or mail to Campbell County Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017. E-mail is preferred. We will post all letters and columns that we can confirm at nky.com, and print as many as space allows in the Campbell Community Recorder.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

PROVIDED

Jelly bean math

Sixth grade students at St. Joseph, Cold Spring traditionally celebrate spring by spending one class doing “jelly bean math.” Using jelly beans, the students weigh, measure, estimate, and figure percents and enjoy math. Jessica Appel, Jackson Crawford and Kristen Schack are working on their jelly bean math.

Attorney’s race features primary contest By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Attorney candidates Chris Macke and Steve Franzen will face each other in the May 18 primary for the right to be the Republican candidate in November to challenge Democrat Jim Daley, the incumbent, for the job. Daley was appointed to the post in December 2008 after Justin Verst retired from the office. Franzen, 54, of Newport, said he sees the office as the most important legal position in the county, and that his experience with cases in areas where the county attorney works makes him uniquely qualified. Macke, 46, of Newport, said he thinks he thinks there needs to be a difference in the philosophy of government and he wants to keep taxes and government expenditures to a minimum. Franzen said his experience includes five years as an assistant Campbell County Attorney where he prosecuted and tried jury cases and 23 years as the city attorney for Highland Heights where he has helped the city go through bonding issues for property and buildings. “All these are things that the county attorney does,” he said. Franzen said he’s worked, tried and defended cases include planning and zoning cases, nursing home cases, employment cases, Civil Rights actions, nursing home cases, employment cases, medical malpractice, and complex criminal law cases as a prosecutor and defense attorney, Franzen said. “I’m not exaggerating when I say, … if you do not have the required experience and understanding of those issues, it can

Franzen

Macke

cost the county a lot of money both in civil litigation and loss of criminal prosecutions,” he said. Franzen said he wants the county to take a very serious look at becoming self-insured, which could save $100,000 or more annually. “In order to do that the county attorney has to be comfortable with litigating these types of issues, which I have,” he said. Franzen said he also wants to work with parents willing to pay their child support, while stepping up enforcement to make sure parents are paying for their children’s care. Franzen said he doesn’t believe the election for county attorney should be a partisan race, but he feels strongly the office needs to be accountable to the public. “I do believe that the county attorney should be elected, the county attorney must be independent of the judge-executive and the county commissioners,” he said. Macke, an attorney since 1993, said he has primarily spent his career in civil and business law dealing with real estate transactions, zoning and variances and representing corporations. “Obviously there’s competence in each of the three candidates,” Macke said. “But, I come at it strictly from a private enterprise standpoint.”

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While recognizing the office is not part of the elected body of Fiscal Court, the county attorney still has a role to play in saving county money, he said. Macke said he might have offered the county a different legal opinion about the county’s new building in Newport that’s led to litigation and expenses. “If I thought that there was a possibility of litigation we could have thought out the whole Tim Nolan lawsuit and saved a whole bunch of money,” he said. Macke said one of the most important developments going on in the county is Ovation, the $1 billion mixed-use residential and commercial/retail area planned on Newport’s riverfront by Corporex CEO Bill Butler. “I would like to be in the conversation about gambling if gambling is ever approved in the General Assembly and bringing that to the riverfront with Bill Butler,” Macke said. On other issues, Macke said he’s done work in juvenile court and wants to see a more punitive approach for parents who don’t take an active interest in their children’s education, and he wants to prosecute more DUI cases for more than the minimum fine instead of pleading the case out. “A lot of the times the defendants can pay more than the minimums and should pay more than the minimums,” Macke said. But Macke said his main mission is to be involved in the county’s conversations about spending money and advising conservative spending. “I’ll always be the stick in the mud advising Fiscal Court about spending tax payer money, and I think that’s OK,” he said.

Cold Spring resident Jacob Dougherty is quite a character, and is out to prove he’s the right person to sell insurance on television. Progressive has selected Dougherty, 21, as one of the 10 finalists out of more than 2,500 entries for the “Help Flo” video Visit contest. Flo is the name www.help of the character flo.com. selling insurance in a Progressive’s ad Voting campaign, and the will contest is for a continue chance to appear in a commercial with through her as her helper. May 3. D o u g h e r t y ’s video features him seamlessly transitioning from accents and costumes starting with a stereotypical gritty New York City resident to a cowboy hat southern-drawl talking gentleman and a proper British gent. Dougherty said he started practicing accents for his mother when he was as young as 6 years old. “I can do pretty much any accent,” he said. After seeing the opportunity to enter the commercial audition contest in January, Dougherty said he decided to write out a creative script and use some of the accents he uses most frequently around his friends. “I’ve always had a passion for acting, and have never had an opportunity to purse it,” he said. Dougherty said he has always worked at being creative and he records his own comedy songs. Dougherty said does parodies in every musical genre from metal to country. “Because they’re funny songs, I pretty much do everything I do acoustically,” he said. Dougherty’s mother, Diana Rebholz of Grant’s Lick, said her son has always had a flair for the creative, and that he created the video with help from two of his friends. After attending school for audio and visual production, he now works for a bank full-time, owns a recording studio and plays in a band in his spare time, Rebholz said. “He’s always been very very good at portraying different accents and playing different characters,” she said. To watch Dougherty’s video and cast a vote for him to be one of the three winners to receive a casting call audition visit www.helpflo.com. Voting will continue through May 3. After May 3, the finalists will be announced and auditions will be before the end of May.

START BUILDING © 2009 CareerBuilder, LLC. All rights reserved.


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Campbell Community Recorder

News

April 15, 2010

County leaves position open for savings By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Fiscal Court announced at the April 7 meeting temporary plans for managing the duties of the human services director position left vacant by the retirement of Pat Dressman. Dressman of Independence, retired March 30 from the Campbell County position she worked in for 11 years to continue her campaign for a Kenton County commissioner spot. Campbell County judgeexecutive Steve Pendery said Dressman has been in charge of one of the best attended and most awarded-winning senior centers in Kentucky during her tenure. Dressman has also distributed funds from mental health and retardation and senior citizens taxes in a fashion that does the most good, he said. After Dressman was honored with a retirement ceremony during the April 7 meeting, a new part-time position was added to handle some of Dressman’s duties. Katie Tallon, Dressman’s intern for the past two years, will be the new part-time human service

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery shakes hands with Pat Dressman as he presents her with a retirement gift, a watch and thank you letter, for her 11 years as human services director for the county, during the April 7 Fiscal Court meeting. specialist. Dressman said a person can only succeed if they have a good staff and invited Marsha Dufeck, director of the senior center; Sarah Ritchie, health and wellness coordinator at the senior center; and Tallon, to stand with her during her retirement ceremony. “It’s been a pleasure to

serve Campbell County all these years, and I’m sure Katie will do a good job,” Dressman said. “She’s doing a good job already as a student intern.” Tallon’s position will be limited to 100 hours a month at a pay rate of $15.72 an hour, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. Tallon’s job

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will include reviewing and paying monthly claims from social service agencies, Horine said. She’ll also be the point of contact for the agencies and work on troubleshooting and finding solutions to problems, working in concert with the social agencies, he said. Horine said there was no recommendation to fill the director’s position anytime soon, which including salary and benefits costs the county about $80,000 per year. “By saving money in

Why the retirement?

Pat Dressman spent 11 years as director of human services for Campbell County before retiring March 30. Dressman said she resigned after asking the U.S. Office of Special Counsel for a consultation about her candidacy for Kenton County commissioner. After the consultation, Dressman was given until the end of March to either withdraw from the race or resign her position because the candidacy was in violation of the Hatch Act. State and local employees, except school officials, are prohibited from political activity if their work involves programs financed with federal money according to the agency. The May 18 Republican primary will feature three candidates Dressman of Independence, incumbent commissioner Sara Reeder Voelker of Taylor Mill, and former state Rep. Jon Draud of Edgewood. The winner will face Democrat Tom Elfers of Edgewood in the November general election. this regard, we’re able to dedicate more funds to the delivery of services,” Horine said. Since the economy has taken Campbell County’s unemployment rate from 5 percent to 11 percent, the county is now receiving less from mental health and retardation and senior citizens payroll tax revenue, he said. “And in an economic downturn, the demand for those services don’t go down, they go up,” he said. Social services have already been told this year to expect a 5 percent funding cut, Horine said. The county also approved the 2011 overall funding for the two funds at the April 7 meeting. The Mental Health/Mental Retardation funds allocated were $792,740, and the Senior Citizens Tax allocated was $488,160. Services covered from the two payroll taxes

include everything from the Meals on Wheels for seniors program and adult daycare to school-based health programs in Newport and programs at children’s homes. Horine said the county will leave the director position open as long as possible. “But, I don’t think we’ll leave it open for a full year,” he said. Horine said the county already has left positions vacant in other areas to save money during the past year including two police officer job, five jail jobs, and one administration job. Horine said Marsha Dufeck, director of the senior center in Highland Heights, will take a greater responsibility for managing the center and Tallon will take over some of Dressman’s other duties. “Employees are stepping up to do what they need to do to make sure services are continued,” Horine said.

BRIEFLY Campbell officials to visit libraries

Kentucky State Senator Katie Stine, State Representative Joe Fisher, State Representative Tom McKee, Campbell County Judge Executive Steve Pendery and Campbell County Commissioner Ken

Rechtin will be visiting with the public at the Campbell County Public Libraries Monday, April 19 through Wednesday, April 21. The five elected officials will be on hand to help patrons check out library materials and informally talk with the public over coffee

COMMUNITY RECORDER

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue – nky.com/ Cold Spring – nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights – nky.com/highlandheights Newport – nky.com/newport Southgate – nky.com/southgate Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

and cookies. The public is invited to meet their elected representatives for informal conversation during their visits. Stine will be at all three library locations on Tuesday, April 20 starting at 9:30 a.m. at the Newport branch, 10:45 a.m. at the Fort Thomas branch and 1:15 p.m. at the Cold Spring branch. Fischer will be at the Fort Thomas branch at 6 p.m. Monday, April 19. McKee will be at the Cold Spring branch at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 21. Pendery will be at the Cold Spring branch at 3:30 p.m. Monday, April 19, and Rechtin will be at the Newport branch at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 21. Each officials will be at the library for about an hour.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B9 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A9 Viewpoints ................................A12

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News

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

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Police handgun explodes while firing at target range By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

New guns are on order in Alexandria after a handgun issued to an officer of the Alexandria Police Department exploded in his hands on the firing range. The officer is all right now, but he broke his index finger and received burns to both hands from the March 24 incident, said Chief Mike Ward. “He’s back to work, and he’s doing OK,” Ward said of the officer. The officer missed a couple of days of work while having an orthopedic surgeon look at the finger. “He’s just damn lucky that it didn’t come back and hit him in the face or get him in his eyes,” Ward said. Ward said the officer told him the explosion felt like someone dropped a 10

PROVIDED

An Alexandria Police photo of the broken firing mechanism from the Glock .45 caliber handgun that exploded in an officer’s hands while shooting it at a firing range March 24. pound sledge hammer on his hands. Until the explosion, Ward said he was unaware there were ever any issues with the Glock .45 caliber handguns that all 14 offi-

cers in the city are issued, he said. The guns, some 10 years old, were all every well maintained, Ward said. There are .45 caliber guns built as long ago as World

War II that still work very well, he said. “There was absolutely no reason that should ever have happened,” Ward said. It’s believed the explosion was the result of some combination of weapon and ammunition failure, Ward said. There’s no way to determine with certainty the weapon was the only thing at fault, he said. But the bottom of the breach blew out, and it blew out the side of the weapon, he said. “And it was a mess, and it just should not have happened,” Ward said. Ward said it was only after the explosion did he learn that other police agencies in the U.S. have had similar problems, but he’s never seen any official advisory. So, the department is trading in its Glock hand-

guns as part of a purchase of new Sig Sauer .45 caliber and 9 millimeter handguns for the officers, he said. With the trade in, the cost will be about $4,000, and the department expects to have the new handguns by the end of April, Ward said. Ward said in his career shooting multiple weapons in both the military and in police service, he’s never had a gun blow up before. When it comes to police equipment, having a car and a weapon that are as close to 100 percent reliability as possible is of the utmost importance, he said. “Those are two things that could kill us or take someone else’s life, so we felt it was best that we replace them,” Ward said. Ward said the department just couldn’t take a chance with the existing

PROVIDED

An Alexandria Police Department photo of the Glock .45 caliber handgun that exploded in officer’s hand while shooting it at a firing range March 24. guns. “When they (officers) pull it out they don’t need to second guess whether it’s going to go off or not,” he said.

BRIEFLY Perry re-appointed to state real estate commission

Ken Perry of Alexandria, has been re-appointed to serve another four year term on the Kentucky Real Estate Commission. Perry is the owner and broker of Ken Perry Realty in Cold Spring, Gov. Steve Perry Beshear’s reappointment of Perry to the commission was effective March 10. The appointment will expire Oct. 1, 2013. The commission is tasked with protecting the public interest through the regulation of state

licensing and the education of real estate brokers and sales associates. Perry is a former member of the board of directors for Northern Kentucky Multiple Listing Service, and is a past president of the Re/Max Broker’s Council. He’s previously served on Alexandria City Council, a city where he still lives with his wife Mary Beth and daughter Jessica. Before founding Ken Perry Realty in 2002, he worked as both a sales associate and broker for a variety of sales companies.

Emergency planning course

The Campbell County Office of Emergency Management is hosting a planning course for professions including health care, school admin-

istrators and police and fire first responders. The Implementing Continuity of Operations Planning Course will be in H Highland Heights April 21-22. The University of Maryland’s Center for Health and Homeland Security is giving the training. The training is designed to help officials create plans as part of catastrophic event preparedness. The primary audience for the course includes: emergency medical agencies, emergency medical services, fire service, governmental administrative, hazardous material, health care, law enforcement, public health, public safety communications, school administrators and public works. Registration is available online at https://ky.train.org/DesktopShell.as

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px under reference course number 1019941. For information call William R. Turner, director of Campbell County Office of Emergency Management at 547-3150.

Board of health meeting

The District Director of Health Search Committee of the Northern Kentucky District Board of Health will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, April 19, in the Executive Conference Room, at the Health Department’s District Office, 610 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, Ky.

Diabetes workshop

For those with diabetes or prediabetes, the Northern Kentucky Health Department’s diabetes pro-

gram is holding a free workshop to learn more about the disorder. The workshop will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 24, at the Southern Campbell County Firehouse, 1050 Race Track Road, in Alexandria. Lunch will be provided free of charge. Registration is required. Topics will include: what is diabetes, healthy eating, complications and more. The workshop will be led by a registered nurse and a registered dietitian from the Health Department. To register for the workshop, or for more information about the workshop or the Health Department’s diabetes control program, call Jan Lazarus at 859-363-2116 or Joan Geohegan at 859-363-2115, or visit www.nkyhealth.org.

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CCF Recorder

News

April 15, 2010

Register to vote by April 19 for primary

Kentuckians who wish to vote in the upcoming May 18 primary election only have a few more days to register to vote. The deadline to register for the upcoming May primary is Monday, April 19. County clerks’ offices throughout Kentucky will accept voter registration cards until the close of business that day. A postmark of April 19 is also required for all mail-in

Efforts to fight swine flu honored

voter registration applications. Registration cards can be obtained over the Internet at www.vote.ky.gov/ register. Also, minors who are 17 years old but will be 18 years old on or before the general election (Nov. 2) are eligible to register and entitled to vote in the upcoming primary but are not eligible to vote in special elections unless they are 18 years old.

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The swine flu vaccination campaign in the fall 2009 and winter 2010 was unlike any challenge ever faced by the Northern Kentucky Health Department. Thousands of residents received the vaccine, many through community vaccination clinics. The Health Department’s vaccination efforts would not have been successful without the support of two groups: the Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps and TANK. For their assistance, both groups are being recognized with the 2010 Award of Excellence in Public Health. The awards presentation took place during the Kentucky Outreach and Information Network luncheon April 13 at Receptions in Erlanger. Seventy-four members of the Medical Reserve Corps responded to the

swine flu vaccination effort. They functioned in a number of capacities including data entry, clerical support, flow support, medical screening of clients, medical triage, vaccine administrative support, vaccine administration and exit evaluation. “The Medical Reserve Corps members were a vital component of our community response,” said Jennifer Hunter, director of clinical services, in her nomination. “They jumped in to the roles assigned to them with true dedication, smiling faces and an overall positive attitude. They adjusted to whatever came their way, changed roles when needed and were complimented by many internal staff and public. They melded into our team with ease and held our goals as theirs.” TANK provided shuttle bus service

for four community flu vaccination clinics. Their leadership was quick to join the response efforts, and performed the preliminary work on routes to be taken and coordinated dropoff/pick-up scheduling. “The bus drivers could not have been more cordial and accommodating,” said Steve Divine, director of environmental health and safety, in his nomination. “Not only did they perform their duties with high marks, but they also understood the overall mission of protecting the public’s health by taking part in these events.” The Award of Excellence in Public Health is presented each spring to honor those people or organizations in Northern Kentucky who have shown progress toward achieving and maintaining a healthier community.

NKADD seeks nominations for annual awards The Northern Kentucky Area Development District is seeking nominations for the principal recognition made at the NKADD annual meeting. In preparation for the 2010 event scheduled for Aug. 16, nominations are being solicited for the following awards:

• The Intergovernmental Awards are designed to recognize contributions in the public arena and for the public good. • Two Intergovernmental Unity of Effort awards will be presented, one to an individual and one to an organization.

• The Community Leadership Award is reserved for a non-public individual or organization contributing either to the public or private sectors. • The Volunteer Award will also be presented. Nominees will be required to complete a form

provided by the NKADD Awards Committee. Nominations should be made by visiting www.nkadd.org. The criteria for each award can also be found at the NKADD Web site. The deadline for nominations is July 16. Call Robert Schrage at 859-283-1885.

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News

April 15, 2010

CCF Recorder

A5

Everything Pets Expo brings pets and their people together Animal Communicator Donetta Zimmerman was there doing animal psychic readings, there were agility demonstrations with dogs running obstacle courses and discussions about the suitability of exotic animals for pets.

By Marsie Hall Newbold kynews@communitypress.com

Dr. Doolittle wasn’t the only one “talking to the animals” this past weekend at the Duke Energy Convention Center at the Everything Pets Expo, a pet-centric trade show offering education, entertainment and equipment. Animal Communicator Donetta Zimmerman was there doing animal psychic readings, there were agility demonstrations with dogs running obstacle courses, discussions about the suitability of exotic animals for pets and “Ultimate Air Dogs” competing to see who could leap the furthest into a pool. Attendees were taught how to make home-baked treats, “makeovers” turned dogs from “dingy to dazzling” and representatives of The Late Show with David Letterman were there to audition local house pets for upcoming “Stupid Pet Tricks“ segments. “We’re having a great time,” said Angela Cooney of Bethel who was attending with husband, Anthony and their children Livie, 5, and Max, 2. She was holding Max up so he could gently stroke the nose of one of the Cincinnati Police Department’s Mounted Patrol Squad horses. This was the family’s second visit to the show. “This is a great event,” she said. “We came a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it, so now we’re back. The main thing we wanted to see were the ‘Fly

MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD/CONTRIBUTOR

Left to right: Pam Elliott and Jeane Doan with Lily, Rosie and Cassidy.

Pet aFair

The Pet WOW of Highland Heights will be sponsoring “It’s a Pet aFair” for all pet owners of the Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati area from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 24, at Gil Lynn Park, 201 Green Devil Lane, in Dayton. The PT Cruiser club, Cincinnati Cruisers and Cincy Custom Street Machines will be holding their car shows along with the pet fair. This is a one day event/festival for them and their pets. All proceeds from this event will go to the SAAP (Stray Animal Adoption Program) in Northern Kentucky. The fair is to help educate owners about their pets and to let them know what rescues and resources that are available to pet owners when they want to adopt a pet or when they can now longer keep one. To help teach responsible pet ownership. Dogs.’ They are pretty amazing and it seems like a lot of fun. Our Border Collie,

MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD/ CONTRIBUTOR

Elizabeth Stevens and Cocoa the Umbrella Cockatoo. Zellie is 4 months old now and really likes Frisbees and jumping, so we’re thinking about getting her into something like that.” Anthony Cooney believes that it is good for kids to interact with pets.

The family owns three dogs, three horses and three cats. “It helps to build character,” he said. “It teaches them responsibility and makes them happier throughout their lives.” Pam Elliot and Jeane Doan of Guilford, Ind. were all smiles as they perused the aisles tightly holding the leashes of Lily, Rosie and Cassidy, three friendly and fluffy Japanese Chin dogs. They were here to volunteer time working at the West Chester based “Lucky Chin” rescue group booth. “It’s great to see all of these pet people together at one time,” said Elliott, straightening the squirming Lily’s colorful bandana. Self-professed “dog people,” they also own two Boxers. “When the doorbell rings at our house it is pretty exciting,” Doan said, chuckling, “All you hear is barking and us yelling, ‘Shut up, shut up, stop, stop…stop!’”

Over at the “Bird Fever” exotic bird store booth fourth-grader Elizabeth Stevens, 9, of Springdale was cradling Cocoa, a white Umbrella Cockatoo. She was attending the expo with her Aunt, Sylvia Bain of Green Township. “I love animals,” she said, grinning and complying as her feathery pal stretched out a wing indicating that was where she’d like to be rubbed. “I don’t have a lot of pets right now, just a Bearded Dragon named Spike and

Miranda, who is a Hound mix.” What the little girl likes most about pets is, “Even if I want to be alone I can still be with them and talk to them. They always listen, you know?” Stevens believes that kindness matters. “It’s important to always take good care of them,” she said. “What you do for them may come back to you; because someday you may be need to be taken care of yourself.”

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SCHOOLS A6

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

School brings little ones safety lessons

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Each year Campbell Ridge Elementary schools its youngest students in a few basic safety lessons. During the school’s annual kindergarten health and safety fair Wednesday, April 7, students were fingerprinted by police for help if they are ever reported missing, and they learned to stop, drop and roll with the assistance of a firefighter. They also received instructional tips about

everything from slopping on sunscreen to protect against the sun to hands-on lessons about bus safety and dental hygiene. In previous years the event was always done in conjunction with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and featured bicycle safety and further healthrelated lessons, said Linda Hardy, the school nurse. Hardy said because of the economy and the need to trim expenses, the cost to transport the equipment like bicycles and helmets from

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Eric Wachter, 5, has his hands cleaned of finger print ink by Ray Stacy, an Alexandria Police Department Volunteer In Police Service (VIPS) during the Campbell Ridge Elementary School Kindergarten Health and Safety Fair Wednesday April 7.

Cincinnati Children’s was too much. So, instead there is a greater emphasis on local police, firefighters, the school staff and local dental representatives, Hardy said. “Basically we’re getting the same information across, but we’re doing it for less,” she said. Michelle McGrath, a dental hygienist for Highland Heights dentist David M. Rider, showed the kindergartners how to use a tooth brush using a stuffed animal. McGrath also taught the children about why they need to brush their teeth after eating, especially after a sugary sweet. Remember that the dentist is there to help you, and it’s fun and isn’t scary, McGrath said to the children. “Nobody ever told me that when I was little,” she said. Hardy and other staff members at the school led students through lessons about preventing sun damage to skin and eyes. Students learned the lessons of “slip, slop, slap and wrap,” Hardy said. The emphasis of the saying is to slip on a long

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Saying “ahhh,” Morgan Knight, 6, far left and Michelle McGrath, far right, a dental hygienist for dentist David M. Rider in Highland Heights, talk together about cleaning teeth during the Campbell Ridge Elementary School Kindergarten Health and Safety Fair Wednesday, April 7. From left of Knight are kindergartners Elizabeth Scales and Isaiah Sims. sleeve shirt, slop on some sun screen, slap on a hat and wrap on some sunglasses, she said. There are other annual health events at Campbell Ridge for all students including the Healthy Challenge to teach children about eating five fruits and vegetables a day, Hardy

Schools share summer camp activities at fair

cmayhew@nky.com

FILE

During a week-long soccer camp at Edward S. Pendery Sports Park in Melbourne July 18, 2009, instructor Joseph Kinch, left, moves the ball in for Bradley Pangburn, right, 7, of Alexandria, to practice kicking it away from a player. with 1-3 years experience July 26-30 from 9 a.m. to noon, two other youth strings camps, and an “audition boot camp” Aug. 21-22 offered through NKU. For information visit http://musicprep.nku.edu/s ummer.htm. Plum Creek Christian Church in Butler is offering weekly “Creative Kids Academy” summer camps with themes ranging from “Adventures in Art” to “Wild, Wild West” depending on the week. Children can come to the K-12 grades camps for one week or all of them, said Jared Perkins, children’s minister for Plum Creek. Each camp includes a hot lunch every day and

most weekly camps will have a field trip with a bag lunch on one of the dates, Perkins said. State assistance is also available to qualified applicants, he said. Camps begin the week of June 7-11 with “Down on the Farm” and conclude with the final camp “The Great Outdoors” Aug. 9-13. For information visit www.plumcreek.org. The Creative Kids Academy registration forms and information are under the Christian daycare and preschool link of the Children’s ministry section. Linda Cross, the Family Resource Center coordinator for Grant’s Lick and Reiley elementary schools, said it’s the second year for the community camp and recre-

and safety to the children at a very early age, Hardy said. They get to meet people like a person from the dentist office and from police and fire agencies in the process, she said. “It’s just to help the kids know that the fireman is there to help them, it’s not a scary person,” Hardy said.

More camp connections

By Chris Mayhew

As the school year nears its conclusion it’s time to book it – but only when it comes to summer camps and activities. Campbell County Schools’ Family Resource Centers gathered more than 25 camp and activity opportunities in one place April 8 for a community camp and recreation fair at the Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service office in Highland Heights. Local camps included everything from sports and outdoor camps to a learning Spanish and a “Survivor Camp” based on the reality television show of the same name. In addition to regular private music lessons offered at Northern Kentucky University for students, there are several music-related camps, said Toni W. Sheffer, director of the music preparatory department. One of the most popular is the June 14-18 or July 12-16 “Theatre Works” musical theater and drama camp for ages 7-15, Sheffer said. The point is to come and have fun and with handson learning in musical theater, she said. “It’s educational, but it’s also just good summer fun,” Sheffer said. There are also summer strings camp for players

said. There was also a Diabetes walk for students this year, and there is always a health and safety fair for fifth-graders on subjects ranging from hygiene to staying away from downed power lines, she said. But, the kindergarten event is a way to get basic information about health

ation fair and this year’s had more booths. It’s onestop shopping, Cross said. “I think it just gives parents a good idea of what’s out there,” Cross said. Eric Bihl of Claryville brought his 14-year-old daughter Cammy to the April 8 event. Cammy said she just wanted to see if there was something fun to do and hadn’t decided upon a camp or activity. Cammy is already involved in 4-H activities including the 4-H teen summit, Eric said. But, Eric said his daughter is always looking for something to do in the summer. “She’s always interested in outside stuff,” he said.

In case you didn’t make it to the April 8 Community Camps and Recreation Fair in Highland Heights, The Community Recorder has you covered with information from the event. Other camps and activities being promoted at the event include: • Town & Country Sports & Health Club offers a more than a dozen weekly activities ranging from soccer camps to a magic camp for ages 8-12, and a “Dinosaur Cartoon” art camp for ages 6-12. for information visit www.towncountrysports.com. • Campbell County Schools’ “Hablemos espanol! Let’s speak Spanish” camp from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 7-11 for students entering grades 4-6. Camp tuition is $75. For information contact Toni Schneller, Spanish teacher at Campbell County High School, and foreign language department chair at 635-4161. • Campbell Ridge Elementary School’s “Survivor Camp” for students entering grades 4-5 is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 19-23. The cost is $75. For information call Ashley Ritchie at 448-4780. • “Around the World in 5 Days,” another camp at Campbell Ridge Elementary, is either from June 14-18 or July 12-16 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. The camp includes dancing, storytelling, and making music and is open to children of all abilities ages 8-11. The cost is $40. For information call Juanita Nelson at 448-4780. • “Not So Boring Board Games” for student entering grades 4-6 will be at Campbell Ridge Elementary from 9 a.m. to noon July 12-16. The cost is $40. For information call 448-4780. • Campbell County High School’s volleyball camps for students in grades 3-5 from 9 a.m. to noon and grades 6-9 from 1-4 p.m. will be June 14-16. Registration is $35 and includes a shirt and certificate. For information e-mail Leah Ballinger at leahb72283@yahoo.com. • Campbell County High School’s football camp for players entering grades 2-8 will be June 14-18 at the school’s practice fields. The cost is $65 and covers a daily Gatorade, snack and a camp shirt. Sports camps including cheerleading, wrestling, baseball, softball and boys and girls basketball are also available. For information call the school at 635-4161, ext. 2175. • Sunrock Farm offers a variety of weekly and extended spending time on the farm camp sessions. For information visit www.sunrockfarm.org. • The Campbell County Cooperative Extension Center is offering camps including Kid’s Gardening June 28-July 1 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for ages 8-12 and a a 4-H entrepreneur camp for ages 9-12 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. June 9-11. For information call 572-2600 or register online at http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell. • The Girl Scouts of Kentucky’s Wilderness Road Council Licking Valley Cluster is offering a summer day camp for all girls ages 5-17. For information call 342-6263 or (800) 716-6162. • The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati is offering a variety of camps in Northern Kentucky. For information visit www.myy.org/locations/campbellcounty/camp.shtml. • The Cincinnati Museum Center offers camps including a space camp, dinosaur camp and two Harry Potter camps (space is limited for those). For information call (513) 287-7021 or visit www.cincymuseum.org. • The Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington’s Devou Park offers camps ranging from archaeology (June 29-30 for ages 8-10 and July 19-23 for ages 11-15) to “Camp Claymation” (June 7-11 for ages 8-12) and “Passport to the World Music Camp” (Aug. 2-6 for ages 6-10). For information call 491-4003 or e-mail education@bcmuseum.org.

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Schools

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

A7

PROVIDED

Cardinal Pacelli students, along with parents and teachers, recently threw a surprise baby shower for science teacher Maggie Taul. Here, students wish Taul (back, center) well as she prepares to have her fourth child, which will also be her first daughter.

PROVIDED

‘Amazing’ production

Cardinal Pacelli students throw surprise baby shower for teacher will be Taul’s first daughter. She and her husband, Nelson, who live in Fort Thomas, Ky., have three sons, ages 10, 7 and 5. Taul has a Bachelor of Science in biology, an MBA and M.Ed. from Xavier University.

Gateway offers alcohol service training Gateway Community and Technical College is now offering alcohol service training to help the hospitality industry teach employees how to serve alcohol responsibly. The four-hour, non-credit class will be conducted from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, April 20, and 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 24, at the college’s Boone Campus, 500 Technology Way, Florence. The cost is $90 per person, including a participant workbook. The class highlights how to help patrons avoid overindulging, how to identify behavior clues to avoid over-serving, as well as how to offer alternatives and intervene if drinking becomes excessive. The course covers the physical properties of alcohol, its effect on the human body, prevention of sales to minors, and a review of state and local liquor laws.

COLLEGE CORNER Students present at psychology conference

The week of March 8, a group of 11 undergraduate and five graduate psychology majors from Xavier University attended the Southeastern Psychological Association's annual convention. Of 143 submissions, eleven projects were given awards, and three of those were Xavier psychology majors - Krysten Knecht, Gerald McDonnell, and Kate Saunders. Xavier senior Elizabeth A. Craig presented “Can a smile enhance the perceptions of people with facial acne? A quantitative analysis” with advisor Dr. Christian End. A 2006 graduate of The Wellington School, she is the daughter of Robin and Dan Field of Westerville and Bruce and Tammy Craig of Alexandria.

Cocktail servers, restaurant servers, dining room supervisors and beginning and experienced bartenders would benefit from the class. To register, contact Regina Schadler at 859442-1170 or regina.schadler@kctcs.edu.

She has been a science and religion teacher at Cardinal Pacelli School for nine years.

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Cardinal Pacelli sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students, along with parents and teachers, recently threw a surprise baby shower for science teacher Maggie Taul. The theme of the shower was “Pretty in Pink,” as this

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A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

April 15, 2010

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S.T.E.P (Students Together Empowering Peers) Club members from Campbell County High School and from six other Northern Kentucky area schools attended a Youth Leadership Workshop hosted by New Hope Center. Top row, from left: Ashley Hyden, Allie Rawlings, Nedra McDaniel. Bottom row, from left: Sarah Porter and Amanda Pike.

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SCHOOL NOTES Campbell Ridge wins

The championship for the March 20 regional Governor’s Cup competition at Reiley Elementary was won by Campbell Ridge Elementary’s Academic Team. It was the first time every a district elementary won the regional Governor’s Cup competition. Led by a quick recall team that had went undefeated all season, it was the first time in 18 years a school in the district took first in the event.

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Campbell County Schools had four students win first place in the Campbell County Conservation District’s annual contest. This year’s theme was “Water - Every Drop Counts.” The first place winners were: • Jessica Turner, writing contest winner for grades 612, Campbell County High School. • Grace Messer, art contest winner grades K-2, Campbell Ridge Elementary. • Jeremy Lackey, art contest winner for grades 3-5, Crossroads Elementary. • Colton Graham, art contest winner for grades 3-5, Campbell Ridge Elementary.

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It’s time to elect officers of the School Based Decision Making Council at Campbell County Middle School. The school’s Parent Teacher Organization and SBDM Council are holding the election of officers. Anyone with a child enrolled at the school for the 2010-11 school year is eligible to be in the election. Nominations are due to the school to the attention of the PTO no later than 3 p.m. April 9. The nomination forms are available under the parent link at www.campbellcounty schools.org. NKY.com/community

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This week in baseball

• Newport Central Catholic beat Lloyd 6-4, April 5. NCC’s Gray was the winning pitcher; Shaun Meyer had two basehits and two RBIs. • Heritage Academy beat Silver Grove 17-2 in five innings, April 5. Silver Grove’s Seider went 2-3; Greiss went 2-2 with two RBI. • Holy Cross beat Highlands 7-5, April 6. Highlands’ Sam Liggett was 4-4. • Bishop Brossart beat Carroll County 12-2, in six innings, April 6. Brossart’s David Greis was the winning pitcher; Travis Norton went 4-4 with three RBIs and two basehits.

This week in track and field

• Campbell County boys placed first in the Raider Friday Night Frenzy with a score of 127, April 9. Newport placed fifth with a score of 66, and Highlands was sixth with a 44. Campbell’s Doug Strange won the 400 meter in 53.01; Robbie Scharold won the 800 meter in 1:57.64 and broke the meet record; Alexx Bernard won the 1,600 meter in 4:46.22; Campbell County won the 4x200 meter relay in 1:35.2, the 4x400 meter relay in 3:31.5 and the 4x800 meter relay in 8:24.8, breaking the meet record. Newport’s Hatfield won the high jump, and the discus at 133 feet, 4 inches. • Campbell County girls placed first with a score of 156 in the Raider Friday Night Frenzy, April 9. Highlands placed third with a 133. Newport placed sixth with a score of 13. Campbell’s Carrigan won the 200 meter in 26.1; Dreyer won the 800 meter in 2:31.03; Robinson won the 1600 meter in 5:34.99; Berkley won the high jump in 35 feet, 1.5 inches, a meet record; Berkley won the 100 meter hurdles in 16.7; Campbell County won the 4x400 meter relay in 4:15.3 and the 4x800 meter relay in 10:11, a meet record. Highlands’ Weyer won the 100 meter in 12.9; Rosenhagen won the long jump; Ashley Collinsworth won the 300 meter hurdles in 47.3, a meet record; and Highlands won the 4x200 meter relay in 1:52.31.

Mountain bike race

For the second year, mountain bike enthusiasts will be taking to the outdoor trails of Northern Kentucky on April 25, all to benefit the Campbell County YMCA financial assistance program. Part of the Kentucky Championship and Cincinnati Off Road Alliance (CORA) series, the World Famous Mountain Bike Race will offer competitors a variety of courses based on difficulty and distance from five to 20 miles. There will be races for children (beginning at age 5) on up. The World Famous Mountain Bike Race will be at the Tower Park Trails in Ft. Thomas, Kentucky (950 S. Ft. Thomas Ave). Kids ages 5 to 14 can race for free. Other races range from $15 to $30 with registration beginning at 9 a.m. Individual race times are: • 9:30 a.m. – Cat3 (beginner) – all 7.5 miles, first-timer all five miles. • 11 a.m. – Cat 1 (pro/expert) men 20 miles, Cat1 women 15 miles. • Noon – Cat2 (sport) men 15 miles, Cat2 women 10 mines. Single speed all 15 miles. • 2 p.m. –Super D, best of two runs kids races. For more information, the public can call the Campbell County YMCA at 859-7811814 or e-mail yrace@fuse.net.

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Hot-hitting Mustangs race to hot 9-1 start

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Bishop Brossart High School baseball team has seemingly had to buy a lot of new baseballs since it has been tearing the cover off the ones used the last few weeks. The Mustangs entered the All “A” 10th Region Tournament with a 9-1 record through April 7. They won their last six games, averaging 14 runs per game in that span. No Mustang has been vandalizing the ball more than junior outfielder Travis Norton. In a two-day stretch April 6-7, Norton had 11 straight hits in three lopsided wins. March 31 against Ryle, Norton tied a state record with four doubles during a 10-8 win over the Raiders. He had 11 doubles through the team’s first eight games. “I’m just seeing the ball really well,” Norton said. “My swing feels really well. The big thing is our team keeps winning. That’s all I’m worried about.” Norton, a third-year starter, hit .359 last year. “He’s definitely come a long way with his hitting,” Brossart head coach Matt Grosser said. “He’s hitting the ball hard, he’s hitting the gaps. He’s seeing a good pitch and attacking it.” While the offense has been explosive, Grosser’s first explanation for the team’s hot start has been improved pitching. Brossart allowed three runs or less in six of the first 10 games. “Our pitchers needed another year to develop last year,” Grosser said. “We have some guys who are talented but they’re young. The year of maturity is really making a difference. We have seven guys we can put out there we feel pretty confident in, and that’s pretty rare.” Grosser hopes to add an eighth quality arm in junior Nick Hamberg, who will miss several weeks with a thumb injury. He hit .367

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic senior Courtney Sandfoss dribbles the basketball during the Ohio-Kentucky All-Star Game April 10 at Thomas More College. Sandfoss had seven points in Kentucky’s 84-55 loss.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior second baseman Steve Popovich hits the ball April 6.

Rivals get together for all-star game By James Weber jweber@nky.com

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior second baseman Steve Popovich tries to get the double play against Carroll County during Brossart’s 13-2 home win April 6. last year. Norton is excited about the team’s start. “We have a lot of high expectations,” Norton said. “We didn’t lose a whole lot from last year. We’ve kind of got that underdog factor. A lot of people didn’t expect a lot from us, but we know what we can do.” The Mustangs are on their way to doing more than last year’s 12-17 season. “Our seniors have done a great job of setting the tone,” Grosser said. “All the guys get along; the chemistry has made the difference on the field.”

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior third baseman Anthony Steffen throws out a Carroll County batter at first during Brossart’s 13-2 home win April 6.

SIDELINES New Cath Hoops Camp

Katie Allen and Courtney Sandfoss started out as AAU teammates, but ended up as district rivals during their basketball careers. April 10, they were teammates again, playing for the Kentucky team in the Ohio-Kentucky senior all-star basketball games at Thomas More College. Allen (Highlands) and Sandfoss (Newport Central Catholic) joined Campbell County High School’s Brianna Peters as county representatives in the game. All three were on the floor together at various times. “We think alike. The chemistry was still there,” Allen said of Sandfoss. “The game wasn’t close but it was fun. It was great to be a part of.” Sandfoss and Peters scored seven points apiece and Allen five in Kentucky’s 84-55 loss. “It was a great experience,” Sandfoss said. “I loved meeting the new girls, people I’ve never played with before. That’s also the hard part – we had two days of practice.” Peters, the Campbell County center and first team all-region pick in the 10th, enjoyed making two late free throws for her final points. Allen and Sandfoss may be teammates more in the future, with Peters as well. All three area players are still weighing their college

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands senior Katie Allen shoots during the Ohio-Kentucky All-Star Game April 10 at Thomas More College. Allen had five points in Kentucky’s 84-55 loss. options. They are each considering continuing their hoops careers on the same floor at Thomas More, playing for the NCAA Division III powers. Peters is considering TMC and Wilmington College. She plans to major in animal science so she can work for a zoo, and said her decision will come down to academics. Sandfoss will major in nursing and hopes to stay local, but is unsure whether she will play basketball or not. Allen is weighing several college offers as well.

Newport Central Catholic coaches and players are conducting a hoops camp this summer. Girls’ sessions: • 9 a.m. to noon, June 7-10, for fifth through eighth grades. • 1-4 p.m., June 7-10, for first through fourth grades. Boys’ sessions: • 9 a.m. to noon, June 14-17, for fifth through eighth grades. • 1-4 p.m., June 14-17, for first through fourth grades. Cost is $55 if registered by May 15, and $65 after that date. Family discount is $10 for two campers, $30 for three campers. Camp features T-shirt, snack and soft drinks daily, door prizes, contests, guest speaker and emphasis on fundamentals.

Kings Soccer Academy tryouts

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Jumping to victory

Highlands junior Taylor Rosenhagen won the long jump April 9 during the Ryle Friday Night Frenzy track meet. Ashley Collinsworth set a meet record in winning the 300 hurdles (47.30). Maria Weyer won the 100 meters, and Highlands girls’ won the 4x100 and 4x200.

Kings Soccer Academy is having tryouts June 1-12 for U8-U18 boys’ and girls’ teams at the Town and Country Sports Complex, 1018 Town Drive, Wilder. E-mail Tracy Roberts at troberts@kingssa.com. Visit www.kingssa.com for more information.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County senior Brianna Peters guards an Ohio opponent during the OhioKentucky All-Star Game April 10 at Thomas More College. Peters had seven points in Kentucky’s 84-55 loss.


A10

CCF Recorder

Sports & recreation

April 15, 2010

Doty at the derby

Making a pitch

Ethan Doty of Ft. Thomas represents Johnson Elementary and the Northern Kentucky Red Sox in the 2010 Southwest Ohio League King Kong Home Run Derby at Lakota High School recently. Ethan placed third in the 11U division.

Newport Central Catholic junior Danielle Hausfeld pitches against Ryle April 5 during NCC’s 51 loss at Bartlett Field. Senior Liz Kroger had a double and an RBI for NewCath. JAMES WEBER/STAFF

PROVIDED

Campbell teams ready for tourneys By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Baseball and softball take center stage April 16-18 with two major local tournaments. The “Doc� Morris Scholarship Tournament brings together 16 Northern Kentucky baseball teams in a single-elimination tournament April 17-18.

The Bulldog Bash returns to the Bill Cappel sports complex in Latonia April 1617. That will have eight Northern Kentucky softball teams. The Morris tourney raises scholarship money for local ballplayers. It honors a deceased Northern Kentucky umpire and will be played with wooden bats.

The tourney begins with 16 teams divided into four sites Saturday, April 17. One survivor from each site will play semifinal games Sunday, April 18, with the winners advancing to the final. Newport Central Catholic will host a bracket. NewCath, Newport, Bellevue and Campbell County are in the field. Boone County is the

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defending champion. Saturday action starts at 10 a.m. with three games at each location. The winners of the first two meet in a quarterfinal game on the same field. Admission charge for each session is $5 adults, $3 students. The schedule (10 a.m. games listed first): At Scott : Conner vs. Scott, Bellevue vs. Simon Kenton. At Morscher Field (Newport Central Catholic): Ludlow vs. NCC, Cooper vs. Holy Cross. At Dixie Heights: Holmes vs. Dixie Heights, St. Henry vs. Boone County. At Covington Catholic : Cov Cath vs. Newport,

Campbell County vs. Ryle. The semifinals are 1 p.m. Sunday, April 19: The Scott and NewCath bracket winners will play at Scott, and the Cov Cath/Dixie winners meet at Cov Cath. The final is 5 p.m. Sunday at Scott. The semis and finals will have separate admission charges. The Bulldog Bash will have two pools of four teams, with each team in a pool playing each other. Campbell County High School will compete in the tournament. Pool A is Boone County, Pendleton County, Dixie Heights and Bracken County. Pool B has Holmes, Mason County, Scott and

Campbell County. Up to three games will run at the same time at the complex. Friday, April 16: 6 p.m. – Holmes vs. Scott, Boone vs. Dixie. 8 p.m. – Campbell vs. Mason, Bracken vs. Boone. Saturday, April 17: 9 a.m. – Dixie vs. Pendleton, Holmes vs. Campbell, Scott vs. Mason. 11 a.m. – Pendleton vs. Bracken, Mason vs. Holmes, Campbell vs. Scott. 2 p.m. – Boone vs. Pendleton, Dixie vs. Bracken. 4 p.m. – Playoffs, second through fourth place in each pool paired together. 6 p.m. – Championship game, first-place team from each pool.

Time to nominate Sportsmen of Year More than 90,000 votes were cast in last year’s inaugural Community Press and Community Recorder Sportsman and Sportwoman of the Year online contest. Now, it’s time for high school fan bases to rally once again for 2010. Here’s the gameplan: Online readers will select 30 high school athletes (half male, half female) on 15 different newspaper ballots in Ohio and Kentucky who meet the highest standards both on and off the field. In Kentucky, there will be a Sportsman and Sports-

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woman of the Year winner for each of the three Northern Kentucky counties Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. Voting occurs in two waves. Readers can nominate an athlete until April 29 by going to the nky.com/preps page and clicking on the yellow/green Community Recorder Sportsman of the Year icon on the right side. In their nominations, they should explain why this athlete deserves the honor. The nominations will be used to create ballots that online readers will vote on

from May 13 to midnight June 10. Online vistors will be able to vote more than once. The top vote-getters will be featured at NKY.com and in your local newspaper June 24. Public voting on the nominations will begin May 13. As with sports, the greatest effort gets the greatest result in this contest. Questions? E-mail Melanie Laughman at mlaughman@communitypress.com or call 513-2487573.

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Sports & recreation

April 15, 2010

CCF Recorder

A11

BRIEFLY More in baseball

• Walton-Verona beat Silver Grove 22-0, April 5. • Bishop Brossart beat Louisville Holy Cross 16-6 in five innings, April 6. Brossart’s Embs was the winning pitcher, Anthony Steffen went 2-4 with a homerun and two RBIs. Brossart advances to 8-1 with the win. • Villa Madonna beat Dayton 4-0, April 6. • Newport Central Catholic beat Covington Catholic 3-0, April 6. NewCath’s Shaun Meyer pitched eight strikeouts; Meyer had three basehits. NewCath advances to 42 with the win. • Connor beat Newport 10-0 in five innings, April 6. Newport’s Travis Jones went 2-3. • Campbell County beat Silver Grove 13-0 in five innings, April 6. Campbell’s Tyler Holzschuh pitched eight strikeouts; Nate Lozey went 2-3 with two basehits and four RBIs. • St. Henry beat Newport 7-6, April 7. Newport’s Travis Jones went 2-4 with three basehits; Brown went 2-4. Newport advances to 3-3 with the win. • Bishop Brossart beat Lloyd 14-3 in five innings, April 7. Brossart’s Zach Fardo was the winning pitcher; Travis Norton went 4-4 with

three runs and two RBIs. • Campbell County beat Ryle 3-2, April 7. Campbell’s Jake Rebolz was the winning pitcher, and Nate Losey had an RBI. Campbell advances to 4-2 with the win. • Holy Cross beat Brossart 7-2, April 9. Brossart’s Steve Popovich had two basehits. • Newport Central Catholic beat St. Henry 6-5 in eight innings, April 9. NCC’s Murphy was the winning pitcher; Shaun Meyer went 2-4 with two RBIs. • Ludlow beat Dayton 14-1 in five innings, April 9. • Lloyd beat Silver Grove 19-0 in five innings, April 9. • Campbell County beat Ludlow 15-3 in six innings, April 10. Campbell’s Jake Rebolz was the winning pitcher, who also went 4-4, scored a homerun and had four RBIs. • Bishop Brossart beat Henry County 8-0, April 10. Brossart’s David Greis was the winning pitcher; Anthony Steffen was 2-3 with three basehits and three RBIs.

More in track and field • Newport Central Catholic placed 12th with a score of nine, and Bishop Brossart placed 15th with a score of three in the Walton-Verona

Bearcat Open, April 10. • Newport Central Catholic girls placed second in the Walton-Verona Bearcat Open, April 10, with a score of 93. Bishop Brossart placed seventh with a 23. Bellevue was eighth with a score of 21. NewCath’s Sarah Suedkamp won the 800 meter in 2:30.56; Aubrey Muench won the 300 meter hurdles in 51.24; NewCath won the 4x100 meter relay in 53.08, and the 4x400 meter relay in 4:20.37; and Frannie Schultz won the shot put. Brossart’s Britt won the discus at 104 feet.

This week in softball

• Bishop Brossart High School beat Cooper High School 5-1, April 5. Brossart’s Alicia Miller was the winning pitcher; Molly Williams had three basehits. • Highlands beat Notre Dame Academy 11-2, April 7. Highlands’ winning pitcher was Sydney Groneck; Eden Schlosser went 3-4 with three runs and three basehits. • Bishop Brossart beat Simon Kenton 7-0, April 7. Brossart’s Alicia Miller was the winning pitcher; Miller went 3-3 with two basehits. • Newport Central Catholic beat Campbell County 6-3, April 7. NCC’s Danielle Hausfeld pitched 11 strikeouts, Hannah Thiem went 2-4 with

two basehits and two RBIs. • Highlands beat Bellevue 8-4, April 9. Highlands’ Karly Hamberg was the winning pitcher, and Devin Bressler went 3-5 with two basehits and two RBIs. Bellevue’s Briana Taylor was 2-3 with two basehits and two RBIs. • Brossart beat Louisville Presentation 10-2 in the first round of the Pete Noll Invitational, April 9. Brossart’s Alicia Miller was the winning pitcher; Molly Williams had three basehits. • Brossart beat Notre Dame 17-1 in three innings in the first round of the Pete Noll Invitational, April 9. Alicia Miller was the winning pitcher and Molly Williams went 3-3 with two basehits and four RBIs.

This week in tennis

• Highlands boys beat Cooper 4-1, April 7. Highlands’ Mitchell beat Tyler Honschopp 6-2, 6-1; Coughlan beat O’Brien 6-0, 6-0. Drenin-Levine beat Yeomanson-Thibault 6-0, 6-0; Sudkamp-Mays beat GreenballMitchell 6-0, 6-1. Highlands advances to 1-0 with the win. • Ryle beat Campbell County 4-1, April 7. Campbell’s Neises beat Hart 7-5, 61.

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A12

Campbell Community Recorder

CH@TROOM

April 15, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

RECORDER

Next question:

Last week’s question

Do you agree with President Obama’s decision to open more coastal waters to oil and gas exploration? Why or why not? “Yes and no. For the people who depend on gasoline and I guess that is about 98 percent of us maybe the price would come down. and for the people that have No. 2 oil for heating it really would be a godsend because of the price of oil would go down. But terrorists have targets in mind and these sites in my opinion are just like sitting ducks.” Isabelle Klopsch, Burlington “Yes, because the foreign oil companies are charging way too much for theirs.” Kimberley A. Powell “Yes! We must decrease our reliance on foreign countries for our energy sources. This means expanding our own energy production in all areas that are economically feasible. Technology has been making this safer and requiring the use of less “platforms” out in the ocean. I think Obama made a wise decision.” J.K.T. “Mr. Obama will do as he pleases with or without my approval. He’s already proven he is out for himself and not the American people, or should I say he’s out to help those persons he owes favors to and has in his back pocket. The only good thing coming up ... he won’t see a second term in office!” Florence, Ky. “I’ve heard there is a law that shut this drilling down years ago it is expiring. So it seems he really isn’t doing anything.” M.C. “Obama made that decision about offshore drilling purely to help his sagging poll numbers. He knows that exploring and drilling for oil and gas is very popular with the American people. “But he also knows that his administration has many loopholes that can be used down the road to prevent drilling in those very same areas. “This is very deceptive, but something I have come to expect from him. And, in a related action, which did not get nearly the same amount of press, he put other areas off limits for exploration. “Our continued national decision to ignore much of our oil and gas reserves and to fail to produce more nuclear energy is tragic. “It will produce higher energy costs, higher unemployment, and higher inflation, but far worse, it may cost American lives if we ever get into a war where our overseas energy sources are denied us. This is the definition of insanity.” T.H. “The U.S. Is critically dependent on foreign oil and gets jerked

What’s your opinion of Chad Ochocino’s non-football activities like “Dancing With the Stars?” Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. around by petro-rich countries because of it. We have untapped oil resources in our coastal waters that could reduce our dependence. “What’s not to like, as long as the exploration is done in an environmentally responsible way? How can we let ourselves starve to death in the middle of a buffet line?” F.S.D.

Signing day

“Yes! I believe we should be doing much more to wean ourselves totally off foreign oil.” G.G. “If President Obama actually did open more coastal waters for oil and gas exploration that’s good news. However, I heard claims that while he gave more with one hand he reduced even more with the other. “American companies have the know-how to safely recover oil from the ocean depths without harming the environment. They can also do the same in the Alaskan wilderness.” R.V. “The only valid reason is that he is placating the Republicans in Congress. While I personally am not against legitimate drilling in known preserves, the amount of oil is negligible to the total we use. This may take some of the focus off greater efficiencies and renewable alternatives.” J.Z. “I never thought I would find myself agreeing with any decision made by Mr. Obama, but in this case, I do. We must not overlook any potential source of energy at this point in time, and if this can be done with minimal impact on the environment, I’m all for it.” Bill B. “I agree wholeheartedly! But only if all drilling operations, contracts and – most importantly – employees are issued to companies and people in the United States. “Minimizing our dependence on foreign oil suppliers should be a very high priority for us until we can begin developing alternate sources of energy. “When plans were made to open huge wind-powered energy fields out west, I was horrified to learn the U.S. companies issued these enormous contracts farmed most of the work building the giant windmills to overseas companies and their (cheaper?) employees. No large contracts for this sort of project should be issued without strict regulations guaranteeing that all work – development, manufacturing, assembly and installation – will be done by U.S. companies and U.S. employees.” M.M.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

Northern Kentucky University Professor Dr. Jim Claypool autographs his new book “Images of America - Kentucky’s Bluegrass Music,” for Pete Erschell of Fort Thomas at the Kentucky Haus in Newport. PROVIDED

Schickel leads the way for licensure legislation in Kentucky When people ask me what I had to do to become an orthotist or a prosthetist I have always told them “Nothing.” However, I did choose to attend a post-bachelor program for prosthetics and then for orthotics, complete a one-year residency for each discipline and pass examinations certifying that I have reached a certain level of competency. Unfortunately, this has been voluntary. To many people’s surprise, orthotists, prosthetists and pedorthists (the individuals that fabricate and fit custom braces, artificial limbs and foot care products) are not required to meet any minimum educational or training requirements to practice in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Currently, there are only 12 other states in the U.S. that have established licensure requirements for the orthotic and prosthetic profession. Ohio passed legislation to establish licensure for the profession in 2001. Licensure of the orthotic and

prosthetic profession helps provide patient protection by establishing minimum educational and professional standards to practice. It also establishes a pathAnthony way to prevent Ward those from continuing to practicing Community who have providRecorder ed injurious or guest poor care. columnist On April 1, legislation to establish licensure for orthotist, prosthetist and pedorthist overcame its final legislative hurdle when it was passed by the House of Representatives. It is currently waiting for final approval by Gov. Steve Beshear. Sen. John Schickel of Boone, Kenton and Gallatin counties sponsored the legislation this year. The legislation was also supported by Sen. Katie Kratz Stine of Campbell

Growth and jobs equals economic stability and less tax The latest Kentucky unemployment numbers have been released and once again, Campbell County has the highest unemployment rate (11.4 percent) of the three Northern Kentucky counties. While all of Northern Kentucky has been hurt in this recession, why does Campbell County get hit harder than Boone or Kenton Counties? I believe it is because the current leadership in our county does little to encourage business to locate and stay here. In fact, by repeatedly increasing taxes at the maximum allowable rate, they are driving away commerce and job opportunities to other areas in Greater Cincinnati, the United States and abroad. As your Judge-Executive, one of my highest priorities would be to set the stage for economic growth in Campbell County. Our economic efforts must shift from passive to aggressive. We cannot have economic sustainability only by being a county of buyers, we must also be a county of producers. By showcasing our industrial zones in Claryville, Silver Grove, Melbourne, Wilder, and Newport, we can go after businesses versus watching them go to Boone and Kenton

counties. When it comes to job creation, our efforts must be centered on the production, medical, service, and technological industries. We must also look at how we can facilitate growth with Northern Kentucky University in terms of their campus and surrounding communities. We can help NKU in their efforts to support regional employers with their graduating students. We must also cultivate a growing relationship with existing industrial entities so they know we are their long-term partners. This is especially important when it comes to small businesses on main arteries like US 27, AA Highway, the Fort Thomas business district and on the riverfront. It is very important to work with these small businesses in order to retain jobs for the county. We must also work to help and assist existing employers such as Sarah Lee, IPSCO Steel, Trauth Dairy, LaFarge, and St. Elizabeth/St. Luke to ensure they have room to grow at every level. When it comes to economic renewal, there are important philosophical differences between my strategy and the economic record of our judge-executive. If you look

A publication of

COMMUNITY RECORDER

and Pendleton counties and carried in the House of Representatives by Rep. Sal Santoro of Boone County and Rep. Dennis Keene of Campbell County. The legislation was not without debate on both the Senate and House floors and these leaders all stood and fought for what was right. After more than four years of working with other professionals in our state to pass this legislation it is a great relief to see it pass. I have much appreciation for the hard work of the individuals mentioned above who made passage of this legislation a reality. I would also like to say thank you to retired Sen. Dick Roeding who initiated this legislation for us four years ago. Despite serving a small portion of their constituents they fought to see this through and for that I am grateful. Anthony Ward practices orthotics and prosthetics at Durrett’s O and P Services in Edgewood.

Campbell Community Editor . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

at the county budget over the last 11 years, he Kevin Sell believes that you can spend and tax Community your way to prosRecorder perity. I believe guest that government columnist shouldn't take advantage of Campbell County home-owners and businesses by using your tax dollars to fund plush new government offices. In 1819, Chief Justice John Marshall wrote: "An unlimited power to tax involves, necessarily, a power to destroy; because there is a limit beyond which no institution and no property can bear taxation." You and I know this to be true, but with each passing year, my opponent continues to push you to that limit by excessively raising many county taxes. As your judgeexecutive, I would put an end to these steep tax increases on homes and business as part of my larger plan to bring jobs back to Campbell County. The bottom line is that we need less tax and more taxpayers. Kevin Sell is a Republican candidate for Campbell County judge-executive.

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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T h u r s d a y, A p r i l 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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Petting zoo fields wildlife attraction

CATCH A STAR

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

PROVIDED

Bellevue resident Patrick Dougherty, a self-employed studio potter, works on a fireplace mantle he made.

Bellevue potter recognized in book of international artists For more than 30 years, Bellevue resident Patrick Doughtery has been following his true calling, creating art. The self-employed studio potter was recently recognized as one of 38 noted international artists in the book “Masters: Earthernware,” curated by Matthias Ostermann. “It really just blows me away to be included in the book,” Doughtery said. “There are artists in there from France and Belgium and then you see my bio where is says based in Kentucky.” Doughtery said he has spent years and put in a lot of hard work creating his artwork. While working as a social worker in 1974, Doughtery decided to take

an art class at Northern Kentucky University for fun. Since no painting classes were open, he took a ceramics class. “That was 30 something years ago, and I’m still doing it,” Doughtery said. “I realized my true calling, and the rest is history.” After going back to school to get his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in fine arts, Doughtery taught ceramics at various universities for years. Now, his time is taken up with his studio art, which includes pottery and architectural work like sinks and fireplace mantles. Doughtery also shows his work across the country and teaches workshops at various places.

THINGS TO DO Waite at the Syndicate

Rock singer John Waite ( p i c t u re d ) will perform at the Newport Syndicate April 16 at 7:30 p.m. Waite is most known for his single, “Missing You,” which was No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1984. Tickets, which range from $40 to $60, include access to a dinner buffet at 6 p.m. To purchase tickets, visit www.rwatickets.com or call 781-7700. The Syndicate is located two blocks south of Newport on the Levee at 18 East 5th Street.

Food and wine

Learn how to cook and how to pair that meal with the correct wine during the Cork and Fork Cooking Class at the Argentine Bean in Crestview

Hills April 17. The class begins at 2 p.m. and includes cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. The class is family friendly and costs $20 to attend. For more information, call 426-1042. The Argentine Bean is located at 2875 Town Center Blvd.

Shop ‘til you drop

The Boone County Main Library in Burlington will have host a special shopping experience April 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The library will be selling audiobooks, movies and music as well as books. Adult hardcover books will be sold for $1 and paperback books will sell for 50 and 25 cents. Children’s books and magazines will also be available. For more information, call 342-2665. The Boone County Main Library is located at 1786 Burlington Pike.

Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo, in its 12th year as a haven for animals big and small, opens April 15 this year with an unplanned attraction of a wildlife rookery of a nesting colony of great blue herons. Wanda Wanner and Buddy Teke keep the farm at 3269 Koehler Road in California. The animals are a collection of everything from bison and an African Watusi steer with horns that are wider than a grown man’s arms can reach from finger tip to finger tip to baby goats, sheep and rabbits. There are also pony rides, a shaded picnic area, and a gold and blue parrot that sometimes performs tricks for the public, Wanner said. But, the nesting colony of great blue herons in the tops of trees lining one of the farm fields has been a surprise that’s been growing in recent years, she said. The number of nests has grown over several years from five to 14 and finally 21 nests by this spring, she said. Each February, the birds return for the warmer months to the farm, she said. They’re making an observation post that won’t disturb the birds too much, so visitors can go out to the field and observe the herons at distance, Wanner said. The birds can be seen from the spot with the naked eye, but bring binoculars for a better view, she said. The baby herons usually hatch by April and start taking first flights around the end of June or early July, Wanner said. The farm also has its own bird attractions including a pair of emus, peacocks, pheasants, doves, turkeys and silky chickens, but to see the herons up close is majestic, Wanner said. “This year the herons are kind of adding to the bird watchers who like to come,” she said. A regular attraction for visiting children are the baby goats, sheep, bunnies, chicks and other animals

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Buddy Teke, co-owner of Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo in California, cares and feeds for many of the animals including Cindy the bison.

If you go

Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo, 3269 Koehler Road, is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Unguided tours are $5 per person. Call Wanda or Buddy at 635-0803 to schedule a guided tour. For information visit www.noahsarkfarmzoo.com.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

“Big Jim” an African Watusi steer (front) and a “Buffy” the water buffalo at Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo in California. born at the farm each year, Wanner said. It’s also hoped that “Buffy” the water buffalo will have a calf born this summer or fall with her new mate, Wanner said.

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A blue heron perches above nests in the tree tops at Noah’s Ark Farm & Petting Zoo in California Thursday, April 8.

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Teke said sometimes visitors witness the birth of an animal, and that’s often a special moment for them. As for variety of animals, the emus, a bird as big as an ostrich, are one of the oldest species of birds on the planet, Teke said. And the fourhorned sheep is a line of sheep mentioned in the Bible as spotted sheep and are also sometimes called Jacob’s sheep, he said. Churches, daycare groups, schools and groups of people with disabilities often come to the farm, but so do grandparents with their grandchildren on unscheduled vis-

its, Teke said. Teke said he enjoys seeing the animals like the water buffalo play in the fields, and seeing the animals up close is an experience people can’t get just by watching television. Seeing the children interact with the young and old animals is one of the reasons Wanner said she enjoys operating Noah’s Ark. But one of the most popular attractions with children isn’t one of the more exotic animals, she said. “The kids spend the whole day playing with the baby kittens,” Wanner said.

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A four-horned sheep (missing its left front horn) at Noah's Ark Farm & Petting Zoo in California.

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B2

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, A P R I L 1 6

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Knit On, 735 Monmouth St. Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 2915648. Newport.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

John Waite, 7:30 p.m. Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Grand Ballroom. Includes dinner buffet at 6 p.m. English rock singer and musician. $70 stage front, $60 VIP, $50 reserved, $40. Reservations required. 4918000; www.rwatickets.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Cross-Tie, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Comedy for a Cause, 8 p.m. Drawbridge Inn Hotel, 2477 Royal Drive, Doors open 6:30 p.m. Comedy by Terry Foster, Shelley Iker and Cathy Youtsey-Halloran. Heavy hors d’oeuvres provided and cash bar available. Music by Robby Meeks. Dancing begins 10 p.m. Benefits The Chelsea Schweinefuss Fund, The Jeff Rennekamp Fund, The Peggy Foster Memorial Fund and Chicks & Chucks, Inc. $25. 513-841-6756; www.chicksandchucks.org. Fort Mitchell.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Once Upon a Mattress, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, 909 Camel Crossing, Auditorium. Grown-up modern twist on Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Princess and the Pea.”. $9. Reservations recommended. Presented by Campbell County High School Drama. Through April 18. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bury the Dead, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Six slain soldiers arise from graves and refuse to be buried, inciting international intrigue. With the UC College-Conservatory of Music Department of Drama. Talkback session follows performance. $18, $16 members, $14 students. Through April 24. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Bye Bye Birdie, 8 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, Nunn Drive, Tony Award-winning musical comedy tells story of rock and roll singer who is about to be inducted into the army. $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. Through April 25. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. The Garden of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, 7:30 p.m. Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St. Featuring Playhouse’s Touring Company. Free-flowing adaptation of the Kipling classic. Part of Playhouse Off the Hill Series. Ages 4 and up. $5. Presented by Playhouse in the Park. 513-688-8400. Covington.

A Modern Tale of Sibling Rivalry and Rage!, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Tale of a jealous older brother and his continuing ambition to convince everybody about the anguish he has suffered. Short comedy skits follow performance. $8. Through April 17. 655-9140; www.finalactproductions.com. Newport.

RECREATION

Family Fun Night, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Pool party. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Family-organized games, optional crafts, Aeroball, rock climbing, Wii Sports, sports wall and swimming. Family friendly. $5 per family. Reservations required. 442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Sweet Adeline Regional Competition, 2 p.m. Quartet competition. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd. Barbershop harmony competition for women choruses and quartets. $30. Presented by Sweet Adelines International. Through April 17. 513-554-2648; www.sai-region4.org. Covington. S A T U R D A Y, A P R I L 1 7

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Tri State County Animal Response Team Volunteer Meeting, 10 a.m.-noon, Sutton Rankin Law Building, 130 Dudley Road, Discuss disaster preparedness and evacuating with your pets and informing potential volunteers of state laws and activation process to respond to disaster or emergency. Free. Presented by Tri State County Animal Response Team. 513702-8373; www.tristatecart.com. Edgewood.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Links & Lace Dance Club Dinner/Dance, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Metropolitan Club, 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd. Cocktail hour and cash bar 6-7 p.m. Dinner and big band music 7 p.m. Attire is semi-formal to formal. Couple: $225 three dances, $170 tow dances, $85 dance. Registration required a week before dance. Presented by Links & Lace Dance Club. 513-553-7349. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. Family friendly. $20. Reservations required. 426-1042. Crestview Hills.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Class, 9 a.m.-10 a.m. Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Latin dance fitness party. First class free. Packages available. $10. 291-2300. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Guest wine blogger, Michelle Lentz of My Wine Education, leads tastings. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, Free. 781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Party Town, 6823 Burlington Pike, Free. 371-4466; www.partytownky.com. Florence. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-8 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

LECTURES

A Night with the Stars, 8 p.m. Thomas More College Science Lecture Hall, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Dr. Wes Ryle discusses composition and inner workings of a star and numerous variety of stars. Followed by telescope viewing at observatory, weather permitting. Free. Presented by Thomas More College. 341-5800. Crestview Hills.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

All the Way from Memphis, 8 p.m. With Gary Burbank, the Sonny Moorman Group, Long Tall Deb & the Drifter Kings and 12elve 8ight. Doors open 7 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. Benefits Play It Forward. $8. 491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

The Remains Benefit Dance, 7 p.m.-midnight. For medical expenses of Helena Schmidt, 8-year-old with cerebral palsy. Live music by The Remains, cash bar, bring own snacks. Casual dress. 21 and up. Shimmers Ballroom, 1939 Dixie Highway. $10. 282-7198; connieraabe@yahoo.com. Fort Wright.

PROVIDED

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

The Burlington Antique Show will have its first show of the 2010 season Sunday, April 18. The show will take place at the Boone County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Early buying will also be available from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. The cost to enter the show is $5 before 8 a.m. and $3 after 8 a.m. It is free for children ages 11 and under. Future antique shows will take place on the third Sunday of each month through October. For more information, visit www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com or call 513-922-6847. The Boone County Fairgrounds are located at 5819 Idlewild Road in Burlington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Once Upon a Mattress, 2 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, $9. Reservations recommended. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria.

Once Upon a Mattress, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, $9. Reservations recommended. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria. Bury the Dead, 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $18, $16 members, $14 students. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Bye Bye Birdie, 8 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. A Modern Tale of Sibling Rivalry and Rage!, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $8. 6559140; www.finalactproductions.com. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Sweet Adeline Regional Competition, 2 p.m. A cappella chorus competition. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, $30. 513-5542648; www.sai-region4.org. Covington. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 1 8

BARS/CLUBS A Shot for Breast Cancer, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, Participants receive one shot of Jameson Irish Whiskey and commemorative shot glass for first 150 registered. Guinness World Record attempt for “largest shot slam.” Benefits Northern Kentucky Women’s Cancer Coalition. $7 donation. 581-8888; www.nkwcc.org. Newport. FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. StoneBrook Winery, $5. 635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m. The Royal Palm Orchestra. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Through April 25. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bye Bye Birdie, 3 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights. M O N D A Y, A P R I L 1 9

BUSINESS CLASSES Using QuickBooks for Small Business Accounting, 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Newport City Building, 998 Monmouth St. Basic overview of small business accounting practices along with introduction to using QuickBooks as management tool. Free. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Small Business Development Center. 4424281. Newport. LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Puppy Tales, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Children practice reading skills by reading to dogs that like to listen. 15-minute sessions. Grades 1-3. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

CincyMLM Anniversary Party, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St. Free. Presented by Cincy MomsLikeMe.com. cincinnati@momslikeme.com; http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com. Newport.

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To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Bye Bye Birdie, 8 p.m. NKU Corbett Auditorium, $12, $11 NKU faculty, staff, alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 student. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS & TRYOUTS

Cincinnati Falcons Practices, 6:30 p.m.9:30 p.m. Pioneer Park, 3951 Madison Pike, Semi-pro football team recruiting. Ages 18 and up. Must pay fee, provide own equipment and purchase uniform once on team. 496-3211; www.cincinnatifalcons.us. Covington. W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 1

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

T H U R S D A Y, A P R I L 2 2

EDUCATION Incorporating Healthy Lifestyle Changes Into Your Life, 2 p.m.-4:15 p.m. Mental Health America of Northern Kentucky, 513 Madison, Learning how to manage stress reduces the risk of onset mental and other underlying medical illnesses. Free. Registration required. 431-1077; www.mhanky.org. Covington. EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Fitness Class, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Dance Express, 725 Alexandria Pike, Fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easy-to-follow moves to create one-of-a-kind fitness program. Ages 16 and up. $8. 581-4062. Fort Thomas.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3 and up. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

T U E S D A Y, A P R I L 2 0

BUSINESS CLASSES

Work Smart, Not Hard Workshop, 8 a.m.11 a.m. PRISM, 809 Wrights Summit Parkway, PRISM Training Room. Learn to implement time management tools to increase productivity, reduce stress and begin your new journey to success you have always dreamed of. $99. Registration required. Presented by PRISM Consulting. Through May 19. 344-2731; www.prismsuccess.com. Fort Mitchell.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

Kings Island opens for the season on Saturday, April 17, with its newest attraction, Planet Snoopy. The collection of “Peanuts”themed rides for all ages include four children’s roller coasters, a live stage show and Peanuts’ characters’ meet and greets. Pictured is the “Race for Your Life Charlie Brown” ride. The park has another new ride, Boo Blasters on Boo Hill, an interactive family attraction. Hours for Saturday, April 17, are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., with the park closed Sunday. The park re-opens Friday, April 23 for weekend operation. Daily operation begins May 21. Go to www.visitkingsisland.com. for ticket prices.

Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

See Elmo, Zoe and Big Bird sing and dance during Sesame Street Live’s touring production of “Elmo’s Green Thumb,” an adventure and lesson about the ecosystem. It is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 16; 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17; and 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 18, at the Bank of Kentucky Center. Tickets are $12-$27, plus a $2 facility fee. Opening night tickets are $12, plus a $2 facility fee. For information, call 859-442-2652; visit www.sesamestreetlive.com. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

B3

A twist on the ‘Ten Commandments of Marriage’ The Rev. Ed Young, senior pastor of Second Baptist Church in Houston, Texas, wrote a book titled “The Ten Commandments of Marriage.” I never read the Rev. Young’s book but I enjoyed his commandment titles. I expand on them with my own reflections. 1. Thou shalt not be a selfish pig. The worst enemy in any relationship is our selfishness – that my feelings count and yours don’t; that you are here to serve me and make me happy; that if anything goes wrong, it’s your fault, not mine. The opposite of selfishness is love. A good indication that love is present is when the welfare and satisfaction of another person comes to mean as much to me as my own. 2. Though shalt cut the apron stings. When a wedding takes place in a church, another ceremony takes place right below in the couples psychic basement. The groom unconsciously transfers to his bride the qualities and

faults of his mother – and expects to find them hereafter in his bride. The bride, transfers over to the groom the qualities and faults of Father Lou her dad. The Guntzelman u n c o n s c i o u s cerePerspectives basement mony is not ideal. The most ideal situation happens when each spouse recognizes these parental transferences, cuts loose from them, and works to come to know the uniqueness of their own spouse. 3. Thou shalt continually communicate. The average married couple actively communicate about 27 minutes a week. Yet, “Unless we are fully known, we cannot be fully loved.” And how else do we become authentically known unless we let the other know of our fears, hopes, dreams, anxieties, insufficiencies, etc.?

We’re usually afraid because we expect rejection. That’s a possibility. But the risk is worth taking to finally come to be loved for who and what we are. 4. Thou shalt make conflict thy ally. Disagreements are not catastrophes. They are to be expected occasionally when two separate and unique persons form a relationship. Differences are opportunities to communicate, understand, compromise and solidify the relationship. The absence of conflict demonstrates that either the relationship isn’t important enough or that both individuals are too insecure to risk disagreement. 5. Though shalt avoid the quicksand of debt. Money, especially in our culture, can become a bone of contention, an instrument of power, a constant worry, an expression of selfishness, and a destroyer of more important realities. Prudent spending flows from a responsible maturity on the part of both spouses.

6. Thou shalt flee sexual temptations – online and otherwise. Sexual pleasure is wonderful, but it speaks of spiritual and personal realities far more profound than feeling good. To seek sexual pleasure independently of my spouse and my sense of commitment to her/him, is more an adolescent trait than that of an adult. The interpenetration of hearts and souls requires lifelong fidelity. 7. Thou shalt forgive your mate 490-plus times. The 490 number comes from the biblical admonition to forgive not only seven times, but seventy times seven. One of marriages primary purposes is to teach us how to forgive. It is a manifestation of love. 8. Thou shalt keep the home fires burning. Building a good marriage and a good log fire are similar. At first, the paper and kindling make a brilliantly burning blaze. Then the first blaze dies down and you wonder if the fire will fizzle out and leave you in the

dark. You blow on it and fan it for all you’re worth. Sometimes the smoke billows out and almost chokes you or brings tears to your eyes. But if the materials are good and you invest enough time and energy and interest, the solid logs catch and the fire continues. 9. Thou shalt begin again and again. Nothing in this world that is worthwhile occurs suddenly. If a solid love relationship is really desired and valued, we are willing to go for it again and again. 10. Thou shalt build a winning team. It takes two to build a successful marriage, but only one to destroy it. All of the above are seen as teamwork issues by both spouses. And a good team reaches the goal. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Know how to protect yourself before buying home

$5,000 stimulus program. We’re giving you a chance to win one of five $1,000 American Express® gift cards. Use it to complete your spring projects or just pamper yourself a bit — it’s up to you! Check out the Sunday Enquirer for details and the official entry form. A new $1,000 winner will be drawn each week during our Spring Stimulus Spectacular! Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com/subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500.

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CE-0000391862.INDD

ing. In addition, the builder has agreed to re-grade the backyard and has now scrubbed the brick so the white substance has been removed. To make sure the new house you’re considering was built properly, I suggest you hire a home inspector certified by the American Society of Home Inspectors. Hire an ASHI Certified home inspector for a new home just as you would before buying an existing home. The inspector needs to check for problems and, and depending on the severity of what’s found, you may

decide to set aside some money in an escrow account at the closing. The builder will only get that money when he makes the repairs. If he fails to make the corrections within a specified time, the money should go to you so you can get the repairs made. Finally, whenever you buy or sell a house I always recommend you get your own lawyer to protect you. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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Now’s your chance to cash in with The Enquirer’s

due to the grade of the yard, I have a swamp out here for at least a week at a time,” said Frisby. “It became a problem and I let them know. They came out, looked at it, and told me the grade works. Basically, they’re going to keep it how it is,” he said. Frisby told the builder he contacted me and said now the builder is much more cooperative. The company has agreed to hire an engineer to assess the driveway and sidewalk problem. The company will now rely on the engineer to come up with a proposal to keep the concrete from collaps-

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trucks and just regular cars. Gravity is going to collapse it.” he said. Frisby complained, “The builder just plans to shovel gravel underneath my driveway and that’s how they’re going to fix it. I’m not happy with that at all.” He said that gravel needs to be compacted in order to properly support the concrete. Another concern is a white chalk-like substance that’s appeared in many areas on the brick around the house. Frisby wants to know what that substance is, what’s caused it, and how to get rid of it for good. Yet another issue concerns the grading of the backyard. When it rains, water pools in the yard and doesn’t drain away. “After any rain or snow,

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making it very difficult for me, which is why I c a l l e d you,” he said. O n e Howard Ain m a j o r Hey Howard! p r o b l e m pointed out by his father, Dave, and others, has to do with the concrete driveway and sidewalk – they’re suspended in air in several places. “We’re 8 feet straight out this way and there’s absolutely nothing underneath holding it up. There should be compacted gravel underneath the concrete,” said Frisby’s father. “It’s just a matter of time before all this just collapses from the weight of vehicles,

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The warm weather is bringing out homebuyers and new home sales are expected to be up this year. But, if you’re in the market for a new house you need to know how to protect yourself before you buy. Josh Frisby bought a brand new house in Morrow and moved in last December. Although he loves the house, he says the builder has been reluctant to correct problems he’s found. “The house is great, but obviously there are some issues that need to be dealt with. I’m trying to give the builder the benefit of the doubt to take care of these issues,” said Frisby. “Some things they are taking care of, and some things they’re giving me the runaround on. They’re

Enquirer Media is proud to support the Fine Arts Fund.


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

April 15, 2010

Roll out a tasty teatime with asparagus

I was right in the middle of making bean soup from leftover Easter ham when I got the call from friends Butch and Char Castle. “We’re going morel hunting – want us to pick you up?” Within five minutes, I was waiting at the edge of the driveway with my favorite morel-hunting basket in hand. (Yes, I did turn off the bean soup). Now I can’t tell you where we looked, since it’s as secret as knowing where to find ginseng, but I will tell you it was one vigorous workout, climbing up to the crest of the wooded hill. We found everything BUT morels: wild flowers in abundance: spring beauties, bloodroot, trilliums, violets, phlox, Dutchmen’s breaches, and wild edibles like garlic mustard, onions, and ramps (wild leeks). It was just the mental spring tonic I needed. (And we will go back – we morel hunters never give up). When I got home, I found a bonus near the fencerow: wild asparagus. I

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

added that to what I picked out of our asparagus patch and plan to m a k e t h e s e yummy asparagus rolls.

Promont Museum’s asparagus rolls

Just looking at the photo will have you running to the kitchen to make these. Mary Ann Benoski, tea coordinator at the Milford, Ohio, museum, shared this recipe. “One of my favorite sandwich recipes this time of year,” she said. Mary Ann and staff have afternoon teas at Promont House and volunteers prepare the food. Beautifully presented on fine china, their afternoon tea is not to be missed. They provide a docent guided tour included in the price of the tea ($20; luncheon $25). Mary Ann said

tea cuisine “includes something chocolate, something crunchy and something gooey.” You’ll have a memorable time taking tea at this Victorian mansion once occupied by Ohio Gov. John Pattison and family, and the profits from the teas help the upkeep of the museum. To make reservations, call 513-248-0324 or log onto www.milfordhistory.net.

14 asparagus spears steamed tender-crisp in salted water, set aside on paper towels. 5 oz. extra sharp Cheddar, grated coarse 5 oz. Pepper Jack, grated coarse 3 ⁄4 cup mayonnaise 1 ⁄4 cup finely diced bottled roasted red pepper, and reserve enough 2-inch slices for garnish on sandwich folds. (Rinse and pat dry all first) Combine everything but asparagus in a mixing bowl with hand held mixer set on medium-low speed.

Assembly:

14 slices Pepperidge Farm white bread (crust removed) Place slices of bread between sheets of waxed paper and flatten slightly with rolling pin. Spread each slice with a rounded tablespoon of cheese mixture, top with asparagus spear (trimmed the length of bread slice from corner to corner). Fold opposite corners together over spear overlapping and garnish with two strips of roasted red peppers making an “X,” sealing down corners of bread slice. If necessary use tooth pick to secure until serving and cover all sandwiches with moist paper towels until served. Chilling helps to tighten the flattened rolls.

Panini with mozzarella, prosciutto and peppers

Never one to throw leftovers away, I made these grilled sandwiches from leftover Ciabiatta bread, some prosciutto I had left from an antipasto tray, and the last

COURTESY MARY ANN BENOSKI

Asparagus rolls are a favorite treat this time of year for Mary Ann Benoski, tea coordinator at the Promont House Museum. of the roasted red peppers from the freezer. Feel free to augment these with more filling, or use whatever cheese, meat, etc. you have on hand. You can hardly go wrong! Thin slices of crusty Italian bread Prosciutto (or other ham) Roasted red pepper strips Mozzarella slices Thinly sliced red onion

Preheat grill pan or griddle over medium high. Make sandwiches: 2 to 3 slices prosciutto topped with an even layer of pepper, mozzarella, and onion, then top with another slice of bread. Brush with olive oil. Place that side face down on griddle and brush top with olive oil. Weight sandwiches down with heavy skillet (or not, if you use a panini press) and brown a few minutes on each side.

From readers’ kitchens

Kudos for Ruth Lyons coffee cake: Dave Weller, a Villa Hills, Ky., reader, said he’s made the Ruth Lyons coffee cake. “If you like a moist cinnamon coffee cake, that would be your cake. The cake is easy to make. It has become a favorite at my in-laws for Easter brunch.” Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

B5

Owners need to practice calm before (and during) the storm By Marsie Hall Newbold marsolete@insightbb.com

Sweet Adelines competition

The Sweet Adelines International region 4 annual quartet and chorus competition will be held starting at 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 1617 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W Rivercenter Blvd., in Covington. The competition is open to the public. Tickets are $30 and are available at the convention center box office the days of the competition Sweet Adelines International East Region 4, an independent, nonprofit, worldwide organization for women singers committed to advancing the musical art form of barbershop harmony through education and performance. International membership is nearly 25,000 members, 1,200 registered quartets, and 600 choruses in most of the 50 U.S. states and Australia, Canada, England, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, Scotland, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Wales.

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calm place not exposed to the windows or to the sounds. I play classical music on the radio and leave the lights on.â&#x20AC;? She believes that the agitation cats exhibit during thunderstorms is not necessarily from fear, but more of a sense of protectiveness of the house. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our energy can also affect how they respond,â&#x20AC;? she admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can transfer our feelings to them. I see it all the time. People come in here and ask questions about their catsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; behavior, and I find that there is something going on in their own lives, health related or work related and they realize that they are transmitting that information to their pets. After all, their role in our lives is to absorb some of our stuff.â&#x20AC;? Do you have any story ideas? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to hear them as well as see your pet photos. Send them to me at: marsolete@insightbb.com with your name, your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, age, breed and a short explanation and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll post them on my new Web site: www.marsiesmenagerie.com . You can also become a fan of Marsieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menagerie on Facebook. Come join in the fun, but always rememberâ&#x20AC;Śno nipping!

the dog knows the fear is going to begin again and the behavior is then trained into the dog.â&#x20AC;? Owners need to be able to show their pets what is and is not acceptable by example. If a pet reacts to a loud clap of thunder, she says that you must correct that immediately. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell them to lie down, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow them to overreact, that is how the animal will continue to behave. Make sure you are relaxed, think about your own behavior and body language is saying to the dogs.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;And,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just undesirable behavior that deserves attention. You should reinforce desired behavior with food, verbal or physical praise.â&#x20AC;? Most of what the experts told me covered canine, not feline behavior, so I called Cheryl Franklin, owner of Confetti Cats in Mt. Lookout (www.confetti cats.com). She has owned cats since grade school and is considered by many to be an expert in the area. Through the years, she has had several fearful felines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The best thing that I have found,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is to put them in a part of the house where they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel the storm. That means a

Baseball Pitch, Hit and Run competition in Newport Two local attorneys, John Hayden and Sean FitzGerald, will host a free Aquafina Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit, and Run Competition for area youth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know there is a lot of talented young baseball and softball players out there and it is exciting for me to provide an opportunity for them to compete and show their skillsâ&#x20AC;? said Hayden, who also serves as a Newport City commissioner. The event will be held: Saturday, April 17 at 10 a.m. at the Ralph Mussman Sports Complex in Newport. Cincinnati Reds mascot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosie Redâ&#x20AC;? will be on hand from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Florence Freedom mascot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Libertyâ&#x20AC;? will be in attendance from 10 a.m. to noon. There will be an ice cream truck on site and the concession stand for the Ralph Mussman Sports complex will be open. Pitch Hit and Run is the Official Skills Competition of Major League Baseball. This grassroots program is designed to provide youngsters with an opportunity to compete; free of charge, in a competition that recognizes individual excellence in core baseball skills. Competitors are divided

into four age divisions: 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14, and have the chance to advance through four levels of competition, including Team Championships at Major League ballparks and the National Finals at the 2010 MLB All-Star Game. The individual Pitching, Hitting and Running Champions, along with the All-

COINS?

If you have an important collection of coins for sale and were smart enough not to take them to some motel room for a low offer, we hold a Rare Coin Auction every year in connection with the Greater Cincinnati Numismatic Expo, held in June at Sharonville Convention Center, and now in its 27th year.

Around Champion in each age group at the local competition will be awarded and advanced to the Sectional Level of Competition.

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at the air. But, what about the owners whose pets are still bothered by storms? What can we do to comfort them as we go into thunderstorm season? Nipperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vet, Aaron Stamper, DVM of Highland Heights Animal Hospital (www.petwow.com) suggests putting your pet in a place in the house where they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t watch the storm; preferably in a spot that has as much sound proofing as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is evidence to suggest that dogs and cats can sense when a storm is coming,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most likely from barometric pressure change, and so anxiety sets in from past experiences.â&#x20AC;? It is the sound, he believes, that causes most of the petsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; anxiety. That would be why Nipperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to storms has changed since he lost his hearing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sound of thunder extends from the highest to the lowest frequency,â&#x20AC;? Stam-

effective making it not desirable when a quick storm pops up and Valium is not great for storms that last long into the night as it often wears off. There are some other tricyclic anti-depressant drugs like Elavil and Xanax. Karen Pilis, behaviorist for All Creatures Animal Hospital (www.all-creatures.com) in Amelia, finds that there are two versions of thunderstorm phobia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first is caused by the owner,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The second is an actual phobia from the pressure and noise of a storm that the owner has no contributing factors to.â&#x20AC;? For example, she explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two dogs I adopted at the age of 10 came to me with the phobia and no matter what I did I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change it. The ones I have had since puppies have never had storm phobias. Only the ones owned by someone previously have had it. The way that a dog behaves during a storm has everything to do with the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reactions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You gasp and the dog wonders what the problem is. The fear transfers to them and then we reinforce that fear because we comfort the dog and we pet them. So every time a storm happens,

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KaBOOOOOMMMMMM! A clap of thunder rattled the house. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lady! Lady! Woof, woof, woof! Let me out, let me out, NOW!â&#x20AC;? Nipper arfed impatiently scratching at the door. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why?â&#x20AC;&#x153; I asked suspiciously, narrowing my eyes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just so you can go out on the porch to run around, bark like a nut-case and annoy the neighbors?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, yeah,â&#x20AC;? he admitted, prancing about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mon, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a storm out there; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotta go show it whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boss.â&#x20AC;? Sighing, I opened the door and watched in amusement as our 14-and-threefourths-year-old, arthritic dog ran back and forth, barking at the top of his Cocker-Spaniel lungs. Spring, and its thunderstorms, used to be a major trauma at our house, causing Nipper to shiver and cower. That changed last year, when he went deaf. No longer able to hear the loud claps of thunder, his fear dissipated and was replaced by excitement. Now he loves stormy weather; happily wagging his tail and sniffing

per said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And since dogs hear better than we do it stands to reason that pets would be more sensitive to the loud noise created by storms.â&#x20AC;? Stamper, who owns several dogs, has successfully used ear plugs on his own pets to help keep them calm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are easy to put in,â&#x20AC;&#x153; he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safe, comfortable and easy to remove. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most ear plugs are designed to drastically reduce the noise of firearms which is similar to the frequency and decibel level of most storms.â&#x20AC;? How about medications? Even though it would be preferred not to use them, he says that tranquilizing medications are probably the most widely accepted means of curbing the effects of storms or fireworks for pets. The problem is, it is difficult to control the timing. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t predict exactly when a storm will hit and the medication needs enough time to take effect before it does. According to Stamper the most commonly used drugs are Acepromazine, a long acting tranquilizer lasting six to 12 hours and Valium that lasts two to four hours for most pets. Acepromazine takes about two hours to be

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

April 15, 2010

How to understand your weeds better Spring can be very frustrating for homeowners, especially when a crop of dandelions or clover pops up in the lawn. And that’s when the neighbors start giving you that “take care of your flowering weeds” stare. So before you try to get rid of them, first try to understand them.

Dandelions

At one time, there were no dandelions in the United States. They were brought here by the Europeans to serve many purposes. The dandelion was and still is a workhorse of a plant! The roots, which can get an inch thick and grow deeper into the ground than tree roots, were harvested and boiled for making a tea used for medicinal purposes. The foliage was grown for harvesting and eaten as you would any other type of greens. The unopened flower buds were eaten along with the foliage, and the opened yellow flowers were used for

making dandelion wine, as well as battered and deep fried for a little snack (and still are!). But unfortunately the dandelion escaped from the garden and has become a nuisance in the lawn – a nuisance only if you don’t like flowering plants in the turf. So, what is the best way to get rid of dandelions in the lawn? Keep the lawn good and thick. In most cases, where dandelions are growing, the lawn has thinned. Along sidewalks and driveways, low compacted areas, and poorly maintained lawns are where they show up the worst. If dandelions do pop up in the lawn, dig them out by cutting the root 6 to 8 inches below soil level. Spring treatments using a water soluble weed killer may work – treat when the flowers are in the puffball stage. (Treating in the fall is actually the best time to control dandelions and most weeds.)

ST A F THE

free). Except for when it’s flowering, clover is usually greener than the lawn, earthworms really like the soil when clover is present, it is disease and drought tolerant, and it is avoided by most turf pests. Once again, clover flowers are an important source of nectar for honeybees and bumblebees. Those flowers can also be picked and tossed in with your salads. Like with most “weeds,” when clover shows up, it says something is happening to cause the lawn to thin out and allow the clover to grow. So, make corrections to the soil in those areas to encourage the lawn to grow thicker. A thicker lawn means less clover and other assorted weeds. To control clover (in addition to having a thicker lawn) try applying corn gluten meal on a “multiyear program” to stop clover seeds from growing, as well as adding nitrogen back to your soil.

Note: Dandelion flowers are an important early bloomer for honeybees. If you have dandelions, let them flower for the bees, then try to control them later. And if you find you still can’t get rid of those dandelions in your lawn, remember – if you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em!

Clover

Although clover is actually a good plant, most folks don’t want it (flowering plants unwanted in the turf). Clover is a tough perennial that multiplies by roots and by seed – those seeds can lie dormant for years before growing. Once established it can send runners through the lawn in search of other thinner areas to grow. At one time clover seed was actually added to grass seed mixes in newer lawns. It took the nitrogen out of the air and made it available for the grass in the soil (actually feeds the lawn for

Clover patches can also be hand pulled out of the grass, Ron Wilson and works In the quite nicely garden in smaller yards. Combine these with good lawn care practices and you should be able to suppress the clover over a couple years, “naturally.” If you need to get rid of it now, spot treat the clover a weed killer that will kill clover but not the lawn. Clover is a tough, so make sure it’s listed on the label. Do not spray the entire lawn – simply spot treat the clover patches as needed. Spray for clover in mid to late spring, but the best time for clover control is spraying in the fall! Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. You can reach him at columns@communitypress.com

RELIGION NOTES St. John’s

St. John’s Anglican Catholic Church will be having a spaghetti dinner April 24 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $7 for adults and $3.50 for children. Carryout is available. St. John’s Anglican Catholic Church is located on O’Fallon Avenue in Dayton.

Interfaith Commission

The Northern Kentucky Interfaith Commission (IFC) will host its 16th annual Yom HaShoah Holocaust Remembrance Service at the Florence Christian Church April 18 at 2:30 p.m. The guest speaker will be Henry Fenichel, a Holocaust survivor and current board member of The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education. The Northern Kentucky Children’s Ensemble Prep Choir will perform under the direction of Joshua Huff. A reception will follow the service. For more information on this service, call 581-2237. Florence Christian Church is located at 300 Main Street. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

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Community

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

B7

Library accepting applications for new board member The Campbell County Public Library is seeking applications for an opening on its board of trustees. This is a non-paid, volunteer position. Members of the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of trustees are appointed to serve four-year terms. By law, board members must represent all areas of the county. In keeping with that law, the newly appointed board member needs to be from the Alexandria and southern Campbell County area. Dr. Ann Painter,

president of the board representing Alexandria and southern Campbell County, has served the maximum of two, four-year terms. Her current term ends Sept. 30, 2010. People with occupations or interests in areas of business, finance and banking would be especially beneficial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an exciting time for the library. Library usage is at an alltime high, our operations are strong and we have dedicated

employees. To be at the helm of a healthy library system that is enthusiastically supported by patrons and businesses is very rewarding,â&#x20AC;? said JC Morgan, director. Applicants should submit letters of interest and a resume to Library Director JC Morgan at the Cold Spring Branch, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076. Applications will be accepted through April 30. Interviews will be conducted in May. By law, the

names of two nominees will be forwarded to Kentucky State Librarian Wayne Onkst. The approved recommendations will be forwarded to Campbell County Judge Executive Steve Pendery, who will select one of the two names that have been submitted. The term for the new board of trustee member begins Oct. 1, 2010. The board meets at 4:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month. Meetings last about two

hours. Board of trustee responsibilities include reading prepared materials prior to the meetings, reviewing and approving the policies and budget of the library; and long-range planning. Trustees are expected to be advocates for the library. Other current board members are Don Grosenbach of Cold Spring, Rebecca Kelm of Fort Thomas, Angela Siddall of Newport and Dr. Judy Voelker of Bellevue.

Nurses host free advanced cardiac screening cal (listening to heart and carotid arteries in the neck). â&#x20AC;˘ Lipid (cholesterol) testing (Note: individuals seeking lipid testing should fast for 12 hours prior to the test (water or black coffee only). â&#x20AC;˘ Conducting a complete cardiac screening history (assessing risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, family history, etc.). â&#x20AC;˘ EKGs (for those individuals identified as needing one). Once the screening is performed, results will be tallied and discussed with each participant including information on how they may be able to reduce their risk for heart disease. Participants can take their screening information with them to share with their own health care providers if they choose. According to Dottie Baker, an advanced registered nurse practitioner practicing in Northern Kentucky who is coordinating the cardiac screening event, the state association wanted to give back to the community during its conference by helping the public recognize the risk factors associated with heart disease and how they possibly could reduce these factors in their own lives. Baker reports that heart

MARRIAGE LICENSES Megan White, 29, and Jody Helton, 35, both of Cold Spring, issued March 13. Kerry Powell, 28, and Dominick Favia, 29, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 25. Carley Baynum, 20, of Fort Thomas and Tyler Mardis, 19, of Cincinnati, issued March 25. Patricia McNutt, 50, of Hamilton and Herbert Seger, 57, of Dayton, issued March 25. Valeria Bazua, 26, of London and Michael Miller Jr., 26, of Fort Thomas, issued March 25. Heidi Armentrout, 29, of Alexandria and John Cullen, 31, of Cincin-

nati, issued March 27. Jill Mason, 31, of Mariemont and Timothy Gabennesch, 48, of Fort Thomas, issued March 27. Jolene Norber, 34, of Chicago and Scott Smith, 40, of Fort Thomas, issued March 27. Cindy Williams, 53, and Douglas Robinson, 50, both of Covington, issued March 27. Suzanne Merusi, 50, and William Hartsock, 51, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 30. Amy Gentry, 29, and Beau Stidham, 32, both of Fort Thomas, issued March 30.

disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women, and it is responsible for 34.3 percent or 1 of every 2.9 deaths in the

Global Spectrum, a facility management company at Cincinnatiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duke Energy Convention Center, has hired Kara Manis as an event manager.

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The Kentucky Coalition of Nurse Practitioners & Nurse Midwives will hold an Advanced Cardiac Risk Assessment screening 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, April 22, at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center. The screening is free and open to the public (over 18 years old only). No advance or pre-registration is required to receive the complimentary Advanced Cardiac Risk Assessment. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;walk-inâ&#x20AC;? screening event will be conducted at the Northern Kentucky Convention Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Exhibit Hall 2 (street level) located at 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Covington. The free public outreach event is part of the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 Conference that will bring approximately 650 nursing professionals to Northern Kentucky April 21-24 from throughout Kentucky for continuing education and networking opportunities. Advanced Practice Nurses (Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners or Nurse Midwives) will perform various cardiac risk screening procedures including: â&#x20AC;˘ Checking vital signs (blood pressure, pulse, respiration). â&#x20AC;˘ Taking a cardiac physi-

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CCF Recorder

Community

April 15, 2010

Emergency prep training in Campbell County The Campbell County Office of Emergency Management will be hosting a Implementing Continuity of Operations Planning Course April 21-22, in Highland Heights. This training will be delivered by the University of Maryland’s, Center for Health and Homeland Security (CHHS). Participants in this training will gain information and materials to train state and local, administrators and managers in the development and implementation of COOP plans in their communities as part of catastrophic event preparedness.

The major goal of this course is to teach key local, office holders, emergency management and public safety officials within their jurisdictions to write effective COOP plans that support the National Response Plan (NRP) and ensure that essential governmental functions, programs, services, systems, and personnel continue to operate during and after a disabling natural disaster or terrorist attack. This course incorporates a discussion based exercise that engages the participants in a hands-on learning experience. This is an invaluable instructional

tool that draws on the relative backgrounds of the participants to create a dynamic environment in which they must apply the principles of the course to a set of decisions that are likely to occur in a COOP Event scenario. Anyone wishing to attend this training is urged to register online at (https://ky.train.org/DesktopShell.aspx) reference course number 1019941. For more information contact William R. Turner, Director of the Campbell County office of Emergency Management at 859-547-3150.

CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES for the year ended June 30, 2009 ___________

Total primary government

$1,876,676

$

30,228 184,915 61,424 -

$

276,567 $ 276,567

27,742 63,176 -

$

90,918 $

90,918

$

27,231 14,467 3,000 -

2009 Primary Government

2008 Totals

$ (213,891) $ (63,852) (608,165) (610,518) (168,560) (105,909) 37,601 564,098 (2,415) (14,642) (265,938) (194,078) (52,458) (60,877) (53,304) (55,880) (114,502) (99,294) (22,861) (35,307)

44,698

(1,464,493

(676,259)

44,698

(1,464,493)

(676,259)

733,943 43,061 288,196

683,924 47,048 256,201

77,638 239,712 49,745 4,125 1,778 11,011 68,337

75,762 242,862 41,190 5,075 19,451 965 47,328

General revenues Taxes Property taxes, levied for general purposes Motor vehicle tax Payroll tax License fees Franchise Insurance premiums Occupational Other licenses Investment earnings Sale of Assets, net of cost Miscellaneous Total general revenues Loss on sale/disposal of property Change in Net Assets Net assets-beginning NET ASSETS-ENDING

1,517,546 (101,343) (48,290) 2,949,438 $ 2,901,148 $

1,419,806 743,547 2,205,891 2,949,438

CITY OF SOUTHGATE, KENTUCKY REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ON COMPLIANCE AND OTHER MATTERS BASED ON AN AUDIT OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH GOVERNMENT AUDITING STANDARDS Mayor and the City Council City of Southgate Southgate, Kentucky We have audited the financial statements of the City of Southgate (the “City”) as of and for the year ended June 30, 2009 and have issued our report thereon dated November 17, 2009. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Internal Control Over Financial Reporting In planning and performing our audit, we considered the City’s internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing our auditing procedures for the purpose of expressing our opinion on the financial statements, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the City’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on the effectiveness of the City’s internal control over financial reporting. A control deficiency exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent or detect misstatements on a timely basis. A significant deficiency is a control deficiency, or a combination of control deficiencies, that adversely affects the entity’s ability to initiate, authorize, record, process, or report financial data reliably in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles such that there is more than a remote likelihood that a misstatement of the City’s financial statements that is more than inconsequential will not be prevented or detected by the City’s internal control. A material weakness is a significant deficiency, or a combination of significant deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the financial statements will not be prevented or detected by the entity’s internal control. Our consideration of internal control was for the limited purpose described in the first paragraph of this section and would not necessarily identify all deficiencies in internal control that might be significant deficiencies or material weaknesses. We did not identify any deficiencies in internal control that we consider to be material weaknesses, as defined above. However, we identified the following deficiency in internal control that we consider to be a significant deficiency. While management is certainly knowledgeable in regard to the amounts reported in the financial statements, identifying and applying new authoritative guidance in regard to certain elements reported in the financial statements is outside the scope of management. At present the City lacks the required expertise on financial reporting necessary to successfully apply generally accepted accounting principles in regards to drafting the financial statements and related disclosures. Compliance and Other Matters As part of obtaining reasonable assurance about whether the City’s financial statements are free of material misstatements, we performed tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements, noncompliance with which could have a direct and material effect on the determination of financial statement amounts. However, providing an opinion on compliance with those provisions was not an objective of our audit, and accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. The results of our tests disclosed no instances of noncompliance or other matters that are required to be reported under Government Auditing Standards. This report is intended solely for the information and use of management, City Council, others within the entity, and federal awarding agencies and pass-through entities and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties.

Ray. Foley, Hensley & Company, PLLC A complete copy of the City of Southgate, Ky. audit report, including financial statements and supplemental information, is on file at the Southgate City Office located at 122 Electric Avenue, Southgate, Ky. and is available for public inspection from 8:00 am until 400 pm Monday through Thursday excluding holidays. Any citizen of Southgate may obtain a copy of the complete audit report, including financial statements and supplemental information for their personal use. Any citizen requesting a copy of the audit report will be charged a fee for duplication costs not to exceed twenty-five cents ($.25) per page. Any member of the public may secure a copy, at no cost, of the financial statement prepared in accordance with KRS 424.220 at the Southgate CE-1001550741-01.INDD

Six teams from the Latecomers League at Super Bowl Lanes in Erlanger made the trip north to bowl in the Ohio State U.S. Bowling Congress State Tournament and took the Boone, Kenton and Campbell County Recorders along. Four teams will be going on to bowl in the U.S. Bowling Congress National Tournament in El Paso, Texas, in May. Back row: Sandy Varney, Mary Ann Ranz, Mary Baute, Cindy Cruze, Debbie Evans, Robin Lusby, Deana Johnson, Bonnie Ivey, Barb Crum, Cissy Van Huss, Diana Wiedemann, Gwyn Dicken, Jill Rolfsen and Penny Wichman. Middle row: Rachel Dicken, Janet Brossart, Carol Phelps, Stephanie Augustin, Diane Dietz, Lynn Winkler. Front row: Shaunna Jacobs, Linda Prather, Shawna Fornash, Lorna Funk, Barb Crapser, Debbie Riehle and Carissa Perry. PROVIDED

CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS For the Year Ended June 30, 2009

Net (Expense) Revenue and Changes in Net Assets Program Revenues Operating Capital Charges for Grants and Grants and Expenses Services Contributions Contributions

Functions/Programs Primary government Governmental activities Administration $ 241,122 Police 635,907 Street 231,736 Sewer 7,094 Waste disposal 187,330 Fire 265,938 Community center 113,882 Parks 56,304 Garage 114,502 Interest on long-term debt 22,861 Total governmental activities 1,876,676

Recorder goes bowling

REVENUES Taxes Licenses and pemits Intergovernmental Charges for services Fined and forfeitures Interest Special assessments Miscellaneous Total revenues EXPENDITURES Current: General Government Police Fire General Services Recreation Capital outlay Debt service: Principal Interest Total expenditures Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Lease Proceeds Transfers in Transfers out Total other financing sources and uses Net change in fund balances Fund balances beginning Fund balances ending

Public Works/ KDOT

General $ 4,002,230 4,614,205 192,689 567,851 68,580 130,633 203,332 $ 9,779,520

$

8,538 30,610 $ 1,208,875

$

$ 1,164,964 2,694,411 2,405,951 1,752,952 617,594 653,839

$

$

14,666 $ 9,304,377

$ 1,015,454

$ 463,928

475,143

193,421

820,000 (493,130)

Other Governmental Funds

Total Governmental Funds

$

14,727 6,820 $ 21,547

$

23,974 397,600 734,814 9,980 $ 1,166,368

$ 4,077,403 4,638,179 1,684,843 1,302,665 68,580 173,147 33,334 235,397 $ 12,213,548

122,038 341,890

$

$

11,526 769,027 420,002

$ 1,176,490 2,694,411 2,405,951 2,678,654 617,594 2,437,926

$ 41,378

455,478 60,250 $ 1,716,283

455,478 74,916 $ 12,541,420

(426,690)

(19,831)

(549,915)

(327,872)

57,460 -

420,000 (389,810)

(12,990)

418,470 -

820,000 895,930 (895,930)

326,870

57,460

30,190

(12,990)

418,470

820,000

802,013

250,881

(396,500)

(32,821)

(131,445)

492,128

7,923,088

336,058

791,666

977,762

501,604

10,530,178

586,939

$ 395,166

370,159

$ 11,022,306

$

25,464 989,990

$

Tower Park

9,269 2,724 25,245 37,238

$ 8,725,101

75,173 1,094,554 -

Central Business District

9,173 32,205 -

$ 944,941 $

(Financial statement and annual audit copies are available at the office of the City Treasurer, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue) CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY BALANCE SHEET, GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS For the Year Ended June 30, 2009 General ASSETS Cash and cash $ 7,464,964 equivalents Receivables: 105,803 Taxes 7,695 Governmental units Assessments 974,634 Accounts 10,325 Accrued Interest 100,341 Prepaids Due from other funds 805,404 Restricted assets - cash $ 9,469,166 Total assets LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES Liabilities: Accounts payable $ 109,655 Accrued liabilities 150,919 Deferred revenue 117,983 Due to other funds 236,640 Accounts payable from restricted assets 128,868 Total liabilities 744,065 Fund balances: Reserved for prepaids 100,341 Unreserved, reported in: General fund 8,624,760 Special revenue funds Debt service Capital projects funds Total fund balances 8,725,101 Total liabilities and fund balances $ 9,469,166

Public Works/ KDOT

Central Business District

Tower Park

Other Governmental Funds

Total Governmental Funds

$

364,408 18,899 383,307

$ 9,556,415 114,066 36,221 21,664 993,533 10,325 103,472 241,198 805,404 $ 11,882,298

$

400,260

$ 374,892

$ 951,891

$

8,263 28,526 12,821 154,558 604,428

8,843 3,131 86,640 $ 473,506

$ 951,891

$

$

$

$

$

$

4,668 12,821 -

62,795 2,144 8,843 4,558

6,950 -

800 12,348 -

$

184,868 153,063 151,995 241,198

17,489

78,340

6,950

13,148

128,868 859,992

-

-

-

-

100,341

586,939 586,939

395,166 395,166

944,941 944,941

320,291 49,868 370,159

8,624,760 1,302,396 49,868 944,941 11,022,306

604,428

$ 473,506

$ 951,891

383,307

$ 11,882,298

$

Total governmental fund balances $ Amounts reported for governmental activities in the statement of net assets are different because: Capital assets used in governmental activities are not financial resources and, therefore, are not reported in the funds, net of accumulated depreciation $10,538,211 Other long-term assets are not available to pay for current-period expenditures and therefore are deferred in the funds. Costs of issuance of debt, including discounts and premiums, are expensed currently for governmental funds and are carried as deferred charges in the statement of net assets. Accrual interest payable on long-term debt Long-term liabilities, including notes payable, are not due and payable in the current period and therefore are not reported in the funds: Acrued absences payable Notes and leases payable

(278,455) (2,522,448)

Net assets of governmental activities

19,186,575

CE-1001551460-01.INDD

$

11,022,306 10,782,754 137,546 49,572 (4,700)


ON

THE

RECORD

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrest

Paul J. Finn, 30, 31079 Ky. Hwy. 435, warrant at 31079 Ky. Hwy. 435, March 22. Jason M. Nuckels, 39, 12340 Burns Road, speeding, driving on DUI suspended license - third offense at A.J. Jolly main entrance, March 25. James C. Medley, 26, 8602 Calument Way, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at Newport on the Levee, March 27. Thomas G. Phillips Jr., 26, 526 Enright Ave., DUI - first offense at U.S. 27 and Martha Layne Collins Blvd., March 27. Michael J. David, 23, 6215 Craig Line Court, public intoxication in a public place - first and second offense at 1 Levee Way, March 28. Samuel A. Campbell Jr., 48, 8334 Jakaro Drive, DUI - first offense, possession of marijuana, possession of alcoholic beverage container in motor vehicle at Combs Hehl Bridge, March 27. Kenneth R. Parker, 39, 11795 Mary Ingles Hwy., DUI - second offense, driving on DUI suspended license second offense at I-471 South, March 28. Jeffrey C. Turner, 24, 10568 Lynn Lane, third degree burglary - building at 5380 Four Mile Road, March 29. Timothy L. Noble, 21, 6362 Mary Ingles Hwy., third degree burglary building at 5380 Four Mile Road, March 29. Terry N. Black, 46, 13176 Bakersfield Road, first degree wanton endangerment first degree police officer two counts, first degree wanton endangerment - one count, resisting arrest at 13176 Bakerfield Road, April 1.

Incidents/reports Criminal mischief

Report of lock cut off soft drink machine and money taken at 9722 Alexandria Pike, March 30.

Fourth degree assault

Man reported being punched in face by male neighbor at 762 Smith Hiteman, March 31.

Leaving the scene of an accident

Officer responded to scene of single vehicle accident with vehicle striking tree and found no one at scene at Licking Pike at Deer Run Road, March 19.

Road rage

Reported at AA Highway and Ivor Road, March 26.

Suspicious activity

Report of rear door of trailer tampered with and pry marks left at 9843 Riva Ridge, March 26. Report of e-mail account hacked into by unknown person and requests sent to contacts in address book asking for money at 1873 Upper Tug Fork, March 29. Report of lock of out buildings broken, but nothing taken at 12433 Mary Ingles Hwy., March 29.

Theft by deception

Report of truck not delivered after money wired for transaction at 10790 U.S. 27, March 22.

Theft by failure to make required disposition Report of rented tool not returned at 8235 Alexandria Pike, March 31.

Theft by unlawful taking

Report of bronze or copper merman statue taken from front yard at 3787 Nine Mile Road, March 27.

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

Report of scrap metal taken and lock on fence cut at Tollgate Road at old tire dump, March 29.

Third degree burglary

Suzanne Barnett, 64, Silver Grove, died March 31, 2010, at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati. She was a data entry operator at Cincinnati Bell. Survivors include her son, Alan Barnett; sister, Jeanne Morgan; brothers, James and David Toppen and three grandchildren. Memorials: Humane Society, 22 Commonwealth, Erlanger, KY 41018.

Stanley Beiting

Stanley “Butch” Beiting, 72, Fort Thomas, a carpenter, died April 3, 2010, at his home. His daughter, Angel Beiting, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Billie Sue Beiting; sons, Ted Beiting of Independence and Jeff Beiting of Edgewood; daughter, Sherri Beiting of Wilder; brothers, Msgr. Ralph Beiting of Louisa; Donald Beiting of Wilder, Jerry Beiting of Peach

BIRTHS

Collins Blvd., April 1. Report of woman attempted to take prescription medication and jewelry

Report of mail and newspaper boxes knocked off posts at 282 Pooles Creek Road, March 22.

Unauthorized use of motor vehicle Vehicle mishap

Report of metal in roadway scratched vehicle's lower front and driver's side door at AA Highway and California Crossroads, March 30.

Verbal argument

Reported at Washington Trace Road, March 27.

COLD SPRING Arrest

Dennis L. Baker, 48, 830 Isabella St., theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, receiving stolen property at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 18. Sandra K. Alfano, 44, 11373 Pippin Road, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting, receiving stolen property at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 18. Madisen R. Caldwell, 22, 168 Breckenridge, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 24. Jesseca L. Ball, 24, 35 Wright Court, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 24. James J. Blanchet, 36, 434 Van Voast Ave., operating vehicle with expired operators license, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia - first offense at Ky. 9, March 27. Jack H. Ensor III, 21, 841 Slateview, fourth degree assault at 4210 Alexandria Pike, April 1. Camy R. Barnard KC, 22, 132 North Grand Ave., Unit 16, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., April 3. Tiffany R. Teirney, 21, 8444 Summer Place, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., April 3. Rodney Baker, 42, 830 Isabella St., receiving stolen property, operating on suspended or revoked operators license at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 18.

Incidents/reports Theft by unlawful taking

Report of copper wire cut from side of building and cell tower at 3704 Alexandria Pike, March 26. Report of attempted quick change scam at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., Feb. 28. Report of knight statue taken off front porch at 40 James Court, March 29. Report of caller attempted to activate phone cards by pretending to be from corporate office at 5710 Alexandria Pike, April 1. Report of meat and sea food taken without paying at 70 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., April 3. Report of golf clubs taken from vehicle at 8 Glenridge Drive, April 4. Report of attempt to switch price stickers to pay less for merchandise than the price at 5400 Alexandria Pike, April 5.

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Report of attempt to take compact discs without paying at 5400 Alexandria Pike, March 30. Report of two juveniles taking clothing without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., March 30. Report of items taken without paying at U-scan at 70 Martha Layne

Grove, Jim Beiting of Silver Grove; sisters, Sr. Martha Beiting, S.N.D. of Covington, Ann Schadle of Highland Heights and Mary Lou Deavy of Fort Thomas. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Newport Central Catholic High School Fund, 13 Carothers Road, Newport, KY 41071-2497; or St. Jude Church Mission, 1121 Meadowbrook Lane, Louisa, KY 41230-0177.

Ronald Bowen Jr.

Ronald G. Bowen Jr., 52, Florence, died April 2, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a truck driver for USF Holland. Survivors include his wife, Rachel Bowen of Florence; sons, Neddie Raleigh of Newport and Ronald Bowen of Florence; daughters, Donna Washington of Florence and Veronica Bowen of Detroit, Mich.;

Deaths continued B10

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

at 5400 Alexandria Pike, April 2. Report of juvenile attempted to take items in purse without paying at

Third degree criminal mischief

Reported at Ky. 915 and Ky. 536, March 22.

POLICE

ws@

unit

B9

RECORDER

POLICE REPORTS

Report of weed-eater taken from shed at 11798 Lees Road, March 26. Report of tools taken from barn at 12705 Shaw Goetz, March 23. Report of cast iron tubs, wire and other items taken from barn at 2609 Wagoner Road, March 29.

DEATHS Suzanne Barnett

CCF Recorder

April 15, 2010

LEGAL NOTICE Group No. 41206 PIDN: 999-99-36-419.00 Portion of Southview Avenue Fort Thomas, Kentucky ORDINANCE NO. 0-4-2010 AN ORDINANCE CLOSING AND VACATING A PORTION OF SOUTHVIEW AVENUE LOCATED IN THE CITY OF FT. THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas has determined that a portion of Southview Avenue located within the City of Fort Thomas should be closed. The public way is more particularly described as follows: Located in the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, lying at the northwesterly terminus of Southview Avenue and being part of a publicly dedicated street as recorded in Slide 649B, of the Campbell County Clerk’s Office at Newport, Kentucky, and is more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point in the northerly rightof-way line of Southview Avenue, being the common corner of Lot 23 and Lot 24 of New Southview Subdivision (Slide 649B); thence with said right-of-way line N61°48’00"W 17.38 feet to a point, being the TRUE PLACE OF BEGINNING; thence crossing Southview Avenue S28°12’00"W 40.00 feet to a point in the southerly right-of-way line of Southview Avenue; thence with the southerly right-ofway line of Southview Avenue N61°48’00"W 240.62 feet to a point; thence N14°10’00"E 45.88 feet to a point; thence S87°50’00"E 61.34 feet to a point; thence S14°10’00"W 32.40 feet to a point; thence S61°48’00"E 188.78 feet to the TRUE PLACE OF BEGINNING containing 0.251 acres. See plat attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference and known as Exhibit A. SECTION II The City has determined that the owner of the property, which abuts the portion of Southview Avenue to be closed is Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. SECTION III The City of Fort Thomas has provided written notice of the closing of a portion of Southview Avenue to the property owner, Northern Kentucky Water District. A Receipt of Notice has been signed by the abutting property owner and is attached hereto as Exhibit B. Northern Kentucky Water District owns the real estate abutting the portion of Southview Avenue to be closed by virtue of a deed recorded in Deed Book 473, page 612, of the Campbell County Clerk’s office, Newport, Kentucky. The abutting property is part of Parcel 1 of said deed. SECTION IV The owner of property abutting the portion of Southview Avenue; namely, Northern Kentucky Water District, has given its written, notarized Consent to the closing of the portion of Southview Avenue and a copy of the Consent is attached hereto, marked Exhibit B, and is incorporated herein by reference. SECTION V That portion of Southview Avenue described in SECTION I hereof is hereby declared closed without any further action pursuant to K.R.S. 82.405 (1) and (2). SECTION VI This ordinance shall be effective when read, passed and advertised according to law. Adopted and passed by the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky and approved and signed this 5th day of April, 2010. APPROVED: Mary H. Brown, Mayor FIRST READING: March 15, 2010 ADOPTED: April 5, 2010 ATTEST: Melissa Kelly, City Clerk 1001550796

INVITATION TO BID Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III will be accepting sealed bids for the construction of Hamlet Row, five (5) new homeownership buildings, located on Hamlet St. in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, April 30, 2010, at the offices of NM HC III, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "Hamlet Row Construction Project #10-04". Contract Documents may be purchased from Phipps Reprographics, 6920 Plainfield Rd., Cincinnati, OH (513) 793-1030. Copies of the Contract Documents are open to public inspection and may be examined at the following office: Allied Construction Industries 3 Kovach Drive Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 NMHC III will conduct a pre-bid conference at the offices of NMHCIII at 10:00 a.m., local time, APRIL 15, 2010. A certified check or bank draft, payable to NMHC III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. NMHC III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHC III to do so. It is the intent of NMHC III to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHC III is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1177812/1548163

5400 Alexandria Pike, April 3.

Theft of services

Report of cab passengers transported

from Newport did not pay fare at 5905 Marble Way, April 2.

CITY OF INDEPENDENCE KENTON COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE

CITY OF FORT THOMAS CAMPBELL COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the City Clerk, 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas Kentucky, 41075, until 11:00 A.M. local time on MAY 12, 2010, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete the project known as the FORT THOMAS 2010 STREET PROGRAM, and, at the same time and place, publicly opened and read aloud.

Sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the City Clerk, 5409 Madison Pike, Independence, Kentucky, 41017, until 11:00 A.M. local time APRIL 29, 2010, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete the project known as the ARBOR COURT IMPROVEMENTS, and, at the same time and place, publicly opened and read aloud.

Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the office of CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky, 41042, after APRIL 15, 2010, at a cost of $40.00 per set (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $10.00 per set. Checks to be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc.

Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at the office of CDS Associates, Inc., 7000 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky, 41042, after APRIL 15, 2010, at a cost of $50.00 per set (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $10.00 per set. Checks to be made payable to CDS Associates, Inc.

Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the F. W. Dodge Corporation and Allied Construction Industries (ACI).

Specifications will also be on file in the plan room of the F. W. Dodge Corporation and Allied Construction Industries (ACI).

Each bidder is required to submit with their proposal a bid bond or certified check equal in amount to five percent (5%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount.

Each bidder is required to submit with his proposal a bid bond or certified check equal in amount to five percent (5%) of the base bid. The bidder to whom the contract is awarded will be required to furnish a surety bond in an amount equal to onehundred percent (100%) of the contract amount.

The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Fort Thomas before the Contract will be awarded.

The successful bidder will be required to have a current occupational license in the City of Independence before the Contract will be awarded.

Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City that this project be completed no later than SEPTEMBER 30, 2010.

Bidders must comply with the Prevailing Wage Rates on Public Improvements in Kenton County and the City of Independence, as ascertained and determined by the Kentucky Revised Statute as provided in Section 337.505 through 337.550 of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

The Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. By the order of the Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Don Martin City Administrative Officer Publishing Date: THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 2010 Campbell County Recorder 1001551350 LEGAL NOTICE Fort Thomas Board of Adjustment Public Hearing The Board of Adjustment of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Public Hearing at the City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, on Tuesday, April 27, 2010 at 6:00 P.M. for the following cases: CASE NO. 1267 - A hearing of an appeal filed by Nadine Howard, applicant and owner of property located at 535 Highland Avenue, requesting a side yard variance to allow an existing deck to remain.

Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the City that this project be completed no later than NOVEMBER 1, 2010. The Board of Council of the City of Independence, Kentucky, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. Chris Moriconi, Mayor 1001551483

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the City of Fort Thomas will receive sealed bids in the office of the Purchasing Agent, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, up to 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 29th, 2010 on the following items:

SURPLUS ITEM(S): 1997 Ford Crown Victoria – 2FALP71W3VX208800, current age: 87,775 CASE NO. 1268 - A hearing of an appeal 2003 Ford Crown Victoria – filed by Sara and Elmer Grosser, appli- 2FAFP71WX3X158181, current cants and owners of property located at 9 age: 92,646 Linden Avenue, requesting a variance to allow the construction of a room addition 2005 Ford Crown Victoria – 2FAHP71W05X110121, current within 3 feet of the side property line. age: 108,303

VIN mileVIN mileVIN mile-

CASE NO. 1269 - A hearing of an appeal filed by Patricia Schoettker, owner and Mike Phirman, applicant, for property located at 22 Indiana Avenue, requesting variances for the front and side yards to allow the construction of a new home.

Sealed bids shall be returned on the Bid Blank which is a part of the Bid Package, all of which may be obtained at the Office of the City Purchasing Agent, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY 41075, or by downloading the CASE NO. 1270 - A hearing of an appeal filed by George and Auleta Schurr, appli- Bid Package at www.ftthomas.org.

cants and owners of property located at 115 Tower Place, requesting a variance to allow the construction a room addition/deck within 34 feet of the rear property line.

Items are available for inspection by calling the City of Fort Thomas at (859) 441-1055. Items are in as-is condition; no warranties expressed or implied. Buyer is responsible for pickup and Any adjoining property owner who is un- transportation of items. The City reable to attend this hearing is encouraged serves the right to waive irregularities in to submit signed, written comments to the the bids pursuant to State Law and City Board concerning the proposed project. Said written correspondence shall be re- bidding procedures. All sales will be ceived no later than the time of public hear- made to the highest responsible bidder; ing, and thereupon shall be a matter of the City reserves the right to reject any public record. All correspondence shall be and all bids. Bids received after the directed to City of Fort Thomas, General specified time and date will be returned Services Department, Attn: Julie Rice, 130 unopened to the bidder. N. Ft Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075

The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building, General Services Department at (859) 572-1210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. City of Ft. Thomas General Services Department (Publishing date: 04/15/2010) 1001551055

Payment to be made on the day of acceptance in the form of cash (U.S. Dollars), Cashier’s Check, or Money Order only. Bid Blank forms must be submitted in sealed envelope and marked on the outside “Surplus Bid Opening – 04/29/10”. Bids will be opened and read at the office of the Purchasing Agent, City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075, on Thursday, April 29, 2010, at 3:05 p.m. Signed: Jennifer Machesney, Purchasing Agent Publication Date: April 15, 2010 1001551047


B10

CCF Recorder

From B9

Dorothy Delaney

Lawrence Brossart, 65, California, died April 9, 2010, at his home. He was a farmer and member of Sts. Peter and Paul Church in California, Catholic Order of Foresters and Sts. Peter and Paul Seniors. Survivors include his brother, Norman Brossart of California; sisters, Andrea Shaw, Teresa Bezold and JoAnn Fornash, all of California, Pam Bezold and Millie Baynum, both of Alexandria, Stella Vonessen of Indianapolis and Joyce McClafferty of Wilder. Burial was at Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery in California.

Dorothy R. Tedesco Delaney, 88, Fort Thomas, died April 3, 2010, at her home. She was a Realtor with West Shell and Lucille Schaber Realty Co., member of the Northern Kentucky Realtors Association, volunteer at St. Luke Hospital in Fort Thomas. Her husband, Joseph Delaney and grandsons, Michael Sheridan and Dennis Delaney, died previously. Survivors include her son, Dennis Delaney of Edgewood; daughters, Denise Sheridan of Cold Spring, Patty Haas, Ana St. Claire and Michelle Middleton, all of Fort Thomas; 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Scot Bush

Florence Enzweiler

mother, Ilene Bowen of Detroit; brothers, Robert and Warren Bowen, both of Detroit, Mich.; and sister, Irene Bowen of Detroit, Mich. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements.

Lawrence Brossart

Scot D. Bush, 40, Edgewood, died April 9, 2010, in Boone County. He was a factory worker for White Castle and a member of Elsmere Church of Christ. Survivors include his father and stepmother, Benton and Joan Bush of Edgewood; his mother and stepfather, Julia and Robert Broaddus of California, Ky.; sisters, Shayna Hamilton of Morning View and Jennifer Jones of Walton; brothers, Andrew Broaddus of California, Ky. and Roy Jones of Florence; his son, Jacob Miller; and daughter, Brooklyn Miller. Burial was in Hebron Lutheran Cemetery.

Deaths

April 15, 2010

Florence G. Enzweiler, 78, Camp Springs, died April 4, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center, Newport. She worked for McAlpin’s Department Store, was a member Ladies Auxiliary of Camp Springs Fire Department and St. Joseph Church in Camp Springs. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Roman Enzweiler; daughters, Laura Thropp of Houston, Texas, Linda Reller of Fort Thomas, Carole Kaiser, Amy Eglian and Gail Wilhem-Olsen, all of Alexandria; sons, Bob Enzweiler of California, Ky., Andy Enzweiler of Silver Grove; sisters, Catherine Seibert of Fort Thomas, Georgia Berger of Maryland and Ann Groeschen of Cold Spring; brothers, Jesse Groeschen

of Seattle, Wash., Jude Groeschen of Xenia, Ohio and Julius Groeschen of Erlanger; 12 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Camp Springs. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, Attn: Sharon Turner, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071; or Saint Joseph School Education Fund, 6833 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs, KY 41059.

Alfred Gorres

Alfred C. “Bud” Gorres, 80, Dayton, died April 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a refrigeration technician at French Bauer and the Conservatory Restaurant. Survivors include his wife, Freda Gorres; son, Randall Gorres of Dry Ridge; daughters, Barbara Gorres of Florence, Kathleen Hoffman of Orlando, Fla.; sister, Margie Satterlee of Jacksonville, Fla.; stepdaughters, Sandy McMillan of Dayton, Carol Kinney of Fort Thomas and Brenda Blaut of Philadelphia, Pa.; stepsons, Jerry McMillan of Radcliff and Denny McMillan of Dayton; 16 grandchildren and 24 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements. Memorials: American Heart Association National Center, 7272 Greenville Ave., Dallas, TX 75231.

Charles Griffin

Masonic Lodge and the Christian Tabernacle Church in Newport. Survivors include his wife, Grace Griffin; sons, Michael Griffin of Alexandria and Mark Griffin of Fort Thomas, and a daughter, Marcia Falk of Pawleys Island, S.C. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Christian Tabernacle Van Fund, 325 Washington Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Roger Hall

Roger L. Hall, 60, Melbourne, died April 4, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Priscilla Hall; daughters, Christi Hawkins of Hebron, Brandi Hall of Newport and Kelly Brulport of Melbourne; brother, Robert Pelfrey of Camden, Ohio; sister, Carol Freshour of Cincinnati and six grandchildren. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home, Newport, handled the arrangements.

Edwin Joseph Hengelbrok

Edwin Joseph Hengelbrok, 80, Fort Thomas, died April 7, 2010, in Fort Thomas. He was the president of W.J. Baker Metal Manufacturing Co. in Wilder, served as chairman of the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, past president of the Mental Health, Mental Retardation Regional Board, Board of Directors of St. Luke Hospital, Newport Optimist Club,

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Recorder. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the "Obituaries" link at NKY.com. Northern Kentucky and Campbell County Chamber of Commerce; chairman of the board for the Boy Scouts Cherokee district; former director of Newport National Bank, member of the Greater Cincinnati Foreign Trade Zone Board, Greater Cincinnati Cancer Control Program, Campbell County Cable Television Board and St. Thomas Church in Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Jean Germann Hengelbrok; daughter, Nancy Breitenbach of Flemington, N.J.; sons, John Hengelbrok of Fort Thomas, Richard Hengelbrok of Berlin, Germany, Robert Hengelbrok of Weston, Conn.; brother, James Hengelbrok of Cincinnati; sister, Anne Ratterman of Denver, Colo., and 11 grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: The Hengelbrok Legacy Fund for St. Thomas School, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075; or St. Elizabeth Hospital Foundation Fort Thomas, 85 N. Grand Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Betty Herron

Betty Ruth Herron, 75, Erlanger, died April 5, 2010, at her daughter’s home in Erlanger. She worked as a cook for 20 years at R.A Jones School and was a member of Elsmere Church of Christ. Her husband, Charles Herron; daughter, Linda Shelton; and granddaughter, Brittany Taylor, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Sherry Taylor of Erlanger; stepson, Dan Herron of Newport; brother, Roy Watkins of Dayton, Ohio; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Brittany Taylor Teen Mission Fund, c/o First Church of Christ, 6080 Camp Ernst Road, Burlington, KY 41005.

Deaths continued B11

Charles William Griffin, 87, Fort Thomas, died April 9, 2010, at his home. He was a World War II Navy veteran, member of Fort Thomas COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY COUNTY OF CAMPBELL CITY OF COLD SPRING ORDINANCE NO. 10- 961

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOW ING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE, SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED According TO LAW TO THE FOL LOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING.

Whereas, Section 130 of the Cold Spring Code of Ordinance pertains to Curfew; and Whereas, the City of Cold Spring is desirous of amending the hours of said ordinance.

DECEASED VIONE CLARK 115 HARVARD PL SOUTHGATE, KY 41071

FIDUCIARY RICHARD CLARK 115 HARVARD PL SOUTHGATE KY 41071

RICHARD MATTINGLY 15 RENSHAW HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076

MICHAEL MATTINGLY 30 HOLMES AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

THOMAS WILKING 421 BERRY AVE BELLVIEW KY 41073

TIMOTHY WILKING 6145 OAKHAVEN DR CINCINNATI OH 45233

JESSICA BIRKENHAUER PO BOX 861 COVINGTON KY 41011

§ 130.01 CURFEW.

DAVID L. CLARK 37 EARNSCLIFF CT FT THOMAS KY 41075

ROBERT BLAU 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING Y 41076

ROBERT BLAU 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING KY 41076

(B) (1) It shall be unlawful for any person under the age of 18 to be or remain in or upon any public assembly, building, place, street or highway within the city at night during the following periods:

RITA LAWS 501-5 CHESAPEAKE AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

LINDA LAWS 501-5 CHESAPEAKE AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

JESSICA BIRKENHAUER 40 W PIKE ST COVINGTON KY 41075

DIANE PORTER 16 WHISPERING WOODS LN ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

ROBERT JENNINGS 3 WHISPERING WOODS ALEXANDRIA, KY 41001

ROBERT JENNINGS 3 WHISPERING WOODS ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

HOMER GREGORY 15 OBSERVATORY AVE BELLVIEW KY 41073

WILLIAM GREGORY 2901 N M-52 OWOSSO MI 48867

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

TIMOTHY DANIEL 14 CEDARVIEW ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

DOUGLAS DANIEL 3298 NlAGRA ST CINCINNATI OH 45251

FRANK BENTON IV PO BOX 72218 NEWPORT KY 41071

DOROTHY GOSHORN 42 DONNELLY DR FT THOMAS KY 41075

DONNA WILSON 118 HARTWEG AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

JESSICA BIRKENHAUFR 40 W PIKE ST COVINGTON KY 41011

PATRICIA BERRY 21 HIGHLAND MEADOWS CR #7 HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076

ROBERT BERRY 503 S HIGH ST STE 200 COLUMBUS OH 43215

MICHELLE TURNER 600 GREENUP ST COVINGTON KY 41011

MARY MCNUTT 940 HIGHLAND AVE FT. THOMAS KY 41075

PAUL GAROFOLO 14389 1 HISSEM RD BUTLER KY 410006

JOHN FORTNER 526 GREENUP ST COVINGTON KY 41011

JOSEPH EPPSTEIN 137 CLOVER RIDGE FT THOMAS KY 41075

ANNA EPPSTEIN 122 CLOVER RIDGE FT THOMAS K 41075

JANN SIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

JOSEPH FERMAN 22 WILSON RD FT THOMAS KY 41075

PAULA HUG 215 CLOVER RIDGE FT THOMAS KY 41075

ED TRANTER 33 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

RUTH V SMITH 233 RIDGEWAY SOUTHGATE KY 41071

MARGARET DOYLE 7545 BONNIE DR WEST CHESTER OH 45068

MERLE CLARK 145 N 3RD ST DANVILLE KY 40422

MALCOLM EADS 10 FOUNDERS CT COLD SPRING KY 41076

ELOISE EADS 10 FOUNDERS CT COLD SPRING KY 41076

JANN SEIDENFADEN 122 N FT THOMAS AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

WALTER RUCH 400 BRENTWOOD LN. ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

LYNNDA VOLMER 11 ARBOR DR ALEXANDRIA KY 41001

JOHN BROOKING 909 WRIGHTS SUMMIT FT WRIGHT KY 41011

ELIZABETH HERZOG 24 HIGHLAND MEADOWS CR HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076

RALPH HERZOG 24 HIGHLAND~MEADOWS CR HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076

EVELYN HOFFMAN 164 D0GWOOD DR HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076

RONALD HOFFMAN 632 FOREST HILL DR LEXINGTON KY 40509

GREGORY KRIEGE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK COLD SPRING KY 41076

AUDREY FRITSCHE 940 HIGHLAND AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

RANDALL FRITSCHE 63 MIAMI PKWY FT THOMAS KY 41075

SCOTT MCMURRAY 515 MONMOUTH ST NEWPORT KY 41075

PEARL HINES 117 STRATHMORE AVE FT THOMAS KY 41075

WILLIAM HINDS 7337 LAWYER RD CINCINNATI OH 45144

BY: CK. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK TAUNYA NOLAN JACK, CIRCUIT CLERK 1273881/1551375

ATTORNEY N/A

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING COLD SPRING CODE OF ORDINANCES PERTAINING TO OFFENSES AGAINST MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF COLD SPRING, COUNTY OF CAMPBELL, COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY: Section I

VINCENT THOMAS 16 W 4TH ST NEWPORT KY 41071

The city of Cold Spring amends § 130.01(B) of the Cold Spring Code of Ordinances as follows: (parts struck through are to be deleted and underlined added)

1:00 am 12:00 am 1:00 am 12:00 am 11:00 pm Sunday 11:00 pm Monday 11:00 pm Tuesday 11:00 pm Wednesday 11:00 pm Thursday

to 6:00 am Saturday to 6:00 am Sunday to 6:00 am Monday to 6:00 am Tuesday to 6:00 am Wednesday to 6:00 am Thursday to 6:00 am Friday

LEGAL NOTICE Angilo’s of Alexandria; California Angilo’s, Sheri Bitter, mailing addresses; 8109 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001; 3520 Ivor Road, California, KY 41007. Hereby declares intention(s) to apply for a Retail Beer License no later than May 1, 2010, The business to be licensed will be located at 8109 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001; 3520 Ivor Road, California, KY 41007 doing business as Angilo’s of Alexandria; California Angilo’s. The owner(s); Principal Officers and Directors; Limited Partners; or Members) are as follows: Owner, Sheri Bitter of 14 Crupper Lane, Alexandria, KY 41001. Any person, association, corporation, or body politic may protest the granting of the license(s) by writing the Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, 1003 Twilight Trail, Frankfort, KY. 40601-8400, within 30 days of the date of this legal publication 1219455/1001549404

Request for Proposals The Housing Authority of Newport (HAN) is Requesting Pro(2) It is a curfew violation for a child under 13 years of age to be in a public place posals for specific after 10:00 pm or before 5:00 am 6:00 am on any day. Realty services. In brief, HAN is seeking a qualified firm or inSection II dividual to engage in Realty services to Any section or provision of this Ordinance which is declared invalid by a court of HAN and it’s entities competent jurisdiction for any reason, such declaration shall not invalidate, or adversely in the advertising, affect, the remainder of this Ordinance. promotion and selling of up to thirty Section III homeownership units. Requests for This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, publication Proposals are due no and recording, according to law. later than 12:00 p.m., local time, May 13, Adopted this 22nd day of March 2010. 2010, at the offices of the Housing Authority First Reading- February 22 , 2010 Votes Cast 6 Yes 0 No of Newport, located at 30 East 8th. St. Second Reading- March 22 , 2010 Votes Cast 6 Yes 0 No Newport, KY 41071. The RFP packet may be obtained by conCity of Cold Spring tacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217, by e-mail at By: __/s/ Mark Stoeber______________________ rschweinzger@neigh Mark Stoeber borhoodfoundations.c Mayor om or may be downloaded from the HAN Attest: website at www.neighborhoodfo /s/ Rita Seger______________________ undations.com The Rita Seger hearing and/or Clerk speech-impaired may CE-1001551669-01.INDD call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. The Housing Authority of LEGAL NOTICE Newport reserves the NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE FOLLOWING SETTLE right to waive any inMENTS HAVE BEEN PRESENTED O THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT formality, irregularity, COURT, WRITTEN EXCEPTIONS TO THE ABOVE SETTLE or defect in any proMENTS MUST BE FILED WITHIN 20 DAYS OF THIS NOTICE. IF posal, and to reject NO EXCEPTIONS ARE FILED SAID SETTLEMENTS WILL BE any/or all proposals CONFIRMED AND ORDERED RECORDED. should it be deemed in the best interest of TYPE EXECUTOR DECEASED The Housing AuthoriFINAL JEROME ZIEGELMEYER HERBERT ZIEGELMEYER The quickest way to ty of Newport to do PARTIAL SHIRLEY ORLECK GERTRUDE ORLECK get rid of your so. It is the intent of FINAL DAVID MARSCHNER RITA MARSCHNER The Housing Authoriunwanted items is to FINAL SUE ANN WEBER WILLIAM LAMPE sell them quickly in the ty of Newport to FINAL JAMES SIMPSON ROBERT SIMPSON award a contract to Community Classified. FINAL THELMA FARNEY CATHERINE NORRIS the lowest responsiFINAL LUDIE JOHNSON MARILYN GAMBLE ble and responsive bidder. The Housing TAUNYA NOLAN JACK, CIRCUIT COURT CLERK Call Authority of Newport, BY: CK. WASSER DUPTY CLERK is an Equal 513.242.4000 Kentucky CAMPBELL COUNTY DISTRICT PROBATE COURT Opportunity Employ1273881/1551492 er. 1680

Cleaning out your basement or attic?


Deaths From B10

Sandy Taylor of Crittenden; sons, Gerald Kannady and Danny Kannady, both of Dry Ridge, Tim Kannady of Crittenden; sisters, Rita Warren of Georgia, Deborah Teaford of Alexandria, Linda Smith of Bromley, Sheila Smith of Florence and Judy Jackson of Dry Ridge; nine grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Hill Crest Cemetery, Dry Ridge. Memorials: Memorial and Honor

John Kannady

John W. Edsel Kannady, 73, Dry Ridge, died April 4, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a heavy equipment operator for Bavarian Corp. in Walton and member of Pleasant View Baptist Church. His wife, Bernice Kannady, died in 1997. Survivors include his daughter,

Donation Program - American Diabetes Association, P. O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312.

Mary Ling

Mary A. Ling, 91, of Owensboro, formerly of Carthage, died April 4, 2010, at Owensboro Medical Health System. She was a homemaker and member of the Carthage United Methodist Church. Her husband, Roger L. Ling,

PUBLICATION SUMMARY ORDINANCE NO. 0-03-2010 AN ORDINANCE CONFIRMING THE CITY ENGINEER’S ESTIMATE OF THE COST OF THE IMPROVEMENT AND CERTIFICATE OF APPORTIONMENT FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF AUDUBON PLACE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH ST. NICHOLAS PLACE; MANOR LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; MONTVALE COURT FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; NEWMAN AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CHURCHILL DRIVE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH KYLES LANE; WOODLAND PLACE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; AND SWEETBRIAR AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ALL IN THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND ALL IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS THERETO AS SUBMITTED BY THE CITY ENGINEER AND AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL; APPROVING AND LEVYING A SPECIAL ASSESSMENT AGAINST THE ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS AND PROVIDING FOR ITS PAYMENT; DIRECTING THE CITY CLERK TO PUBLISH AN ABSTRACT OF THIS ORDINANCE, DIRECTING THE CITY TREASURER TO PREPARE AND DISTRIBUTE THE ASSESSMENT BILLS REQUIRING ALL ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS TO PAY THE IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT. That the Public Works Committee and the City Engineer recommend the acceptance of the improvement of the streets listed in the title of this Ordinance. The work is completed and the City Engineer’s estimate of the cost and the Certificate of apportionment are hereby accepted. SECTION II That special assessment rates as set out below per linear foot and fronting on listed streets, be and the same is hereby apportioned, levied, and assessed against said real estate and the owners thereof (see attached Exhibit “A”) at the stated cost per foot, as set out as follows: STREET

FRONT FT COST CITY PORTION

Audubon Place (25’) Audubon Place (28’) Manor Lane (20’) Manor Lane (28’) Montvale Court Newman Avenue Sweetbriar Avenue Woodland Place

$ 4.71 $ 6.80 $ 6.78 $ 9.54 $ 6.42 $ 5.37 $ 7.29 $ 8.06

FRONT FT COST PPTY OWNR PORTION $ 4.71 $ 6.80 $ 6.78 $ 9.54 $ 6.42 $ 5.37 $ 7.29 $ 8.06

FINAL COST $ 4,315.54 $ 10,129.66 $ 18,936.19 $ 20,151.69 $ 17,082.36 $ 46,174.11 $ 32,674.47 $ 23,507.04

SECTION III Payments for all improvements shall be due within forty-five (45) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment and any assessment levied that is not paid when due shall bear a penalty of five percent (5%). An additional ten percent (10%) penalty will be levied thirty-one (31) days after the due date, and any unpaid assessment shall accrue eight percent (8%) per annum interest, except for those property owners participating in the Installment Payment Plan, as outlined below, and shall continue to accrue and be liable as provided by law. The City’s portion of the entire improvement cost shall be paid within thirty (30) days from the acceptance of said work under the contract. INSTALLMENT PAYMENT PLAN A property owner may have the option to finance the payment of their assessment bill over a specified period of time subject to the total amount of their assessment. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $400, but less than $1,000 may finance their bill over a three (3) year period with equal payments. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $1,000 may finance their bill over a five (5) year period with equal payments. The total amount of the assessment to quality for the improvement installment plan shall not be less than $400. An interest rate of eight per cent (8%) per annum shall be levied on the unpaid portion of the balance. The first annual installment shall become due and payable on July 1, following the year in which the project was completed. Any interested property owner qualifying for the improvement Installment Payment Plan shall initiate this process by completing an Installment Agreement Form with the City’s Director of Finance within thirty (30) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment. A non-refundable administrative fee of thirty-five dollars ($35) shall be required to process the Installment Agreement Application Form. Installment payments shall be made to the Finance Office on or before July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement. If any property owner fails to make their installment payment by July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement, the entire unpaid balance will become due immediately and payable in full with no recourse. The City shall exercise its rights to proceed to collect all amounts in default of improvement assessment bills by initiating appropriate legal action. The City Treasurer shall, within one week after the Ordinance is published, send the assessment bills requiring all property owners to pay the improvement tax levied. I, Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney for the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky, and an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Mayor and Board of Council, and that this Summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of the Ordinance. ___________________________ Jann Seidenfaden, City Attorney WIDTH OF PAVEMENT = 25' Name Mailing Address BANKENPER, CHARLENE 26 AUDUBON PL. HERDINA, STEPHEN A. & KAREN F. 37 AUDUBON PL. BORNE, PATRICIA C. 45 AUDUBON PL. ARNZEN, NATHANIEL EYER 49 AUDUBON PL.

City, State, Zip Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075

Assessed Address 26 AUDUBON PL. 37 AUDUBON PL. 45 AUDUBON PL. 49 AUDUBON PL.

WIDTH OF PAVEMENT = 28' Name Mailing Address LAROSA, WALTER A. 29 AUDUBON PL. NEAB LLC 11 AUDUBON PL. FT. THOMAS ENTERPRISES INC. P.O. BOX 388 DOEPKER, JAMES A. & DARCY M. 12 HIGHLAND AVE. HESCH, ROBERT L. & BETTIE R. 21 AUDUBON PL. LESTER, CHARLES T. & KATHLEEN R. 25 AUDUBON PL. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 15 S. FT. THOMAS AVE BANKENPER, JOHN A. PSC 26 AUDUBON PL.

% of Project 22.82% 15.83% 5.46% 5.89% 50.00%

Frontage PerFoot Total 209.10 4.71 984.86 145.10 4.71 683.42 50.00 4.71 235.50 54.00 4.71 254.34 458.20 $2,158.12

City, State, Zip Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075

WIDTH OF PAVEMENT = 20' Name Mailing Address TRAUTH, JAMES A. & SHARON L. 104 MANOR LN. JANSEN, GERALD K. & MERLIN 105 MANOR LN. MERRIFIELD, JOAN E. 106 MANOR LN. CAUDILL, JOHN L. & MARIA A. 108 MANOR LN. JANI, DARSHAN P. & SONIA D. 110 MANOR LN. DEINLEIN, CHRISTOPHER & JONI 111 MANOR LN. PIERATT, EDWARD & LAURA 119 MANOR LN. ROLF, KEVIN J. & SANDRA G. 120 MANOR LN. SCHELL, DARREL G. JR. & ANDREA 123 MANOR LN. GERL, GEORGE J. & LOUISE M. 124 MANOR LN. KINSMAN, DONALD V. & DOROTHY M. 128 MANOR LN. CONNIFF, PATRICK J. & CATHERINE 132 MANOR LN. ENGLAND, ROBERT & DEBRA A. 134 MANOR LN. BOTTO, MARK D. & KIMBELL D. 138 MANOR LN. BUECKER, DUSTIN J. & SUZANNE W. 141 MANOR LN. SEWARD, GARY L. & DENISE M. 145 MANOR LN. PLUNKETT, JIM & JOAN 147 MANOR LN. MARTIN, WILLIAM P. II & CHRISTIN 150 MANOR LN.

Assessed Address PIDN % of Project 29 AUDUBON PL. 14-213.00 0.67% 11 AUDUBON PL. 12-779.00 3.06% 11 S. FT. THOMAS AVE.13-642.00 8.85% 17 AUDUBON PL. 13-222.00 3.36% 21 AUDUBON PL. 14-224.00 3.36% 25 AUDUBON PL. 14-938.00 4.03% AUDUBON PL. 36-399.00 20.76% 26 AUDUBON PL. 12-318.00 5.91% Total 50.00%

Frontage PerFoot Total 10.00 6.80 68.00 45.60 6.80 310.08 131.77 6.80 896.04 50.00 6.80 340.00 50.00 6.80 340.00 60.00 6.80 408.00 309.12 6.80 2102.02 88.00 6.80 598.40 744.49 $5,062.53

City, State, Zip Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075

Assessed Address 104 MANOR LN. 105 MANOR LN. 106 MANOR LN. 108 MANOR LN. 110 MANOR LN. 111 MANOR LN. 119 MANOR LN. 120 MANOR LN. 123 MANOR LN. 124 MANOR LN. 128 MANOR LN. 132 MANOR LN. 134 MANOR LN. 138 MANOR LN. 141 MANOR LN. 145 MANOR LN. 147 MANOR LN. 150 MANOR LN.

WIDTH OF PAVEMENT = 28' Name Mailing Address GERL, LOUISE M. 15 MANOR LN. HIGHLAND HILLS PROPERTIES LLC 122 S. FT THOMAS AVE. VOGELSANG, JOAN 2 MANOR LN. LABER, MICHAEL & PATRICIA 23 MANOR LN. SCHROER, ELEANOR B. 33 MANOR LN. PENDERY, P. STEVEN & DANA 39 MANOR LN. MORRIS, DAVID B. & TERI 4 MANOR LN. BUSCHLE, MARK & KRISTEN 90 MANOR LN. HENGELBROK, EDWIN JR. & HARRIET 96 MANOR LN. CITY OF FT. THOMAS R-O-WHAROLD, MICHAEL & EVALENE 234 S. FT.THOMAS AVE. TRAUTH, JAMES A. & SHARON L. 104 MANOR LN.

PIDN % of Project 16-944.00 2.15% 14-461.00 4.37% 12-744.00 2.15% 12-855.00 2.15% 14-369.00 2.15% 17-182.00 4.29% 13-530.00 4.29% 16-087.00 2.15% 12-980.00 2.68% 13-739.00 2.15% 14-663.00 2.15% 12-977.00 2.15% 13-382.00 2.15% 12-579.00 2.15% 13-084.00 3.06% 16-469.00 3.40% 32.215.00 3.07% 13-616.00 3.36% Total 50.00%

Frontage PerFoot Total 60.00 6.78 406.80 122.12 6.78 827.97 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 120.00 6.78 813.60 120.00 6.78 813.60 60.00 6.78 406.80 75.00 6.78 508.50 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 60.00 6.78 406.80 85.50 6.78 579.69 95.00 6.78 644.10 85.79 6.78 581.66 93.90 6.78 636.64 1397.31 $9,473.76

City, State, Zip Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft.Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 Ft.Thomas, KY 41075 Ft. Thomas, KY 41075

Assessed Address 15 MANOR LN. 19 MANOR LN. 2 MANOR LN. 23 MANOR LN. 33 MANOR LN. 39 MANOR LN. 4 MANOR LN. 90 MANOR LN. 96 MANOR LN. ALLEY MANOR LN. 104 MANOR LN.

PIDN % of Project 17-291.00 4.26% 16-133.00 3.86% 15-652.00 5.92% 14-838.00 2.37% 16-356.00 6.20% 15-710.00 1.92% 15-421.00 3.73% 15-803.00 3.17% 14-175.00 5.75% 0.81% 15-879.00 6.57% 16-944.00 5.45% Total 50.00%

Frontage PerFoot Total 90.00 9.54 858.60 81.50 9.54 777.51 125.00 9.54 1192.50 50.00 9.54 477.00 131.02 9.54 1249.93 40.46 9.54 385.99 78.70 9.54 750.80 67.03 9.54 639.47 121.33 9.54 1157.49 17.04 9.54 162.56 138.75 9.54 1323.68 115.00 9.54 1097.10 1055.83 $10,072.62

PIDN 12-318.00 13-512.00 12-571.00 13-679.00 Total

died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Sharon Kurtz of Owensboro and Carolyn Campbell of Naperville, Ill.; four grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Mount Gilead Cemetery, Carthage. Alexandria Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Carthage United Methodist Church, 3427 Carthage Road, California, KY 41007.

Name GUARDIAN SAVINGS BANK DRAKE, ROBERT J. & JERLYN WILDER, FRAN TRUST SCHRODER, JUANITA & HELEN KLARE, JOS. N. & LINDA E. YOUNG, JOSHIAH & ELIZABETH GRONECK, KEVIN J. & DAWN GRONECK, KEVIN J. & DAWN MCGINNIS, MARK & JEANNIFER KEY WUEST INVESTMENTS NESTHEIDE, ROBERT R. & KATHY KEY WUEST INVESTMENTS SEILER, JOHN A. THOMAS, MICHAEL & ROBIN THOMAS, MICHAEL & ROBIN MCCAUSEY, JAMES N. JR. & ARVIN J. WENZEL, RUTH E. TRUST CITY OF FT. THOMAS THIRTY DAV JO LTD LIABILITY U.S.P.S. (EXEMPT)

April 15, 2010

Marlene Long

Marlene Joy Long, 73, Newport, died April 5, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a nursing care provider. Survivors include her husband, Carl Long Sr.; sons, Larry Long of Southgate and Carl Long Jr. of Newport; daughters, Debbie Watts of Newport, Linda Cunningham of Maui, Hawaii, Pauline Gies of Florence, Nellie Napier of Newport,

CCF Recorder

B11

Peggy Henn of Cold Spring, Lisa Brossart of Burlington, Carol Constable and Sandy Turner, both of Loveland; brothers, Terry and Wayne Quinn, both of Louisville; 26 grandchildren; and 25 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Grand View Cemetery, Mentor.

Deaths continued B12

City, State, Zip Assessed Address Mailing Address PIDN % of Project 2774 BLUE ROCK RD. CINCINNATI, OH 45239 11 MONTVALE CT. 12-866.00 2.44% 36 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 36 MONTVALE CT. 13-314.00 1.88% 25 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 25 MONTVALE CT. 13-861.00 2.07% 39 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 39 MONTVALE CT. 14-521.00 2.82% 46 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 46 MONTVALE CT. 14-680.00 2.82% P.O. BOX 533510 ATLANTA, GA 30353 22 MONTVALE CT. 14-923.00 2.04% 45 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 45 MONTVALE CT. 15-192.00 2.82% 45 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 45 MONTVALE CT. 15.193.00 0.73% 30 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 30 MONTVALE CT. 15-194.00 1.88% 609 MONTEREY LN. COLD SPRING, KY 41076 21 MONTVALE CT. 15-514.00 2.07% 33 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 33 MONTVALE CT. 15-529.00 1.88% 609 MONTEREY LN. COLD SPRING, KY 41076 19 MONTVALE CT. 16-435.00 2.07% 17 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 17 MONTVALE CT. 16-456.00 2.07% 52 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 52 MONTVALE CT. 16-893.00 0.75% 52 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 52 MONTVALE CT. 16-894.00 1.48% 42 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 42 MONTVALE CT. 17-168.00 2.82% 26 MONTVALE CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 26 MONTVALE CT. 17-251.00 2.04% R-O-W FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 MONTVALE CT. 0.63% 835 YORK STREET NEWPORT, KY 41071 106 S. FT. THOMAS AVE.13-216.00 10.02% 24 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 24 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. 4.70% Total 50.00% Name Mailing Address City, State, Zip Assessed Address PIDN % of Project BUECHEL CARMELLA A. 334 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 334 NEWMAN AVE. 12-734.00 0.97% RAY JOHN & HOLLI 333 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 333 NEWMAN AVE. 12-431.00 0.79% BIAS MASON & RAMONA D. 352 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 352 NEWMAN AVE. 12-485.00 1.51% DIXIUS JAMES R. 330 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 330 NEWMAN AVE. 13-210.00 0.18% JORDAN DONNA 326 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 326 NEWMAN AVE. 13-165.00 1.32% GAMMON, ROBERT F. & ELIZ. 360 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 360 NEWMAN AVE. 13-678.00 1.20% GIBSON, SUZANNE 18 CLARA’S VIEW FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 468 NEWMAN AVE. 13-763.00 1.30% JACOBS, EDWARD L. 8250 BLOME RD. CINCINNATI, OH 45243 370 NEWMAN AVE. 14-200.00 2.73% JACOBS, EDWARD L. 8250 BLOME RD. CINCINNATI, OH 45243 383 NEWMAN AVE. 14-201.00 1.11% HITEMAN CHRISTOPHER 327 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 327 NEWMAN AVE. 14-212.00 0.94% HOGAN, MICHAEL D. & JUDY 462 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 462 NEWMAN AVE. 14-306.00 0.72% JACOBS, ED CONST. CO. INC. 184 HIGHLAND AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 380 NEWMAN AVE. 14-438.00 0.87% LW LIMITED - NORTH AMERICAN PROP 212 E 3RD ST. STE 300 FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 379 NEWMAN AVE. 14-833.00 4.98% SHAEFER, ROBERT C. & MELANIE 434 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 434 NEWMAN AVE. 14-897.00 0.74% WADE, MARLELE L. 430 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 430 NEWMAN AVE. 14-910.00 0.73% MACMILLAN, ALEX & JOYCE 422 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 422 NEWMAN AVE. 15-055.00 1.07% HEMPLEMAN, ALAN C. & KIM 332C NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 332 NEWMAN AVE. 15-203.00 0.18% OLDIGES, THOS. A. & PATRICIA 426 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 426 NEWMAN AVE. 15-612.00 0.75% PLAVSIC, IRVIN C. & MARY E. 442 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 442 NEWMAN AVE. 15-771.00 1.13% BROWN JUDITH SECRIST 332A NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 332A NEWMAN AVE. 15-781.00 0.18% SCHAEFER, KENNETH W. & THERESA P.O. BOX 102 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 332 NEWMAN AVE. 16-237.00 0.18% HOGAN, GERALD & SHEILA 456 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 456 NEWMAN AVE. 16-238.00 1.13% STRATMAN, PATRICIA 485 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 446 NEWMAN AVE. 16-768.00 1.58% STRATMAN, PATRICIA 485 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 485 NEWMAN AVE. 16-769.00 2.83% MCDERMOTT, BETTY & GREGORY 355 NEWMAN AVE. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 355 NEWMAN AVE. 17-321.00 0.84% TOWN HOMES AT HUNTEMANN PLACE 12 GUNPOWDER RIDGE FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 100 HUNTEMANN LN. 14-914.01 3.24% CARRIAGE HOUSE CONDO ASSOC. 1407 GRAND AVE. NEWPORT, KY 41071 NEWMAN AVE. 15-569.01 5.47% NORAN, DAVID P.O. BOX 75272 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 1913 MERCER WAY 15-569.00 0.59% WELCH, MICHAEL & KERI 3 PATRICIA CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 14-426.00 0.84% DONELAN, JAMES & JESSICA 7 PATRICIA CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 16-297.00 0.86% HERZOG, FRANCIS 13 PATRICIA CT. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 14-220.00 0.42% MORGAN, VICKI & JONES, MARY 5 BOARDWALK PL. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 12-430.00 1.29% FRANK, MARY FRANCES 8 KYLES LN. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 13-599.0 1.23% WEDGEWOOD MANOR CONDO HOA 1730 WEDGEWOOD CR. FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 37-139.00 3.78% BOARDWALK R-O-W 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 00-000.00 0.32% HUNTEMANN LN. R-O-W 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 00-000.00 0.32% JENNIFER CT. R-O-W 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 00-000.00 0.32% CHURCHILL RD. R-O-W 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 00-000.00 1.05% KYLES LANE R-O-W 130 N.FT.THOMAS AVE. FT.THOMAS, KY 41075 NEWMAN AVE. 00-000.00 0.32% Total 50.00% Name Mailing Address City, State, Zip Assessed Address PIDN % of Project BILTZ, THOMAS & BARBARA 84 SWEETBRIAR AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 84 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 12-497.00 2.16% TURNER, DAVID C. & JENNIFER M. 55 SWEETBRIAR AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 55 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 12-622.00 1.67% BURKART, WM. H. JR. & RITA M. 33 SWEETBRIAR AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 33 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 12-758.00 1.80% AHEARN, DANIEL T. & MARGARET A. 69 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 69 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-205.00 1.67% BARLOW BRANDON & ASHLEY 63 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 63 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-297.00 1.67% GABBARD FAMILY TRUST 37 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 37 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-658.00 1.68% FORD, MARY P. 92 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 92 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-575.00 1.20% SANOW, PAUL & ZELEZNIK, M. 48 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 48 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-625.00 1.67% GILLES, KEITH E. & LESLIE P. 66 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 66 SWEETBRIAR AVE.13-784.00 1.67% HILLS, THOMAS G. & AMY G. 25 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 25 SWEETBRIAR AVE.14-258.00 1.58% HOLMES, WM. G. & CAROLE S. 54 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 54 SWEETBRIAR AVE.14-318.00 1.67% FENNELL, KENT D. & HANNAH E. 60 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 60 SWEETBRIAR AVE.14-519.00 1.67% GRIMM RYAN & KIMBERLY 34 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 34 SWEETBRIAR AVE.14-595.00 1.72% LILES, JAMES D. 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE.14-962.00 1.17% MACKE, MARY C. 49 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 49 SWEETBRIAR AVE.15-060.00 1.67% MALONE, DAVID B. & TRACIE B. 73 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 73 SWEETBRIAR AVE.15-079.00 2.23% POMPILIO, JASON & AMANDA 43532 CLIVEDON CT. ASHBURN, VA 20147 22 SWEETBRIAR AVE.15-187.00 2.24% PENDERY, THOMAS & AMY 65 S SHAW LN. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 78 SWEETBRIAR AVE.15-699.00 1.74% FOSTER, PHILIP A. & CAROL D. 72 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 72 SWEETBRIAR AVE.15-754.00 1.67% LILES, JAMES D. 16 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 0 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 15-878.01 0.33% ROY, JAMES DALE & MARCIA H. 45 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 45 SWEETBRIAR AVE.16-151.00 1.67% JANOSICK SUZANNE 28 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 28 SWEETBRIAR AVE.16-189.00 1.80% WIEFERING AARON & ADENAN 85 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 85 SWEETBRIAR AVE.16-221.00 1.78% SIMONS, MITCHELL E. 81 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 81 SWEETBRIAR AVE.16-531.00 1.67% WATSON, ALFRED P. DIANE P. 15 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 15 SWEETBRIAR AVE.17-172.00 2.37% ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 44 SWEETBRIAR AVE.Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 44 SWEETBRIAR AVE.33-526.00 1.67% PETERSON, MARLENE 331 HIGHLAND AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 15-878.00 2.91% BEZOLD, DONALD W. & JAMIE O. 403 HIGHLAND AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 SWEETBRIAR AVE. 12-483.00 3.19% Total 50.00% Name Mailing Address City, State, Zip Assessed Address PIDN % of Project MAINES, DIANA L. 30 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 30 WOODLAND PL. 12-305.00 1.89% DEDMAN, RICHARD TODD 5 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 5 WOODLAND PL. 12-647.00 2.00% PAGLIAMINTO, THOMAS P. 39 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 39 WOODLAND PL. 12-989.00 1.72% COSTA, ANTHONY & JOYCE P. 40 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 40 WOODLAND PL. 12-999.00 1.37% DEDMAN, FAMILY REV LIV TRUST 22 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 22 WOODLAND PL. 13-126.00 3.77% BARTON, BRIAN R. 13 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 13 WOODLAN PL. 13.427.00 1.72% MUHLBERGER, MARC & RAMONA 44 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 44 WOODLAND PL. 13-515.00 1.37% PAQUIN, GARY W. & CHARLOTTE M. 9 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 9 WOODLAND PL. 13-737.00 1.61% GARRY, JANE M. 51 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 51 WOODLAND PL. 14-008.00 1.72% LANDWEHR, HILARY W. 47 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 47 WOODLAND PL. 14-214.00 1.72% HUDEPOHL, PATTI A. 26 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 26 WOODLAND PL. 14-379.00 1.72% MARX, LEONARD F. & MILDRED 38 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 38 WOODLAND PL. 15-124.00 2.16% NOBLE, JOHN & CHANELLE 48 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 48 WOODLAND PL. 14-687.00 1.72% EVERETT, JOYLEE C. 5090 TEBBE LN. HAMILTON, OH 45013 29 WOODLAND PL. 14-840.00 1.72% EDDINS AIMEE J. 33 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 33 WOODLAND PL. 15-077.00 1.72% WEYER, JOSEPH A. & KIMBERLY N. 56 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 56 WOODLAND PL. 15-115.00 1.72% FRINK, PAUL & CARYN 43 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 43 WOODLAND PL. 15-395.00 1.72% NEWMAN, ROBERT & SUSAN 55 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 55 WOODLAND PL. 15-535.00 1.72% NEWMAN, DOROTHY 59 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 59 WOODLAND PL. 15-538.00 0.86% PAGLIAMINTO, THOMAS & DELORES 35 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 35 WOODLAND PL. 15-656.00 1.72% RANSON, JOHN H. & SANDRA A. 52 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 52 WOODLAND PL. 15-890.00 1.72% ROMITO, ANNA LUCILLE TTE 21 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 21 WOODLAND PL. 16-104.00 1.72% WELSCHER, DAVID J. & REGINA M. 25 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 25 WOODLAND PL. 16-105.00 1.72% SUDKAMP, CATHERINE M. & JEFFERY 57 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 57 WOODLAND PL. 16-799.00 0.86% GARDNER, JASON & MINDI 17 WOODLAND PL. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 17 WOODLAND PL. 17-402.00 1.72% JMG INVESTMENTS LLC 9 HIGHLAND AVE. Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 9 HIGHLAND AVE. 16-597.00 5.72% CITY OF FORT THOMAS R-O-W Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 LODGE LN. 0.34% CITY OF FORT THOMAS R-O-W Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 UNIMPROVED ROW 0.60% Total 50.00%

Frontage 65.00 50.00 55.00 75.00 75.00 54.25 75.00 19.47 50.00 55.00 50.00 55.00 55.00 19.85 39.27 75.00 54.25 16.69 266.75 125.00 1330.53 Frontage 86.20 70.00 134.36 16.20 116.93 106.20 115.26 242.43 98.56 83.41 63.70 77.69 442.39 65.87 65.00 95.39 16.20 67.00 100.00 16.20 16.20 100.00 139.92 251.46 74.37 288.25 486.24 52.39 74.22 76.78 37.26 115.00 109.60 335.93 28.00 28.00 28.00 93.16 28.00 4441.77 Frontage 96.60 75.00 80.86 75.00 75.00 75.38 53.60 75.00 75.00 70.78 75.00 75.00 77.03 52.25 75.00 100.12 100.49 78.00 75.00 15.00 75.00 80.64 79.98 75.00 106.15 75.00 130.45 143.16 2240.49 Frontage 55.00 58.25 50.00 40.00 110.00 50.00 40.00 47.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 63.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 166.69 10.00 17.48 1457.42

Total 417.30 321.00 353.10 481.50 481.50 348.29 481.50 125.00 321.00 353.10 321.00 353.10 353.10 127.44 252.11 481.50 348.29 107.15 1712.54 802.50 $8,542.00 PerFoot Total 5.37 462.89 5.37 375.90 5.37 721.51 5.37 86.99 5.37 627.91 5.37 570.29 5.37 618.95 5.37 1301.85 5.37 529.27 5.37 447.91 5.37 342.07 5.37 417.20 5.37 2375.63 5.37 353.72 5.37 349.05 5.37 512.24 5.37 86.99 5.37 359.79 5.37 537.00 5.37 86.99 5.37 86.99 5.37 537.00 5.37 751.37 5.37 1350.34 5.37 399.37 5.37 1547.90 5.37 2611.11 5.37 281.33 5.37 398.56 5.37 412.31 5.37 200.09 5.37 617.55 5.37 588.55 5.37 1803.94 5.37 150.36 5.37 150.36 5.37 150.36 5.37 500.27 5.37 150.36 $23,852.30 PerFoot Total 7.29 704.21 7.29 546.75 7.29 589.47 7.29 546.75 7.29 546.75 7.29 549.52 7.29 390.74 7.29 546.75 7.29 546.75 7.29 515.99 7.29 546.75 7.29 546.75 7.29 561.55 7.29 380.90 7.29 546.75 7.29 729.87 7.29 732.57 7.29 568.62 7.29 546.75 7.29 109.35 7.29 546.75 7.29 587.87 7.29 583.05 7.29 546.75 7.29 773.83 7.29 546.75 7.29 950.98 7.29 1043.64 $16,333.17 PerFoot Total 8.06 443.30 8.06 469.50 8.06 403.00 8.06 322.40 8.06 886.60 8.06 403.00 8.06 322.40 8.06 378.82 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 507.78 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 201.50 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 403.00 8.06 201.50 8.06 403.00 8.06 1343.52 8.06 80.60 8.06 140.89 $11,746.81 PerFoot 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.42


B12

CCF Recorder

On the record

April 15, 2010

DEATHS From B11

Donald Mueller

Donald Kenneth Mueller, 58, California, died April 9, 2010, at his home. He was a vice-president at PNC Bank in Cincinnati, a service center executive for ADP, owner of Edgecom in California and a member of St. Joseph parish in Cold Spring. Survivors include his wife, Gayle Geiman Mueller of California; daughter, Tiffany Kuehne of Alexandria; sons, Trevor Mueller of Covington and Tyler Mueller of Park Hills; mother, Terese Mueller of Cold Spring; sister, Nancy Scanlon of Independence; brothers, Dennis “Rock” Mueller of Hebron, Steve Mueller of Covington, Jerry Mueller and Kenny Mueller, both of Price Hill, Ohio and three grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home in Fort Thomas handled the arrangements. Memorials: Jewish Hospital, c/o Bone Morrow Transplant Unit, 4777 E. Galbraith Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45236.

Robert Nickles

Robert E. Nickles, 70, Kenton County, died April 7, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a self-employed construction worker, Mason and member of Bradford Lodge 123 F. & A.M. Survivors include his wife, Bobbie Jean Gay Nickles; sons, Rick and Rob Nickles, both of California,

Ky.; daughter, Lisa Jolly of Alexandria; stepson, Charles Gay of Falmouth; stepdaughter, Lisa Riley of Park Hills; brother, Ronnie Nickles of Detroit, Mich.; sisters, Wilma Hughes and Betty Nickles, both of Knott County and five grandchildren. Swindler & Currin Funeral Home, Independence handled the arrangements.

Sandy Parker

Sandy Parker, 57, Silver Grove, died April 5, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and served as an emergency medical technician for Silver Grove. Survivors include her husband, Frank “Bob” Parker of Silver Grove; daughter, Amanda Foster of Edgewood; sisters, Linda Turner of Las Vegas, Nev., Darlene Mullins of Covington and Gail Ross of Burlington; brothers, Carl Mullins of Amelia and Jimmy Mullins of Batavia and one stepgranddaughter. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or Memorial and Honor Donation Program - American Diabetes Association, P. O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312.

Ladonna Robinson

Ladonna E. Robinson, 79, of Holmes Beach, Fla., formerly of Florence, died April 8, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a homemaker, member of Saramana Model A Restorers

Club, Northern Kentucky Association for the Retarded now known as the Point/Arc in Covington, Westside Christian Church in Bradenton, Fla. and Florence Christian Church. Survivors include her husband, Ron Robinson; son, Paul Robinson of Burlington; daughters, Nannette Dedman of Florence, Cyndy Kloeker of Walton, Lauren Baumgardt of Amelia, Ohio and Rhonda Heringer of Fort Thomas; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: The Point/ARC of Northern Kentucky, 104 Pike St., Covington, KY 41011.

John Rouse

John Robert “Bob” Rouse, 79, Southgate, died April 5, 2010, at Highlandsprings of Fort Thomas Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. He was a supervisor for 35 years with AT&T in Cincinnati, member of the Telephone Pioneers of America, Historical Society of Campbell County and a Korean War Army veteran. His wife, Gayle Shaw Rouse, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Jenny Schalk of California; son, Scott Rouse of Union; brother, William Rouse of Dayton and five grandchildren. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery, Mentor. Memorials: Campbell County Historical Society, 8352 E. Main St., Alexandria, KY 41001.

Deborah Ruebusch

Deborah Ruebusch, 52, New-

port, died April 2, 2010, in Newport. She was a homemaker and member of St. Therese Parish in Southgate. Survivors include her husband, Fred Ruebusch; daughter, Angelia Wallace of Cold Spring; son, Fred Ruebusch III of Newport; brothers, Mike and Edward Guthier; and stepbrothers, Steve, Greg and Gary Combs.

Loretta M. Ruf

Loretta M. Ruf, 85, of Gray, formerly of California, Ky., died April 6, 2010, at her home. She was a cleaning person for Likea Meat Processors and the former owner of the White Oak Tavern in Campbell County. Survivors include her son, Frank Stehlin of Gray; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and 12 great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger.

Leonidas Sarakatsannis

Leonidas Sarakatsannis, 80, of Sarasota Fla., formerly of Fort Thomas, died April 9, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. Dr. Sarakatsannis was a pianist, pedagogue, composer and conductor. He received a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree from the College Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati and served as Chairman of the Department of Music at the University of Central Florida and University of Guam, Chairman of

Travel & Resort TENN

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BED AND BREAKFAST

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Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or near ocean. Great locations & rates. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828

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CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

Hilton Head Island, SC

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

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DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

NEW YORK EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

ORLANDO. Nr Disney. 4br 3ba townhouse in gated resort. Sleeps 10. Available year round. From $80/night + tax. Locally owned. 859-609-0712 www.orlandoguesthouse.com

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

HILTON HEAD Sea Pines Upgraded & very nicely appointed 3 BR, 3½ BA townhome on golf course & near beach. Reduced rates. Rented only by the owners. 513-874-5927 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

CE-1001545946-01.INDD

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

Kelly Simon

Kelly S. Simon, 45, Newport, died April 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a child care provider. Survivors include her husband, George Simon of Newport; sons, Eric and Matthew Clark of Newport; daughter, Jennifer Schulze of Demossville; mother, Lucille Ervin of Covington; father, James Clark, Sr. of Erlanger; brothers, James Clark, Jr. of Cincinnati and Brian Clark of Erlanger; sisters, Tina Blanchet of Covington and Brittany Clark of Erlanger and four grandchildren. Burial was in Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick, Ky.

Otto Stapleton Sr.

Bed & Breakfast The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

the Piano Department at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and Director of Applied Music at Northern Kentucky University. He also had been an Adjunct Professor of Music at State College of Florida in Bradenton, Fla. He performed solo piano recitals and chamber music programs in both the U.S. and abroad with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Florida Orchestra of Orlando, Florida Philharmonic, University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music Symphony, University of Florida Symphony and others. He was a member of the Marquis Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in America and has a biography in the International Who’s Who in Music and Musician’s Directory. His wife, Frances Nicholas Sarakatsannis died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Melanie L. Sarakatsannis of Philadelphia; sons, Nicholas L. Sarakatsannis of Cold Spring and Jamie L. Sarakatsannis of Detroit; brothers, George Sarakatsannis, Chris Sarakatsannis and Panny Sarakatsannis, all of Fort Thomas, Spiros Sarakatsannis of Cincinnati and four grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Dobbling Funeral Home in Fort Thomas handled the arrangements. Memorials: Holy TrinitySt.Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 7000 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH 45224; St. Barbara Greek Orthodox Church, 7176 Lockwood Ridge Road, Sarasota, FL 34234.

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

NORTH CAROLINA

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

Otto Morris Stapleton Sr., 66, Butler, died April 5, 2010, at his home. He worked for General Motors, was a Pendleton County Constable, Army veteran and member of Blue Grass Saddle Club. His granddaughter, Catherine Elizabeth Hope Bonar, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Norma Jean Stapleton; sons, Otto Stapleton Jr. and Kenneth Stapleton, both of Butler; daughters, Melissa Catchen of Park Hills and Tammie Bonar of Alexandria; brother, Wayne Stapleton of Southgate; six grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Butler. Memorials: Hospice of Hope, 909 Kenton Station Drive, Maysville, KY 41056.

Wendy Taylor

Wendy J. Lautz Taylor, 54, Villa Hills, a homemaker, died April 2, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood.

Survivors include her husband, Gary A. Taylor; son, Richard Sunderhaus of Cleves; daughters, Christina Sunderhaus of Harrison and Kelley Clark of Alexandria; stepsons, Anthony Taylor of Taylor Mill and Nicholas Taylor of Louisville; stepdaughter, Lindsey Taylor of Fort Thomas; father, Louis Lautz of Cincinnati and four grandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Nellie Vickers

Nellie Mae Vickers, 80, Newport, died April 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a cook. Survivors include her sons, Reuben Vickers of Dayton, Timothy Vickers of Florence, Rickey and David Vickers, both of Bellevue, Dennis Vickers of Taylor Mill, Jeffrey Vickers of Latonia, Danny Vickers of Union, Douglas Vickers of Newport and Sherwood Jenkins of Newport; 18 grandchildren and 40 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Floral Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: New Hope Food Pantry, 22 William Blatt Ave., Southgate, KY 41071.

Donald Walker

Donald Glenn Walker, 39, Newport, died April 5, 2010, in Newport. Survivors include his wife, Lynette Walker; daughter, Brittany Walker; father, Glenn Walker; mother, Veronica Wichman-Wineka; sisters, Loni Walker and Chantelle Diersing; brother, John Fawley and grandmother, Vera Wichman. Alexandria Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Mary Woodruff

Mary B. Mack Woodruff, 70, Dayton, died April 6, 2010, in Fort Thomas. She was a former owner of Ruebusches Cafe in Dayton, worked at the Dayton 5 & Dime Store for 30 years, cleaned the Fort Thomas Woman’s Club, danced on the Midwestern Hayride TV program in the early 1950s, taught tap classes for the grade schools in Dayton and attended St. Philip Parish in Melbourne. Her husband, Robert Woodruff, and second husband, Raymond Mosley, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Cindy Scott of Dayton; son, Tommy Mack of Dayton; companion, Bob Mains of Melbourne; five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Philip Parish, 1400 Mary Ingles Highway, Melbourne, KY 41059.

William Young

William James “Jimmy” Young, 32, Dayton, died April 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked for Reliable Castings in Cincinnati. Survivors include his daughter, Brooklyn Christopher; parents, William Young and Sheila Mullins; brother, Christopher Young and sister, Tammy Spradlin. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Time to ‘Rock the Tot’ Fifty-one Bar Louie locations around the country, including Newport on the Levee, will host the 3rd annual “Rock the Tot” tater tot eating contest Thursday, April 22. Each location’s contest will begin at 8 p.m. and crown their very own “Rock the Tot” champion. Competitors will face off regionally in a challenge to eat as many tater tots possible in six minutes. Contestants are allowed to have any drink of their choice during that time and dip the tater tots in the drink before consuming. At the end of the six minutes a winner will be declared the “Rock the Tot” champion. All winners will be declared locally, with Bar Louie America verifying the results after the regional competitions are completed and deciding on a national champion. Multiple tater tots consumed in just six minutes will be rewarded with more

than just bragging rights. All 51 regional champions will receive a $250 Bar Louie gift card, a complimentary party for up to 20 friends, a champion trophy, T-shirt and most importantly, free tater tots for one year. The national champion out of all the locations will win a $500 gift card to Bar Louie and Bar Louie gift package. Almost 250,000 tater tots were consumed nationwide during last year’s competition. The overall national champion from Easton, Ohio consumed four pounds and five ounces of tater tots in the six minutes. Participants should arrive early to register by 7:30 p.m. and are encouraged to bring fans and get creative with costumes. In addition, for those who want to practice, Bar Louie will be offering $1.50 “practice baskets” of tater tots between April 19-22.

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Petting zoo attracts wildlife Macke Franzen Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Sout...

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