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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Tracey and Eric Herman

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com

Volume 14, Number 4 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

T h u r s d a y, M a r c h 1 8 , 2 0 1 0

Web site: NKY.com B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

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Newport’s ‘best-selling’ author speaks

E-mails sent to candidates

If you are a candidate in a contested race in the May 18 primary election, you should have received an e-mail invitation to participate in NKY.com’s online election guide. If you haven’t gotten an invitation, we might not have your correct e-mail address. To be included, send your campaign e-mail address to Mary Lu Strange at mstrange@nky.com or call her at 859-578-5574. The election guide will be accessible to voters through NKY.com later this month and will include biographical information on candidates and answers to questions posed by NKY.com editors.

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Can-do

History day

Dawson Gausephol, 5, of Bellevue, above, decorates his homemade coffee can “Canjo” musical instrument with stickers during the Campbell County Public Library Newport Branch’s Adventure Club meeting Tuesday, March 9.

Designed for anyone curious about local history, the 17th annual Northern Kentucky Regional History Day is a chance for anyone to drop in and find out what historians have to say about the area. Open workshops will feature topics ranging myths of Newport’s “Reformation” to Civil War Songs, researching Civl War ancestors, and the forming of a church by settlers of Dayton. LIFE, B1

Mary Bryant, left, of Newport, helps tie a string for the homemade “Canjo” musical instrument she’s making with her granddaughter Adrianna Denney, right, 8, of Newport out of string, a coffee can and yard stick.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Library events

This week at the Newport Branch Library, will be Adventure Club: A Visit from the Cincinnati Zoo. It’s at 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 23. A zookeeper will bring a cheetah to the library, along with other cat ambassadors. Ages 6-11. Please register. The library is at 901 E. Sixth St.; call 859-5725035 for information.

Share your news

Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and our other publications and Web sites.

Find your community online

Find your community’s Web site by visiting NKY.com/ community and looking for “Community News” near the top of the page. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

Senior isn’t letting epilepsy slow her down in life, service work By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The fact that she has epilepsy isn’t stopping Newport Central Catholic senior Elizabeth “Lizzie” Canafax from living her life and helping others improve theirs. If anything, Canafax said her diagnosis eight years ago has made her stronger and made her the person she is today. “If it wasn’t for having epilepsy, I may have never thought about pursing a career in medicine and I would have never been introduced to Children’s Hospital,” said Canafax, a Covington resident. Now Canafax, who plans to study to be a pediatric radiologist after graduating from NCC, volunteers every Saturday at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where she received treatment for years. “Going to Children’s is a personal thing for me because after going there as a patient for so

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long, now I get to see what it’s like to be on the opposite side,” Canafax said. “I love helping the kids and bringing a smile to their faces.” Last summer, Canafax spent two weeks as a missionary in Uganda, Africa, and plans to return there in 2012. “When I was on the mission it really hit me that I wanted service to be a really big part of my life,” Canafax said. “It has been a catalyst for everything I do back here.” Besides volunteering at Children’s, Canafax is president of NCC’s National Honor Society where she has led a project to support Earth Day, volunteered at St. Vincent de Paul, and led a dance event at Thomas More College to raise funds for Haiti earthquake victims. Canafax is also a member of the Covington Youth Commission and a 2009 graduate of the Northern Kentucky Youth Leadership

PROVIDED

Newport Central Catholic senior Lizzie Canafax hands out mosquito nets to the elderly and pregnant people at St. Bakhita, a school in Uganda where she did mission work last June. Program. Canafax’s father Kevin Canafax said he is proud of all his daughter has accomplished and hopes her story will inspire other young people to get involved and give back. “Lizzie is involved in so many things, she just boggles the mind,” said Kevin Canafax. “She has managed to excel inside and outside the classroom despite the challenges brought on by (her) diagnosis.”

The Blue Marble bookstore and the newly formed Bluebird Arts & Education Alliance are partnering together to bring a New York Times best-selling author to Highlands High School. Newport resident Beth Hoffman, author of “Saving Cee Cee Honeycutt,” is coming to the school to talk about her book from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 20. Hoffman said she will talk about how the novel, which is her first, came about and how a near-death experience brought back her child“It’s hood dream of wonderful writing. Since the that this novel was book is released in January, it has been touching so added to many many best-seller lists. lives.” “I just had a Beth story I really Hoffman wanted to tell,” Hoffman said. “It’s wonderful that this book is touching so many lives.” Hoffman said though it’s hard work, leading to traveling for the past two months on a book tour, she feels blessed that her novel has been so successful and is looking forward to the event at H i g h lands. “I can’t even tell how great it is to be doing an e v e n t r i g h t here,” Hoffman said. “I love Kentucky so much.” Nancy Baker, who is active at the Blue Marble and in the Bluebird Arts & Education Alliance, helped bring the two together to work on the event. “The Bluebird Arts & Education Alliance was formed to schedule fine arts events to benefit the students and the community,” Baker said. “I felt that an author event fit right in.” Chuck Keller, chair of the alliance, said he’s excited to have a successful, local author coming to speak. “Communities need to celebrate the achievements of their own,” Keller said. “It’s exciting to see how many readers are responding in such positive ways to her work.” Copies of the novel are available at the Blue Marble and will also be sold at the event. For more information about the novel and Beth Hoffman, visit www.bethhoffman.net.

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A2 • Campbell Community Recorder

BRIEFLY Students help with tax returns

Garrett Davidson of Fort Mitchell, a senior double majoring in accounting and economics at Xavier; Matt Schuler of Edgewood, a junior double majoring in accounting and economics at Xavier; and Abbey Leibel of Cold Spring, a senior accounting major at Xavier are three of 24 Xavier University accounting students helping prepare tax returns for low income, elderly and student taxpayers on Monday evenings through April 12. The students are offering free basic Federal and State income tax assistance through the IRS-sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). They will help March 29, and April 12 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Cintas Center by appointment only at 513-7452828.

Dinner at VFW

The ladies auxiliary of Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria is having a spaghetti dinner from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, March 26.

News

March 18, 2010

Costs for the dinner of spaghetti, homemade sauce (meatless), meatballs, salad, drinks and dessert are $6 for adults and $4 for children. The VFW hall is at 8261 Alexandria Pike, quarter mile south of the intersection of East Main Street and Alexandria Pike. Proceeds will benefit troops overseas, patriotic essay contests and donation of flags to many schools. For more information call 859394-3068.

Dressman to retire

Pat Von Lehman Dressman has become the second Kenton County candidate to quit her government job, after federal authorities said that her candidacy violates the Hatch Act, a New Deal-era law designed to prevent political favoritism in the administration of federal grants. Dressman said Wednesday that she's retiring as Campbell County's human services director on March 30 so that she can continue her campaign for Kenton County commissioner. She had been in the job for 11 years. -Gannett News Service

F.O.P. endorsing candidates April 6 By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

In an effort to be more proactive in local political races affecting police agencies, Fraternal Order of Police Campbell County Lodge No. 10 is having a candidates night April 6. The lodge has endorsed political candidates before, but it hadn’t been opening up the floor of its membership meeting to all countywide or city races. Each candidate will be given 10 minutes to speak and answer questions posed by the lodge members. After the candidates speak, there will be a business meeting of the membership and they will vote on who, if anyone, to endorse, said James Poynter, F.O.P. president. Endorsements will be known by the end of the night, Poynter said. “We don’t have to endorse anybody for anything, and we don’t have to endorse anybody that

shows up,” he said. The lodge’s member police agencies includes the city departments of Alexandria, Bellevue, Cold Spring, Dayton, Highland HeightsSouthgate Police Authority, Silver Grove and Wilder, and also the Campbell County Police Department, Campbell County Detention Center, and the Northern Kentucky University Department of Public Safety. The lodge has already been contacted by several candidates seeking an endorsement, Poynter said. Poynter said the lodge is not sending a letter to all eligible candidates. Rather he is counting on candidates finding out about the event through the newspaper. The endorsement process in the past has been less formal without a candidates night, he said. “The national lodge would like to see all the lodges become more active in the politics that affect police agencies,” Poynter said.

Looking for an endorsement?

The following is from the Fraternal Order of Police Campbell County Lodge No. 10 to political candidates seeking the endorsement of the lodge for elections in 2010. Candidates are being directed to respond in writing to the lodge at the mailing address of P.O. Box 133, Alexandria, KY 41001. “Please provide a short bio about yourself and answer the important questions listed below. Your bio should include such information as where you live, how long you have been a resident of Campbell County or the city in which you are seeking office, and anything that you wish to tell us about your family. List any community groups, civic or charitable organizations of which you are a member. What is your present occupation, employer and if you have any prior law enforcement experience. You may also provide any other information that you think is important for us to know. 1- Are you a member of the FOP, if so which lodge and how long have you been a member? 2- How have you supported the FOP or local law enforcement in the past? 3-What is your position on consolidation of law enforcement services in Campbell County? 4- What is your position on Collective Bargaining Rights for Law Enforcement Officers? 5- What are your qualifications for the office you are seeking? 6- If elected, how will you use your office to support local law enforcement? Please have your bio and question responses back to us on or before April 5, 2010. The lodge plans to allow each candidate 10 minutes to address our members and respond to any other question that a member may have at our April 6 meeting. This meeting will start at 7 p.m. at the lodge hall 5093 Mary Ingles Hwy. Silver Grove. Before the closing of this meeting the lodge will decide on which candidates will receive our endorsement, if any. Lodge 10 is not obligated to endorse any candidate or endorse every office available, but we feel that it is important to support those that will support our members. Only those seeking our endorsement and taking part in this process will be considered. Candidates will be notified within 24 hours of the lodge’s endorsements.” From collective bargaining to other issues, there are forces working in the opposite direction of police officer’s interests, he said. “There’s just so many things that affect law enforcement officers, and we need to make our voices heard,” Poynter said. The candidates night and Campbell County F.O.P. Lodge No. 10 meeting are

not open to the public, said Alexandria Police Department Lt. George Schreiner, secretary and treasurer of the lodge. Any county-wide or city elections in the county are eligible to seek the lodge’s endorsement, but that does not include state legislature candidates which the lodge is prohibited by law from endorsing, Schreiner said.

Taking back their street By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

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After years of dealing with drug transactions, loud drug-related arguments and an uncomfortable environment around her residence on Hollywoods Drive, Fort Thomas resident Susannah Fedders now feels safe in her home. Fedders praised the Fort Thomas Police Department at a City Council meeting March 15 for their hard work and dedication, which helped clean up her street. “The whole neighborhood is blown away with the way the police officers handled their jobs,” Fedders said. “I’m just now starting to feel like I can take a walk at night and feel safe.” For a time, Fedders said she didn’t feel safe because there were illegal drugs being sold out of apartments on Hollywoods, dealings that led to numerous cars

coming and going and loud arguments about drug deals. When she finally got fed up, Fedders contacted police and started a neighborhood watch group. Following her lead, Hollywoods resident and concerned citizen Rajiim Gross got involved. “She was doing this great feat on her own,” Gross said. “I felt the only way things were going to change was if people stepped up to the plate.” Using the Internet, Gross started a Yahoo group for the neighborhood watch, where residents can report potentially illegal things they see and hear. The Web site includes a database of license plate numbers, car descriptions and days and times drug transactions take place. “I hope to use (the site) to help the police,” Gross said.

Index Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Life...............................................B1

Police reports............................B11 Schools........................................A7 Sports ..........................................A9 Viewpoints ................................A11

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue – nky.com/ Cold Spring – nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights – nky.com/highlandheights Newport – nky.com/newport Southgate – nky.com/southgate Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

March 18, 2010

CCF Recorder

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Duo looking for best pizza

By Justin B. Duke jbduke@nky.com

JUSTIN B. DUKE/STAFF

Brad Zapp, left, and Jay Vaughn search for the best pizza in Northern Kentucky.

Two men have embarked on a mission to serve all of humanity: find the best pizza in Northern Kentucky. Jay Vaughn of Covington and Brad Zapp of Union are taking a tour around Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties to find what restaurant makes the best medium pepperoni pizza. “It’ll take us a couple months, so we don’t gain too much weight,” Zapp said. Officially titled the Northern Kentucky Pizza

Challenge, it was founded when Zapp had a craving for hot wings and wanted to find who had the best. “After a couple beers, we decided we’d do this for pizza,” Vaughn said. They took the challenge online and set up a Facebook group asking what the best pizzerias in the area were and got close to 50 responses. “We got 145 members in a week,” Zapp said. The number of restaurants were paired down to 17 and don’t include national chains. Restaurants aren’t notified

Pregnancy counseling office opened By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The Pro-life New Hope Center has opened an Alexandria satellite office providing pregnancy counseling services. The office is operated in partnership with the Caring And Reaching with Encouragement Ministry in Alexandria and is open from 3 p.m.

to 6 p.m. each Monday. “We are a Pro-life agency 100 percent,” said Pam Glenn, director of the New Hope Center. New Hope does not provide abortion referrals. “But, we do want her to be completely informed about all pregnancy options,” Glenn said. The center also has locations in Crestview Hills and Latonia and caters to any

woman of child-bearing years, she said. “For the most part our clients fall in the 16 to 26 years old range,” Glenn said. Services offered include pregnancy testing and counseling of what her options are, Glenn said. “We want to give her the full information about what abortion is, parenting and adoption,” she said. Glenn said New Hope is

in the process training a staff of volunteers for the Alexandria office and hopes to soon be open each Monday from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Then as more volunteers come on line we will expand hours (further),” she said. Each volunteer receives 25 hours of training. “We’re really trying to make the girl feel comfortable with where she is,” Glenn said. “We really train

when they’re coming. “We pay for it, we get no special treatment,” Zapp said. At every restaurant, they order a medium pepperoni pizza and judge on aroma of the restaurant, speed of service, price, presentation and taste, which gets the most weight. Through the Facebook group, Vaughn is hoping to get members to come to the restaurants with them and make it a community event. “We hope people see the humor in it,” Vaughn said. Nine members of the

group joined them as they made the challenge’s first stop at Riverfront Pizza in Covington. Once the pizza challenge is over, Vaughn and Zapp plan to keep finding the best foods in the area maybe branching out into burgers or sushi. “After this we’re going to call ‘Biggest Loser’ so we can lose all the weight we gained,” Vaughn joked. For more information about the Northern Kentucky Pizza Challenge, visit the Facebook page at http:// tinyurl.com/pizzachallenge.

Contact information

The New Hope Center’s new Alexandria office, 11093 Alexandria Pike, is currently open from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. each Monday in addition to two other Northern Kentucky offices. For counseling services call 391-1725 for Alexandria, 431-0011 for Latonia and 341-0766 for Crestview Hills. New Hope operates separate Web sites for donations www.newhopedonations.com and for clients www.newhopecenter.com. our volunteers the most important thing to do is to put her at ease and let her know she’s in a safe place.” The center offers parenting lessons to people who

seek counseling. Each time a person completes a lesson they receive a dozen diapers. Completing seven lessons earns a car seat, and 14 lessons earns a crib, Glenn said.

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CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

News

Alexandria boy face of 2010 heart walk By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Alexandria residents Andy and Sandi Ritter have kept a vow to assist the American Heart Association in any way they can since their son Noah was born with a congenital heart defect in 2001 and received a live-saving surgery at 2 days old. Noah’s story is at the center of roadside bill-

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boards, posters and brochures and of a video at www.heartmini.org in promotion of the 33rd WalMart Mini Marathon & Heart Walk in Cincinnati March 28. Every year since doctors at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center performed the surgery to fix Noah’s heart, the family has organized a team to raise money and walk in the event. “Us participating in the heart Mini Marathon seems like a very small price to pay for what they have given us,” said Noah’s mother Sandi. “That's going to probably be our life-long payback to them for what

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PROVIDED

A copy of the billboard advertisement for the American Heart Association’s 33rd annual Walmart Mini Marathon and Heart Walk with Noah Ritter, 8, of Alexandria, at far left. they have given us.” Sandi said their family feels honored they were asked to represent this year’s event, and that the more money the event can raise, the more research the association can fund. Most people, even if they don’t know Noah, have been impacted by heart disease in some way whether it was a heart attack or stroke, she said. Noah was born with the two main arteries going into his heart being reversed, which resulted in him not

getting any oxygenated blood, she said. The medical techniques used by doctors to treat Noah’s diagnosis were only about 10 years old at the time, Sandi said. “Without that surgery, and without all those years of research that had led up to that, our son would have died,” she said. “We felt like they pretty much gave us our son back.” Noah leads a pretty normal life now, Sandi said. Noah’s story highlights the fact that a lot of medical

advancements have happened in a short time-span, said Lori Fovel, communications director for the Cincinnati chapter of the American Heart Association. The main goal of the annual Mini Marathon and Heart Walk, one of the biggest fundraisers in the country for the Heart Association, is to raise money for research, Fovel said. The goal for this year’s event is to raise a net of $1.6 million, she said. All proceeds go to research funded by the

association, and most stays in Cincinnati to pay for ongoing research at University Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, she said. Some people come to the Mini Marathon just because they like to run, but many others come because they have a personal connection, she said. “We really have a lot of families like the Ritter’s that put teams together to participate in the event, and they walk in honor of someone,” Fovel said.

SHARE your stories, photos and events at nky.com/share

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CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

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Old cell phones give new hope By Patricia A. Scheyer Community Recorder Contributor

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Day at the lake

Ricky Rhoden of Bracken County, a former resident of Alexandria, steps off the path for a for a lakeside moment at the Alexandria Community Park while walking his 3-month-old Boxer “Capone” Tuesday, March 9.

Rural Metro expands service in Northern Kentucky St. Elizabeth Healthcare has entered into a definitive agreement to sell TransCare of Kentucky, Inc. to Rural/Metro Corporation. Upon completion, the deal is expected to result in expanded Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Northern Kentucky. St. Elizabeth and formerly St. Luke Hospitals have co-owned and operated TransCare for the past 12 years. The transaction is pending a 30day wait period and approval from the Kentucky Office of Health Policy to transfer the Certificates of Need to Rural/Metro. TransCare provides 24hour basic life support and advanced life support ambulance transportation to move patients to and from hospitals, medical testing or treatment facilities such as MRI or dialysis, long-term care centers, and personal residences. TransCare's emergency technicians and paramedics serve more than 328,000 residents and others who work in and travel through Northern Kentucky. Its primary service areas for advanced life support and medical transportation services are Kenton County

(Ludlow, Bromley, Park Hills, Ft. Wright, Ft. Mitchell, Taylor Mill), Campbell County (Southgate, Wilder, Alexandria, Silver Grove, Melbourne, Mentor, California), Pendleton County, and Grant County. “We have always prided ourselves by staffing an experienced team of medical professionals who provide high-quality emergency services to the community,” says Judy Arnett, TransCare President & CEO. “One of

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our main goals with this deal is to keep our strong team intact. This arrangement allows us to accomplish that objective and keep our team together.” Rural/Metro is one of the nation's leading providers of emergency and non-emergency medical transportation services and fire protection services. With more than 50 years of experience, Rural/Metro serves more than 400 communities throughout the United States, including Cincinnati.

Cell phones and computers are similar in that almost everyone has one, and the technology changes virtually daily. But the problem that arises from both conveniences is what to do with the old ones. The Northern Kentucky Women’s Crisis Center has an answer for old cell phones. “We have been collecting discarded cell phones since January of 2004,” said Kirsten Heyob, administrative assistant for the crisis center. “I had heard about a program where the National Shelter Alliance collects old phones and gives money for them, anywhere from approximately $2 to $50, depending on how fancy the phone is.” The shelter has received $22,000 to date from turning in old donated phones, and the money allows the crisis center to offer programs to the women and children who have to seek help from mental and physical abuse. “We have outreach offices in Covington, Hebron, Vanceburg, Williamstown, Carrollton and Maysville,” said Susan Asher, director of the Women’s Crisis Center. “People can drop their old phones off there. Currently, the Florence Rotary Club is assisting us in this project, and we really appreciate it.” The Women’s Crisis Center not only provides residential care for anyone who has suffered abuse and needs to stay safe, but it also has programs in schools, from preschool to high school, which helps

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phone project fit the bill,” said John Salyers, Rotary president. “We have food drives and coat drives, we have summer reading programs, and have provided Shelter Boxes for Haiti, which include a tent and food and blankets for a family. I have been involved in many organizations, but I think the Rotary Club is the greatest service organization I have been a part of.” The crisis center is happy to partner with the Rotary Club for this project. “This project gets more and more lucrative each year as it becomes more widely known,” said Heyob. “It doesn’t cost us anything, and it keeps the phones out of landfills. We appreciate the Rotary Club’s help.”

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children identify what abuse is, and gives them guidelines for safe relationships. The crisis center is also at the hospital when a woman is raped to help her deal with the aftereffects. The center has a 24/7 hotline, 859-491-3335, or 1-800928-3335. “With the economy in such bad shape, and the unemployment high, we find that family tension escalates, too,” said Asher. “Unfortunately, we are seeing more victims of abuse because of the situation.” The Florence Rotary Club has many community service projects, and regularly takes on more. “Our motto is ‘Service Above Self,’ so we always search for ways to help the community, and the cell

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CCF Recorder

News

March 18, 2010

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Peggi Anneken, left, leads more than 50 people in the first Zumba Fitness class at Reca Roller Rink in Alexandria Monday, March 8. Krysty Lyons of Alexandria is at far right. PROVIDED

Hats off

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Music will blare, and

people trying to get fit will get out onto the floor of Reca Roller Rink, but not on skates. Reca is bringing the fitness dance routine known as “Zumba Fitness” to Alexandria, said Kelly Dan-

ner, general manager, of Reca Roller Rink. Zumba features a mix of everything from Hip-Hop, Reggae and Latin to belly dancing styles, Danner said. Danner said she has a couple of friends who

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St. Thomas Students Matthew Frey, Rachael Simons, Collin Kruse, Adam Groneck, and Kate Lonneman celebrate “Hats Off to Reading Day” at St. Thomas School in Fort Thomas.

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Taking on Zumba

A free Zumba Fitness class and open house at Reca, 11 Viewpoint Drive, Alexandria, will be from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, March 8. Subsequent classes will be on the following Mondays at 7 p.m. March 15, 22 and 29 and April 12, 19, 26 and May 10, 17 and 24. The cost is $45 for all nine weeks, or $8 per week. already take Zumba, and she wanted to take the classes herself. The wood roller rink floor at Reca offered plenty of space, she said. So, Danner said she thought why not bring Zumba to Reca. “And I saw there really wasn’t anyplace south of Fort Thomas doing this,” she said. The class will be taught by Peggi Anneken, a certified Zumba Fitness instructor in the Cincinnati area since June 2009. The objective is to move to the music, but also at your own pace, and it’s for any age, Anneken said. But, there’s no need to know how to dance, she said. The music is upbeat and includes moves from Salsa, Mambo (the cha cha), Merengue, Reggaeton and Cumbia, Anneken said. Anneken said a person can burn as much as 500 to 600 calories in a one-hour class. “Zumba is a really fun way to stay in shape or lose weight,” she said.

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SCHOOLS

March 18, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

Campbell Community Recorder

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A7

RECORDER

Storytelling program unites school By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Tell them a story. St. Joseph School’s Great Leap’s monthly program of reading books aloud to all students is creating a common conversation and shared vocabulary the kindergartners and older students can both use. Each month, the school unveils a new book. The book for March is “The Tale of Three Trees: A Traditional Folktale” by author Angela Elwell Hunt and illustrator Tim Jonke. Jill Stratman, a first-grade teacher, read the book to her class March 8. The book spins a tale of how three trees when being logged dreaming of becoming mighty ships, treasure chests and of not being cut and allowed to point to heaven all ending up having their dreams realized, but not in the way they expected. After students listened, Stratman asked her students to think about how they could put things together in a new way, adding a poster to the wall with the word “synergize.” It’s a big word for first-graders, but they pick up on the meaning, she said. “They’re learning some terms that they might not otherwise, but it helps with their reading comprehension,” said Stratman. To reinforce the word, each

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Matthew Batschoum, left, of Alexandria, demonstrates his idea of how a tree branch could also be a slingshot to fourth-grade teacher Maureen Randle at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring Monday, March 8 as part of a reading comprehension lesson associated with the book “The Tale of the Three Trees.” reading is followed by a writing or art project, she said. Other reading vocabulary words and phrases the school has focused upon so far include: making connections, visualizing, questioning, and inferring. Jack Scharstein, a fourth-grade student, listened without flinching to his fourth-grade teacher Maureen Randle read aloud March 8. “I actually prefer reading myself, but I don’t mind,” Scharstein said.

Randle brought in a tree branch and asked students to think about what else it could be used for by synthesizing a new strategy using the materials on hand. Each grade level often takes a different approach to incorporating the book that’s being read in classroom lesson all month long, Holzmacher said. When students had “The Librarian That Measured the Earth” read to them eighth-grade

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Turner Shelton of Cold Spring and Brooke Eckert of Wilder listen as Jill Stratman, their first-grade teacher at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring reads aloud from “The Tale of Three Trees” Monday, March 8. students were finding the circumference of the Earth and other spheres, she said. And in February when the students had “Wednesday Surprise” read to them, the school brought in unannounced guest readers from the community to read aloud, Holzmacher said. Part of what Great Leaps does is to have older and younger siblings of the same family talking

about books at home and around the dinner table, she said. “The other point was to get families to talk about reading,” she said. In each lesson all school year long students have to have good comprehension of the books and writings they’re using, Holzmacher said. “When you get down to it, all of education is reading,” she said.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Super students

Bellevue Independent School officials pose for a picture with Grandview Elementary School’s students of the month for February. Front row from left: Darrin Elliott, Mia Bell, Ricky Randoll, Garrett Glancy, Kierstyn Ratterman, Dallas Montgomery and Estelle Chase. Back row from left: Michael Gray, Callie Stamper, Jeffrey Brinker, Alex Wright, Elizabeth Poinsett and Ellis McCarthy. Not pictured: Brooklyn Fritsch, Christopher Bundy, Brandon Fogelman, Kevin Poncio, Malachi Ashcraft and Cassidy Daniel.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Bellevue Independent School officials pose for a picture with the Bellevue High School students of the month for February. From left: Mackenzie Davis, Charlotte Flaherty, Ryan Walz, Nick Asher and Jasmmine Mills. Not pictured: Alicia Ball.

Sticking to it

PROVIDED

Crossroads Elementary School fourth-grader Kayle Kyle, left, slaps a piece of duct tape across the arm of Kim Visse, principal, as part of a fundraiser to help build a grade school in Haiti. Crossroads students bought pieces of the tape for $1 each, and along with other fundraisers, the school raised $1,560 in total for the Haitian school.

Celebration to raise money for Holy Trinity tuition assistance By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Holy Trinity School is heading to the races to raise money for tuition assistance. The school’s third annual winter celebration is being held Friday, March 19 at Turfway Park. “This is way for us to take advantage of the live racing and

wonderful chef that Turfway has to offer and it makes it a little easier for the parents to spend less time working and more time enjoying the evening,” said Amy Hennekes, chair of the event. The past two years, the event raised about $20,000 each year towards tuition assistance, said Principal Jeff Finke. The school gives anywhere

from $30,000 to $50,000 in tuition assistance a year to families that attend Holy Trinity that can’t afford the $2,600 yearly tuition. “There are plenty of students that want to come here that can’t afford it and we want to make sure that any child that wants to come here can,” Finke said. Hennekes said she thinks the celebration is important because it

allows the school to continue serving families in Newport, Bellevue and Dayton as the only Catholic elementary and junior high school left in the area. Some families have been coming to the school, or one of the schools that combined into Holy Trinity, for many generations. “It’s important to allow families to continue that tradition, and we

do that through tuition assistance,” Hennekes said. Doors open at the event at 5 p.m., the first race is at 5:30 p.m. and a Lenten buffet will be open from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost of the event is $50 per person. For more information and sponsorship opportunities contact Jeff Finke at 292-0487.


A8

CCF Recorder

Schools

March 18, 2010

Newport Preschool Center celebrates top rating A Newport preschool program has earned Kentucky’s top child care program rating. The Newport Preschool Center, operating in partnership between Children, Inc. and Newport Independent Schools, received a four STAR rating from STARS for KIDS NOW, part of Kentucky’s KIDS NOW Early Childhood Initiative. Under Kentucky’s voluntary quality rating system for child care, programs are granted ratings from one to four STARS. The STAR ratings indicate that the program meets quality indicators above those standards required by licensing regulations. Children, Inc. has partnered with Newport Schools to offer Newport families a full day preschool program

PROVIDED

Michael Brandt, Superintendent of Newport Independent Schools with April Hayes and Rick Hulefeld of Children, Inc., proudly displaying the Newport Preschool Center’s 4 STAR certificate. since 2005. This program is dedicated to getting children ready to succeed in school, and operates opposite Newport Schools’ and Head Start’s half day preschool programs. Enrollment is

open to children ages 3, 4 and 5 who live in the Newport Independent School District or have parents employed by the district. Children, Inc.’s Newport Preschool is a United Way

PROVIDED

Branton Koroly, 4, of Newport, works on an art project at Newport Preschool Center. funded program that complements its first priority of preparing children for kindergarten. Children, Inc. has held three and four STAR ratings since 2002 and offers more

multi-starred programs than any other organization in Kentucky. There are 13 four STAR programs across the Commonwealth. There are now two four STAR programs

Northern Kentucky. The other top rated program is Kenton Child Development Center, located in Simon Kenton High School and also operated by Children, Inc.

Science fair winners

The entire eighth-grade class of St. Joseph, Cold Spring participated in a science fair. The fair was divided into two categories consisting of life science and physical science. Megan Hamberg placed first in life science, Sam Cetrulo and Hannah Ziegler were second, and Rachel Parnell and Alli Otten were third. In the physical science division, Jake Schulte placed first, Drew Miller and Matt Tolle were second, and Cheryl Horner and Morgan Bosley placed third. The two winning entries in each division will go on to the Diocesan Competition. The winners in the St. Joseph, Cold Spring science fair are (from left to right) Drew Miller, Hannah Ziegler, Jake Schulte, Morgan Bosley, Matt Tolle, Sam Cetrulo, Megan Hamberg, Alli Otten, Rachel Parnell, and Cheryl Horner.

PROVIDED

SCHOOL NOTES All Shook Up

As a kick-off to the 2010 student theatrical performance of All Shook Up, NCC will host the annual spring gala, benefiting the NCC Tuition Assistance Program. The Gala Performance of the school play is scheduled for Friday, April 16, at 6 p.m. with cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, and curtain time scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Gala Performance tickets are $45 per person. Corporate and individual sponsorships of the Gala, starting at $150,

are also available, and all proceeds benefit the NCC Tuition Assistance Fund. For more details regarding the gala, contact Scott and Jane Grosser at 859-441-9568.

Xavier Univ. scholarsip

Anne Marie Dumaine of California, the daughter of Pam and Tom Dumaine, has accepted a Trustee Scholarship from Xavier University in Cincinnati. She will graduate from Campbell County High School, where she is active in National Honor Society, ath-

letics, and FBLA. Anne Marie plans to major in biology at Xavier. All incoming freshmen are evaluated for Xavier’s Trustee and Presidential Scholarships and the Honor and Schawe Awards and award levels vary.

Guys and Dolls

The NCC Drama Program will host a night of live music from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 30 featuring: Gary Devoto and the Lunch Buddies, NCC student musicians, several NCC drama alumni,

several cast members performing songs from “All Shook Up!” with guest appearances by Steve Chuke, a.k.a. Elvis Presley. There is a $5 cover charge for the entertainment as well as drink specials and reduced prices on appetizers. Full dinner menu is also available. All proceeds will go towards this year’s production of “All Shook Up!”

Mock Trial Tournament

Highlands High School Blue Team and Newport Central Catholic High School

placed in the top 10 at the 2010 Kentucky High School Mock Trial Tournament in Louisville held March 5-7. Highlands placed fifth, while NCC took seventh.

Report cards online

Report cards reviewing Campbell County Schools as a district and each of the district schools are available now. The 2008-09 Campbell County Schools’ district and school report cards are available at the Web site

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SPORTS BRIEFLY

Schwaeble wins 1st game

Northern Kentucky University’s Emily Schwaeble went 4-for-7 on the day and picked up her first collegiate win as the Norse softball team picked up a pair of victories in day two action at the Rebel Spring Games. Schwaeble was tested early in the game against Clairon, having to get out of a bases-loaded jam in the top of the first inning before coming back to slam a two-run double to left center field in the bottom half. She brought in Rose Broderick on an RBI-single to extend the lead to 6-0. Broderick came through with a three-run triple in the second inning. Schwaeble was solid in the circle as well, scattering three hits and giving up two runs, one earned, while striking out seven in the complete-game victory. In addition, she went three-for-three with four RBI to lead the offense. Game two saw the Norse jump out to the early lead again, scoring on a Broderick RBI-single in the top of the first inning. Ehlers was on fire from the start, retiring the first 11 batters she saw in order. She would help her own cause in the third inning, smashing a two-run double down the left field line to extend the lead to 3-0. A defensive miscue from the Vulcans defense allowed Chelsea Luessen to plate a run in the sixth inning before Stephanie West added an RBI-single to right to a 3-for-3 performance. Ehlers (4-4) allowed just one hit and struck out nine batters to claim her second shutout of the season. Gretchen Lorenz also stood out with a 2-for-3 game two performance.

All-star team

Northern Kentucky University women’s basketball standout Casse Mogan has been selected to the Daktronics All-Midwest Region second team. Mogan, a sophomore guard from Circleville, Ohio, averages 16.7 points per game entering the NCAA Division II Tournament. NKU meets Michigan Tech in the first round of the Midwest Regional on Friday. Mogan leads the Great Lakes Valley Conference in minutes played at 34 per contest. She also averages 5.8 rebounds per game, leads the team with 44 steals and has helped NKU compile a 20-9 record. Mogan scored in double figures in 28 consecutive games to start the season, but she was held to four points during a 50-36 loss at Wisconsin-Parkside in the second round of the GLVC Tournament. Mogan also was named to the All-GLVC first team this season.

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

YOUTH

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

A9

RECORDER

Campbell bowlers reach state quarterfinals

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Home-lane advantage wasn’t much of an aid to local high school bowlers March 13-14. Area athletes fell short of state championships at the state tournament at Super Bowl Erlanger. The tourney consisted of both a team and a singles championship. In the team tourney, 16 teams of each gender bowled a qualifying round for seeding, which determined the brackets for single-elimination match play. The matches were best-offive games in the Baker format, in which five bowlers roll two frames apiece for one game score. In the singles championship, 32 bowlers of each gender rolled three games, with the top five advancing to match play. No Northern Kentucky team made it to the semifinals, and no individual reached the top five. In the boys’ team tourney, Campbell County got the eighth seed with an 1,100 (183 average). The Camels swept Clark County 3-0 (177-167, 191-161, 218-199) but lost to top seed Pleasure Ridge Park in a thriller. Campbell lost 198-191 in the fifth and deciding game against PRP. The Camels won Game 2, 187152 and Game 3, 234-187. They lost Game 1, 194-179 and lost Game 4 to a nearperfect 279 while scoring 214 themselves. Bishop Brossart was the 13th seed with a 995 (166 average) and lost to No. 4

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County’s Brianne Vogelpohl was the top Northern Kentucky girls’ bowler during the state singles tournament March 14 at Super Bowl Erlanger. seed Scott County. Newport was the 16th seed with a 942 (157 average) and lost to top seed PRP in three games (216165, 185-156, 170-142). Manual beat West Jessamine for the boys’ title, going to a fifth game which ended 258-255. In the individual tourney, Campbell’s James Losey finished seventh overall with a

636 for three games. He was just two pins short of qualifying for the matchplay state finals. Camel Trey Brun was 20th with a 562. Dayton’s James Jones was 27th with a 533. In girls’ play, Campbell County was the No. 7 seed with a 965 (161 average) but lost to No. 10 seed Clark County in the first round.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County freshman Trey Brun gets set to bowl during the state singles tournament March 14 at Super Bowl Erlanger. In the singles championship, Brianne Vogelpohl led the Camels in 10th place, shooting a 565 (190-

170-205). Sam Mann finished 30th (419). Newport’s Katlyn Hoeh was 28th (427).

NCC indoor track claims second place By James Weber jweber@nky.com

As the Newport Catholic High School girls’ track team prepares its defense of its 2009 Class 1A state team championship, head coach David Meyers got strong performances from the Thoroughbreds during indoor season. NewCath finished second at the Mason-Dixon Indoor Games March 6 in Louisville. The meet serves as the state championship for indoor track, which is not sanctioned by the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Many of the team’s top programs participated in the meet. NewCath scored 57

Cisper on a streak

Northern Kentucky University senior outfielder Jason Cisper, a Moeller High School graduate, extended his hitting streak to 35 consecutive games, March 11, as NKU posted a 7-4 win against UCClermont. Cisper went two-for-four and scored a run for NKU which rallied from a 4-1 deficit to pick up the non-conference victory. Cisper has hit safely in all 11 games this season. He finished the 2009 season with a 24-game hitting streak. NKU began Great Lakes Valley Conference play on Saturday, March 13, with a road doubleheader at Rockhurst.

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

FILE PHOTO

Zach Holtkamp and the Brossart boys’ cross country team finished third at the 1A regional.

points to 113 for champ St. Henry. The Breds scored those points without some of their top athletes, who were in the Ninth Region girls’ basketball tournament. Included were relay stars Kiley Bartels and Aubrey Muench, who were part of NCC’s three relay state championships last season. NewCath graduated a lot of points from last year, led by individual event champs Kimber Schultz and Annie Gruenschlaeger, but return most of their relay starters this spring. At the indoor meet, NewCath had six individuals who medalled and one relay. Morgan Dubuc, another returning relay starter, was third in 400 (1:06.74), third in long jump (138.25), and seventh in triple jump (30-11). Sarah Suedkamp was second in the 800 (2:32.66). Liz Gruenschlaeger was third in the shot put (2811). Katrina Hlebiczki was fourth in pole vault (6-0). Courtney Stone was fifth in the 3,000 (13:27.65) and Emma Heil fifth in high jump (4-8). The 4x800 relay was second (10:42.83) with Suedkamp, Stone, Mallory Neimer and Amy Schwarber. Overall, NewCath returns 11 of 17 athletes from last year. “They realize the pres-

FILE PHOTO

Relay standout Aubrey Muench (left) and the Newport Central Catholic girls’ team is looking to repeat its Class 1A state title this year. sure of being the defending state champs and the fact that a lot of teams are coming after them, but they still come to practice every day upbeat and ready to work hard,” Meyers said. “It’s funny; they rarely mention having won last year. Their main focus is, ‘How can I get better?’.” NewCath boys’ athletes Sam Schaefer and Matt Dettmer medalled. Schaefer was third in the pole vault (10-0) and Dettmer was seventh in the triple jump (35-8.5). Brossart had several medalists in Class 1A. The boys’ team was fifth

overall. Seven Mustangs won individual medals. Clay Elam was second in the 55 hurdles (8.95) and eighth in the high jump (52). Zach Holtkamp was third in the 1,500 (4:27.34) and fifth in the 800 (2:13.12). Brett Evans was fifth in the 400 (57.02). Brian Neltner was sixth in the 3,000 (10:25.78) and Matt Stover sixth in long jump (17-7.75). Tanner Schmidt was seventh in the 55 (7.12) and Corey Hartig eighth in triple jump (35-7.25). The Mustangs were second in two relays, the

4x400 and 4x800. The 4x400 team (3:48.02) was Evans, Holtkamp, Josh Beckerich and Alex Schwartz. In girls’, Sarah Klump medalled three times. She was eighth in the 55 (8.2) and part of the 4x200 and 4x400 relays. The 4x200 was fifth (2:01.86) behind Klump, Michelle Fischer, Julia Steffen, and Melanie Fleissner. The 4x400 was eighth (4:47.28) with Klump, Shelly Neiser, Alanna VanBenschoten, and Natalie Fielders. Fleissner was sixth individually in the high jump (4-8). Shannon Donley was eighth in the 800 (2:50.57) and Alyssa Evans sixth in the shot put (27-7.75). Bellevue had four medalists in Class 1A. Two of them were less than a week removed from playing in the Ninth Region girls’ basketball tournament. Megan Arnzen finished fifth in the long jump (131.5). Brittany Bohn was eighth in the high jump (4-6). Danielle Swope was sixth in the 55 hurdles (10.41). In boys’, Nolan Rechtin was eighth in the 400 (57.99). Dayton had two medalists in Class 1A. Jay Nellis was fourth in boys’ shot put (39-9.75). Harlee Painter was eighth in the girls’ long jump (1210.5).


A10

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

Sports & recreation

Spring sports loaded with big events By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Local high schools don’t waste any time getting spring sports started. Just two days after the vernal equinox, Kentucky begins its spring sports season. Contests begin Monday, March 22, in baseball, softball, track and tennis. Here is a look at some of the key area meets and tournaments in those sports.

Baseball

April 12-14: All “A” Ninth Region. April 17-18: Doc Morris

Tournament. April 24-25: Jim Dougherty Memorial, Bellevue and Lloyd. May 1-2: All “A” state tournament, Lexington. May 6-8: NCKC Tournament. May 8: Coach Connor Classic. May 24-29: District tournaments. May 31-June 5: Regional tournament. June 14-19: State tournament, Applebee’s Park, Lexington. Some highlights of the first week of the season, as they say, “weather permitting”: The 36th District goes

head to head with some of the area’s best programs next week. Highlands begins the season with games against Boone County, Conner and Beechwood to start the season on consecutive days March 22-24. Newport Central Catholic plays at Ryle March 26 and Conner March 27.

Softball

April 16-17: Bulldog Bash, Cappel Complex, Covington. April 26-27: All “A” Ninth Region tourney, 10th Region tourney. May 8-9: All “A” state

tourney, Jeffersontown. May 14-15: Boone County Tournament. May 24-29: District tournaments. May 31-June 5: Regional tournaments. June 11-12: State tournament, Owensboro.

Track and field

March 27: Ryle Relays. March 29: Boone Relays, Boone County High School. April 3: River City Classic, Newport. April 9: Ryle Friday Night Frenzy. April 10: Walton-Verona Bearcat Open April 13: Lloyd Gold

Medal Meet. April 17: Donnie Carnes Memorial, Campbell County Middle School. April 20: Campbell County championships, Campbell County Middle School. April 23: Jaguar Invite, Cooper. April 29: NKAC championships, Newport (small school) and Dixie Heights (big school). May 1: Conner Invitational. May 3: Dixie girls only meet. May 4: Walton-Verona Gold Medal Meet. May 7-8: Lloyd Invitational. May 10: Diocese of Cov-

ington Meet, Covington Catholic. May 14: Jaguar Gold Medal, Cooper High School. May 18: Red Dog Meet, Highlands. May 20: Scott Invitational. May 22: Regional tuneup meet, Dixie Heights. May 29: Regional meets June 4-5: State meet, University of Louisville.

Tennis:

May 3-6: NKAC Tournament. May 17-21: Regional tournaments. May 27-29: State tourney, Lexington.

Grand time for Kowolonek

PROVIDED

Bluejay battle

PROVIDED

Highlands High School senior Stephen Kowolonek was honored for scoring his 1,000th career point Feb. 19. The milestone occurred Feb. 12 against Lloyd. From left: Shonda Kowolonek, Stephen Kowolonek, Steve Kowolonek and head coach Mike Flynn.

League champs

PROVIDED

The Omega Wildcats receive the trophy for being League Champs of the Newport fourth-grade league, Feb. 20. Pictured are Grant Jolly, Addison Reynolds, Drew Wilson, Ryan Leigh, Bryce Ziegler and Reid Jolly. Not pictured are Jayden Lankheit and Noah Bertsch. Their coaches are Steve Leigh and Gary Jolly.

BRIEFLY All kids 12 and under will enjoy a free Eisenberg hot dog, bag of Husman’s Potato Chips and Pepsi fountain drink at Sunday through Wednesday Florence Freedom games with the Meijer Kids Eat Free Program this season. For children to receive their free food at the park this summer, parents must stop by one of 10 Greater Cincinnati Meijer locations, look for the Freedom mascot Belle and her in-store cut-out standee located near the customer service desk and pick up a voucher. Kids with a Meijer Kids Eat

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Free voucher on Sunday can also get in for free by being a Liberty’s Newport Aquarium Kids Club Member. On Wednesday, kids can get in for free by reading four books and being a member of Xavier’s Xtreme Reading Club. The Meijer Kids Eat Free Program excludes participation on Wednesday, May 26, for Education Day and Monday, June 28, for Super Splash Day. For a list of all participating Meijer locations, information on the kids and reading club and more, visit FlorenceFreedom.com.

Major League competition

The Florence Freedom will conduct a free Aquafina Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit & Run Competition for area youth ages 7-14, Saturday, March 27. Registration starts at 9

a.m., and competition starts at 10 a.m., at Champion Window Field. Pitch, Hit & Run is the Official Skills Competition of Major League Baseball. Competitors are divided into four age divisions, and have the chance to advance through four levels of competition, including Team Championships at Major League ballparks and the National Finals at the MLB All-Star Game. The individual pitching, hitting and running champions, along with the All-Around Champion in each age group at the local competition will be awarded and advance to the sectional level of competition. All participants must bring a copy of their birth certificate and fill out a registration/ waiver form prior to that start of the competition. Contact Megan Smith via e-mail at MSmith@florencefreedom.com.

Madison Salkowski (left) battles No. 5 Anna Schroer for a rebound at the 50th Bluejay Classic basketball tournament at St. Joseph School in Cold Spring. Both St. Joseph teams met in the championship game.

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VIEWPOINTS

March 18, 2010

EDITORIALS

How would it affect you if the U.S. Postal Service dropped Saturday service? “Not one bit! And they can do away with Tuesday, also.” Duke “Since the Post Office has a deficit, it makes sense. We can live without Saturday deliveries.” Rabbit Hash “No effect.” “Not at all.”

M.C. Kimberley A. Powell

“It would eliminate one daily trip to the post office to pick up a meager amount of mail. Closing on Mondays might be more productive since they are already closed for paid holidays so frequently.” G.G. “I would love it! That’s one less thing to worry about if you go out of town for the weekend. Often, Saturday mail is full of junk for the recycle box.” T.F. in Richwood “Daily mail is great! But, I lived for two years in remote Alaska, with one delivery each week, weather permitting – you just accept it. We are all spoiled in the U.S.” W.R. “It will affect us all – the more service is reduced, the less people will use the Postal Service. Then will they reduce delivery to four days, or every other day? Surely the government and the Postal Service can find other ways to save money without reducing its basic, core service of mail delivery.” J.S.B.

Next question: Do you think businesses are right to block employees’ access to NCAA Tournament-related Web sites during the tournament? Why or why not? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. things but totally inappropriate as replacements for a good, old-fashioned, handwritten letter. ‘Nuff said.” M.M. “It won’t affect me at all. We pay most of our bills on the Internet or phone, which is why the post office is not doing as much business as in the past. We’ve gone mostly paperless so we don’t get bills mailed to our house but sent to our e-mail, and have some accounts automatically debited. If I buy something online, it’s usually shipped Fed Ex or UPS – because it’s cheaper and faster. “I did see where some members of Congress would like a 2- or 3day a week service, which I think would be too drastic. Unfortunately this is a sign of the times, in much the same way fewer and fewer people are reading hard copies of the newspaper. Everyone has to adjust.” R.L.H. “I don’t believe it would be much of an issue. My feelings go beyond this though. My understanding is that the issue they are trying to address is cost and in reality this, from what I have read, has very little to do with cost. “If this were a private industry service would be the highest priority. In the case of the post office it is more to protect the union.” C.H. “It won’t. Just get the bills two days later.” J.Z.

“Minimally. I wouldn’t like it, but I could deal with it. I understand something about how shaky the Postal Service has been in the last 20-30 years and since I am one of the few people in my circle of friends and family who still writes letters, pay bills by check, etc., I have witnessed the incremental increases in the cost of a first-class postage stamp to its current 44 cents. When I was a kid, we actually had mail delivery twice a day. As one of the current TV commercials would say, ‘Can you believe it?’ “I wish I could have done something to change the outcome, but as someone said in his campaign for the presidency recently, ‘It’s above my pay grade.’ “It may seem harsh, but think about it: most of the stuff we get in our mailbox these days is junk mail, plain and simple – and advertising circulars. I could go one more day without those.” Bill B.

“Saturdays bills and junk mail would come on Monday. They could cut it back to delivery Monday, Wednesday and Friday and I could care less. The USPS is just another failure of the federal government.” Nick Weber

“If the US Postal Service (a privately-operated entity) is such dire financial straits that the only immediate solution is suspension of Saturday deliveries, it will little or no impact on us (most of the mail we receive is catalogs and junk anyway!). “I remain amazed that I can write a letter to a friend in California, put a 44-cent stamp on it and find out that it arrived safely, at the correct address in just three days. It’s a shame that the electronic age has allowed us to give up the fine art of letter-writing in favor of emails which are great for some

“There would be some impact by the Saturday closing. Things mailed on Friday might not be delivered until Tuesday. However, if the Postal Service needs to save money they should give every customer the same lousy service I've received for 24 years! Give everyone a cluster box, you know, the big gray monstrosity that sits on the corner several blocks from your house. Why should just a minority get this so-called postal service? Equality is the American way.” R.V.

“I would rather have the U.S. P.S. discontinue Wednesday or Thursday service. That way there would be minimal delay as compared to a two day lapse over the weekend.” N.F.

“Nowadays, if it’s urgent, it goes by email or FedEx. Two or three deliveries of junk mail a week is more than enough! “I know that the USPS has just said it won’t consider dropping Saturday delivery, but that is just ‘Head in the sand’ thinking.” D.M.R.

For more viewpoints from around Greater Cincinnati, go to cincinnati.com/opinion

LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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A11

RECORDER

Politics of deceit and hypocrisy Election campaign time is approaching and the politicians are getting ready to bombard us with dubious political slogans and jargons such as no taxes and small government. Open your eyes Americans; no government, local, state, or national could function without tax revenue. The fact of life is that governments collect taxes from all sources including income, store receipts, utility and telephone bills. It does not take rocket science to know that the United States is a world power only because we fulfill our patriotic duty and pay taxes. No politician has ever explained what actually is a small government? Small government is an impractical and meaningless gobbledygook used mostly by conservative politicians as a ploy to win elections and then, they borrow and spend. Speaking historically at the national level starting with Presidents Reagan, his idea of small government was reducing taxes and increase in deficit spending that produced the largest debt in American history. Then President George H. W. Bush, who will forget his “read my lips” and at the end of four years he left us with more debts. President George W. Bush who

inherited government surplus from President Clinton and squandered it on two wars. The younger Bush campaigned on small government and no Charlie taxes; he wedged Chukwudolue two wars, cut and continCommunity taxes ued to borrow and Recorder spend. guest Now, the same columnist hypocrites who are talking about fiscal responsibility voted for all the Bush deficit spending including $1.2 trillion none funded Medicare prescription drug benefit. Mr. Bush left government and handed $1.7 trillion deficit to President Obama. If fiscal conservatives as touted by the Republicans exist in America, we have not seen any in 30 years. Apparently, our elected representatives went to Washington and forgot the citizens who elected them and now are protecting special and corporate interests. On Jan. 21, 2010, using this paper, our Rep. Geoff Davis talked about transparency for the health care reform bill he opposed. He never mentions the plight of thousands of Kentucky citizens who do not have any health insurance. A flawed health care reform bill

is better than doing nothing. We do not live a perfect world. It does not concern our politicians that 35 percent of Kentucky citizens do not have any medical insurance? Instead our representatives are fighting to protect the interest of big insurance companies. Somebody should tell Mr. Davis that after one year, the health care reform bill does not need any more public debate because it had gone through many public debates including town hall shouting meetings. The health care reform bill has passed both houses of Congress and all Republicans voted no. Mr. Davis mentioned negotiation, but negotiation requires good faith from all parties and Republicans have shown that they lack good faith. Sixteen years ago Republicans opposed the Clinton health care reform bill citing lack of mandates for individuals to purchase health insurance. Today in their double standard, they oppose Obama’s because it included mandates. If the only thing Republicans could offer is to start health care reform debate over, the Democrats should use reconciliation to pass the bill just as the Republicans have previously done 16 times in most recent history. Charlie Chukwudolue is a Florence resident.

CVG still means: ‘Cincinnati Very Good’ As a Kenton County Airport Board member in 1974, Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong coined the phrase: “CVG – Cincinnati Very Good.” In 36 years, a lot has happened that has made this a true statement about our Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport that goes by the call letters “CVG.” Without question, the airport has been the single largest economic driver of our tri-state region, at its peak employing upwards of 10,000 direct jobs and churning tens of thousands of additional indirect and support jobs throughout the area. We can thank lots of things for this economic effect, including our strategic location, unsurpassed airport infrastructure, and visionary and effective leadership in business and government. But in the end, the reality is that it has been the presence of Delta Air Lines’ domestic hub (once its second largest) located at CVG that has attracted hundreds of companies to our community and millions of passengers through the terminal gates. Delta’s presence at CVG has not only been important, it is as old as the airport. In January of 1947, an American Airlines flight became the first commercial landing at CVG. Moments later, Delta landed the second. But when it comes to air service at CVG over the past two years, the news has often been grim. In 2005, the airport saw more than 600 flights occur daily at its runways carrying a total of 21 million passengers. In less than five years, announcement after announcement foretold plummeting numbers of flights and passengers as our air service diminished. In 2009, only 10.6 million passengers were counted at CVG barely half of what traveled through the airport in 2005. In December of 2009, more bad news came as five additional destinations were to be discontinued in February 2010, taking our

number of daily flights to 160175 and direct flights to just 70 cities. We still use the term “hub” for what the Delta presence that exists at CVG, but now it is used more loosely since the number of Delta flights here now make it the airline’s fifth largest hub. Certainly, the elimination of international destinations – Rome, Amsterdam and London – have been equally disappointing and even troubling to those of us interested in recruiting multinational corporations and headquarters operations that were once attracted here by direct flights to key European destinations, where businesspeople could travel, do a day’s business and then return to the region the next day. So, was it the economy, the merger of Delta and Northwest, a business decision or something else that created such a drastic change and exposed our vulnerability in air service? Probably it’s best stated that it was a combination of many of these. No matter the reasons however, the question is what to do about it. First, the Northern Kentucky Chamber has been involved in this issue in numerous ways since warning signs first started. We have been communicating our concerns, support and offers of assistance to airport and Delta Air Line officials for the past four years. The Chamber’s board placed “Increasing air service at CVG to create competitive advantage” near the top of our list of priorities on our organization’s strategic plan and we’ve worked the topic in some way every month since the beginning of our year in September. Airport and airline officials have attended meetings with our board of directors, small meetings

Steve Stevens Community Recorder guest columnist

A publication of

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

CH@TROOM

Last week’s question

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Campbell Community Recorder

Campbell Community Editor . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

with our top leadership and even open forums for our entire membership. It’s important work that our businesses expect us to do. We are the voice of the regional business community, the convener of critical stakeholders and often a facilitator on public policy issues. While we don’t get a win or the outcome we always want on every issue, we nevertheless continue to perform this work. Simply, it’s one of the reasons we exist. So, where do we go from here? In June of last year, the Kenton County Airport Board made an important move in hiring aviation industry veteran John Mok as aviation director at CVG. He not only has years of work experience in his business, he also holds a degree in political science from Columbia University. Why is that relevant? If you don’t think politics is an important part of his business, think again. John is a member of our chamber’s board of directors because he helps us understand and to communicate more effectively on the very important air service issues we face. I have also personally admired his advocacy on behalf of CVG and this community in the meetings I’ve attended with airline officials. We have many other regional partners who are at work with us on the issue of increasing air service at CVG. We have appreciated Delta’s support over the years and the fact that the service they provided helped us become the vibrant community we are today. If in the future however, it is clear we are not to be the location they choose to locate major operations, rest assured that it will be your chamber that will be leading businesses and leading communities to send the message to other air carriers that CVG still means: “Cincinnati Very Good.” Steve Stevens is president of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


A12

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

Faster Recovery Time? Very Hip.

L E A R N M O R E AT S T E L I Z A B E T H . C O M I wasn’t looking forward to my hip replacement or months of recovery. The good news? I don’t have to. Commonwealth Orthopaedics has been working closely with St. Elizabeth Healthcare to deliver better, faster joint replacement using a new surgery table that allows them to be more precise than ever, to minimize surgical trauma so I can be up and about the same day. It’s just one of the things that makes St. Elizabeth #1 for orthopaedics in Greater Cincinnati*. Better surgeries. Faster recovery time. Commonwealth Orthopaedics and St. Elizabeth are Better Together.

*St. Elizabeth Edgewood, Healthgrades 2010 CE-0000388847.INDD


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, M a r c h 1 8 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Northern Kentucky shows off its history

CATCH A STAR

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Couple makes difference at Dean At least once a week, Tracey and Eric Herman can be found volunteering at Mildred Dean Elementary School. The couple, who has one child in third grade at Mildred Dean and a child at Newport Middle School, have spent countless hours working in the classrooms, doing clerical work for teachers and chaperoning on field trips, said Principal Steve McCafferty. “They are here all the time and we know we can depend on them,” McCafferty said. “The kind of chemistry they have with the students and teachers is rare for volunteers.” Tracey, who has been volunteering at the school since her oldest child was in kindergarten, said she thinks it’s important to

show interest in her children’s school and help out in any way she can. “Since the school doesn’t have money for teacher’s aides, any work I can do for the teachers gives them more time to teach,” Tracey said. “I have a great time and enjoy it as much as the kids.” Eric, who started volunteering a lot once he became a firefighter for the City of Newport a few years ago and had days off during the week, said he likes having a chance to help with his child and the other children. McCafferty said having the Hermans there really helps improve the school. “When they walk in the door, you know the day is going to be a little better,” McCafferty said.

THINGS TO DO

In search for treasure?

It is time for the 2010 Little Treasures Spring Sale, which will take place March 18 through March 20. The event expects more than 150 consignors and will provide a good opportunity for parents to shop for new and gently used kid’s clothing, shoes, toys, books and furniture. For hours and more information, call 817-9100 or visit www.littletreasuressale.com. The event will take place at Madison Office Products, located 8307 Hwy 42 in Florence.

Need a laugh?

Bobcat Goldthwaite (picutred) will perform his stand-up comedy routine at the Funny Bone at Newport on the Levee March 19-21. Goldwaite is most recognized from his role in the “Police Academy” movies. More recently, he wrote and directed the movie “World’s Greatest Dad” starring Robin Williams. Visit www.funnyboneonthelevee.com.

Getting in the swing of things

The Executive Women’s Golf Association (EWGA) presents its First Day of Spring Golf Clinic for Women at The Golf Courses of Kenton County March 20 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The clinic is free for members and others interested in joining EWGA. Participants are asked to bring their driver, favorite fairway wood, pitching wedge and putter. For more information, call 371-3200 or visit www.ewgacincinnati.com. The Golf Courses of Kenton County is located at 3908 Richardson Road in Independence.

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Check out the Northern Kentucky History page at NKY.com by typing “history” into the search bar on the homepage. |

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society President Ken Reis inside the society's second floor museum display in the Alexandria courthouse. The valise in the glass box was believed to have been used in a murder to carry the head of Pearl Bryan in connection with the 1896 killing in Fort Thomas. Reis will give a presentation about the formation and operation of the group during the 17th annual Northern Kentucky Regional History Day at Northern Kentucky University Saturday, March 20.

History Day details

The 17th annual Northern Kentucky Regional History Day will be at Northern Kentucky University’s Highland Heights campus Saturday, March 20. The day is organized by NKU’s History and Geography Department and costs $8 the day of the event or $6 in advance. Parking for the event will be in the Kenton Drive parking garage, and a coupon for free parking will be available at the History Day registration table. History Day starts in NKU’s Student Union at 8 a.m. with a two-hour open registration time and a chance to browse tables with information about local history organizations and museums, books and artifacts The featured presentation “Cincinnati in 1848: A Panoramic Portrait of a River Community” will be 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Otto Budig Theater in the University Center. A series of two sets of workshops will be from 11:15 to noon and from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. with door prizes announced and another chance to peruse the displays from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. For information including a list of workshops and a campus map visit http://hisgeo.nku.edu/projects/ historyday. Historical Society and a board member of the Behringer-Crawford Museum. Boh said although the featured 10 a.m. presentation “Cincinnati in 1848: A Panoramic Portrait of a River Community” is about a series of photographs of Cincinnati, it still links directly back to Northern Kentucky. Steamboats in the panoramic photograph were probably supplied with coal to refuel by Covington businessman Amos Shinkle’s coal company, Boh said. Shinkle was one of the wealthiest men in Northern

A MEMBER SERVICE

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More Campbell history

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

The Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society's collection on the second floor of the Alexandria courthouse includes information about the 1896 killing of Pearl Bryan in Fort Thomas in which this valise was thought to have been a piece of evidence. Kentucky and was involved in real estate and banking, and was one of the driving forces in getting the Suspension Bridge built, Boh said. History can be highly entertaining because people often come and find out how their own families contributed to the community’s history, he said. “I think if you’re interested in local history it should be a good time of entertainment,” Boh said of history day.

The Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society operates a second floor history library, meeting space, and museum display on the second floor of the Alexandria courthouse, 8352 East Main St. Displays range from framed documents and newspapers to artifacts from the former Speers Hospital in Dayton and evidence from the Pearl Bryan murder. Bryan’s headless body was found in 1896 in Fort Thomas about where U.S. 27 is at the intersection with South Fort Thomas Avenue, said Ken Reis, society president. Two men were arrested in connection with the killing and a doublehanging was performed outside the Newport courthouse where the addition is being built to the building now, Reis said. It was the final public hanging in Campbell County. For information about the society including hours it is open to the public visit /www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/ ~kycchgs.

KYFB.COM

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

The Campbell County Historical and Genealogical Society is located on the second floor of the historic Alexandria courthouse, built in 1842.

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0000381955

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Tracey and Eric Herman, parent volunteers at Mildred Dean Elementary School in Newport, pose for a picture by the Mildred Dean Bee, in the background.

Designed for anyone curious about local history, the 17th annual Northern Kentucky Regional History Day is a chance for anyone to drop in and find out what historians have to say about the area. Open workshops will feature topics ranging from myths of Newport’s “Reformation” to Civil War Songs, researching Civl War ancestors, and the forming of a church by settlers of Dayton. Ken Reis, president of the Campbell County Historical & Genealogical Society, will present the workshop “A Hidden Gem: The Campbell County Historical Society.” Reis, a founding member of the society and also of the regional history day, said in 1989 he and his brother Jim had a discussion at Thanksgiving about why the county didn’t have a historical society. With the state’s bicentennial in 1992 and the county’s bicentennial in 1994, the brothers found a sponsor in Campbell County Public Library in Cold Spring where the society’s first meeting was. By 1993 the Campbell County Fiscal Court asked the society if they would take over the second floor Alexandria courthouse that had been vacant for 13 years prior where the county jail once was, Ken said. “We remodeled this space ourselves,” he said. Attendance at meetings, which rotate to various spots around the county, has varied over the years from a high of as many as 75 people at a meeting 10 years ago to between 35 to 45 people at meetings now, Reis said. The group meets every month in various locations around the county and always has an unpaid speaker at the meeting, he said. The regional History Day at NKU is a way to reach people who might be interested in history, but aren’t part of a formal historical society, he said. “We thought that the best way to teach people about our area and the best way to preserve our history is to educate them,” Reis said. The day is a good opportunity to buy books and to network with people, said John Boh of Covington, secretary of the Kenton County


B2

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A R C H 1 9

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Knit On, 735 Monmouth St. Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 2915648. Newport.

ART EXHIBITS

More Than Ink, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Tattooart show with works by James Dryer, Austin Fields and Dustin Zion of Asylum Tattoo in Covington; Kevin Combs, Jeff Davis, Brad Rouse and Sam Gabriel of Old Street Tattoo in Monroe and others. Works available for purchase. Free. Through March 31. 2615770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

FOOD & DRINK

Fish and Shrimp Fry, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m. St. Joseph Church - Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road, Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes, a sampler platter and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available. $4.50-$11. Presented by St. Joseph Church. 635-5652. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. St. Thomas School, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Serving fish sandwiches, shrimp, sides, pizza, french fries, homemade desserts and drinks. Benefits St. Thomas School activities. $1.50-$6. 572-4641; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Spanish Values I. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, 90 W. Alexandria Pike, Free. 781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Fish Fry, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. St. Bernard Church, 401 Berry St. Church Hall. Fish, salmon patty, shrimp, fries, macaroni and cheese, and sweet or sour coleslaw. Carryout available. $6. 431-9705. Dayton. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 5011 Four Mile, Includes fish, shrimp, chicken tenders, frog legs, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese and coleslaw. Carryout available, call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $4.75-$6.50, 25 cents carryout fee. 441-6251. Silver Grove. Wine Tasting, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, 6685 Four Mile Road, $1. 4480253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Holy Trinity Junior High School, 840 Washington Ave. Fish, shrimp, grilled cheese, fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and drink. Carryout available. 75 cents-$7. 491-7612. Newport. Fish Fry, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Knights of Columbus, Father DeJaco Council 5220, 11186 Licking Pike, Fish dinners and sandwiches, baked fish, shrimp, fries, cheese pizza, macaroni and cheese, hush puppies, and coleslaw. Carryout available. 75 cents-$6.50. 6359863. Alexandria.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Pure Prairie League, 6 p.m. Newport Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St. Grand Ballroom. Includes dinner buffet. Country-rock band. $70 stage front, $60 VIP, $50 reserved, $40. 849-4918000; rwatickets.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Keith Swinney, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Bobcat Goldthwait, 7:30 p.m. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Standup comedian and actor. $20. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Beckett and Bock, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Includes “The Shaker Chair” by Adam Bock; “Come and Go” and “Play” by Samuel Beckett. $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. Presented by Left Bank Productions, LLC. Through March 28. 240-0319. Newport.

SCHOOLS

Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy Open House, 7 p.m.-8 p.m. Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, Children’s Wing. Tour school, meet staff, view student presentations and learn about benefits of a classical and Christian education. For families with students entering grades K-5. Free. Presented by Cornerstone Classical Christian Academy. 640-5147; www.CornerstoneClassical.org. Lakeside Park. S A T U R D A Y, M A R C H 2 0

BENEFITS

Charity Night at the Tables, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Lane’s End V.I.P. tent. Includes food, beer, wine, soft drinks and casino-style gambling. Entertainment, raffles and silent auction. Benefits seven local charities. $75. Reservations required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 578-6388; www.nkychamber.com. Florence.

EDUCATION

Frozen Ropes Hitting Clinic, 9 a.m. For ages 12-14. Florence Freedom Baseball Academy, Freedom Way, One-hour hitting clinics. Each instructor-led clinic includes 4-8 kids who rotate through various hitting drills to get ready for the season. Online registration required. www.florencefreedom.com/baseballacademy.php. Florence.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Negociant Wines: A look at Louis Jadot, Louis Latour, Georges Duboeuf and more. D.E.P.’s Fine Wine & Spirits Fort Thomas, Free. 781-8105; www.depsfinewine.com. Fort Thomas. Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-8 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

LECTURES

A Night with the Stars, 7:30 p.m. Thomas More College Science Lecture Hall, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Dr. Wes Ryle discusses the composition and inner workings of a star and the numerous variety of stars found in the night sky. Followed by telescope viewing of the sky at observatory, weather permitting. Free. Presented by Thomas More College. 341-5800. Crestview Hills.

LITERARY - SIGNINGS

Beth Hoffman, 2 p.m.3:30 p.m. Highlands High School, 2400 Memorial Parkway, Newport resident author discusses and signs “Saving CeeCee Honeycutt.”. $5. 513-781-5900; www.bluemarblebooks.com. Fort Thomas.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - BIG BAND

Big Band Swing Dance Music, 7:30 p.m.11 p.m. York St. Cafe, 738 York St. Seventeen piece swing and dance band. $10. 380-0032. Newport.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Bobcat Goldthwait, 7:30 p.m. Funny Bone Comedy Club, $20. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Beckett and Bock, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 240-0319. Newport.

RECREATION

Charity Cornhole Tournament, 7 p.m.-11 p.m. Sports of All Sorts - Florence, 25 Cavalier Blvd. Singles, doubles and seven-player team event. Top eight finishers in each division qualify for May 15 TheRiverJam tournament with guaranteed payout. Benefits CityCURE and Shining Star Sports. Singles tournament: $40 per player; Doubles tournament: $50 per team; College singles tournament: $20 per player with ID; College doubles tournament: $40 per team with ID; Youth tournament: $20 per player (age 16 and under). Registration available at Columbus@AmericanCornHole.com. Presented by American Cornhole, LLC. 614-584-4662; http://theriverjam.com/?page_id=225. Florence. S U N D A Y, M A R C H 2 1

ART EXHIBITS

More Than Ink, noon-6 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Second Sight, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Bean Haus, Free. 431-2326. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Camp Springs Vineyard, $1. 448-0253; www.campspringsvineyard.com. Camp Springs.

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

A Musical Tribute to Phil Blank, 5 p.m. Doors open at 4 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Ballroom. With Ricky Nye. Benefits Play It Forward Foundation. $5. 4312201. Newport.

PROVIDED

Ekoostik Hookah members Dave Katz (left), Eric Lanese, John Mullins, Steve Sweney and Cliff Starbuck will play at the Southgate House Thursday, March 25. The show will begin at 9 p.m. and the doors will open at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $18 and $15 in advance. The Southgate House is located at 24 E. Third St. in Newport. For more information, call 431-2201 or visit www.southgatehouse.com.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Footloose!, 2 p.m. Villa Madonna Academy, $12, $8 students. 331-6333; www.villamadonna.net. Villa Hills.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Beckett and Bock, 2 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $15, $12 seniors and students. Reservations recommended. 240-0319. Newport. M O N D A Y, M A R C H 2 2

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

The Art of Food, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 957-1940. Covington.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - ROCK

MUSIC - JAZZ

Royal Palm Orchestra, 4:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Seven-piece ensemble directed by Bill Gemmer. “Every Tuesday is Fat Tuesday!”. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Bobcat Goldthwait, 7 p.m. Funny Bone Comedy Club, $20. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

The Big Pink, 9:30 p.m. With A Place To Bury Strangers. Doors open 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $13, $10 advance. 431-2201. Newport.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, M A R C H 2 4

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 23. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Lap Time, 9:30 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 5

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3 and up. Free. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - CABARET

Don Fangman Sings Sinatra, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Knotty Pine on the Bayou, 6720 Licking Pike, Songs also by Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli and Neal Diamond. Free. Reservations required. 781-2200; www.fangsingsfrank.com. Campbell County.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Top Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, A London employment agency’s managing director’s celebration of success becomes an introspective look at the sacrifices she has made on her rise to that success. In repertory. $12, $11 faculty, staff, and alumni, $10 ages 60 and up, $8 students. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Theatre and Dance. Through April 2. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

SPORTS

Winter/Spring Meet, 1:10 p.m. Turfway Park, Free, except March 27. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence.

T U E S D A Y, M A R C H 2 3

ART EXHIBITS

More Than Ink, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Arnie’s on the Levee, 120 E. Third St. $3 Red Stag cocktails. 4314340. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra returns to Cincinnati to perform “Beethoven’s Last Night,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 25, at the Taft Theatre. They will also perform songs from their new album, “Night Castle.” Tickets are $48.50 and $58.50; $1 from each ticket will be donated to the Music Resource Center. Call 513-721-8883 or visit www.Livenation.com. Pictured is Roddy Chong of Trans-Siberian Orchestra.

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

See DJ Lance Rock, Brobee, Foofa, Muno, Plex and Toodee in “Yo Gabba Gabba! Live!: There’s a Party in My City!” at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday, March 20, at the Aronoff Center. The production features music, singing, dancing and animation. Hip-hop artist Biz Markie will also be on stage teaching kids how to beat box, as well as special guests The Aquabats, as part of the Super Music Friends Show. Tickets are $25 and $35. Children under 1 year old are admitted for free to sit on a parent’s lap. Packages are available for $99 and include a meet-and-greet with the characters. Call 513-621-2787 or visit www.CincinnatiArts.org.


Life

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

B3

Five responses to question, ‘Why me?’ It’s not news to read that life doesn’t always happen as expected. When despite my best I lose out, can’t find a good job, watch a valuable relationship dissolve, discover I have an incurable disease, or encounter countless other major or minor tragedies – a question often arises, “Why me?” Here are five possible considerations among so many others. 1. An imagined “Contract with the Universe,” or, with God. Most of us live harboring a quid pro quo attitude. It’s as though we’ve made a contract with God or the Universe. Our imaginary contract says “If I’m good only good things will happen to me.” If I live an ordinary, honest, helpful-to-others life, things will go well and no traumas or dramas will occur.” When adversity does arrive we feel betrayed. We wonder, “Why me?” Of course, there is no contract.

Life in this world is unpredictable and unfair. Full justice, and even mercy, come later.

2. The expectation of Father Lou e x e m p t i o n . Guntzelman Others die, not Perspectives me; others get diseases, not me; others encounter all sorts of problems, but not me. When one of my sisters was lying on a hospital gurney awaiting an operation, a doctor friend passed. Surprised to see her he asked, “What’s wrong? What are you doing here?” Somewhat teary-eyed she told him. Then she added, “Right now I’m lying here feeling a little sorry for myself and wondering, ‘Why me?’” Known for his humor rather than tact, he exclaimed, “Well, wouldn’t a better question be,

‘Why not?’” He was realistic but insensitive. His realistic response has led me many times to ask myself that question. When I feel undeservedly dumped on by life I often ask myself, “Why not?” I have never been able to come up with a convincing reason that should exempt me from the vicissitudes of life. 3. My own unconscious causality. “Why me?” Because sometimes I set myself up for them by not recognizing my behavior or thoughts. E.g. Some people marry, find their spouse physically abusive, and eventually divorce. The abused person later marries again, and voila, the second spouse does the same. Is the conclusion then that all spouses abuse? Or, could I be part of the reason it occurs. Do I disrespect myself and passively permit mistreatment? Do I unconsciously seek it because as a child I saw it

in my own family, and now I erroneously assume it’s something that happens in every marriage? Or, perhaps I blame myself for it or even perceive it, in a twisted way, as an expression of love? – Besides abuse, other problems may occur in my life because I unknowingly set the stage for them. Perhaps knowing myself a lot better might help avoid some situations that just seem to “come to me.” 4. Ignorance of the ambiguity of life. Until the age of 25 or later we believe that we are gods. During mid-life and thereafter the sad news is gradually conveyed – “You are not a god; you don’t always have control over what happens; your very life hangs by a thread and you must live without the answers to many questions.” The tolerance of ambiguity is one of the signs of human maturity. Amidst it all we must take

responsibility for our physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing, and grow up. In the midst of life’s ambiguous mysteries we become ripe for discovering our true self, God, and the meaning of life.

5. Maintain a sense of greater purpose. “O God who made the lion and the lamb, you decreed I should be who I am, would it spoil some vast eternal plan, if I were a wealthy man?” sang Tevya in “Fiddler On the Roof.” Does the “vast eternal plan” for my life necessitate dealing with joys and sorrows and unfairness that are actually bringing about my growth, transformation, and eventually glory? Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Stuck with a timeshare? Consider charitable donation Timeshare sales are still big business, but many who bought them now say they it’s something they regret. It’s no wonder that timeshare re-sales are also big business, but trying to find a buyer can be very difficult. Cecilia Owens of Florence says one of the timeshares she owns is great – she’s used it a lot and has traded it for other properties. But she isn’t happy with her other timeshares. The key here is while timeshares can be of value, you have to know what you’re doing and how to use them. Owens said her one good timeshare has been traded

for lots of trips. Owens says her two other timeshares h a v e turned out be a Howard Ain to drag on Hey Howard! her. She has paid more than $14,000 for both, but the bills continue. “You may have them paid off but you’re still paying your maintenance fees and, for the three of them together it is costing us $1,600 or $1,700 a year,” Owens said. Owens recently received

a postcard from a company offering to take two of her timeshares off her hands. The offer sounds tempting because it would get her out from under those yearly maintenance fees – fees she must pay for the rest of her life. But before doing that I suggested she consider donating the timeshares to charity. Several charities, including the American Kidney Fund, are offering to take them. The American Kidney Fund says timeshares typically sell for from between $600 and $5,000. The sale is handled by an outside firm and when the sale is

complete you’ll receive a receipt for your donation. I told Owens she won’t have to pay anything and she liked the idea she would get a tax write off. Charities won’t automatically accept every time-

share, but they do take most. They’ll first determine the value of the property to make sure it can be sold quickly for a profit. One Web site, www.donateforacause.org., says it has raised $3.3 mil-

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

March 18, 2010

Virginia Bakery offers coffeecake secrets

It all started with an heirloom cookbook compiled by Children’s Hospital Cooperative way back in 1973. It was given to me by friend Joanie Woodward, now of blessed memory. She gave it to me last year, and there was a recipe in there for Virginia Bakery’s German coffeecake. I made it and included it in a column. I did have to work with the recipe as it needed tweaking and really wasn’t easy for the home cook to duplicate. I talked with the folks at Virginia Bakery, asking for help. Well lo and behold, the authentic recipe from yes, Virginia Bakery, is in this column today. Tom Thie, of Virginia Bakery, reworked it for the home cook. It’s just one of 50 fabulous Virginia Bakery recipes included in an original cookbook by Tom. Described as a “flavored cookbook,” meaning it will be a combination of bakery history, Thie family stories, and customer memories in addition to the recipes and photos of approximately 50 of Virginia Bakery’s favorite items. And the recipe for schnecken will be included!

N o w the cookbook will be available during the winter holiday season Rita later this Heikenfeld year. let Rita’s kitchen youI’llknow exactly when, since I know I’m among the many fans who will want this Cincinnati treasure.

Virginia Bakery cinnamon coffeecake Yellow Dough Sponge

2 cups warm water 3 packs of instant dry yeast (such as Red Star) 3 cups all purpose flour Start yeast in warm water (105 to 110 degrees) for five minutes. Add flour, mix well. Cover bowl with a cloth and let rise until it doubles or the sponge starts to fall. Depending on the temperature, this could take one to two hours.

Add:

11⁄4 cup sugar 4 teaspoon salt

for future use, put it in plastic bags. The dough should be used within 48 hours or frozen up to a month. The yeast activity will decline rapidly after a month and your dough will be flat. When making an item from frozen dough, simply thaw it in the refrigerator or in the microwave on “Defrost.”

PROVIDED

Virginia Bakery’s famous cinnamon crumb coffeecake. 1 cup shortening (such fectly fine results.) Mix all ingredients to as Crisco) 4 oz. salted butter (1 form a soft dough. It should stick) softened to room tem- be quite sticky – soft, pliable and moist – but not batterperature like. If the dough forms a 1 tight ball, you’ve added too ⁄2 cup egg yolks much flour. Add a little 1 cup cool milk* water. 1 cup cool water Starting the dough early 9 (approximately) cups flour – preferably 3 cups in the day or a day ahead is winter flour** (pastry flour) best. Fresh yellow dough is and 6 cups all purpose flour difficult to work with. Tom recommends refrigerating (*The Virginia Bakery the dough allowing it to always used whole milk and stiffen. It takes a few hours for Tom Thie prefers it. “We’re not making diet bakery the dough to rise after being goods. When you consider in the refrigerator overnight. the amount of fat and eggs The sponge method is not a in the dough, changing the quick way to make bakery milk is not going to save goods, but the dough is many fat calories. On the easy to work with. For coffeecakes, such as other hand, if skim is all you have, use it. You can the crumb cinnamon, divide always compensate by dough into nine pieces. adding a tad more butter.”) Each piece will weigh (**The winter flour helps approximately 12 ounces. If you’re going to use the to soften the dough and gives the yellow dough a divided dough soon, you better texture. Not essential, can just put it on a floured but nice to have. All pur- tray and cover with a towel. pose flour will produce per- If the dough will be frozen

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Crumb cinnamon coffeecake topping

This cake requires a 12 oz. piece of yellow dough to be spread evenly over the bottom of a well greased 8by-8-inch pan. Crisco or a spray like Pam works well. With lightly floured hands, pat to flatten with no lip. Wash the dough with melted butter and cover generously with cinnamon crumbs. The recipe below yields enough to cover two cakes with a layer of streusel as they were made in the bakery.

Cinnamon Crumbs:

2 tablespoon butter 3 tablespoon shortening 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 1 ⁄3 cup light brown sugar loosely packed 1 teaspoon honey optional, but desired 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ⁄8 teaspoon salt Caramel color optional 2 ⁄3 cup flour Cream everything except flour. The caramel color was added to darken the crumbs.

Not necessary. If you do use it, don’t use too much, it can be bitter. Caramel color is nothing but burnt sugar. Be careful if you make it at home – it smokes something awful. Add the flour and rub between the tips of your fingers, kind of like mixing pie dough. Do not combine flour in a mixer, it is too easy to over mix. Mix until you have nice moist cinnamon crumbs. If they are too wet, add more flour. If too dry, add a little melted butter. (In the bakery, they would make the cinnamon crumb base – everything but the flour – the night before, and then rub in the flour fresh every morning. Cinnamon crumbs will dry out quickly unless covered or refrigerated.) After putting crumbs on the dough in the baking pan, let the cake rise in a warm place until dough is almost doubled. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes – until cake springs back when tested. Cakes are easier to remove from the pan when slightly warm. Often a customer would ask to have the cake covered with sifted powdered sugar Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. Email columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.


Community 3920 Alexandria Pike • Delve Into Boone County Murder with Author Hal McFarland 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 14 Join author Hal McFarland as he discusses his writing career, his book “A Dream Within a Dream,” and why he chose to write about the Joan Kiger Murder Trial. Please register. • Build a Bench with Nelstone 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17 Join Nelstone, a renowned builder of stone statuary, as they build a beautiful new bench for the Cold Spring Library. Children will be able to carve out their own part of the stone that will eventually become the bench, and that stone will be made into a jewelry keepsake to take home. No registration required. • Get Your Kicks on Route 66 7 p.m. Monday, April 19 Join road traveler Paul Ashworth for a visual passport to the old route’s landmarks and roadside attractions across eight states. Please register. • CD Clock Craft

6 p.m. Tuesday, April 20 Learn to make a clock out of unusable CDs. Bring the CDs - all other materials will be provided. Ages 12-18. Please register.

Carrico/Fort Thomas 3

1000 Highland Ave. • Asian American Festival 1 - 4 p.m. Saturday, April

Learn about the land, people and history of Asia to celebrate Asian Awareness Month at the library. Free food and music provided. No registration required. • Let’s Talk About It: The House of Bernarda Alba 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 13 Let’s Talk About It book discussion group led by the faculty of Northern Kentucky University. The final book in the series is “The House of Bernarda Alba” by Federico Garcia Lorca. Refreshments provided by the Friends.

Newport

901 E. Sixth St. • Puppy Tales. Read to a Dog 4 p.m. Mondays, April 5, 12, 19 & 26 Especially for grades 1-3. Sign up for a 15-minute reading session with a dog that loves to listen. No regis-

tration required. • One Stop Job Fair 1 - 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 14 Make connections with multiple employers at one location. One Stop Northern Kentucky will conduct a three-hour job fair featuring 15 employers. No registration required. The Campbell County Public Library operates three branches. The Cold Spring Branch is located at 3920 Alexandria Pike in Cold Spring; phone 859-7816166. The Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch is located at 1000 Highland Ave. in Fort Thomas; phone 859-5725033. The Newport Branch is located at 901 E. Sixth St. in Newport; phone 859-5725035. Hours for all three branches are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Web site address is www.cc-pl.org; 24-hour reference service, www.askwhyky.org; 24hour circulation service, 859572-5041; and 24-hour storytelling service, 859-5725039.

Mentors needed

Mentoring Plus was established in April of 2009 by several long-time Northern Kentucky residents to serve disadvantaged teens. It is the sole program of Ex-Change House, Inc., a small local grassroots agency. The mission of Mentoring Plus is to enable youth to realize and grow into their potential in order to become healthy and productive members of society. Unlike any other mentoring program, Mentoring Plus is

unique in several ways: *the neediest of youth are served *family needs are also addressed *in addition to having a personal relationship with a volunteer adult role model, whom we call a "life coach", youth are provided educational support, substance abuse services, job/life skills and character development. Once a youth and the life coach are matched, they come together once weekly for three hours at the Salvation Army in Newport. The life

coach supports and assists their youth one-on-one in completing their lessons and activities. Program staff are present to guide the activities. The life coach will also contact youth once weekly through phone, text or e-mail. Mentors must be 21 or older and be willing to commit to a youth for one year. To become a mentor or volunteer in other ways contact Kevin Kennedy at 859-982-5895 or e-mail at mentoringplus@fuse.net.

BUSINESS NOTES Cristofoli-Keeling, Inc. hire Hartman

Cristofoli-Keeling, Inc., a marketing communications firm, has hired Clare Hartman as Marketing & Public Relations Assistant. Hartman will be responsible for providing support in client services and strategy implementation as well as coordinating communication projects. Previously an Administrative Assistant for Spring Grove Cemetery, Hartman’s professional experience includes customer serv-

ice and relationship management, project coordination and general business operations. Hartman Hartman holds a Bachelors of Arts from Northern Kentucky University and is currently working towards her Masters in Communications from Northern Kentucky University. Hartman resides in Fort Thomas.

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April events at the Campbell County library Cold Spring

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

3-1 lb. Pkgs. Ground Beef 1-24 oz. Sirloin Steak 2-8 oz. Ribeye Steaks 1-3 lb. Chuck Roast 5-4 oz. Center Cut Pork Chops 4-7 oz. Country Style Ribs 2-1 lb. Pkgs. Bacon 10 lb. Chicken Leg Quarters

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

March 18, 2010

Legacy introduces leader awards Legacy is accepting nominations and applications for the premiere of the Next Generation Leader Awards. These awards are designed to salute and applaud the Northern Kentucky/Cincinnati region’s young professionals for significant accomplishments in their chosen professional field. Applications are due in the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s office by 5 p.m. Friday, March 19. The Next Generation Leader Awards are open to individuals ages 21-40 who live or work in the Northern Kentucky/Cincinnati area. Finalists and a winner

FA THE

will be chosen in each of the 13 categories/industries. Categories are: Architecture, engineering and construction; arts, entertainment and music businesses; community service and nonprofit; education; financial services; government and public affairs; hospitality and tourism; human resources; legal services; medical and health care services; public relations, advertising and marketing; real estate services and technology. There is no application/entry fee. Winners will be announced at the Next Generation Leader Awards dinner July 29, 2010. “Legacy is committed to providing networking and

professional development opportunities for all young professionals regardless of their job description,” said Joshua D. Quinn, president of Legacy. “What makes this award stand out is that winners are chosen by their colleagues and recognized for their leadership within their industry.” For a copy of the application or to nominate a young professional visit www.legacyleadership.org or contact Sarah Klamo, manager of networking and special projects for the Northern Kentucky Chamber, at 859-578-6397. Legacy is an organization for young professionals between the ages of 21-40.

D THE HELP YOU NEED IN NORTH ERN K AY TO FIN W T S E NT STE

Business & Professional

Readers enjoy Disney World

Bailey, 10, and Caraline McDougal, 9, bring their copy of the Fort Thomas Recorder with them to the Magic Kingdom in Disney World. PROVIDED

UC K Y

SERVICE DIRECTORY of Northern Kentucky Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

To place an ad call 859-578-5509, fax 859-578-5515 or email bkrosnes@nky.com.

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Curves conducting food drive During the month of March, Curves locations of Northern Kentucky are participating in the 12th annual Curves Food Drive to benefit local food banks. Collectively, during the past five years, nearly 60 million pounds of food have been distributed to local communities all over the world through the Curves Food Drive. Curves locations in Northern Kentucky are also giving back to the community by waiving their nor-

mal service fee for any new member who brings in a bag of non-perishable groceries and joins between March 8 and March 20. This promotion will help the women of Northern Kentucky manage their weight and their wallets by joining Curves for free, while also helping feed hungry people in the community at a time when food bank pantries are at their lowest. “The Curves Food Drive is always exciting,” said Michelle Armstrong, owner

of the Hebron club. “We have a chance to help so many people at a time when the food banks are often depleted. Especially during these uncertain times, this food is needed more than ever. It’s a win-win situation for everyone, and we’re very proud to participate.” Others wishing to donate may drop off non-perishable food items at any Curves location Monday through Friday during business hours through the month of March.

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Community

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

B7

RELIGION NOTES Community Family Church

The Community Family Church in Independence will present “The Witness,” an Easter Musical Production April 1-4. The musical will be at 7:30 p.m. April 1-3 and at 6:30 p.m. April 4. The presentation will be staged in the Family Life Center at the church, 11875 Taylor Mill Road. The performance is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.cfcky.com or call 3568851.

Hickory Grove Baptist

The Men’s Ministry at Hickory Grove Baptist Church in Independence will be hosting a breakfast with guest speaker Cameron Mills from

Fifth Third adds hours at local branches Fifth Third Bank announced that it has extended hours of operation at 83 locations throughout the Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati market. Fifth Third also announced that 39 locations will add Saturday hours, bringing the total to 108 branch locations open on Saturday in Greater Cincinnati. The following branches in Campbell County will be affected by the change. Now open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday; and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday: • Highland Heights, 2700 Alexandria Pike

• Fort Thomas, 131 N. Fort Thomas Avenue • Alexandria, 6801 Alexandria Pike Now open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday: • Monmouth, 647 Monmouth Street • Bellevue, 240 Fairfield Avenue “We understand the importance of convenience when it comes to choosing and interacting with your bank,” said Leigh Prop, senior vice president and Greater Cincinnati head of Retail for Fifth Third Bank. “We already rank as Greater Cincinnati’s most convenient

bank in terms of number of locations and our hours will remain the same at our convenient 40 Bank Mart locations inside select grocery stores offering full-service banking options seven days a week. Still, our consumer and small business customers are busier than ever and we are pleased to extend the hours at our traditional branch locations into the evening and on the weekend to better serve their needs.” Hours vary by location. For information about local branches, visit the Branch and ATM locator on www.53.com.

Goodwill earns a top rating Ohio Valley Goodwill was recently selected as one of the top-rated, userreviewed nonprofits that provide job training or placement services by GreatNonprofits. The first-ever list shows the breadth of nonprofits stepping up to address the growing need for jobs in the struggling economy. Ratings were posted during the 2010 Job Training and Placement Awards hosted by GreatNonprofits, Goodwill Industries International, the International Association of Jewish Vocational Services and Guidestar. Members of the public who have volunteered, donated or been served by nonprofits submitted ratings. “We are delighted to be included in this list of toprated nonprofits that provide training and employment services,” said Joe Byrum, Goodwill president and CEO. “It is especially gratifying that the ratings are based on feedback from our many customers and users of our services,” added Byrum. To view the reviews, visit www.greatnonprofits.org/jo

bs and look up Ohio Valley Goodwill. In 2008, Ohio Valley Goodwill Industries provid-

ed service to more than 2,600 people and placed 678 individuals into competitive community jobs.

St. Philip Parish Hall will host a spaghetti dinner March 28 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The dinner will benefit the Norbert Frilling Education Fund. Carryout is available. The cost is $6 for adults and $3 for children. St. Philip Parish Hall is

located at 1400 Mary Ingles Hwy. in Melbourne.

Trinity Episcopal Church

The choir of Trinity Episcopal Church will sing service Felix Mendelssohn’s “Hear My Prayer” in conjunction with the service of Evensong. Peggy Lietzenmayer will be soprano soloist for the Mendelssohn and Nicolette Papanek, Interim Rector, will be officiant for the service. For more information, call 431-1786. Trinity Church is located at 326 Madison Avenue in downtown Covington. Have an event at your church? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

FISH FRIES IN CAMPBELL COUNTY F R I D A Y, M A R C H 1 9

Representatives from the Kentucky Center for Mathematics, based at Northern Kentucky University, came to Frankfort on March 2 as part of Mathematics Day, an event to promote numeracy or mathematical literacy among all Kentuckians. Among the center’s core missions is offering a variety of training activities to help classroom mathematics teachers. Shown here with Senate President Tempore Katie Kratz Stine, R-Southgate, are the center’s Jim Justice, Dr. Kirsten Fleming, and Alice Gabbard.

St. Philip Parish

FISH FRIES

St. Joseph Church, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road. Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes, a sampler platter and sides. Dinners and sandwiches. Carryout available. $4.50-$11. Presented by St. Joseph Church. For more information call 635-5652. Camp Springs. Wilder Fire Department Fish Fry, 4 p.m. - 8 p.m., will be hosted every Friday during Lent at the Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike. Dinner will include fish, shrimp, chicken, desserts and more. Eat in or carry out is available. For more information call 4315884. Wilder. St. Thomas School, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Serving fish sandwiches, shrimp, sides, pizza, french fries, homemade desserts and drinks. Benefits St. Thomas School activities. $1.50-$6. For more information call 572-4641; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. St. Bernard Church, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., 401 Berry St. Church Hall. Fish, salmon patty, shrimp, fries, macaroni and cheese, and sweet or sour coleslaw. Carryout available. $6. For more information call 431-9705. Dayton. Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 4 p.m.-7:30 p.m., 5011 Four Mile. Includes fish, shrimp, chicken tenders, frog legs, hush puppies, macaroni and cheese and coleslaw. Carryout available, call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $4.75$6.50, 25 cents carryout fee. For more information call 441-6251. Silver Grove. Holy Trinity Junior High School, 4 p.m.-7 p.m., 840 Washington Ave. Fish, shrimp, grilled cheese, fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and drink. Carryout available. 75 cents-$7. For more information call 491-7612. Newport. Knights of Columbus, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., Father DeJaco Council 5220, 11186 Licking Pike. Fish dinners and sandwiches, baked fish, shrimp, fries, cheese pizza, macaroni and cheese, hush puppies, and coleslaw. Carryout available. 75 cents-$6.50. For more information call 635-9863. Alexandria. Bellevue Veterans Club, 5. p.m. 24 Fairfield Ave. Menu includes fish, fish sandwich,

shrimp, cheese sticks, hush puppies, fries, slaw and macaroni and cheese. Children’s meal includes chicken nuggets and fries. Cost $3-$7, carryout available. For more information, call 360-2046 or visit www.bellevuevets.com. Bellevue.

Fish Fry not listed? Please send your information to calendar@cincinnati.com.

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B8

CCF Recorder

Community

March 18, 2010

NKY SPRING AND SUMMER CAMPS S U N D A Y, M A R C H 2 8

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Open House, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Popcorn, smores, tractor rides, horse ring rides and camp staff answers all of your questions about summer camp program. Family friendly. Free. 5866181; www.myYcamp.org. Burlington. W E D N E S D A Y, A P R I L 1 4

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Miss Julia’s Camp for Young Ladies, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 18. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Embroidery, dancing, elocution, art of conversation, hiking, picnic and tea party. Snacks and water provided. Lunch will not be included. For Ages 11 and up. $100, $85 members. Registration required. 586-6117. Burlington. S U N D A Y, A P R I L 2 5

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Open House, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Camp Ernst, Free. 586-6181; www.myYcamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, M A Y 2 4

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Finally Out. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships and care available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 5-11. $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. At the

Beach. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarship and daycare available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 3-5. $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Themed weeks. Scholarships available. State child care assistance accepted. Ages 11-15. $175, $130 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through May 28. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, Assist staff wit activities. Participants are selected through an interview process. Ages 13-16. $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U N E 1

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Prorated super Sports Fan. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 5345700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Prorated Wild, Wild West. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Schools Out. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Weekly-themed activities. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 5-11. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration

LEGAL NOTICE The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet In accordance with KRS 176.051, Kentucky’s noxious weed law, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will destroy noxious weeds on state-owned right of way at the request of the adjoining property owner. The noxious weeds named in this law are Johnson grass, giant foxtail, Canada thistle, nodding thistle, multiflora rose, black nightshade, wild cucumber and kudzu. Persons who own property adjacent to state right of way and who are involved in eradication efforts on their property can submit a written application to the highway district office in their area. Applications and addresses for each district office can be obtained from state highway garages.

required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:45 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Kenton County YMCA, 10987 Marshall Road, Learn about leadership development, cultural awareness and self-worth. Scholarship assistance available. Ages 13-16. $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County YMCA. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. School’s Out. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Swimming, environmental education, arts and crafts, service learning, science, literature, free time and more. Extended hours available. Financial assistance available. Ages 5-10. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Teen Camping. Themes, activities, swimming and fun traditional day camp. Ages 11-12. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Work on learning projects in surrounding communities and participate in several team building experiences. Financial assistance available. Ages 13-16. $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 4. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Extended care for any family available. Ages 5-16. Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 4. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 7

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS

Newport Central Catholic Summer Drama Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Grades 5-8. Monday-Friday. Continues through June 24. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on June 25-26. $200. Newport Central Catholic High School, 13 Carothers Road, Black Box Theatre. Lunch, acting, dancing and music. With drama coach and assistants. Each session limited to 30 students. Registration required. 292-0001; www.ncchs.com. Newport.

CE-0000388270.INDD

SUMMER CAMP NATURE

Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, 2625 Anderson Road, Montessori-based camp. Learn to recycle, compost and reduce waste; importance of local farming and the origins of the food we eat; and importance of nutritious food and sustainable packaging. Twoweek sessions culminate with field trip including Turner Farms, the Cincinnati Zoo and Gorman Heritage Farm. Children may attend any number of weeks. Ages -1-0. $150-$180 per week. Registration required. 331-3725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Back to the Future. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Part-day. Journey to Space. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wild Wild West. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Scholarships and financial assistance available. Ages 3-5. $85, $65 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas.

Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 11. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 11. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 9

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. COED Parent/Teen Team. Little Miami Bike Canoe. $395 per pair. Teens entering grades 6-9. Three days and two nights. Daily through June 11. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 1 4

SUMMER CAMP NATURE

Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Daily through June 18. Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Hands-on activities with farm animals, creek exploration, woodland adventures, gardening, crafts and games. Campers bring own lunch. Ages 415. $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder. Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, $150$180 per week. Registration required. 3313725. Crescent Springs.

SUMMER CAMP YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Get a Clue. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Under the Sea. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Games Galore. Daily through June 18. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration

required. 781-1814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 25. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Games Galore. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through June 18. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Terry nelson’s Basketball Camp. Art Camp: For the love Art. Daily through June 18. R.C. Durr YMCA, 5874 Veterans Way, $175, $130 members. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U N E 2 1

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Pioneer to the Past Day Camp, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Daily through June 25. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, Heritage and nature activities. Wilderness skills, oldtime games, raft races, cooking and picnics. Lunch provided one day. Snacks each day with plenty of water provided. Children encouraged to bring packed lunch. $100, $85 members. Registration required. 5866117; http://www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP NATURE

Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 9:30 a.m.2:30 p.m. Daily through June 25. Sunrock Farm, $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder. Young Stewards of the Earth, 8 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Montessori Center, $150$180 per week. Registration required. 3313725. Crescent Springs.

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CE-0000388679.INDD


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RECORD

Audrey Adams

Audrey Hope Adams, 80, of the Gertrude community, died March 9, 2010, at the Meadowview Regional Medical Center, Maysville. She was a homemaker and member of the Augusta Trinity United Methodist Church. Her husband, Ogden Adams, died in 2003; daughter, Brenda McCracken; stepdaughter, Linda Thompson; grandchildren, Jarred Adams and Scotty Posten, died previously. Survivors include her son, Roger Adams of Columbus, Ohio; stepson, John Adams of Willoughby, Ohio; daughter, Kathy Dorn of Augusta; stepdaughters, Patricia Bonfield and Kathy Pickrell, both of Augusta; brother, Steven Smith of Fostoria, Ohio; sister, Linda Frazier of Alexandria; 15 grandchildren and 14 fourteen great-grandchildren. Memorials: Augusta Trinity United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 26, Augusta, KY 41002.

Kathy Adams

Kathy Ann Thornberry Adams, 41, a homemaker, Union, died March 7, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. Survivors include her husband, Richard E. Adams; sons, Zachary, Blake and Hunter Adams, all of Union; father, Lloyd Thornberry Sr. of Southgate; stepmother, Vicki Thornberry of Southgate; sisters, Kim Jones of Dayton, Ky. and Kellie Gillespie of Covington; brothers, Keith Thornberry of Covington, Kevin and Lloyd Thornberry Jr., both of Fort Wright. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Wanda Blackwell

Wanda F. Morris Blackwell, 69, Fort Thomas, died March 12, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care in Edgewood.

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

She was a branch manager at the Fort Thomas U.S. Post Office. Her husband, James Blackwell, and two brothers, Carl and Gary Morris, preceded her in death. She is survived by two sons, Tim Napier of La Grange, Kentucky, and Randy Barker of Independence; daughter Rena Rouse of Fort Thomas; brothers John Morris of Toledo and Burl Morris of Edgewood; a sister, Melody Herren of Cincinnati; and 11 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at the Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Dennis Brown

Dennis Bruce Brown, 66, Newport, died March 6, 2010, at his home. He was a ticket broker and Army veteran. Survivors include his sons, Scott Hicks of Jackson, Mich. and Ryan Brown of Fort Thomas; brother, Michael Brown of Ludlow and three grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Robert Campbell

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

Robert Edwin Campbell, 90 of Fort Thomas, formerly of Falmouth, died March 9, 2010, at his home. He was the former owner of Craig's Express truck line in Falmouth, farmer, member of the Masons and Falmouth United Methodist Church His first wife, Margaret Mullins Campbell; second wife, Jeannette Shields Campbell; and daughter, Linda Sue Campbell died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Barbara Crawford of Cold Spring

BIRTHS

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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B9

RECORDER

DEATHS and Joyce McKinney of Nicholasville; eight grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Butler Cemetery. Memorials: Falmouth United Methodist Church, 230 W. Shelby St., Falmouth, KY 41040.

Michael Early

Michael N. Early, 71, of Delhi Township, formerly of Covington, died March 9, 2010, in Delhi. He was a collection agent for the Internal Revenue Service in Covington and an Army veteran. Survivors include his daughter, Lisa Ross of Columbus, Ohio; son, John Early of Siesta Key, Fla; sister, Marilyn Enzweiler of Fort Thomas and seven grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Thomas Parish, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Christina Ferguson

Christina Ficke Ferguson, 50, Bellevue, died March 7, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a banquet server for Hyatt Hotels. Survivors include her son, Andrew Ferguson of Hebron; daughter, Michelle Ferguson of Cincinnati; sister, Francie Halderman of Sworthmore, Pa.; brothers, Daniel Ficke of Erlanger and Michael Ficke of Independence and one grandson. Burial was in St. Cecilia Cemetery.

Edward Goetz

Edward H. Goetz, 81, Erlanger, died March 11, 2010, at his home. He was a salesman for 35 years at Sears Roebuck in Covington and Florence; a Korean War Army veteran; member of St. Henry Church, Elsmere; Knights of St. John in Covington. In retirement he worked at

Lassing Point Golf Course in Union, was a shuttle driver for Comair and a limo driver with Executive Transportation. Survivors include his wife, Jean Hartigan Goetz; daughters, Karen Barth of Florence, Kathy Riesenberg of Fort Thomas, Diane Franks of Erlanger, Mary Ann Kroth of Florence, and Julie Martin of Union; sons, Tom Goetz of Florence, Jim Goetz of Erlanger and Steve Goetz of Erlanger and 21 grandchildren. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018; or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Lorraine Guidugli

Lorraine Barbara Lippert Guidugli, 56, of Bradenton, Fla., formerly of Bellevue and Fort Wright, died Feb. 20, 2010, at Manatee Memorial Hospital in Bradenton. She was a reservationist for Delta Airlines in Northern Kentucky and a paramedic. Survivors include her son, James Minshall of Bradenton, Fla.; daughters, Tricia Minshall of Fort Thomas, Cristi Minshall of Melbourne and Jessica Williams of Bradenton, Fla.; father, Al Lippert of Homosassa, Fla.; sister, Barbara Picard of Cortez, Fla.; brothers, Robert Lippert of Venice, Fla. and Ronald Lippert of Bradenton, Fla. and eight grandchildren. Shannon Funeral Home, Town Chapel, Bradenton, Fla., handled the arrangements.

Robert Hartman

Robert J. Hartman, 77, of Lewes, Del., formerly of Dayton, died Feb. 26, 2010, at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford, Del. He served as a Catholic missionary in Africa, was a middle school

guidance counselor in Howard County, MD, and hospital chaplain in Columbia, Md., member of St. John's parish in Columbia, Md., and a member of St. Edmond's Church in Lewes, Del. Survivors include his wife of 38 years, Katherine Hartman; daughter, Michele Gay; son, Christopher Hartman; brothers, Charles Hartman, Reverend Ralph Hartman, Lawrence Hartman and Reverend Raymond Hartman and seven grandchildren. Burial was in St. Peter's Cemetery, Lewes, Del. Parsell Funeral Home & Crematorium Atkins-Lodge Chapel, Lewes, Del., handled the arrangements. Memorials: Delaware Hospice,

100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963; or Gull House, 38149 Terrace Road, Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971.

Donald Johnson

Donald Louie Johnson, 79, of Cold Spring, formerly of Fort Thomas, died March 7, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was an attorney with Johnson & Johnson Law Firm, member of American Trial Lawyers Association, the Kentucky Bar Association and the Northern Kentucky Bar Associa-

Deaths continued B10

CITY OF WILDER LAND WATER CONSERVATION FUNDS HEARING Under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (Public Law 88-578), citizens are afforded the opportunity to express their views concerning the recreational needs of their community. To provide a forum for discussion, an open meeting is being held on Thursday March 25, at 7:00 p.m. at the Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike, Wilder, KY. 41071 This meeting is being sponsored by the City of Wilder. The specific purpose of this meeting is to discuss future uses of recreation monies including Land Water Conservation Funds for parks and recreational purposes. Uses include but are not limited to development of the Licking River Green Way Trail system in Wilder. Anyone with a significant supporting or opposing view is invited to voice that opinion at this meeting or in writing to: Land and Water Conservation Fund Program; Governor’s Office, Department for Local Government, 1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 340, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 within two (2) weeks of the date of the meeting. CE-0000388102.INDD

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY PROPER ORDER OF THE CAMPBELL DISTRICT COURT THAT THE FOLLOWING WERE APPOINTED FIDUCIARIES OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW FOR THE MONTH. ALL PERSONS HAVING A CLAIM AGAINST THE ESTATE SHALL PRESENT THEM VERIFIED ACCORDING TO LAW TO THE FOLLOWING FIDUCIARIES NO LATER THAN SIX MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF OPENING. DECEASED FIDUCIARY ATTORNEY DECEASED FIDUCIARY ATTORNEY DOROTHY LUCAS MARGARET SCHWEITZER DEBORAH LUCAS GREG KRIEGE RONALD SCHWEITZER RICHARD JOHNSON 307 W 12TH ST 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK 8371 LOCUSTOROVE DR 50 N FT THOMAS AVE NEWPORT KY 41071 BURLINGTON KY 41005 COLD SPRING KY 41076 FT THOMAS KY 41075 REV. DANIEL SANER JAMES SANER FRED SUMME JOYCE JONES JOHN LITTLE CHARLES LESTER 105 S MULBERRY ST 10327 LOCUST PK 4 W 4TH ST. 5247 MADISON PK BATESVILLE IN 47006 NEWPORT KY 41071 RYLAND HEIGHTS KY 41015 INDEPENDENCE KY MICHAEL SKOP MICHAEL WEBB KATHLEEN SKOP WM. SCHOETTELKOTTE KIMBERLY EVERSOLE GREG COLSTON 70 HAWTHORNE ST. 331 YORK ST. 116 6 8TH ST 111 PARKPL STE 101 FT THOMAS KY 41075 NEWPORT KY 41071 NEWPORT KY 41071 COVINGTON KY41011 PAUL CLARK PEGGY WALTERMAN GREG KRIEGE MARY ARNOLD CAROL ARNOLD RICHARD JOHNSON 1989 HART DR 666 NELSON PL 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK 50 N FT THOMAS AVE HEBRON KY 41048 NEWPORT KY 41071 COLD SPRING KY 41076 FT THOMAS KY 41075 EMMA CASSON LAURA ENZWEILER ALAN AHRMAN KEVIN ROBERTS TRACY SMITH CHARLES LESTER 708 KENTON STATION RD 421 MADISON AVE 7373 BEECHMONT AVE STE 3 5247 MADISON PK ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 COVINGTON KY 41011 CINCINNATI OH 45230 INDEPENDENCE KY 41051 BILLIE JETT LILLIAN TRENT DARRELL HERALD HELGA MENEFEE MARY TERHAAR FRED SUMME 3063 HIGHLAND RD PO BOX 744 109 INVERNESS PL 4 W 4TH ST JACKSON KY 41339 JACKSON KY 41339 FT THOMAS KY 41075 NEWPORT KY 41071 ROBERT BLAIR GAIL BLAIR FRANK BENTON IV REBA UELLENDAHL DEBORAH RUBLE JOHN S BROOKING 14 MARIAN DR PO BOX 72218 4027 CROSLEY AVE 909 WRIGHTS SUMMIT COLD SPRING KY 41076 CINCINNATI OH 45212 NEWPORT KY 41071 FT WRIGHT KY 41011 DONALD HALL VIRGINIA GEROLD ANITA MYERS LYN CARUSO HARRY RUST FRANK BENTON IV 7-11 HIGHLAND MEADOWS PO BOX 312 127 FLORAL CT PO F30X 72219 HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 FT THOMAS KY 41075 NEWPORT KY 41071 HARRY THOMPSON JR. LAWRENCE THOMPSON SR JACK GATLIN WARD WINKLER 83 FAREN DR PO BOX 70 323 RIDGEWOOD PL HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076 WILLIAMSTOWN KY FT THOMAS KY 41075 JUANITA GARRETT LINUS REINERT RICHARD JOHNSON HELEN HUNT GARY REED ROBERT JENNINGS 1961 COMORANT DR 50 N FT THOMAS AVE 3487 LICK HILL RD 3 WHISPERING WOODS LN FT THOMAS KY 41075 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 PALM HARBOR FL 34683 CALIFORNIA KY 41007 HELEN HESCH JAMES HESCH MICHAEL BAKER SHIRLEY GALL DAVID GALL HARRY RUST 268 BLUEGRASS AVE 1919 N FT THOMAS AVE PO BOX 175710 PO BOX 7967 COVINGTON KY 41017 ALEXANDRIA PK 41001 SOUTHGATE KY 41071 FT THOMAS KY 41075 BETTY BARKER TODD BARKER JANN SEIDENFADEN JOYCE BILGER CYNTHIA BROCK WILLIAM MONTAGUE 52 INDIANA AVE 122 N FT THOMAS AVE 3472 MEADOWLARK 500 E RIVERCENTER STE. 1800 FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 EDGEWOOD KY 41017 COVINGTON KY 41012 KIMBERLY BURNS MILTON SPORING JUDY CUMMINS HARRY RUST 4253 PARKVIEW CT 9224 AA HWY PO BOX 312 BATAVIA OH 45103 CALIFORNIA KY 41007 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 JILL ZUNIGA HAZEL PERKINS PRISCILLA MASON PAUL VESPER 4628 LONGBRIDGE LN 4904 CHURCH ST. 28 W STH ST. LEXINGTON KY 40515 TAYLOR MILL KY 41015 COVINGTON KY 41011 WILLIAM ROTH STEPHEN ROTH JIM LUERSEN REGINA BAKER PAUL BAKER GREGORY COLSTON 31 HIGH ST 403 WASHINGTON AVE 515 MONMOUTH ST STE 111 PARK PL STE 101 HIGHLAND HEIGHTS KY 41076 NEWPORT KY 41071 NEWPORT KY 41071 COVINGTON KY 41011 CHARITY SHORT CHARLES L. ZIER CHERYL HARRIS CHARLES S. ZIER GREG KRIEGE RICHARD JOHNSON 3643 MEADOWVIEW DR 808 HAMLET ST 50 N FT THOMAS AVE 3699 ALEXANDRIA PK ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 COLD SPRING KY 41076 NEWPORT KY 41071 FT THOMAS KY 41075 MEARLE HUNTER NORMAN HUGHES DUANE PRINCE TERRY LING RICHARD JOHNSON JANN SEIDENFADEN 3735 RIDGEWOOD AVE 1392 ST RT 380 50 N FT THOMAS AVE 122 N FT THOMAS AVE ALEXANDRIA PK 41001 WILMINGTON, OH 45177 FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 SHIRLEY CHANEY DOROTHY TRAUD DAVID HENSCHEN RONALD DAVIS JANN SEIDENFADEN BRENDA BONECUTTER 3716 BRISTOL CT 2889 RICH RD. 530 YORK ST 122 N FT THOMAS AVE ERLANGER KY 41018 MORNING VIEW KY 41063 NEWPORT KY 41071 FT THOMAS KY 41075 VIOLET DOECKEL JR CHRISTINE WHITE ROBERT DOECKEL JOHN WHITE JANN SEIDENFADEN JANN SEIDENFADEN 8448 HWY 41 SOUTH 122 N FT THOMAS AVE 10775 PLEASANT RIDGE RD 122 N FT THOMAS AVE LEEDS AL 35094 ALEXANDRIA KY 41001 FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 DECEASED MARCELLUS SCHWEGMAN MARC SCHWEGMAN FIDUCIARY ATTORNEY MIKE KEHOE 10 BARRETT DR 135 HIGHLAND AVE VIRGINIA LICKERT DIANE HILL STEVE FRANZEN FT THOMAS KY 41075 FT THOMAS KY 41075 5675 E ALEXANDRIA PK 319 YORK ST COLD SPRING KY 41076 NEWPORT KY 41071 BY: CK. WASSER, DEPUTY CLERK TAUNYA NOLAN JACK, CIRCUIT CLERK CE-1001543101-01

INVITATION TO BID March 18, 2010 PROJECT: Backhoe Loader Purchase SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: April 7, 2010 Time: 9:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: The furnishing and delivering of one backhoe loader to the Owner at a location in either Kenton or Campbell County, Kentucky, as designated by Owner, within the number of days specified in the bid form upon issuance of a purchase order by the Owner between April 30, 2010 through December 31, 2010. All prospective bidders should understand that Owner’s purchase of this equipment is exempt from state sales tax. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated above by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. Any questions on the bid specifications can be answered by contacting Jim Wren at 859-991-1646. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Mark Lofland, Vice-President of Customer Service and Distribution Northern Kentucky Water District 1001545159

BINGO

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B10

CCF Recorder

From B9 tion. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Stadtmiller Johnson; sons, Hank Johnson of Melbourne, Richard Johnson of Fort Thomas; mother, Iva Johnson of Cincinnati; sister, Beverly Kowolonek of Florence; brother, Henry Johnson Jr. of Lexington and five grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or Alzheimer's Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, Ohio 45203.

Thomas Kappas

Thomas A. Kappas, 82, of Newport, died March 11, 2010, at his home. He was a supervisor with Wiedemann Brewery in Newport, a World War II Army veteran and member of Christian Tabernacle Church in Newport. Survivors include his wife, JoeAnna Kappas and daughter, Judith Kappas of Newport. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or Christian Tabernacle Church, 325 Washington Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Steven Katkowsky

Dr. Steven R. Katkowsky, 62, died March 11, 2010.

Deaths

March 18, 2010 Katkowsky was the head of the Northern Kentucky Health Department. Survivors include his wife, Maxine, of Union; a stepdaughter, Amy Provan of Baltimore and a granddaughter. A memorial service will be held at 5:30 p.m. April 1 at the Edgewood Senior Center, 550 Freedom Park Drive in Edgewood. Donations can be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or to St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Margaret Ketron

Margaret Mary Ketron, 78, Taylor Mill, died March 8, 2010, at Christus Spohn Memorial Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas. She was a co-owner of Alexandria Appliances, member of the Alexandria Ladies Auxiliary and member of St. Joseph Church, Camp Springs. Her first husband, Ralph Ketron Sr. and son Paul Ketron, died previously. Survivors include her husband, James Leeper; sons, Ralph Ketron of Foster and Frank Ketron of Melbourne; seven grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Arlington Memorial Gardens, Cincinnati. Memorials: Willow Baptist Church, 2535 Powerville-Willow Road, Brooksville, KY 41004.

Shawn Lockhart

Alexandria, died March 7, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a former student at Redwood School and Rehabilitation Center and member of St. Joseph Church, Cold Spring. Survivors include his parents, Carol and Allen Lockhart of Alexandria; sisters, Lauren and Devin Lockhart, both of Alexandria; and grandparents, Arthur and Rosemary Hirth of Dayton. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Howard Meyer

Howard Irvin Meyer, 85, Fort Thomas, died March 12, 2010, at Atria Highland Crossing in Fort Wright. He was a salesman with Reuben H. Donnelley Co.; a veteran of the Navy; a member of Henry Barnes Masonic Lodge #607 in Dayton; a Kentucky colonel; a member of the First Baptist Church in Cold Spring, the Movers Association, the Restaurant Association, and the Bellevue Vets Club. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Lou Mann Meyer; daughter Shellijill Meyer and granddaughter Kaylyn Kalb. Survivors include a son, Michael Meyer of Fort Thomas; daughters Debbie Deters of Fort Thomas, and Sherry Kalb of Covington; six grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Shawn Allen Lockhart, 29,

Official Notice Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation, with its principal office at 8205 Hwy 127 N., Owenton, KY 40359 intends to file a new nonrecurring rate with the Kentucky Public Service Commission. This filing will result in a new rate applicable to customers facing disconnection. The rates proposed in this application are the rates proposed by Owen Electric Cooperative Corporation. However, the Kentucky Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from these proposed rates. Such action may result in rates for consumers other than the rates in this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes request leave to intervene. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. Intervenors may obtain copies of the application and testimony by contacting Mr. Michael Cobb, Owen Electric Cooperative, 8205 Hwy 127 N, Owenton, KY 40359. A copy of the application and testimony is available for public inspection at the utility’s offices. The amount and percent of increase are listed below: Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The effect of the proposed rate on the average monthly bill by rate class is provided below Increase Rate Class Dollar Percent Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $30.00 100% The present and proposed rate structure of Owen Electric Cooperative are listed below Rates Rate Class Present Proposed Nonrecurring Charges Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) Remote Disconnect or Connect $0.00 $30.00

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE 2010-2-1 AN ORDINANCE ENACTING AND ADOPTING A SUPPLEMENT TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY. W H ER EA S ,American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio has completed the 2010 8-21 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Bellevue which supplement contains all ordinances of a general nature enacted since the prior supplement to the Code of Ordinances of this municipality; and WHEREAS, American Legal Publishing Corporation has recommended the revision or addition of certain sections of the Code of Ordinances which are based or make reference to section of the Kentucky Revised Statutes; WHEREAS, it is the intent of Council to accept these updated sections in accordance with the changes of the law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky NOW, THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED by the City of Bellevue SECTION 1. That the 2010 S-21 supplement to the Code of Ordinances of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky , as submitted by American Legal Publishing Corporation of Cincinnati, and as attached hereto, be and the same is hereby adopted by reference as if set out in its entirety. SECTION 2. That this ordinance shall l take effect and be in force from and after its date of passage, approval and publication as required by law. /s/John Meyer Mayor John D. Meyer ATTEST: /s/Mary H. Scott Mary H. Scott, City Clerk Date of First Reading: 2-10-10 Date of Second Reading: 3-10-10 Publication: 3-18-2010 1001545205

Paul Newman

Paul E. Newman, 72, of Coconut Creek, Fla., formerly of Alexandria, died Feb. 21, 2010, at Northwest Medical Center, in Margate, Fla. He was a retired automotive paint salesman. Survivors include his wife, Donna Newman of Coconut Creek, Fla.; daughters, Paula Parrott, Barbara Schadler, Loraine Franks and son, Rick Newman, all of Alexandria; stepchildren, Don Connley of Fayetteville, N.C., Scott Connley of Lake Worth, Fla., Paula Retana of Coconut Creek, Fla., Teri Krug of Las Vegas, Nev., Bryan Connley of Royal Palm Beach, Fla., Todd Laker of Boynton Beach, Fla. and Buck Browning of Jupiter, Fla.; 15 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be held March 27 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at VFW 8261 Alexandria Pike in Alexandria.

Sr. Mary Ernestine Ott

Sr. Mary Ernestine Ott C.D.P., 92, Melbourne, died March 10, 2010, at Holy Family Home Melbourne. She was a member of the Congregation of Divine Providence for 72 years and spent most of her professional life as a classroom teacher, teaching locally at St. Thomas in Fort Thomas, Villa Madonna College in Covington, Academy Notre Dame of Providence in Newport and Holy Family High School in Ashland. She is survived by nieces and nephews. Burial was in St. Anne Convent Cemetery, Melbourne. Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Congregation of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

R. Steven Paine

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS The City of Erlanger, KY will receive sealed bids for the relocation of an 8" water main and alterations on Fitzgerald Court (from Sunset Avenue to Forest Avenue) and James Avenue (from Fitzgerald Court to McAlpin Avenue) on Monday, April 12, 2010 at 3:00 PM at the City of Erlanger Administrative Building, 505 Commonwealth Avenue, Erlanger, KY 41018. At that time the bids shall be opened and read aloud. The Contractor shall furnish all labor and materials to complete the work described in the bid packet. The project consists of 920 LF of 8" PVC water main and other appurtenances. Attention is called to the Construc tion Sequence of Events and the Coordination of Contractors Requirements. Plans and specifications can be obtained for a nonrefundable cost of $75.00 each set from the office of the City Engineer, James H. Viox III, P.E., P.L.S., 466 Erlanger Road, Erlanger, KY. There will be an additional charge of $15.00 each set for mailing and handling if necessary. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Signed: Melissa Andress, City Clerk City of Erlanger 505 Commonwealth Avenue Erlanger, KY 41018 1001545119 To place your BINGO ad call 513.242.4000

Community Classified

513.242.4000 Sell it quicker by selling it closer to home.

LEGAL NOTICE The Bellevue Historic Preservation Commission meeting will be temporarily changed for the month of April and the first week of May to the first and third Thursday of the month at 7 pm in the Callahan Community Center, 322 Van Voast Avenue, Bellevue, Kentucky, 41073. Meetings will return to their regularly scheduled dates and time beginning on Monday, May 17, 2010. For more information, please contact Jody Robinson, Asst. City Admin. at (859) 431-8866. 4645 Request for Qualifications Legal Notice The Campbell County Extension Board is requesting information about qualifications from firms interested in providing professional architectural services related to building renovations and an addition to its office located at 3500 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY 41076. Contact Person: D. J. Scully (859) 5722600, email: djscully@uky.edu 1001543013 LEGAL NOTICE Madhur L.L.C Mailing Adress 42 North Fort Thomas Ave Ste B , FT Thomas KY 41075 Hereby declares intentions to apply for a RETAIL BEER AND RATAIL LIQUOR BY THE PACKAGE Licenses no later than March 31 2010, The business to be located at 42 North Fort Thomas Ave Ste B , FT Thomas KENTUCKY 41075 doing business as Towne Center Mart The Members are as follow: Member Chirag Patel of 2310 Kenyon Ct Hebron Ky 41048. Member Devanshi Patel of 2310 Kenyon Ct Hebron Ky 41048. Any person, association,corporati on,or body politic may protest the granting of the license by writing the Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage control, 1003 Twilight Trail, FrankFort, KY. 40601-8400 within 30 days of this legal publication. 4291

R. Steven Paine, 55, Fort Thomas, died March 9, 2010, at his home. He was a bartender for the Cottage in Fort Thomas and a girl's softball coach. Survivors include his sisters, Carole Paine of Newport and Cindy Paine of Fort Thomas. Burial was in St. Stephen Ceme-

tery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227; or R. Steven Paine Memorial Fund, c/o Dobbling Funeral Home, 106 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Ronnie Renshaw

Ronnie Lee Renshaw, 66, Morning View, died March 7, 2010, in Fort Myers, Fla. He was a teacher for Cincinnati Public Schools and an Army veteran. Survivors include his wife, Linda Smith Renshaw; daughters, Christie and Jill Renshaw, all of Morning View; son, Brian Renshaw of Fort Thomas and brother, Billy Renshaw of Louisville. Burial was in Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Disabled American Veterans, 3725 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076.

Lydia Rouse

Lydia M. Rouse, 83, Fort Thomas, a homemaker, died March 7, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Survivors include her husband, Allan Rouse; son, Steven Rouse of Chicago, Ill., and daughter, Herta Reynolds of Dayton. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass of Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Ambrose Sandfoss

Ambrose Henry Sandfoss, 83, Alexandria, died March 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was an auto body repairman, a World War II Army veteran and member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3205 in Alexandria. His sons, Jeffrey and Kenneth "Ollie" Sandfoss, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Wanda Smith Sandfoss; daughter, Vicki Griess of Bellevue; son, Mark Sandfoss of Covington; sister, Margaret Sandfoss; brothers, Ralph, Wilfred and Ferdinand Sandfoss; three grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery. Memorials: VFW Post 3205,

CASE NO. CV29427 DEPT NO. 1 IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF NYE DAVID JOHN PULKRABEK, Plaintiff

SUMMONS

PATRICIA MAE PULKRABEK Defendant THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby SUMMONED and required to serve upon the plaintiff, DAVID JOHN PULKRABEK, whose address is 2530 Tough Boy Road, #7, Pahrump, NV 89060, an ANSWER to the Complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 20 days after service of this Summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service. In addition, you must file with the Clerk of this Court, whose address is shown below, a formal written answer to the complaint, along with the appropriate filing fees, in accordance with the rules of the Court. If you fail to do so, judgement by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought to recover a judgement dissolving the contract of marriage existing between you and Plaintiff. The filer certifies that this document does not contain the social security number of any person. Sandra L. Merlino Clerk of the Court Print Name: Christina Uribe Date Dec 23, 2009 Signature: /s/Christina Uribe Deputy Clerk P. O. Box 1031, Tonopah, NV 89049 (SEAL OF THE COURT) RETURN OF SERVICE ON REVERSE SIDE

8261 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Aileen Tretter

Aileen C. Fischer Tretter, 92, Newport, died March 6, 2010, at Baptist Convalescent Center, Newport. She was a book keeper with Cowen Brothers, Building Supply. Her husband, Adolph E. Tretter, died in 1958. Survivors include her sons, James Tretter of Louisville, William Tretter of Jacksonville, Fla.; daughters, Donna Thiel of Fort Thomas, Charleen Borchers of Perry Park and Karen Beck of Bellevue; 19 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mother of God Cemetery, Fort Wright. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp & Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport 41071; or Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Rosella Wear

Rosella Cade Wear, 92, Alexandria, died March 9, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and member of the Main Street Baptist Church in Alexandria. Survivors include her sons, Thomas and Danny Cade, both of Alexandria; daughter, Rosanna Fardo of California; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Gloria Winters

Gloria Lee Winters, 80, of Butler, formerly of Cold Spring, died March 13, 2010, at River Valley Nursing Home in Butler. She was a licensed practical nurse with Lakeside Place Nursing Home, Highland Heights, and Booth Hospital, Dayton. She was a member of New Hope United Methodist Church in Southgate; the Sons and Daughters

Deaths continued B11

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that Mr. Clarence Martin 5693 Weaver Ln, Cold Spring, KY 41076, has filed an application with the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet to build a bridge. The property is located at 1921 California Crossroads, California, KY 41007, 4 miles West of AA Highway-West on Crossroads on 12 Mile Stream. Any comments or objections concerning this application shall be directed to: Kentucky Division of Water, Water Resources Branch, 200 Fair Oaks, 4th Floor, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. Phone: (502) 564-3410. 1542712

LEGAL NOTICE Madhur L.L.C Mailing Adress 42 North Fort Thomas Ave Ste A , FT Thomas KY 41075 Hereby declares intentions to apply for a RETAIL BEER LICENCE no later than March 31 2010, The business to be located at 42 North Fort Thomas Ave Ste A , FT Thomas KENTUCKY 41075 doing business as Towne Center Mart The Members are as follow: Member Chirag Patel of 2310 Kenyon Ct Hebron Ky 41048. Member Devanshi Patel of 2310 Kenyon Ct Hebron Ky 41048. Any person, association,corporati on,or body politic may protest the granting of the license by writing the Dept. of Alcoholic control, If you’re looking for Beverage 1003 Twilight Trail, buyers, you’re in KY. the right neighborhood. FrankFort, 40601-8400 within 30 Call Community Classified days of this legal 513.242.4000 publication. 4281

The Alzheimer’s Project A 3 PART DOCUMENTARY SERIES CHANGING THE WAY AMERICA THINKS ABOUT ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE You’re invited to a FREE special screening of HBO’s Emmy-Winning “The Alzheimer’s Project” presented by The Alzheimer’s Association in partnership with Brighton Gardens of Edgewood, Kentucky. The Project brings new understanding to those who fear they will lose their memories and their lives to Alzheimer’s Disease. In HBO’s state-of-the-science report, the leading scientists in the field will reveal ways that research is bringing hope to millions.

EVENT DETAILS

Lunch will be Provided Call Today! Saturday, March 27th, 2010 11:00 AM to 3:30 PM 11:00 AM Registration 2950 Turkeyfoot Road Edgewood, KY Please RSVP to Jan at 859-426-1888

Brighton Gardens of Edgewood 859-426-1888 2950 Turkeyfoot Road, Edgewood, KY 41017 Care- Memory Care Personal Care

For more information and a FREE online newsletter visit www.sunriseseniorliving.com CE-0000388887.INDD


On the record

March 18, 2010

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA

Arrest

Ricky L. Anderson, 50, 9902 Alexandria Pike, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 23. Brian A. Johnson, 53, 9902 Alexandria Pike, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 23.

Incidents/reports Theft by unlawful taking

Report of MP3 player, radio transmitter and GPS taken from vehicle at 8225 Riley Road, Feb. 27. Report of purse and contents taken at 11 Viewpoint Drive, March 1.

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Man stopped for shoplifting cited and released at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 23. Report of woman stopped for shoplifting cited and released at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 28.

Third degree burglary

Report of computer take at 7536 Alexandria Pike, apartment 11, Feb. 28.

BELLEVUE

Arrest

Ronald Jerome Baum, 44, 410 Fairfield Ave., warrant at 410 Fairfield

Ave. no. 3, March 2. Donald Ray Messer, 51, 500 Fairfield Ave., theft of identity, theft of deception at 200 Fairfield Ave., March 3. Jason Ashcraft, 30, 226 No. 2 Poplar St., theft by unlawful taking, warrant at 119 Fairfield Ave., March 2. Christopher Hard, 19, 509 Fourth Ave., 509 Fourth Ave. at Taylor Avenue, March 4. Richard Patrick Mossman, 18, 324 Covert Run, warrant, third degree criminal trespassing at Taylor Avenue, March 4. Losley Brunk, 31, 514 Overton, DUI, no insurance, no operator’s license at Fairfield Ave., March 5. William Wyke, 26, 2315 Kemper Lane No. 26, DUI at 95 Riviera Drive, March 6. Michael Hatch, 18, 144 Ward Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at Ameristop Parking Lot, March 6. Dennis Lee Baker, 47, 830 Isabella St., theft by unlawful taking at 15 Donnermeyer, March 9.

FORT THOMAS Arrest

Stacy Wherry, 23, 1041 South Fort Thomas Ave. No. 5, warrant at US 27 and Maple, March 5. Gail Spangler, 58, 3387 Clover Road, DUI at I-471 exit 3, March 5.

Danielle Vanaglia, 25, 15 Sunset Drive, warrant at South Grand Avenue at Pebble Creek, March 6. David Bunge, 61, 40 Hollywoods Drive, DUI at 40 Hollywoods Drive, March 6. Jeremy Luck, 33, 2309 Weil Road, fourth degree assault at 111 West Vernon Ave., March 6. Jessica Rapp, 20, 145 Southern Trace Apt. F, DUI at Dave Cowens Drive at I-471, March 6. Timothy Peterson, 22, 720 Ravine Circle No. 3D, warrant at US 27 at New Linden, March 7. Sonya Russ, 35, 2367 Memorial Parkway No. 8, warrant at Memorial Parkway at North Fort Thomas Ave., March 7. Brandy Baker, 23, 1705 Lincoln Ave., warrant at Ridgewood Place at Highland Ave., March 9.

Incidents/reports Fourth degree assault

Reported at 152 Grand Ave., March 5.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 122 Tower Place, March 6. Reported at 112 Grant St., March 7. Reported at 10 South Grand Ave., March 10.

Theft of identity

Reported at 320 Grand Ave., Feb. 26.

Third degree criminal mischief Reported at 81 Southgate Ave., March 10.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/SOUTHGATE Arrest

Nathaniel Jones, 19, 5138 Taylor Mill Road, DUI at I-275 west, March 10. Christopher Huber, 29, 2514 Boudinot Ave. No. 4, DUI, possession of marijuana at 415 Johns Hill Road, March 8. Carolyn Kuhnheim, 57, 408 Lincoln Ave., DUI at 2127 Alexandria Pike, March 7. Thomas Mixon, 33, 258 McGregor Ave. No. 3, possession of marijuana at 3782 Regal Ridge, March 6. Benjamin Beumon, 24, 2720 Erlene Drive, possession of marijuana at 1972 Alexandria Pike, March 5. Andrew Brown, 25, 626 Alysheba Drive, possession of marijuana, prescription controlled substance not in proper container at 1972 Alexandria Pike, March 5. Nathan Smith, 23, 1960 Taylor Road, possession of marijuana, alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree indecent exposure at Alexandria Pike and Taylor, March 5.

CCF Recorder

B11

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

Incidents/reports Theft of a controlled substance

Reported at 101 Joyce Ave., March 3.

NEWPORT

Arrest

James Wright, 42, 5805 Chandler St., fourth degree assault, first degree fleeing, possession of marijuana at 216 West Fifth St., March 11. Ian Henry, 19, 215 Overton St., first degree possession of a controlled substance at 100 Block of East Sixth St., March 10. Melissa Helton, 36, 203 Evergreen Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, March 10. Michelle Gillann, 29, 222 York St. Room 128, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 222 York St., March 10. Timothy Frye, 52, 742 Liberty St., tampering with physical evidence, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 1025 Isabella St., March 10. Monica Mays, 22, 206 Cleveland Ave., fourth degree assault at 998

Monmouth St., March 9. Karen McNeil, 39, 170 East 42nd St., theft by unlawful taking at 82 Carothers Road, March 9. Cynthia Woods, 49, 1843 Baynum Road, theft by unlawful taking at 1301 Monmouth St., March 8. Bryant Nicholson, 27, 5425 Whestel Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, warrant at Fourth and Garrard St., March 7. Jack Clark, 28, 5310 Ebersole St., first degree possession of a controlled substance at Fourth and Garrard St., March 7. Derrick Thornton, 21, 3413 McHenry Ave., possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, possession of marijuana, resisting arrest at 1 Levee Way, March 5.

Incidents/reports Second degree criminal possession of a forged instrument

Reported at 402 East 10th St., March 7.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 1301 Monmouth St., March 8.

Theft of services

Reported at 1 Levee Way, March 7.

DONATION OPPORTUNITIES Diapers

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Feminine Hygiene Products

Welcome House 859-431-8717 awalker@welcomehouseky.org

Salon Chairs and Massage Tables/Chairs

Ronald McDonald House Charities 513-636-2760 ldavis@RMHouse.org

Old blankets, towels, linens

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Calculators

Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Used children’s clothing

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissaeames@yahoo.com

Living room furniture

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200 jane.herms@familynurture.org

Tickets - to games, museums, the zoo, etc.

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

Office Desk Chairs

New toys and board games

American Cancer Society 859-372-7880 jamie.webb1@cancer.org

Provide full dinner for families attending group therapy prorams

Juice bags and snack packs

Blankets, material, yarn

Computers up to four years old

Shoulder To Shoulder Inc. 859-371-0444 melissaeames@yahoo.com

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200 jane.herms@familynurture.org

Boys & Girls Clubs513-421-8909 esandul@bgcgc.org

jane.herms@familynurture.org

Family Nurturing Center 859-525-3200

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

Sports Equipment

of Pioneer Rivermen and the Middle Ohio River Chapter of the Sons and Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen. She loved to travel. She was preceded in death by her husband, Raymond Winters. Survivors are her sons, Michael

Winters of Versailles, Ind., and Stephen Winters of Dover, Ky.; daughters, Karen Lynn Lambert of Bethel, Ohio, and Doreen Lee Winters of Lancaster, Ohio; brother, Larry Myers of Highland Heights, seven grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. Burial was in the Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

TENN

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

ESSE

E

Cat Litter

School materials - pencils, notebooks, crayons

Printing

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

Paper Products/Office supplies

New Perceptions Inc. 859-344-9322 dfulkerson@newperceptions.org.

Amazing Grace Cats, Inc. 513.702.4898 amazinggracecats@yahoo.com

HDTV’s from

$

per week

104 weeks

Sponsors or donations

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and

1599

Leas e Z one 7303 Turfway Road

859-647-2160

Video Games, Movies, Cds

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

New books- picture books and chapter books Covington Partners in Prevention

Visit: Cincinnati.Com/living or search: living

Memorials are suggested to the American Cancer Society 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017; Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042; or Hospice of Hope, 909 Kenton Station Drive, Maysville, KY 41056.

LOL is ... Local bloggers writing from your perspective on cooking, wine, romance and more!

513.768.8285 or travelads@enquirer.com

FLORIDA

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

FLORIDA

PANAMA CITY BEACH . Family friendly 2 BR, 2 ba gulf front condo w/balcony. Beautiful view, great location-walk to St. Andrews State Park! View unit 204C at www.moonspinner.com or call local owner, 513-205-5165

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse 2B/2B Family Condos. Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. r 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo. Directly on famous C rescent Beach! Balcony views the Gulf. Bright & airy decor, nicely appointed. Weekly from April 3rd. Cincy owner 513-232-4854

NEW YORK DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

Amazing Grace Cats, Inc. 513.702.4898 amazinggracecats@yahoo.com

Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S) 859-743-6460 kthacker111348@yahoo.com

Travel & Resort Directory

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

Amazing Grace Cats, Inc. 513.702.4898 amazinggracecats@yahoo.com

Covington Partners in Prevention 859-392-3174 meredith.potter@covington.kyschools .us

DEATHS From B10

Cat Food

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $104. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

OHIO Old Man’s Cave/Hocking Hills A great one-tank trip getaway. Rates $45/up. 1-800-254-3371 Inntowner Motel, Logan Ohio www.inntownermotel.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!! 100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

Call for free brochure 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

FRIPP ISLAND û A great family vacation destination! 3 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condo on private resort island next to championship golf course. Sleeps 8. 513-451-7011 Hilton Head Island, SC

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

TENNESSEE

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618


B12

CCF Recorder

March 18, 2010

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WHITE W/3 DRAWERS

EXECUTIVE DESK

HEAVY DUTY, 2 FILE DRAWERS, RETURN SKY ALDER FINISH

1400 Gloria Terrell Dr. Wilder, KY 41076

859-442-7225

TWIN BOOKCASE HEADBOARD & MATE’S BED

WHITE

PINE

Wilder, KY

SALE

$199.99

NIGHTSTAND WHITE

$59.99

TV CREDENZA

CAROLINA OAK FINISH

SALE

$129.95

FACTORYMATTRESSCLEARANCEFROMSPRINGAIR YOU WON’T BELIEVE THIS GREAT DEAL UNTIL YOU SEE IT.

PILLOW-TOP QUEEN SET APPROXIMATELY 12”THICK QUEEN SET $399.95 COMPARE AT $799.99

COMPUTER DESK OAK FINISH WHILE THEY LAST

FACTORY CLEARANCE

$79.95

WARDROBE STORAGE CABINET OREGON OAK FINISH GARMENT ROD AND SHELVES

CE-0000385913.INDD

SALE

$119.95

EXECUTIVE DESK

BOOKCASE

CLASSIC CHERRY FINISH, 3 FILE DRAWERS, COMBINATION FLIP-DOWN KEYBOARD TRAY OR PENCIL DRAWER REG. 319.99

SHAKER CHERRY FINISH, CINNAMON CHERRY, 363/4” WID

LIST 59.95 FACTORY CLEARANCE

$99.99

SALE

$289.95

MICROWAVE CART ON CASTERS WHITE W/ MAPLE TRIP DRAWER AND STORAGE BEHIND DOORS

SALE

$89.95

CORNER COMPUTER TOWER SPACE SAVER

SALE

$139.95

COMPUTER DESK W/HUTCH CAROLINA OAK FINISH

GREAT VALUE

$129.99

DVD STORAGE TOWERS

STORAGE END TABLE

FACTORY CLEARANCE

LIST 199.99 GREAT VALUE! CLEARANCE

MISSION CHERRY OR BLACK WHILE THEY LAST ACCOMMODATES 75 DVD’S

$13.88

SOLID WOOD & VENEERS BRONZE IRON BASE LIFT TOP W/ STORAGE

$69.95

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate Beth Hoffman By Amanda Joering Alley a...

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