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COMMUNITY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, M a r c h

3, 2011

Web site: NKY.com B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Amy Krift

Golfers hitting the links to beat cancer

Volume 15, Number 2 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Where’s the beef?

Campbell County farmer’s freezer beef program is literally starting to cook with classes planned for March 14 and April 25 on ways to create dishes. The Campbell County Extension Service, in cooperation with the Kentucky Beef Council, designed the classes to show a variety of options for cooking beef and highlight the county’s direct farmer to consumer freezer beef program. NEWS, A3

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Cinderella’s Closet

High school prom dresses come in all colors, designs, shapes and sizes, but one thing they all have in common is that their expense makes attending prom costprohibitive for some teens. At Campbell County High School, the Generation Believe Club members are helping the cause of making girls’ prom dreams come true by collecting dresses for Cinderella’s Closet, a nonprofit that gives gently used dresses to teens who might not otherwise be able to afford to go to the prom. SCHOOLS, A4

Bellevue High School sophomore Makenzie Phelps does stretches with children during the Little Hoopsters basketball program.

Children hit the basketball court By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Since it began last year, the Little Hoopsters basketball program has more than doubled in size. When they had trouble finding an affordable basketball program for their daughter, Melissa and Steve Tatum decided to start Little Hoopsters as a way to not only expose younger children to basketball, but to also raise money for Bellevue’s girls’ basketball team. “There really wasn’t much out there as far as basketball programs for little ones, and we wanted to design a program that everyone could afford,” Melissa said. Last year, 26 children ages 4

through 8 participated in the program, led by the high school and middle school girl players and coaching staff. This year the program has grown to 80 children, Melissa said. “Pretty much just from word of mouth the program has more than doubled,” Melissa said. “We have so many kids this year we had to break it up into two sessions, and we’re expecting even more kids next year,” she said. The program, which runs for eight weeks and costs $40, includes lessons on dribbling, passing and shooting. “We are teaching them the same skills the older kids learn, but we bring it down to their

level,” Melissa said. Sharon Eaglin, whose two grandchildren participate in the program, said she thinks it’s great that the program offers younger children a chance to learn the game and gives them exercise and a chance to play together. “I just think it’s a great program, and the kids love it,” Eaglin said. “They look forward to it every Saturday.” The money raised by the program is used to support the Bellevue girls’ basketball team and helps pay for things like new uniforms, Melissa said. For more information about the program, e-mail littlehoopsters @gmail.com. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/bellevue

Bellevue resident tells of governor’s fury By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Why ‘knot’?

From the glow of the sun to the crack of the bat to the roars of the crowd – there’s nothing quite like a day at the ballpark. That’s why the Behringer-Crawford Museum is partnering with the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame to launch a special exhibit dubbed “Play Ball: In a League of Our Own - The History of Knothole Baseball.” The exhibit will open March 5 and run through June 5. LIFE, B1

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Bellevue resident Howard McEwen has spent countless hours theorizing about the anger and drive that propelled William Goebel to the governor’s mansion in 1900. Goebel shot and killed a political rival in broad daylight on a downtown Covington street in 1895. And before being sworn in, Goebel himself was gunned down by an assassin’s bullet in Frankfort in 1900, as almost 1,000 armed men filled the city in reaction to controversy swirling around the gubernatorial election. In McEwen’s second book and first historical fiction novel “Wrath” he tells the story of how Goebel, who was the only governor ever to be assassinated in U.S. History, was cold and calculating, rarely shook hands with people or smiled, and forced his way to power. The facts are correct, but McEwen said the fiction comes in

through his guesses about Goebel’s motivation, thoughts and feelings and personality. McEwen, 40, an investment adviser, said he was intrigued by Goebel’s story because the academic biography he read about the former governor didn’t focus much on how Goebel killed John Sanford, a fellow Democrat, in 1895. Goebel, a Kentucky state senator in 1895, had printed in the newspaper he ran, “The Ledger,” that Sanford, a prominent banker and family man, had the sexually transmitted disease Gonorrhea. McEwen said Sanford, an officer on the side of the Confederates in the Civil War, and Goebel both drew guns in front of Sanford’s bank on Greenup Street. Both were armed, and nobody knows who drew first, McEwen said. Goebel, who went unscathed, shot Sanford in the head. Goebel, who was walking down the street with the state’s attorney general at the time of the

shooting, walked immediately to a police station and confessed to killing Sanford, McEwen said. Goebel was brought before a judge, who dismissed the charges. “So, criminally, he was never held accountable for it,” McEwen said. After the incident, Goebel swore an oath that public officials still take today, often with a snicker or grin, that they “have not fought a duel.” “He swore to his deathbed that he had never been in a duel even though everybody knew that he killed John Sanford,” McEwen said. Politically, Goebel forced his way to power, and he was unpopular with many people in the state for different reasons including the shooting of Sanford. “It’s almost as if he was asking to be assassinated from the start,” McEwen said of Goebel. Links to purchase the 320page “Wrath” are available at www.facebook.com/kywrath.

The community is coming together to support a child recently diagnosed with leukemia by holding fundraisers for the family. In October, 1-year-old Cold Spring resident Ayrton Dobson was diagnosed with leukemia, leading to several months of spinal taps, chemotherapy treatments and taking medications daily. “Considering all he’s g o n e through, he’s taking it very well,” said Jason Dobson, Ayrton Dobson Ayrton’s father. “Most of the time he’s laughing and playing around like any other little boy.” Ayrton is well-known in Fort Thomas because his grandparents, Linda and Don Dobson, have worked at Highlands High School and the family has been very involved in the community, said Linda Stapleton Slone, a family friend. Teacher Ed Long, who has known the Dobsons for The outing is about 26 years, said when he at 12:30 p.m. heard about Sunday, April Ayrton’s diag17, at nosis he immediately wanted Legendary to do someRun Golf thing to help. Course Long, who has been holding an annual golf outing to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society the past few years, decided this year’s outing will benefit Ayrton. “When Don told me about Ayrton, it was kind of a no-brainer,” Long said. “I’m happy to do anything I can to help them out.” In October, money was raised for Ayrton at the Fort Thomas Junior Football’s eighth grade allstar game, said Slone. Slone said through collecting donations at the gate, they were able to raise $1,000. Dobson said he is grateful for everyone that is doing what they can for his son. “I really didn’t expect any of this,” Dobson said. “When things like this happen it really helps you understand how much people care.” The outing is at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17, at Legendary Run Golf Course in Clermont County, east of Cincinnati, and costs $80 a person. For more information call Ed Long at 513474-4866. Donations can also be made in Ayrton’s name at the Bank of Kentucky.


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Campbell Community Recorder

News

March 3, 2011

Wanted: Capital construction projects for Northern Kentucky Every other year, the Northern Kentucky Consensus Committee solicits input to help identify and prioritize capital construction projects for the eight-county Northern Kentucky region. Projects that make the committee’s priority list typically benefit the region as a whole and receive strong support in Frankfort during the General Assembly’s budgetary year. The deadline for the submission of projects this year is Monday, March 21. Applications may be submitted to the Consensus Committee by e-mail, fax or U.S. mail but must be received no later than the deadline. Project proponents who submit an application will be invited to give a brief presentation before the Consensus Committee. “We are looking for projects that address a clear community need and offer a benefit to the region as a

whole,” explained Gary Beatrice, chairman of the Northern Kentucky Consensus Committee. “The final list of priority projects will be one of the building blocks for the region’s efforts during next year’s legislative session. It is important that we carefully consider projects that will continue to support the infrastructure, growth and economic health of the Northern Kentucky region.” The Consensus Committee consists of representatives appointed from business, government, nonprofit and other community organizations from the eight Northern Kentucky counties. “We are committed to securing funding for a list that is both realistic and defensible and provides an opportunity for Northern Kentucky, one of the commonwealth’s economic engines, to get a fair return on its tax investment,” Beatrice said.

Applicants are encouraged to provide submissions and to “think big” and are requested to provide the following information to help the committee in its deliberations: 1. Statement of need or reason for the project: Must be for capital construction costs, as opposed to operating or maintenance costs for current facilities. 2. Project impact: Who will this project serve? Will it have a regional, multicounty impact? 3. Estimated cost of project: Cost of project should generally be $1 million or more. 4. Amount of funds currently available and source of funds. 5. Collateral effects of constructing project – additional infrastructure needs, etc. More information about the Consensus Project application is available online at www.nkychamber.com.

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Singing maintenance man spreads cheer at hospital By Chris Mayhew

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Marvin Sands of Alexandria sings “Amazing Grace” on a karaoke machine Tuesday, Feb. 22 at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas where he is a maintenance worker.

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St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas maintenance worker Marvin Sands Sr. wields the tools of his voice and a karaoke machine to brighten the day of patients with extended rehabilitation stays in the hospital’s skilled nursing unit. Sands, 57, of Alexandria, an employee at the Fort Thomas hospital for 19 years, volunteers about once a month when he’s off-the-clock singing to patients. Gospel hymns are his favorite to sing, and “Amazing Grace” is his absolute favorite song. “When they’re tapping their feet or even if I see someone crying, it touches my heart,” he said. “I did my job.” Sands said he also sings old country songs, bluegrass and certain Elvis Presley songs, which has led to a bit of a nickname. Sands said one former patient always just called him “Maintenance Elvis.” The patient, an elderly lady, was in and out of the hospital for several extended stays, Sands said. Upon their first meeting, Sands said she asked him if he

knew how to sing Elvis’ “Can’t Help Falling in Love.” “I said, ‘Well, this is your lucky day, I sing this to my wife on our anniversary,’” Sands said. After that, the lady would always just ask if “Elvis from maintenance” could come up and see her, he said. In the 1990s, Sands started singing to his mother when he visited her in a nursing home in Indiana. Sands said music is important in his family, and he sang some of his favorite songs at his mother’s bedside for years before she died. “Well, everybody started coming in as I would go sing to her,” he said. Sands said his mother also regularly requested that he sing Elvis songs, so he knows how to sing many of them. “She kind of thought he walked on water,” he said. About 10 years ago, Sands started singing to patients at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Elaine Groneck, an activity coordinator at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas, said when Sands starts singing to patients, usually a group of about eight or nine, hos-

pital staff members often stop by to watch for a moment. Many of the patients in the skilled nursing unit are dealing with a lot of sadness and an illness, Groneck said. “You know, music is something that we’ve all grown up with since we were young,” she said. Sands’ 45-minute shows bring a little joy to the patients, Groneck said. “It just brings back memories, and that’s what life is all about is memories,” she said. Sands also sings regularly at his church, Bethesda General Baptist in Cold Spring. A grandfather of seven, Sands said he’s teaching some of them to play guitar in addition to singing. “I’ve been singing as long as I can remember,” Sands said. Sands said some patients requests copies of him singing, and he makes homemade cassette tapes that he gives away. “It only takes a few precious moments to touch somebody, and that’s the way I look at,” he said. For more about your community, visit www.nky. com/campbellcounty

Veterans field rep has new office The Kentucky Department of Veteran Affairs provides professional assistance, free of charge, to veterans in obtaining and using all the federal and state benefits to which they

are entitled. Veterans field representative Emily Stilkey has a new office located at 7129 Price Pike, Florence. For questions related to veterans benefits or to set

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue – nky.com/ Cold Spring – nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights – nky.com/highlandheights Newport – nky.com/newport Southgate – nky.com/southgate Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Executive . . . 750-8687 | mschlosser@nky.com Sheila Cahill | Account Relationship Specialist 578-5547 | scahill@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

up an appointment, she can be reached at 859-2828583 or toll free at 855204-9676, or via e-mail at emily.stilkey@ky.gov. KDVA helps veterans and their dependents in the presentation, proof and establishment of all claims, privileges, rights and other veteran benefits which they may have under federal, state or local laws. Those other benefits include access to veterans nursing homes, burial with honors in veterans cemeteries, benefits counseling, and specific assistance for homeless veterans. For more information please visit the KDVA website at http://veterans.ky.gov.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B7 Schools........................................A4 Sports ..........................................A6 Viewpoints ..................................A8


News

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

Alexandria lake a bountiful spot for fishing By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Alexandria’s lake is extra fishy, and people like it that way. With 11,150 fish being added in 2011, the lake has become a destination for people who not only like to fish, but to also catch something. People line the banks of Alexandria's lake with regularity to bring their catch of the day to the dinner table because of regular stocking of trout and catfish through a Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife program. Alexandria's lake was among the first lakes stocked under the state's Fishing In Neighborhoods (FINS) program in 2006 that has grown to include 29 lakes across the state. The lake at Southgate Community Park is the only other state-stocked lake in Campbell County. The state also stocks two ponds at Middleton Mills Park in Taylor Mill, Prisoners Lake in Covington's Devou Park, and Camp Ernst Lake near Burlington.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Denny Ortlieb, of Camp Springs, casts a line into the waters of the lake in the Alexandria Community Park after sitting down for an afternoon of fishing around noon Wednesday, Feb. 23. CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Alexandria resident Wally Reinhart reels in his first trout catch of the day at the Alexandria Community Park lake Wednesday, Feb. 23 Wally Reinhardt of Alexandria set two fishing poles on the ground on either side of a lawn chair during one of his regular trips to Alexandria's lake on the sunny, but chilly morning of Wednesday, Feb. 23. Reinhart, a retired teacher for Newport Independent School District, said he often comes to the lake to fish on days when he isn't called back to be a substitute

teacher for the day. An avid hunter and fisherman, Reinhart said he and a group of friends went to Southgate's lake after it was stocked with 500 rainbow trout on Feb. 15, and together they caught 15 trout and two channel catfish. The state stocking program is a benefit for people who like to fish, but it's also a chance for children to get out and learn to fish in a

place where there's a good chance of catching a fish in a short period of time, he said. People also don't have to reside in the city or even state to fish, as long as they have a valid fishing license, Reinhart said. "They want you to catch them and take them home and eat them," he said. Reinhart said his family has a fish fry and game feast from his hunting about three or four times a year where everyone is invited, including older members of the family who used to hunt and fish, but still want to enjoy dining

on fresh fish. In less than two hours, Reinhart caught four trout on Feb. 23, one less than the daily legal limit for trout that can be taken with a state license. For catfish, the daily legal limit to take is four. "If everybody sticks by that, then everybody gets their fair share," he said. The trout range in size from about six inches to a foot, and the catfish typically are between 10-15 inches, Reinhart said. Denny Ortlieb of Camp Springs, who was also fishing at Alexandria's lake Feb.

Stocking schedules

Alexandria Community Park lake's stocking schedule: • Catfish: March: 1,400; April: 700; May: 1,400; July or August: 1,400 • Trout: February: 1,250; March: 2,500; November: 2,500 Southgate Community Park lake stocking schedule: • Catfish: March: 400; July or August: 400. • Trout: February: 500; March 500; Nov. 500. 23, said he typically comes to the lake twice a year. Ortlieb said he probably wouldn't visit if the lake wasn't stocked because of how accessible it is to the public. "With it getting fished a lot, it has to be stocked to make it worthy of fishing in," Ortlieb said. Alexandria Mayor Bill Rachford said during comments at the end of the Feb. 17 council meeting that the state's stocking of the city's lake isn't something everyone in the city is necessarily aware of. "So, the people who are out there fishing actually have something to catch," Rachford said.

Cooking classes focus on beef programs By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County farmer’s freezer beef program is literally starting to cook with classes planned for March 14 and April 25 on ways to create dishes. The Campbell County Extension Service, in cooperation with the Kentucky Beef Council, designed the classes to show a variety of options for cooking beef and highlight the county’s direct farmer to consumer freezer beef program, said Don Sorrell, extension agent for agriculture and natural resources. There are about 40 different traditional meat cuts, Sorrell said. The classes will focus on options ranging from grilling, braising and roasting to wet cooking options like stew and cooking in crock pots, he said. There will also be information about storing frozen beef, and cutting and tenderizing. Participants will get to taste locally grown beef

cooked about four different ways including steaks and a roast, Sorrell said. And “local” is the key word, he said. The freezer beef program offers people an outlet to know exactly how a cow was raised, including without any added hormones or antibiotics, he said. In addition to the cooking lesson, the classes will include a presentation about all aspects, including cost and delivery for the

freezer beef program, Sorrell said. “We’ll have some help from the pros … we have the Campbell County Beef Association wives,” he said. It’s basically a “Beef 101” class that people won’t find anywhere else, said Whitney Carman, KBC Director of Consumer Affairs for the Kentucky Beef Council, who helped Sorrell design the classes and is scheduled to be a

guest speaker. “The information we are going to be covering is the ‘Science behind the Sizzle,’” Carman said. “It will also give people a great chance to talk with farmers and staff about beef from pasture to plate.” Campbell County’s freezer beef program was started in March 2010, and is one that other counties are mirroring when developing their own program, she said.

“Freezer beef programs are growing across the state,” Carman said. “Extension agents like Don and other groups do a great job working with their local farmers and community in getting this program off the ground.”

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SCHOOLS A4

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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RECORDER

Campbell County school club collects prom dresses By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

High school prom dresses come in all colors, designs, shapes and sizes, but one thing they all have in common is that their expense makes attending prom cost-prohibitive for some teens. At Campbell County High School, the Generation “So, it was either B e l i e v e Goodwill or Club members are Cinderella’s helping the Closet, so why cause of not help one girl’s m a k i n g girls’ prom big dream of dreams prom come come true by collecttrue?” ing dresses for CinOlivia Stacey d e r e l l a ’s Senior Closet. from Alexandria Started in 2007, the nonprofit Cinderella’s Closet, gives gently used dresses to teens who might not otherwise be able to afford to go to the prom. The Northern Kentucky location for Cinderella’s Closet is at Immanuel United Methodist Church in Lakeside Park March 18-19, and is by referral only. Campbell County High School’s prom is May 13. Olivia Stacey, a senior, of Alexandria, said she and her her younger sister, donated about 10 dresses. They had lots of “handme-downs” from their other two

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Olivia Stacey, a senior, of Alexandria, takes one of the dresses of a rack Friday, Feb. 25, that she and her younger sister are donating to Cinderella’s Closet as part of the Generation Believe Club’s collection drive at Campbell County High School in Alexandria. older sisters, Stacey said. “So, it was either Goodwill or Cinderella’s Closet, so why not help one girl’s big dream of prom come true?” she said. Stacey said for her own dress she’s going to Cinderella’s Closet herself because her family doesn’t

have the resources to buy a new dress right now either, and she hopes to find a different dress for herself than the ones she’s donating. “I think it will be really cool if I go and see someone trying on the dress I donated and their face light

up,” she said. Stacey said she had already altered one of the dresses her older sisters gave to her, a green sleeveless dress, by adding cap sleeves that she made and sewed on herself. After graduating high school,

College/career ready challenge taken By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Schools have taken what the district’s superintendent calls an “ambitious” pledge in coordination with the state to improve the college and career readiness of graduating seniors from 41 percent to 71 percent by 2015 in all subject area. The goal is part of Senate Bill 1, passed in 2009, to reduce the number of students requiring remedial courses in college. KDE Commissioner Terry Holliday asked all school districts to take the pledge to improve college and career readiness in a Feb. 7 announcement. Superintendent Anthony Strong said at the Feb. 14 Board of Education meeting that Holliday has asked the district to take on the challenge of increasing the percentage of college or career

ready graduating seniors by 30 percent within five years. “By 2015 he asked us to take on the challenge of increasing that to 71 percent,” Strong said. According to a Kentucky Department of Education’s Feb. 7 news release, 41 percent of Campbell County High School’s 314 graduates in 2010 were deemed college or career ready in all subject areas. That meant 122 Campbell County High School graduates in 2010 met all the state’s benchmarks for how well KDE’ is seeking them to perform on the ACT, and six additional students were meeting “career measures standards.” According to the ACT, college or career readiness is measured by a student’s ability to earn a “C” level grade or better in each subject of English, math, reading and science in their first year of col-

lege. The statewide average of college or career ready students for 2010 was 34 percent, and the statewide goal for 2015 is 50 percent, according the state’s news release. College and career readiness became one of the new measures required as part of Senate Bill 1 mandates a new education accountability system, according to KDE. According to a statement in the news release: “SB 1 requires that P-12 and post-secondary education leaders produce a plan to reduce remediation of high school graduates entering college by 50 percent. The plan includes acceleration, interventions, advising and supports for persistence to graduation.” Kentucky is also one of six states participating in the Southern Regional Education Board’s

“Strengthening Statewide College/Career Readiness Initiative” Before voting to approve the pledge, board member Rich Mason said with no plan of action, he thought it was a little strange. Mason said he thinks there needs to be a plan to get to 71 percent of students being college or career ready. “I’m also not opposed to lofty goals, but I’d like to know how in the heck we’re going to do it,” Mason said. Assistant Superintendent Shelli Wilson said the district has already been making gains in college and career readiness, and advance tests indicate there will be at least a 1 percent increase in college and career readiness on the ACT in 2011. Strong said the state is examining it’s career readiness standards, and schools are being asked to take the pledge and see what dis-

Stacey said she’s planning to attend Kent State University and study fashion design. Generation Believe Club President Sarah Franzen, a senior, of Alexandria, said the 100-member student club is having a special tiara day Wednesday, March 2, on the last day of the week-long dress collection. Club members will be handing out paper and plastic tiara crowns to remind people about the reason for donating the dresses, and so girls can dream about wearing a crown at prom, Franzen said. “I mean Cinderella’s Closet, you’re trying to treat a girl like a princess for a day,” she said. Pam Huff, assistant coordinator of the high school’s Youth Service Center, said she’s been referring select students to Cinderella’s Closet for three years, and assisted some of the students while shopping at the store. “So, I’ve actually met students over time and helped with the process of going through Cinderella’s Closet,” she said. The shop serves a need because not all girls can borrow or trade with their friends to find a dress because not everyone is the same dress size, Huff said. “It’s definitely assisted girls that would not have otherwise been able to got to prom,” she said. For more information about Cinderella’s Closet, visit www.cinderellasclosetnky.org. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

College/career ready rates

Here’s how other school districts in Campbell County rate when it comes to the percentage of graduating seniors meeting state 2010 college and career readiness goals. • Bellevue Independent Schools: 21 percent. • Dayton Independent Schools: 14 percent. • Fort Thomas Independent Schools: 72 percent. • Newport Independent School District: 22 percent. • Silver Grove Independent Schools: 21 percent • Southgate Independent School District: K-8 only. tricts can come up with innovative solutions. “I recommend taking the college and career readiness pledge,” Strong said to the board. The motion received a unanimous vote of support from the board. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

Walk-a-thon fundraiser for student ambassadors By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Grant’s Lick resident Ruth Stacey plans to send her 11-yearold and 12-year-old daughters around the world as student ambassadors this summer, and is working on raising the money for the travel. To help pay for their planned trips, Ruth Stacey has organized a walk-a-thon at Friendship Park in Cold Spring at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 5. Olivia Stacey, a seventh-grade student, and Oneida Stacey, a fifth-grade student, were both selected through the People to People program to travel overseas

as student ambassadors. Olivia has been invited to spend 20 days in Australia where she will spend part of her trip living with a host family, Ruth said. Olivia will also get to tour the Sydney Opera house, and swim with dolphins, Ruth said. Oneida will spend 14 days in France and England where she will get to learn about parliament and go to the Eiffel Tower, Ruth said. Both of the girls have had to take quizzes and write essays in advance of the trip. Oneida wrote an essay on Queen Elizabeth II. “As a mom, I’m extremely nervous, but I’m extremely excited for them as well,” Ruth said. Ruth said she looks at the trips

as a life-changing opportunity that will open up not only new opportunities, but give her daughters the perspective that comes with traveling the world. When they return, Ruth Stacey said she’ll be helping her daughters pull together what they learned and what they saw into a presentation for people who donated to help them go on the trip. “When the girls come back from their trip I want to have a big thank you reception,” she said. As part of the nominating process, the girls don’t know who nominated them, Stacey said. “They are both very good stu-

dents, and they both strive to do well,” she said. “They’re both on the academic teams at their schools.” Olivia said she will be filling out a journal as part of her trip, and when she is staying with the family in Australia she’s expected to pitch in on chores in addition to learning about the country so she’s a good ambassador for the U.S. “I’m looking forward to learning about their culture and history and sharing that America is not a bad country,” she said. Oneida said her trip includes a dress code because they’ll get to attend some type of royal function where there’s even the

chance the queen might attend. Oneida said she’s also looking forward to riding the “London Eye” Ferris wheel. “I’m looking forward to meeting new friends, and I just can’t believe that me, a regular girl, gets such a great opportunity,” Oneida said. The sign-up period for participants in the Saturday, March 5, walk-a-thon at Friendship Park in Cold Spring will begin at 8:30 a.m. For information or to find out how to donate directly to the Stacey family’s cause e-mail Mary at stacey.me@pg.com. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/coldspring

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Schools

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

A5

Schools celebrate World Unity Day By Amanda Joering Alley

she may get to visit someday. “Learning about China is really interesting,” Webb said. “I learned that I’m a dragon in the Chinese horoscope.” Bass said all of her students really enjoyed learning about another culture.

In celebration of World Unity Day Friday, Feb. 25, the Newport Independent Schools brought in speakers and did various project and activities. World Unity Day is meant to create awareness and appreciation of cultural diversity. At Newport Intermediate Schools, classes celebrated by learning about a variety of cultures and customs. “Celebrating World Unity Day is important because the children need to be exposed to other cultures outside of their own to have real understanding of the world,” said teacher April Bass. In Bass’s fourth-grade class, students learned about the Chinese culture from Bass’s aunt Lee Bass, a retired teacher who has traveled to several other countries throughout the years. From seeing pictures and artifacts to learning how to eat with chopsticks, Lee Bass immersed the students in the Chinese culture. Lee Bass said she has

“They seem to really like because its something interesting and different,” Bass said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/newport

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Retired teacher Lee Bass talks to fourth-grade students at Newport Intermediate School about the Chinese culture during the district’s World Unity Day celebration. always found it important to learn about other cultures and when she was a teacher, she would travel during the summer then present information about

where she went to her students the next school year. “The world is very small today, and what happens in one country, affects all the other countries,” Lee Bass said. “Everyone needs to have an understanding and

appreciation of other cultures so they can see how we are all more alike than different.” Student Madison Webb said she’s always been interested in learning about other cultures and places

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Madison Webb works on her Chinese money holder during the World Unity Day celebration.

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Nikki Miller, Jayln Collier and Cheyenne Doyen hang a world peace poster their class made on World Unity Day.

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Cierra Childers and Corey Williams work on a Chinese culture-themed project during class.

In accordance with KRS 176.051, Kentucky’s noxious weed law, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will destroy noxious weeds on state-owned right of way at the request of the adjoining property owner. The noxious weeds named in this law are Johnson grass, giant foxtail, Canada thistle, nodding thistle, multiflora rose, black nightshade, wild cucumber and kudzu. Persons who own property adjacent to state right of way and who are involved in eradication efforts on their property can submit a written application to the highway district office in their area. Applications and addresses for each district office can be obtained from state highway garages.

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Something new was added to the annual volleyball game between the faculty and staff volleyball game against the eighth grade students at St. Joseph, Cold Spring. It was the first performance of the Bluejay “Pep” Band. Shown: Andrew Wehmeyer and Evan Kramer both play the trumpet in the St. Joseph, Cold Spring, Bluejay Band.

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Local parents complete parent leadership training Four Campbell County parents were part of a group of 31 who took part in the Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership, an initiative of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. The nationally recognized program helps parents become more effective advocates for their children’s education. The parents participated in three two-day training sessions designed to increase their understanding of school performance and how to improve it. They will be responsible for conducting a follow-up project designed to accelerate the academic achievement of students at their child’s school and to involve more parents in the effort. The new CIPL graduates are listed with the school in which they will implement their CIPL project: Sonia

Clark, Silver Grove Independent; Lynne Coyne-Gammon, Cline Elementary; Stacie Howe, Bellevue High and Bryan Wright, Newport Intermediate. Parents will presented their projects to a CIPL project review panel Feb. 23. The members of the panel consist of persons from the school district, community and past CIPL participants. The institute, which concluded on Nov. 6, has prepared the parents to work toward higher achievement for all public school students by creating a new level of parent engagement. Since it was established in 1997, CIPL has trained more than 1,500 Kentucky parents as education advocates. Application acceptance has begun for the next Northern Kentucky institute. Applications will be accepted from parents from the following 11

counties: Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Harrison, Kenton, Owen, Pendleton and Robertson. The deadline for applications is Friday, April 15. Primary support for the next Northern Kentucky Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership comes from grants from the Scripps Howard Foundation, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./US Bank Foundation, Toyota, State Farm Insurance and Duke Energy. For more information about the Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership and how to register for the next Institute, visit www.cipl.org or call 859-233-9849, ext. 231. The Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence is a nonprofit citizens’ organization that works to improve education for all Kentuckians.

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SPORTS

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CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

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OT finals the order of day in districts By James Weber jweber@nky.com

As one of six seniors on the Campbell County High School boys basketball team, Brady Kennedy didn’t want his season to end at the team’s second home, the Campbell County Middle School. Kennedy and senior Nate Losey rallied the Camels late to beat Bishop Brossart 4639 in a 37th District semifinal Feb. 23 at the middle school. That clinched Campbell’s first berth in the 10th Region tourney since 2008 and ended the season for the Mustangs. “It’s great,” Kennedy said. “We were all pulling for this. None of us have played in the region so we all wanted it bad. It was our last chance.” Campbell eventually lost to Scott 62-60 in overtime in the district final. The Camels remain without a district championship since 2002. Campbell (18-10) will play Mason County (18-12) in the quarterfinals of the 10th Region Tournament 8 p.m. Thursday, March 3 at the Mason County Fieldhouse in Maysville. Mason won by two, 59-57, in Alexandria Jan. 4. The Camels would play either Pendleton County (13-17) or Montgomery County (15-14) in the semifinals 5 p.m. Saturday, March 5. The final is 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 7. The postseason battle of Alexandria rematch went a lot like the first one, which Campbell won in overtime in the same building. Campbell ended the

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Campbell County senior Josh Graff shoots against Bishop Brossart during their 37th District boys basketball semifinal game Feb. 23 at Campbell County Middle School.

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Bishop Brossart senior Travis Norton (21) shoots over Campbell County junior Dalton Griffin during their 37th District boys basketball semifinal game Feb. 23 at Campbell County Middle School. game on a 12-0 run after trailing 39-34 with 2:40 to play. Kennedy had six points in the run, including the go-ahead basket. Losey tied the game at 39 with a three-point basket. “We were down and Nate hit a big shot to bring us back,” Kennedy said. “My teammates found me and the shots were falling tonight. We had a rough night shooting.” Kennedy and Losey led the Camels with 16 points apiece. Graff led the Camels in rebounding, including a key one on offense after Campbell took the lead in the final two minutes. “We survived a bad shooting night,” said Camels head coach Aric Russell. “Brossart played a heck of a game. They’re a strong team and they make you play their game. We did things right down the stretch to help us win the game.” Russell praised the play of his veterans who stepped up in the end. “Losey was cold all night then hit a big shot,” Russell said. “That’s why you have to keep your head in the game and do things right, so you have a chance to win in the end. Graff had a great game. He’s been playing that way all year.” Losey and Kennedy were Campbell’s all-tournament picks. Russell said shooting and defense would be the most important factors for the Camels to advance in the 10th Region tourney.

Bishop Brossart (15-11) lost for the second time this season to the Camels. Justin Saunders led the team with 14 points. Saunders was the top scorer for the year, followed by Zach Fardo, Joe Jennings and Travis Norton. Saunders was Brossart’s alltournament picks.

NewCath wins 36th boys

Newport Central Catholic is going into the Ninth Region Tournament with momentum after defeating Highlands for the 36th District championship. NewCath defeated Highlands 69-62 in overtime to win its third straight district title overall. Junior guard Brady Hightchew scored a career high 32 points and took over in the overtime period. He was named the tourney most valuable player. “Brady stepped up it big time,” said NCC head coach Grant Brannen. “He put everybody on his back.” NCC (24-6) won its seventh straight game since losing to DeSales in the All “A” Classic state tournament Feb. 5. Jake Giesler and Zach Ryan had 15 points each and were alltourney picks. NewCath was set to play St. Henry in the Ninth Region quarterfinals March 2 at Northern Kentucky University. With a win, NCC would play either Ryle (1912) or Covington Catholic (18-11) in the semifinals 6 p.m. Saturday, March 5.

GREG LORING/CONTRIBUTOR

Newport Central Catholic High School defender Jake Giesler tries to block a shot by Highlands’ Jack Stewart Feb. 26. The final is 3 p.m. Sunday, March 6. NewCath has defeated all three teams in its half of the bracket this season. “Winning the district title helps you get some momentum,” Brannen said. “We have to keep it going. Every game you have to go out there and tough it out.”

Highlands faces Dixie

Highlands (14-15) will play Dixie Heights (26-3) 6 p.m. Thursday, March 3. Highlands lost 67-43 at Dixie Dec. 14, but that was a week after Highlands’ win in the state football final. In the district final, Jack Stewart had 26 points and Conor Crowley, 25. Both players were all-tourney picks. Crowley hit five three-point baskets. Stewart tied the game at the buzzer in regulation after a long pass from junior teammate Patrick Towles. Neither Stewart nor Crowley played against Dixie in December, and other Bluebirds were just a week removed from football. Dixie head coach Ken

Other teams

Here is a quick recap of basketball teams whose seasons ended last week in the district tournaments.

Boys

Bellevue (9-18) lost 85-30 to NewCath in the 36th. Brandon Hoffman was Bellevue’s top scorer for the year. Newport (11-18) lost to Highlands 70-50 in a 36th District semifinal. The defending Ninth Region champs had one returning player this year in Travis Jones. Newport beat Dayton (5-20) in the quarterfinals. Danny Sparks had 15 points for Dayton, and Thomas Rogg 11. Silver Grove (4-20) lost 71-29 to Calvary in the 37th District tourney. Jeremy Hammons had 15 points. He was SG’s top scorer for the year at 19 points per game.

Girls

Bellevue (8-20) lost 67-21 to Newport Central Catholic in the 36th District semifinals. Brittany Bohn and Megan Arnzen were the top scorers for the year. Dayton (12-17) lost 69-27 to Highlands in the 36th semifinals. Dayton beat Newport (5-19) in the play-in game 64-48. Margaret Faison and Jamie Harrison were Newport’s top scorers for the year. Silver Grove (8-18) lost 56-37 to Calvary in the 37th District. Amber Fancher and Cindy Miller has 12 points apiece. Miller and Payton Govan averaged 12 points a game for the year, and Fancher nine. Chevalier said he expects a much tougher game this time around because of that. With a win, Highlands would play Boone County (20-10) or Holmes (21-1) in the second semifinal 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 5. Highlands lost 71-64 to

Boone Jan. 22 and 62-46 to Holmes Feb. 3. Highlands didn’t have Stewart, one of the top post players in Northern Kentucky, for either game. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps.

Camels, Thoroughbreds claim girls titles By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Campbell County High School claimed its third championship in four years in the 37th District girls basketball tournament. The Camels defeated Bishop Brossart 61-52 in the district championship game Feb. 24 at Campbell County Middle School. Campbell (22-6) was set to play St. Patrick March 1 in the 10th Region quarterfinal at Bourbon County High School. The next round is Wednesday, March 2. The final is 2 p.m. Saturday, March 5.

The 22 wins is the most in team history in eight years since the Camels won the 10th Region in 2003. Campbell was 25-7 that season. In the district final, the Camels hit 10 three-point baskets from five different players. Kennedy Berkley hit four treys and had 13 points overall. Taylor Robinson led the Camels with 15 points. Megan Rauch and Kelsey Miller had eight points apiece. Brossart snapped a 10-game winning streak and entered the 10th Region with a 19-9 record. Becca Kidney scored 17 points and Abby Stadtmiller 11. Kidney

and Stadtmiller were Brossart’s all-tourney picks. The Mustangs suffered a bad break when Stadtmiller left the game with a strained knee ligament and will not play in the 10th Region tourney. Stadtmiller was the late hero in the tourney semifinals, hitting two free throws in the final seconds to lift Brossart to 34-33 win over Scott. Brossart avenged a 57-54 loss to Scott on Jan. 4, and will play in the 10th Region tourney for the second straight year after winning the 37th District last season. Brossart was to play tourney

favorite Clark County Monday night, Feb. 28. The Mustangs’ semifinal is also scheduled for March 2. Newport Central Catholic (224) beat Highlands (19-10) 42-30 in the girls 36th District final, the third straight year the Thoroughbreds have won the title. Nicole Kiernan led NCC with 13 points, 16 rebounds and six blocked shots and was named the team’s most valuable player. Kiley Bartels and Olivia Huber were named all-tournament. Kelsey Dunn and Allie Conner were all-tourney picks for Highlands.

Both teams are on opposite sides of the Ninth Region draw. Highlands was set to play St. Henry Feb. 28, and NewCath will play Villa Madonna March 1. With a win, Highlands would play either Boone County (26-5) or Holy Cross (17-11) Friday, March 4, in the semifinals. NewCath would play the second semifinal that night against either Notre Dame (18-8) or Ryle (236). The final is 1 p.m. Sunday. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/presspreps.


Sports & recreation The Northern Kentucky River Monsters indoor football organization is pleased to announce the signing of former National Football League quarterback, Jared Lorenzen. Lorenzen, who has been with the organization since its inception as the general manager, will start for the River Monsters when they play their inaugural game 7 p.m. Friday against the Canton Cougars. Due to league rules, Lorenzen will relinquish his general manager title and will serve as the front office consultant while on the active roster. “I been around it since September and I have resisted the urge,” Lorenzen said. “Then when the pads came out, I couldn’t resist any longer.” He automatically becomes the biggest name not only for Northern Kentucky, but for the entire Ultimate Indoor Football League. However, Lorenzen wants to make sure he is just one of the guys. “I have only practiced, three, four times,” Lorenzen said. “This is T-Mac’s (Thomas McKenzie), KJ’s (Kenneth Joshen) team. They are the leaders of this team.” Lorenzen starred locally at Highlands High School, winning a state title and earned Mr. Football for the state of Kentucky as a senior. He went to break nearly every passing record set by former No. 1 pick Tim Couch at the University of Kentucky, but still went undrafted. He signed with the New York Giants, where he played three seasons, including their Super Bowl season of 2007. Lorenzen was the backup to Eli Manning during that titlewinning season. Indianapolis was his next, and final stop, on the NFL train as he was released on the final cutdown day. His final professional stint came with the Lexington Horseman of the AF2 league.

All-conference

By James Weber

jweber@nky.com

Conner Downard was seeded seventh in the state in the 500-yard freestyle based on times from the regional meets. The Highlands High School junior was then seeded second after the preliminaries in the 2011 state championship meet. Downard kept climbing up the ladder to win his first state championship in the 500 free Feb. 26 at the University of Louisville. Downard swam a personal-best 4 minutes, 32.08 seconds to win by 1.31 over Northern Kentucky Clippers teammate Max Williamson from Covington Catholic. “I just went out there and did what I knew how to do,” Downard said. “I dropped a ton of time. I knew I took it out fast, but Max always comes on hard. The last hundred I thought he would be coming up there, but I

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Natalie Schultz of Highlands swims the 200 freestyle relay Feb. 26 at the University of Louisville.

State swimming results

Results from the 2011 Pannell Swim Shop/KHSAA Swimming & Diving Championships Feb. 24-26 at the University of Louisville’s Ralph Wright Natatorium.

Boys

Highlands

200 free relay: 23rd (1:37.76), Bennett Paradis, Mayson Hurtt, Nathan Merkle, Conner Downard. 400 free relay: 24th (3:34.01), Bennett Paradis, Mayson Hurtt, Nathan Merkle, Conner Downard. Conner Downard: Fourth in 200 free (1:43.72), state champ in 500 free (4:32.08). Evan Duckworth: Fifth in diving (397.00). Alex Ivey: 28th in diving (104.15). Mayson Hurtt: 28th in 500 free (5:09.47).

Girls

200 medley relay: 28th (2:00.70), Beth Ann Griffith, Katherine Redden, Natalie Schultz, Shelby Whitt. 200 free relay: 11th (1:45.91), Shelby Whitt, Beth Ann Griffith, Victoria Englert, Natalie Schultz. 400 free relay: 24th (4:00.42), Madeline Huber, Beth Ann Griffith, Katherine Redden, Shelby Whitt. Katherine Redden: 32nd in 200 free (2:07.49), 30th in 500 free (5:36.92). Natalie Schultz: 22nd in 50 free (25.80), 25th in 100 free (56.25). Carly Hill: Fourth in diving (423.65). Sydney Bouras: 10th in diving (339.05).

Girls

Campbell County

Ally Baker: 30th in diving (108.25). Alexis Smith: 15th in diving (311.25).

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Ryle’s Meredith Brownell (second) and Highlands’ Carly Hill (fourth) with their state medals in girls diving Feb. 26 at the University of Louisville.

just held my pace strong and luckily held it out. A little bit longer of a race, he would have got me.” Downard was eighth in the state in the 500 last year. This year, he finished fourth in the 200 free as well to pick up a medal. “I never would have dreamed in a million years I would be standing here

today,” he said. “My coaches always knew I could do it.” Head coach Amanda Johnson was proud of her junior. “Conner had the swim of his life,” she said. “He worked so hard and he deserves it. To go from eighth to first is unbelievable. There weren’t many in

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Highlands High School junior Conner Downard lifts off for the 200-yard freestyle Feb. 26 at the University of Louisville. Downard won the state title later in the 500 free. that field who graduated from last year.” Senior Evan Duckworth finished fifth in boys diving for his fourth and last career medal in his sixth appearance. Eighth-grader Carly Hill finished fourth in girls diving for her third medal, with former Bluebirds standout and University of Louisville diver Hannah Gadd watching. The medals highlighted a young Bluebirds team at state. Counting diving,

Highlands qualified eight individuals and five relays to state. “They’re up and coming,” Johnson said. “I had two seventh-graders, a junior and a sixth-grader on one relay. They had a great senior class last year and when you lose that class and you’re younger, it can be a down year. But it wasn’t for us.” See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/pres spreps

Allen helps Campbellsville Lady Tigers to No. 4

PROVIDED

Katie Allen of Fort Thomas, a freshman guard, helped Campbellsville University’s Lady Tigers reach a No. 4 national ranking. The Tigers claimed a 17-3 (10-1 MSC) record with seven games remaining in the 2010-11 Mid-South Conference regular season. Allen has connected on 56 percent of her field goals.

Track honorees

Katie Allen of Fort Thomas, a freshman guard, has helped the Campbellsville University’s Lady Tigers vault to a No. 4 national ranking. The Tigers claimed a 173 (10-1 MSC) record with seven games remaining in the 2010-11 Mid-South Conference regular season. But with a heavy dose upperclassmen, Allen has seen limited action. But her minutes have picked up some in the past four games and she has taken advantage of that to connect on 56 percent of her field goals. Campbellsville started the season ranked at No. 4, and was bumped up a spot after a loss to No. 1 Union

Dave Meyers of Newport Central Catholic was honored by the Kentucky Track & Cross Country Coaches Association as the 2010 Class A Girls Track & Field Coach of the Year and the Overall Girls Track & Field Coach of the Year. Meyers led Newport Central Catholic to its second consecutive Class A state championship. Jordan Hatfield of Southgate was honored by Kentucky USA Track & Field as the Youth Athletics Male Track & Field Athlete of the Year for 2010. He participated in 12 consecutive association youth meets winning 39 medals in nine different events. Hatfield is a graduate of Newport High School and is a freshman at Northern Kentucky University and a member of the track and field team.

University on Dec. 11. They have remained in that position for three rating periods

until losing on the road to Shawnee State in Portsmouth, Ohio.

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Northern Kentucky University men’s basketball players Malcolm Eleby and Josh Tabb were both named to the AllGreat Lakes Valley Conference third team, Feb. 25. Eleby, a senior guard from Philadelphia, Pa., leads NKU in scoring (12.4 points per game), assists (4.54 apg) and rebounding (6.4 rpg). He has also made 137 free throws and collected 33 steals this season to help NKU post 19-7 record entering the GLVC Tournament. Tabb, a senior guard from Carbondale, Ill., averages 11.0 points per game and has dished out 81 assists. Tabb, who has scored in double figures 15 times this season, also has 27 steals and 11 blocked shots. NKU began GLVC Tournament play Feb. 26 by hosting Quincy in The Bank of Kentucky Center. • Northern Kentucky University women’s basketball player Casse Mogan was named to the All-Great Lakes Valley Conference first team, Feb. 25. Mogan, a junior guard from Circleville, Ohio, averages 17.7 points per game for a 17-9 NKU squad. The 5foot-10 Mogan has scored in double figures 24 times this season, including 14 consecutive games entering the GLVC Tournament. Mogan is now 24th in Norse history with 1,045 career points. She is also No. 2 in steals in the GLVC this season with an average of 2.62 per game. Mogan leads NKU with 71 assists and has made a team-high 118 free throws this season. Mogan, who was also named to the All-GLVC first team last season, averages 5.6 rebounds per game. Her

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Campbell Community Recorder

March 3, 2011

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

RECORDER

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Kentucky’s drug problem

I was happy to see some attention paid to the growing drug abuse problem in our state. I was disappointed, however, by the way in which Sen. McConnell used such a pressing topic as an opportunity for political posturing. The Senator is correct: prescription-drug abuse (and not just by teens) is a serious problem, and Kerlikowske’s visit could be promising in this regard. However, the Senator neglected to acknowledge the ways in which corporate drugcompanies are complicit in this problem by generating goods and services that show extreme bias toward temporary relief of pain and illness (i.e. pills) rather than legitimate strategies toward individualized, medicine-independent recovery.

Such a bias leads to the habitual use of (and not to mention consistent sales to) parents, as well as subsequent exposure of their teenage children to such easily abused substances. Was I too optimistic to expect a Senate leader to challenge his party’s devotion to big business and the costly “War on Drugs” in such a straightforward, ethically minded manner? Mr. Senator, from a Kentucky voter: instead of subjecting it to politically agile yet superficial - and ultimately hollow - analysis, why not assess the multiple roots of a problem like drug abuse? Doing so would indeed allow us to “make the most of the attention [Kerlikowski’s] visit will bring” without tripping over political agendas. Pat LaFleur Fort Thomas

Cuts will hurt most vulnerable The news from Washington is not good. Dozens of worthwhile services that receive federal funding are slated for drastic cuts by as early as March 5. Reducing the deficit is the reason, but the programs proposed for cuts will deeply impact those who are least able to help themselves. One such program is the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission leverages about $20 in additional funding for every $1 of CSBG funding we receive. It is the locally driven foundation on which NKCAC provides not only basic family needs such as heat, housing, food, clothing, health and safety, but also interventions that lift families out of poverty while reinvesting dollars back in the community. With neighborhood centers in each of the eight Northern Kentucky counties, NKCAC has served low- and moderate-income families and individuals in this region since 1966. We help more than 28,000 families and individuals annually – families who will be denied access to comprehensive safety net and developmental services if these cuts go through. There are many misconceptions about the families who come to community action for help. The facts are these: 42 percent of the families we serve are working families, and 23 percent are disabled and unable to work. Less than 4 percent receive TANF assistance (commonly known as “welfare”). And another interesting fact: Nearly 50 percent of the families we have helped since the recession began in 2008 had never asked for help before! They are the newly poor, and they, too, will be abandoned by these deep cuts. Besides CSBG, a partial list of services on the chopping block includes utility assistance for the poor (LIHEAP), AmeriCorps volunteer service program, commodities, job training for seniors, YouthBuild, rental assistance,

community health centers, Florence Legal Aid and Tandy WIC nutrition assistance for Community infants and pregRecorder nant women. guest It reads more columnist like an assault on the poor than on the deficit. The damage caused by these cuts will have a long-term impact on local families and communities. Losing the kinds of preventive services and interventions that NKCAC provides will place an additional burden on employers, local governments, shelters, jails, emergency rooms, landlords, churches and schools. The work that community action does isn’t glamorous. The clients are often desperate and scared, with nowhere else to turn. The workers are not well-paid; the centers are far from elegant. Often they work long hours helping families stay warm, housed, with food on the table, and the lights on. Some in Washington see the poor as a problem to be pushed out of sight. But those who are called to this work know that is not true. We know they are people with promise. They may not have the same opportunities that many of us did, but they deserve the best effort society has to offer. Cutting the very programs that are meant to lift them out of poverty is certainly not the answer for this country, or for the people who need our help. I encourage you to write a letter or call Sens. Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul and Rep. Geoff Davis to tell them it is not OK to cut these vital services to Northern Kentucky’s low-income families. Do it today because tomorrow may be too late. Florence Tandy is executive director of Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission, a social service agency serving eight counties in Northern Kentucky. She and her husband reside in southern Boone County.

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Monday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

PROVIDED

Legislative talks

Rep. Tom McKee, D-Cynthiana, (left) and Rep. Ryan Quarles, R-Georgetown, discuss legislative issues in the Kentucky House of Representatives. State lawmakers are now in the final half of the General Assembly’s 2011 legislative session, which is scheduled to end March 22.

Recognizing the importance of Presidents Day Like most parents, I routinely expect to see school schedule changes because of snow day cancellations. It is common for schools to use planning days, spring break days, and even President’s Day to make-up for the loss. What we never see is the use of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as a make-up day. If you ask your local school system or search the Kentucky Revised Statutes, you will find out why. Before some of you get carried away and jump to the liberal notion that I am biased, let me make myself crystal clear. I believe that the late Rev. King was much more than the leader of the civil rights movement, he was the movement. However, there were multiple sacri-

fices made by many to enable our country to move forward. Yes, we have Memorial Day to remember those paying the ultimate sacrifice, but Kevin Sell what about our Presidents? Community The Kentucky Recorder Revised Statute guest (158.070 (6) (b)) columnist specifically states that “all schools shall be closed on the third Monday of January in observance of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.”. It makes no mention of any

New homeowners should consider future finances For many people, their home is the most valuable asset. It not only provides them and their families with a sense of security and stability, but it can also offer a sense of achievement and community. There are many ideas that pass through your head when you are thinking about your new home. What color are the walls going to be? Where do the plates and cups go? Does my coffee maker match the other appliances? There are many other questions that don’t go through your head. How will the mortgage be paid if I get inured or ill? If I am not here tomorrow will my family be able to stay in their home? There are many questions that people have when it comes down to living in a home. When you are a new homeowner it is a feeling of fear, excitement, joy and concern. There are some simple solutions to help combat these questions. The first step is to make an appointment with a trusted financial representative. You may ask a financial representative, what for? What are they going to do tell me how to set up my retirement or where to invest?

May people are misinformed on how financial representatives and how they can help with your current and future needs. A good representative will help set up your budget for your new home, find proper life insurance needs to protect your family and explain future plans of your family. Second step, put a plan into effect immediately. Families understand the important of life insurance, budgets and future financial goals but often put it off. May common statements that I have personally heard are: • I’m young and have plenty of time to do that. • We can do it in a couple of years nothing will happen to me. • I don’t have the money with a new home. • I have everything I need at work to take care of this. I hear many of these objections daily and they are people that are misinformed. Buying life insurance is less expensive when you are young and every year you wait the price goes up. If you wait to buy health conditions do change and you may not be able to attain coverage. Coverage

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COMMUNITY RECORDER

other day where schools shall be closed. My question is: what about President’s Day? A day to remember, and impress upon our school children, that many of our Presidents made us a better nation. More importantly, four Presidents have been assassinated (Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, and Kennedy) while in office-what about them? Why our legislature passed something like this is beyond me, but they can correct it without any offense or insult. Simply amend KRS 158 to include President’s Day as a day to be closed, or allow school make-up days on this date. This would send the right message to students and maintain a level of equal importance to both days. Kevin Sell is a resident of Alexandria.

Campbell Community Editor . . .Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

on a female that is 25 year old can Marc Barone cost $12.73 or less Community per month for $100,000 in covRecorder erage (20-year guest level term, precolumnist ferred rating, nontobacco user). In these times people lose jobs, change jobs and lose benefits. The coverage you have through work may not be there tomorrow. Knowing your benefits and having personal coverage is vital. Finally, update on a yearly basis. Things change from day to day and year to year and so do your needs. Look at it this way, if you had a new phone number for your best friend would you wait a year to put in into your address book ? Make sure things are up to date to take care of all your families needs. For any future needs please feel free to contact me and set up an appointment today, 859-4480425. Thanks again and happy home hunting! Marc Barone is a financial representative for the Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society in Alexandria.

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, M a r c h

RECORDER

3, 2011

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Behringer-Crawford to pay tribute to Knothole

CATCH A STAR

Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Amy Krift, a nurse for 14 years, opted to become a school nurse at Cline Elementary School in Cold Spring instead of switching careers to become a fulltime teacher.

Cline school nurse finds ways to teach By Chris Mayhew

cmayhew@nky.com

Cline Elementary School’s nurse, Amy Krift, has a passion for teaching, but when she changed jobs three years ago she decided to keep one foot in the world of health care. As the school nurse, Krift said she sees lots of children for illnesses, and she’s performing vision screenings now. “We’ve had a lot of the flu lately,” she said. Using the school’s newsletter and other forms of communication, Krift said she also tries to educate people. Topics have included the risk of Reye’s Syndrome, a rare disease that can cause swelling in the brain and liver be brought on in-part by treating colds and the flu with Aspirin, she said. Krift has been at Cline for three years as the nurse,

and has been in nursing for a total of 14 years. Before coming to Cline, Krift said she was considering going back to school to become a full-time teacher, but decided against that because of her husband’s job in the military. Now, when students pass her in the hallway she stops and talk to them, because it’s hard to treat the students if they don’t know and trust you, she said. “So, I know them by their first name,” Krift said. It’s the contact with the children that makes the job special, she said. “She’s just a good person,” said Brenda Elgin, the school’s secretary. “She takes care of those kids as if they’re her own.” Elgin said she and Krift also back each other up since the nurse’s office is right near the front desk. “I do introduce her as ‘my nurse,’” Elgin said.

AT THE LIBRARY Cold Spring

• Learn to Use MangaCreating Software 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 8 Learn to use computer software to create unique manga. Ages 11-18. Registration required. • Adventure Club: Cincinnati Museum Center presents Lewis and Clark 4 p.m. Thursday, March 10 Learn about the wildlife, unknown lands and people that Lewis and Clark encountered on their expedition. Ages 6-11. Registration required.

Fort Thomas

• Video Processing 2 p.m. Sunday, March 6 Want to create unique videos? Visit to learn how to cre-

ate videos using free software. Ages 12-18. Registration required. • Adventure Club: Balloon Olympics 4 p.m. Monday, March 7 Test skill with a challenging balloon games. Ages 611. Registration required.

Newport

• Adventure Club: Search and Rescue Dogs 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 8 Meet Sergeant Rob Dawn and his canine partner from Campbell County Search and Rescue. Ages 6-11. No registration required. • McGing Irish Dancers 7 p.m. Thursday, March 10 Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with McGing Irish Dancers. All ages welcome. No registration required.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

From the glow of the sun to the crack of the bat to the roars of the crowd - there’s nothing quite like a day at the ball park. That’s why the BehringerCrawford Museum is partnering with the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame to launch a special exhibit dubbed “Play Ball: In a League of Our Own - The History of Knothole Baseball.” The exhibit will open March 5 and run through June 5. “It’s a great way to not only preserve the past, but to provide inspiration for the future,” said Sarah Siegrist, the assistant director of BCM. “So many people have been associated with Knothole over the years, and we figured it would be neat to show that tradition and how it all started.” Joe Brennan, the president of the Northern Kentucky Hall of Fame, said they have been working on putting together the exhibit for over a year, as they’ve been researching the history of Knothole baseball in each county, contacting former coaches and supervisors, and even trying to track down former players. He said they’ve worked with museum for several past exhibits, including displays on the top Northern Kentucky athletes to make it big, as well as the top coaches in Northern Kentucky high school history. “We have a really good time working with the museum and putting these together,” said Brennan. Brennan admitted the research for the Knothole exhibit was a challenge, as historical records were almost non-existent for some districts. However, he said they’ve been able to unearth some of the origins of of Knothole in each county, having discovered that Knothole play began in Campbell County in 1933, in Kenton County in 1939, and not until 1958 in Boone County. “If you think about it, a lot of the neighborhoods weren’t really built out in Boone County until later, so it makes sense,” he said.

PROVIDED

Blake Dickerson of the Rockets tries to get a Dragons’ runner out at third base during the regional championship game in Knothole Class B at the Cappel Complex in Latonia last summer. The upcoming exhibit at the Behringer-Crawford Museum will feature a history of Knothole baseball in Boone, Kenton and Campbell County. Brennan said they’ve also been able to feature some Knothole contributors who weren’t players or coaches, such as Fran Leubbers and Mary Justice, who helped run the books for Kenton County Knothole while their husbands were supervisors, and Betty Duncan, who helped with the purchase of the fields in Boone County by selling snacks out of the back of her station wagon. “That’s actually one of the coolest stories - she helped to raise enough money to help secure the loan for those fields they still play on in District 24,” said Siegrist. “It’s stories like those that we really want to share with everyone.” Of course, Siegrist and Brennan said there will also be plenty of information on players, coaches and supervisors. Major-leaguers like Stan Arnzen, Leo Foster and Jim Bunning will be featured, as will all of the district supervisors, including Bob Marsh, the father of former MLB umpire Randy Marsh, who oversaw the Kenton Knothole program in the late 1950s and early ’6’0s. The

PROVIDED

Jeff Orme of the Mark’s Garage Dragons of Fort Thomas pitches during the regional championship game in Knothole Class B last July. Knothole baseball dates back to 1933 in Campbell County, 1939 in Kenton County and 1958 in Boone County. Telecommunications Board of Northern Kentucky has also filmed several interviews with former players and coaches, which will air in the exhibit and later be available for purchase on DVD. Additionally, Siegrist said the museum is planning to have “Knothole Days” each Saturday while the exhibit runs, where kids currently playing Knothole can visit the exhibit for free. Brennan said that the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and the Kid Glove Program have stepped up to help sponsor the exhib-

it, which will also feature a special tribute to the Cincinnati Reds Community Fund, which has contiributed funds for field maintenance and upgrades over the years. “It’s really going to be pretty cool once it’s all set up,” said Brennan. “I think everyone in this area has been involved in the Knothole program in one way or another at some point, so this should have something everyone can enjoy.” For more information, contact BCM at 491-4003 or visit www.bcmuseum.org.

Area development district plans for leadership change By Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com

A transition plan is in the works for leadership of the Northern Kentucky Area Development District. Executive director John Mays, a Union resident, is retiring Aug. 31. Looking ahead to that vacancy, the NKADD board has promoted Lisa Cooper to be assistant director of the agency, which has offices at 22 Spiral Drive in Florence. The assistant director

position became vacant when Bob Schrage retired in the fall. Cooper is expected to succeed Mays as executive director on Sept. 1. Her previous job at NKADD was department head for development and public administration. The NKADD is one of 15 area development districts in Kentucky. The agency provides public administration services to the eight counties it serves – Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin,

Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton. NKADD provides research, grant application, administration and mapping services, and also helps to coordinate aging and workforce development resources in the district. Mays, who has served as executive director for 15 years, said NKADD’s biggest change during that time is the “challenge that local governments face because of budgeting and in some ways shrinking rev-

enues. “Everything gets more complicated and there’s always new challenges,” Mays said. “Everybody’s got to be more efficient and come up with new ways to address things.” Mays said the next six months will be a challenging time for Cooper, a Fort Thomas resident, as she gets up to speed on the director’s duties. For more information about NKADD, visit www. nkadd.org.


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CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, M A R C H 4

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Incident & Ornament: Baroque States of Mind, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 25 W. Seventh St., Part of First Friday Gallery Hop. Mixed media, installation and paintings by Kim Krause, Jamie Markle, Jill Rowinski and Ryan Snow. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com/arts_center.shtml. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

First Friday Gallery Hop, 6-10 p.m., Covington Arts District, Madison Avenue, Pike Street and MainStrasse Village, First Friday of every month. Covington’s galleries, restaurants and other venues open late for original artwork viewing. Free. 859-292-2322. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Friday Night Ballroom Dance, 8-10 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Group lesson 8-8:30 p.m. DJ dance to multiple styles of ballroom dance music begins 8:30-10 p.m. Family friendly. $5. 859-2912300. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Steve Byrne, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $17. Dinner available. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Comedy Night, 8 p.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., With Landon Faulkner, Ray Price, Jay Armstrong, Jason Cornett, Wayne Strickland and Rob Wilfong. 859-363-9848; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Honk Jr., 7 p.m., Holy Cross High School, 3617 Church St., Award-winning musical has transformed Hans Christian Andersen’s classic tale into modern musical comedy for the whole family. $10. Through March 6. 859957-1940. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Elephant Man, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Based on true story of John Merrick, man so deformed that medical science still has not clearly identified all his maladies. $17, $14 students and ages 65 and up. Presented by Falcon Theater. Through March 5. 513-479-6783; www.falcontheater.net. Newport. S A T U R D A Y, M A R C H 5

BENEFITS

HOLIDAY - MARDI GRAS

Mardi Gras Celebration, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Big Head Parade, 8 p.m. Music by Naked Karate Girls. Cajun food booths and entertainment in MainStrasse Village bars and tents. Beads, baubles and bangles available for purchase in Village businesses. Call if you would like to participate in the parades. Ages 21 and up. $15 both nights, $10 one night. 859-4910458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

MUSIC - BENEFITS

Paint the Town Red Benefit Concert, 8-11 p.m., Leapin Lizard Gallery, 726 Main St., Music by Abbey’s Cage, Sam Mineli, Zak Morse and the Sleeping Sea. Hosted by Brendan Holmes and Carson Scheidler. Includes dancing, prizes, food, video of volunteers’ work in the SOTENI Village of Hope, Mbakalo, Kenya. Benefits SOTENI International. Ages 9-12. $10. Presented by SOTENI International. 513-324-0757; www.soteni.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Will Kimbrough Band, 8:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Ballroom. Doors open at 8 p.m. With Billy Wallace. Ages 18 and up. $13, $10 advance. Presented by WNKU. 859-431-2201; www.magus.msictoday.com. Newport. Gallery Opening Night Party, 9:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Parlour. Music by Aperiodic, Mala In se, Swear Jar and Wasteland Jazz Unit. Doors open 8 p.m. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Jimmy Beaumont and the Skyliners, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., Guys ‘n’ Dolls Restaurant and Nightclub, 4210 Alexandria Pike, With Steve Chuke. Ages 21 and up. $35 VIP, $30. Reservations required. 859-441-4888; www.guysndollsllc.com. Cold Spring.

Crusader Royale, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, St. Henry Elementary School, 3825 Dixie Highway, Casino table games, silent auction, music, roving magician, caricature artist and more. Food, beer and wine included. Benefits St. Henry Elementary School. Ages 21 and up. $40. Presented by St. Henry Elementary PTO. 519-342-2551. Erlanger.

BUSINESS SEMINARS

SCORE Seminars: Websites Fundamentals, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Center, 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 330, Information on website fundamentals for business owners, elements of good website design, marketing you website and Q&A with panel of experts. Ages 21 and up. $40. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-4263651; bit.ly/i2mner. Fort Mitchell.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Tango Dance Party, 8:30-11:30 p.m., StepN-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, Social Tango dancing. Bring appetizer or wine to share. Ages 18 and up. $10. 859-2912300; www.stepnoutstudio.com. Covington.

HOLIDAY - MARDI GRAS

Mardi Gras Celebration, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., MainStrasse Village, Grande Parade, 8 p.m. Music by 4th Day Echo. $15 both nights, $10 one night. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington. ESP, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

MUSIC - BIG BAND

Swingtime Big Band, 7:30-11 p.m., York St. Cafe, 738 York St., 859-261-9675; www.swingtimebigband.com. Newport.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

500 Miles to Memphis, 9 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Doors open 8 p.m. With Steepwater and Dutch Henry. $13 ages 18-20, $10 ages 21 and up. 859-4312201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - WORLD

Stays in Vegas, 10 p.m.-midnight, The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., 859-261-6120. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Steve Byrne, 7:30 p.m. (Dinner available) and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Honk Jr., 7 p.m., Holy Cross High School, $10. 859-957-1940. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Elephant Man, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $17, $14 students and ages 65 and up. 513-479-6783; www.falcontheater.net. Newport.

YOUTH SPORTS

Youth Soccer Referees, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Youth referees who still need to recertify or for those desiring to become new referees, clinics are being held. Online registration available. Presented by KY Soccer Referee Association, Inc. 859-282-0222; www.kyreferee.com. Crestview Hills. S U N D A Y, M A R C H 6

HOLIDAY - MARDI GRAS ESP, 10 p.m., Peecox, 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Cathedral Concert Series, 3 p.m., Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption, 1140 Madison Ave., A Musical Celebration of J.S. Bach’s 326th Birthday. With Bryan Mock, concert organist; Rev. Stef Bankemper, baritone soloist. Free, donations accepted. 859-4312060; www.cathedralconcertseries.org. Covington.

PROVIDED

Mardi Gras with Ricky Nye will be 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 10, at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Part of The Carnegie in Concert Series, Nye, pictured, and his musicians will bring Mardi Gras to life on the Otto M. Budig Theatre stage with a rollicking concert of traditional boogie woogie and elegant New Orleans-style blues and ballads. A Cajun food sampling will be available in the galleries before the show and during intermission. Tickets are $19; $16 for Carnegie, Enjoy the Arts and WVXU Perks members and students. Tickets are available at The Carnegie Box Office, open noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, online at www.thecarnegie.com or by phone at 859-957-1940. T U E S D A Y, M A R C H 8

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Incident & Ornament: Baroque States of Mind, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com/arts_center.shtml. Covington.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

W E D N E S D A Y, M A R C H 9

Honk Jr., 3 p.m., Holy Cross High School, $10. 859-957-1940. Covington.

BENEFITS

SCHOOLS

High School Open House, Noon-2 p.m., Villa Madonna Academy, 2500 Amsterdam Road, School tours, meet faculty and students. For grades 6-8 and parents. Free. 859-3316333, ext. 139. Villa Hills.

YOUTH SPORTS

Youth Soccer Referees, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Thomas More College, Online registration available. 859-282-0222; www.kyreferee.com. Crestview Hills. M O N D A Y, M A R C H 7

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Incident & Ornament: Baroque States of Mind, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com/arts_center.shtml. Covington.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Zumba Class, 6-7 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, $30 per month for unlimited classes; $10 drop-in, $5 class punch cards. 859-2912300. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Lacy

BENEFITS

Mardi Gras for Homeless Children, 6:3010 p.m., Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Food and beverages, silent and called auctions and New Orleans jazz with Robin Lacy and DeZydeco. Queen: Kit Andrews, anchor for WKRC-TV. King: Jim Scott, 700 WLW-AM. Benefits Bethany House Services, Brighton Center’s Homeward Bound, Welcome House of Northern, KY, Inc. and Mercy Franciscan at St. John. $55. 859-431-8717; www.nkramardigras.com. Covington.

HOLIDAY - MARDI GRAS

Fat Tuesday/Fastnacht Celebration, 6 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Features Enzian Dancers with special Fat Tuesday dance program. Music by Nick Gulacsy Jr. Akkordeon-Meister, HB Newport. Prizes presented for best Mardi Gras costumes worn by festgoers. Benefits German-Heritage Museum, which showcases the German heritage of the region. Family friendly. 513-574-1741. Newport.

Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 5011 Four Mile, Dinners include fish, shrimp, chicken or frog legs, hush puppies, cole slaw and choice of macaroni and cheese or fries. Carryout availableadd 25 cents-call ahead. Benefits Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department. $6.50$8.50 dinners; $7.25 frog legs; $4.75 sandwiches, $1.25 side. 859-441-6251. Silver Grove.

BUSINESS SEMINARS

Professional Development Series, 9-11 a.m., The Eisen Agency, 515 Monmouth St., Suite 302. Media Training, Securing more Publicity and Raising Your Profile. Tips, strategies and new ideas to better market and grow a business or organization. $25. Registration required. Through April 13. 859291-4302; www.theeisenagency.com/PDS. Newport.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 1 0

HEALTH / WELLNESS Runner’s Injury Clinic, 5-6:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Edgewood Sports Medicine, 830 Thomas More Parkway, Receive assistance from local medical providers, including physical therapists, athletic trainers, physicians and registered dietitian. Free. Registration required. Presented by Bob Roncker’s Running Spot. 859-301-6300; www.stelizabeth.com/sportsmedicine. Edgewood. LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Pajama Story Time, 6:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 3 and up. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 10-10:45 a.m., Florence Alliance Church, 980 Cayton Road, Stories, songs, finger plays, crafts and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Theme: Children’s Stories from A-Z. Family friendly. Free. 859746-0706. Florence.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Carnegie in Concert Series, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Mardi Gras with Ricky Nye Inc. Traditional boogie woogie, blues and ballads. Cajun food in galleries before show and during intermission available. $48 three concerts, $19. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

MUSIC - WORLD

Wesley Allen Hartley and the Traveling Trees, 9:30 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Parlour. Doors open 8:30 p.m. $5$8. 859-431-2201; www.ticketfly.com. Newport.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS & TRYOUTS

FILE PHOTO

The Fifth Third Bank Cincinnati Home and Garden Show, presented by CincinnatiNorthern Kentucky Honda Dealers, brings the best of the best in regional landscaping and home design together at the Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., downtown. The show continues through March 6. Times are noon to 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, and 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $12, free for children 13 and under. Monica Pedersen, co-host of “HGTV Dream Home Giveaway 2011” will be a special guest Sunday from noon until 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.hartproductions.com or www.duke-energycenter.com.

Spring Registrations, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $95. Registration required. 859-372-7754. Union. High School AAU Basketball Leagues, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $175. 859-372-7754. Union. Men’s Basketball League, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $300. 859-3727754. Union. Women’s Basketball Leagues, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $475 per team. 859-372-7754. Union. Basketball Summer Camp Sign-ups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $175. Registration required. 859-372-7754. Union. Summer Slam Sports Day Camp Signups, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sports of All Sorts Mt. Zion, $125. Registration required. 859-3727754. Union.

PROVIDED

The Pink Floyd Experience comes to the Aronoff Center at 8 p.m. Friday, March 4. The Pink Floyd Experience will present the album “Animals” in its entirety with a light and video show. Six musicians will perform an authentic Pink Floyd experience, including greatest hits, “Money,” and “Comfortably Numb.” Tickets are $42, $38 and $32. Call 513-621-2787 or visit www.CincinnatiArts.org.


Life

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

B3

Are being human and being holy a contradiction? Occasionally the American Catholic laywoman, Dorothy Day, is mentioned as a possible candidate for sainthood. I realize the uneasiness of many who are not Catholic about the whole issue of saints. However, I would like to use some factors of her life to speak about being holy. Dorothy Day was a Greenwich Village radical in the 1920s. In her early years she was a friend of leftists like John Reed and a drinking buddy to writers like John Dos Passos. By the age of 30, she had had an abortion, been divorced, and borne another lover’s child. Later, after converting to Catholicism, she changed drastically and dedicated her life to the poor – not as a nun but as a layperson. She built a string of hospitality houses for the homeless and hungry. She championed the rights if immigrants and farm laborers

through her newspaper “The Catholic Worker,” and founded the Catholic Worker Movement. Her commitment was so sinFather Lou cere that she Guntzelman practiced poverty her life. She Perspectives in was wary of adulation, advising friends not to “trivialize me by trying to make me a saint.” She died in 1980 at the age of 83. But what about her early life and sainthood being mentioned in the same breath? Judgmental people, and many pious Catholics, will sniff disapprovingly at her coming to be considered an exemplar of holiness. “She’s certainly not my idea of a saint,” many would say. To them

her past will overshadow her transformation and what she grew to become. We have a blurred image of what holiness means. Our idea usually includes degrees of antihumanness. We prefer saints be born as plastic people and remain so. When I was younger I remember hearing some saint’s childhood extolled with words similar to these: “She was so dedicated to God, that from the age of 10 she often chose to spend hours alone praying in church rather than join in the frivolous games of the other children.” If I heard of such a child doing that today I’d wonder about what unhealthiness, not holiness, lurked in that child’s life and why. Such a child would have as much transformation to accomplish as Dorothy Day. Holiness is wholeness, human wholeness.

And we never begin life with an accomplished wholeness spiritually or psychologically. We are embarrassed at being human. We regret not being God – as did the first humans depicted in Genesis. We abhor being imperfect, weak, humbled, having to struggle to become more than we are. It is especially difficult for a generation of achievers to accept the intrinsic weakness of human nature. Genuine human growth and holiness (wholeness) are spread over a lifetime. Some religiousappearing people may just to be good pretenders. George McCauley S.J. wrote beautifully of one of the most forgiving and empathetic moments for a human that occurred in the scriptures. It was the incident when the woman caught in adultery was brought to Jesus Christ for condemnation.

Mardi Gras

If a fire hits your home, check out restoration company If the unthinkable happens and your house catches on fire, the repairs can be extensive, lengthy and costly. That’s what a Delhi Township family faced last year after an electrical fire broke out in the children’s bedroom. They hired a restoration company to rebuild, but said their problems only got worse. Homeowner Gina Torbeck said the damage was so great everything had to be removed down to the studs. “We were told we’d be back in within three months. I wasn’t so sure three months was realistic, I was thinking five months – but 10 months is a little ridiculous,” she said. The home restoration company said the cost to rebuild would be about $130,000 – and it has now

received most of the money. But, after 10 months much remains to be done. In fact, Torbeck said her insurance company refused to pay anything more to the restoration company after the first of the year. “I don’t have bathrooms yet, there’s no showers, no tubs, the kitchen isn’t finished, the flooring is not finished. There’s no way we could be living here now,” she said. The company’s contract with Torbeck calls for it to get all necessary permits and inspections, so I asked her about that. “I called to get inspections for the electrical, plumbing and sewer,” Torbeck said. “I was told I could not schedule those because we do not have any active permits on the house. “There’s a pending permit posted on the front win-

dow. It’s a form from Hamilton County. But, when I called on it, they told me it was never finalized,” she said. I called the restoration company and the owner told me the county had approved all the work. But, when I called, building department officials told me although permits were applied for they were never approved. The department even sent a list of required changes to get the permit approved, but officials said they never heard back from the company. Now Torbeck is working with her insurance company to bring in new contractors to finish the house. She said she’s learned a valuable lesson: carefully check out a fire restoration company – and consult an attorney before signing any

BRIEFLY Spring Stagette

The Newport Elks Ladies Auxiliary will host a Ladies Spring Stagette Sunday, March 13. Doors open at 11:30 a.m., and brunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. Tickets for the stagette are $15. Bingo, combination raffle and more will be part of the event. For reservations call Liz at 442-0603.

at the Highlands Country Club, 931 Alexandria Pike. The cost is $20 a person

contract. T h e Howard Ain morning after a fire Hey Howard! all you want to do is get a contractor to board up the property and nothing more. In addition, for any major reconstruction always get your own expert to regularly inspect the work. You can hire an ASHI Certified Home Inspector or a licensed, professional engineer depending on the type of work to be performed. But, by all means, make sure permits are taken out, posted on the job site, and regular inspections are performed by the county. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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m - 10pm p 0 3 : 6 1 1 0 arch 8, 2 M , y a d s e u Center T n Fat io t n e v n KY Co Northern $55 Donation Proceeds benefit Featuring: • Kit Andrews as Queen • Jim Scott as King • Great Food and Beverages • Live New Orleans Jazz with Robin Lacy and DeZydeco • Live and Silent Auctions & More

area Homeless Children Shelters:

Bethany House Services Brighton Center’s Homeward Bound Mercy Franciscan at St. John Welcome House of Northern KY, Inc.

For Ticket and Sponsorship Information call:

Produced by: The Northern Kentucky Restaurant Association in cooperation with the Greater Cincinnati Restaurant Association

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Tickets available at: All Four Benefiting Shelters Embassy Suites RiverCenter Hilton Cincinnati Airport Hofbräuhaus Newport Marriott at RiverCenter

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Daugherty joins Grateful Life Board Holly Daugherty of Villa Hills has been appointed to serve on the Grateful Life Foundation Board. Daughtery is an attorney with Holly Daugherty Daugherty and Associates in Covington and has been practicing law for 22 years. She previously volunteered for the Women’s Crisis Center and Northern Kentucky Legal Aid ProBono Panel.

and includes a catered lunch. For more information, call 859-572-3166

McCauley writes: “When Jesus defends the woman taken in adultery, he is also defending himself. He has identified with her shame and pain because he has learned that to be human is to be caught in a complex web of circumstances that constantly trip and trap us.” “He does not defend evil. But he defends evildoers against all the righteous fakes and phonies who fail to sympathize with our laborious ascent from primeval slime to glory on high. He sets kind standards for the pace of our transformation, so that he may always hold out hope.” That seems true for people like Dorothy Day and for people like you and me. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

March 3, 2011

Have a full house with King cake, jambalaya on Mardi Gras Ever since we put salad greens, radishes and peas in the cold frame and plowed the garden, I’ve been anxious for warm weather so I can start some serious gardening. Turning the calendar from February to March means I’ve had it with winter, even though Mother Nature does not usually cooperate. The onset of Mardi Gras and Lent is a good barometer for letting us know that spring is not that far away.

PROVIDED

Kentucky Symphony receives grant

State Sen. Katie Stine, Sen. Jack Westwood and Rep. Arnold Simpson presented the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra with a ceremonial check for $21,011 for a Kentucky Arts Partnership competitive grant awarded by the Kentucky Arts Council in July 2010. Kentucky Arts Partnership grants provide operational support to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations to ensure year-round arts activities and opportunities are available to Kentuckians. Pictured, from left, are Andee Rudloff, board member, Kentucky Arts Council; Candace S. Klein, board member, Kentucky Symphony Orchestra; Sen. Jack Westwood; Sen. Katie Stine; Rep. Arnold Simpson; and Lindy Casebier, deputy secretary, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet.

Easy King cake for Mardi Gras

Local artists, craftsman needed for ‘Arts Fest’ Artists and craftsman interested in showcasing and selling their work at the Newport on the Levee and Art on the Levee’s first

“Arts Fest” need to register by Friday, April 15. The indoor art show celebrating local artists will be 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday,

FLORIDA

April 30, and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, May 1, in the Levee’s gallery building. To be considered for the show, artists are encouraged to submit images of five pieces to artonthelevee@ gmail.com by the April 15 registration deadline. Participant space is limited. For more information about the “Arts Fest”, visit www.artonthelevee.com.

Summer Leagues Now Forming!

FT. MYERS BEACH - 2BR, 2BA condo at Riviera Club, directly on beach, sunsets & birds! Large pool, balcony, south end of island. Special rates avail., 2 wk. min. 513-489-4730

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

MEN • WOMEN • MIXED • YOUTH

PANAMA CITY BEACH The Summerhouse - 2B/2B Family Accommodations . Beach side pools, tennis, WiFi & More. 800/354-1122 THE BEST BEACH VACATION VALUE! www.SummerhousePC.com

SANIBEL ISLAND ∂ Lakefront 3BR, 2BA home with screened lanai & 2 car garage; 1000 ft. from Gulf of Mexico! Monthly rentals, available now. Local owner, 513-232-4634

Call for details today!

Bring in this ad for BUY ONE GAME, GET ONE FREE! At either Super Bowl location. One coupon per person per visit. Not valid on Friday or Saturday Nights after 6pm. Offer expires 4/30/11.

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FLORIDA

Let the kids help with this. Traditional King cake is a yeasted cake, and I’m sharing a recipe for that in my online column at www.communitypress.com (search “Heikenfeld”). You’re supposed to share the cake with friends and family. The oval shape represents the unity of faiths. The colored sugars are typical Mardi Gras colors: purple for justice, green for faith and gold for power. The plastic baby represents baby Jesus. Whoever

J O I N U S F O R A G O O D T I M E TO DAY ! CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2 BR , 2 BA Gulf Front con do. Heated pool, balcony. Many upgrades. 513-771-1373, 448-7171 www.go-qca.com/condo

Call ahead for lane availability.

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

NEW YORK

DESTIN, FLORIDA 50 Steps to the beach! Beautiful lowrise condos w/pools. 850-830-8133, email destinbeaches4u@yahoo.com or visit www.asummerbreeze.com

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $94. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrook-vacations.info

TENNESSEE DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids’ pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E- 513-752-1735

DESTIN. New,nicely furnished 2BR, 2BA condo. Gorgeous Gulf view, pools and golf course. 513-561-4683. Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

R

omantic etreat!

SOUTH CAROLINA

Free brochure call 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

Heart of Kentucky

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

Conveniently located off I-471

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NORTH CAROLINA

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!!

Bellewood Lanes (859) 781-1211

Conveniently located off I-75

Book your package during the Heart of Kentucky Antique & Craft Fair, March 5 & 6. Enjoy bourbon attractions, Civil War sites, beautiful landscape and small town charm!

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen Cake:

1 loaf frozen bread dough, thawed completely 1 ⁄2 cup sugar Cinnamon, about 3 tablespoons 1 ⁄2 cup finely chopped pecans (opt.) Melted butter

Glaze:

2 cups powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 4-6 tablespoons water or milk Green, purple and yellow colored sugars Tiny plastic baby On a lightly floured surface, roll the bread dough into a 9-by-11 rectangle. (If it snaps back at you, let it rest a bit and then proceed). Brush with melted butter. Mix the sugar, cinnamon and nuts together and scatter the mixture all over. Starting at the long end, roll up tightly. Shape into an oval and lay on sprayed cookie sheet, seam side down. Brush with more melted butter. Bake until golden brown, approximately 30 minutes. Hide the baby in the cake after it has cooled a bit. You can do this by inserting it in the bottom. Make frosting and after cake has cooled, pour the glaze over. Immediately sprinkle with colored sugars, giving each color their own section on the cake. You may have glaze left. It keeps in the fridge for a couple of weeks. Just warm it up to use. Tips from Rita’s kitchen: Feel free to use a box cake and bake it in a Bundt pan. Add a couple shakes of cinnamon to the batter if you like.

Eggless cake tip from Annie Hoffman

Reader Annie Hoffman shares this good tip for box cakes sans eggs. “For a good cake just use regular cake mix, the oil required and use a can of diet soda to replace the eggs and water.

“Diet soda works better than the regular, you can use either one. Just use a flavor that compliments your cake for example, use diet sprite for white, yellow or lemon cake mix, diet cherry cola, diet cola or diet chocolate for chocolate ones. “Make sure to only use the amount of soda in a can not a bottle. If you buy the bottle just measure it out.”

Chicken and sausage jambalaya Go to taste on this.

1 pound Cajun style smoked sausage or regular smoked sausage, cut into 1⁄4inch slices 2-3 ribs celery, chopped 1 medium to large onion, chopped 1 teaspoon garlic or more to taste, minced 1 green bell pepper, chopped 3-4 cups cooked diced chicken 32 oz. chicken broth 11⁄4 cups Uncle Ben’s converted rice Cajun seasoning to taste: start with 2-3 teaspoons Salt to taste Tomato slices and thinly sliced green onions for garnish Film bottom of pan with olive oil. Sauté sausage, celery, onion, garlic and green pepper over medium heat until vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes. Add chicken, broth, rice and seasoning. Bring to a boil. Cover, lower to simmer and cook until rice is done and liquid is absorbed, about 25 to 40 minutes or so. Add salt. Cooking time will depend on the type of rice you use, if the chicken is straight from the fridge, etc. Remove from heat and let stand 10 minutes before serving. Serves eight. To serve: Place jambalaya on plate. Lay a tomato slice on top. Sprinkle with green onions.

Coming soon

Cooking for two: Ziti with spinach, cherry tomatoes, and gorgonzola sauce Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Taking ‘OFF’ the pounds

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finds the baby in their piece of cake is blessed with good luck. Preheat oven to 3 5 0 degrees.

This package for $169 includes: 1 night, double occupancy. Complimentary hot breakfast for 2. 2 “Lebanon-Heart of Kentucky” T-shirts. Box of Maker’s Mark chocolates (8 oz.). 2 keepsake toasting glasses. Dinner for 2 ($40 value). Add a night for $90.

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A session of the OFF Program, a weight loss plan for women sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Health Department, begins Thursday, March 10. OFF, which stands for Outsmarting Female Fat, is specially designed for women who want to lose weight by making longterm lifestyle changes. The OFF Plan is not a diet and it instead focuses on changing behaviors that hinder weight management. The program is led by registered dietitians from the Health Department and deals with all aspects of weight control, healthy eating and exercise. OFF will be 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays, from March 10 through May 12,

The program is led by registered dietitians and deals with all aspects of weight control, healthy eating and exercise. at the Boone County Health Center, 7505 Burlington Pike, in Florence. The program is limited to the first 35 participants to register. Cost of the program is $25 to help cover the cost of materials that participants will receive. The fee will be collected at the first session. To register online or for more information, go to www.nkyhealth.org, and click on Current Programs. To register by phone, call Debbie Burlew at 859-4313345, ext. 2628.


CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

B5

ORDINANCE NO. O-03-2011 AN ORDINANCE CONFIRMING THE CITY ENGINEER’S ESTIMATE OF THE COST OF THE IMPROVEMENT AND CERTIFICATE OF APPORTIONMENT FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ARNO AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ROSSFORD AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; CRESCENT COURT FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CRESCENT AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; DESHLER LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH HIGHLAND AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; HUNTEMANN LANE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH NEWMAN AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ROB ROY AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH N. FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH BURNET RIDGE; STERLING AVENUE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH N. FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; AND MIDWAY COURT FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH FORT THOMAS AVENUE TO ITS TERMINUS; ALL IN THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, AND ALL IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS THERETO AS SUBMITTED BY THE CITY ENGINEER AND AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL; APPROVING AND LEVYING A SPECIAL ASSESSMENT AGAINST THE ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS AND PROVIDING FOR ITS PAYMENT; DIRECTING THE CITY CLERK TO PUBLISH AN ABSTRACT OF THIS ORDINANCE, DIRECTING THE CITY TREASURER TO PREPARE AND DISTRIBUTE THE ASSESSMENT BILLS REQUIRING ALL ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS TO PAY THE IMPROVEMENT ASSESSMENT. WHEREAS, a public hearing was conducted on March 23, 2010 regarding streets resurfacing improvements to Arno Avenue, Crescent Court, Deshler Lane, Huntemann Lane, Rob Roy Avenue, Sterling Avenue and Midway Court; and WHEREAS, bids were solicited for street resurfacing improvements to the said streets; and WHEREAS, an Ordinance ordering the street resurfacing improvements to said streets was adopted by the Board of Council on May 17, 2010 which established the assessments to abutting property owners; and WHEREAS, the city, through is Public Works Committee of Council, staff and engineer, inspected said improvements and recommended acceptance of same. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Arno Avenue from its intersection with Rossford Avenue to its terminus; performed by spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, excavating and grading at end of street for 20’ extension, subgrade compaction, asphalt base course installation and 6” vertical concrete curb, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to concrete base pavement, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary; That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Crescent Court from its intersection with Crescent Avenue to its terminus; performed by mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, sawcutting and removing existing curb and constructing new 4” vertical concrete curb, depressed at driveways and filling behind new curb with topsoil, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line or concrete base, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Deshler Lane from its intersection with Highland Avenue to its terminus; performed by mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line and concrete base including removal of existing concrete curb, partial cul-de-sac island removal, subgrade compaction and asphalt base course installation, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, constructing new 4” vertical concrete curb, depressed at driveways and filling behind new curb with topsoil, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/4” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, driveway alignment, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Huntemann Lane from its intersection with Newman Avenue to its terminus; performed by spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling of variable depth of 3” at gutter line to 1-1/2” at centerline, removing asphalt patches to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (1-1/2” to 2-1/2”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Rob Roy Avenue from its intersection with N. Fort Thomas Avenue to its intersection with Burnet Ridge; performed by spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Sterling Avenue from its intersection with N. Fort Thomas Avenue to its terminus; performed by spot curb repair for areas that have deteriorated, mudjacking as required to fill any voids or cavities underneath the pavement, full depth pavement repair as necessary, bituminous asphalt pavement surface milling, removing asphalt overlay to original gutter line, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”) asphalt leveling to reconstruct the crown on the street as necessary, pavement fabric, asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, raising manholes, and adjusting downspouts that lead to the curb as necessary. That the Public Works Committee of the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and the City Engineer of said City recommend the acceptance of the improvement of Midway Court from its intersection with South Fort Thomas Avenue to its terminus; performed by removal of existing concrete curb, construction of new concrete vertical curb depressed at driveways, asphalt pavement milling, asphalt leveling course of variable thickness (3/4” to 1-1/4”), asphalt resurfacing: 1-1/2” asphalt to be applied on top of the leveling course, and driveway alignment as necessary. All of these improvements have been constructed in accordance with the plans and specifications thereof as submitted by the City Engineer, and the Board of Council, on the advice of the Public Works Committee and the City Engineer, who deem the work completed; and said work is hereby declared to be completed and the City Engineer’s estimate of the cost to said improvement and the Certificate of apportionment are hereby accepted, approved, and confirmed.

SECTION II That special assessment rates as set out below per linear foot and fronting on listed streets, be and the same is hereby apportioned, levied, and assessed against said real estate and the owners thereof (see attached Exhibit “A”) at the stated cost per foot, as set out as follows: STREET

FRONT FT COST CITY PORTION

FRONT FT COST PPTY OWNR PORTION

$ 7.44 $ 7.83 $ 9.77 $ 9.25 $ 9.53 $ 9.44 $ 5.42

$ 7.44 $ 7.83 $ 9.77 $ 9.25 $ 9.53 $ 9.44 $ 5.42

Arno Avenue Crescent Court Deshler Lane Huntemann Lane Rob Roy Avenue Sterling Avenue Midway Court

FINAL COST $ 6,911.04 $ 9,759.79 $ 41,272.13 $ 59,321.99 $ 22,605.17 $ 34,977.75 $ 5,023.86

SECTION III Payments for all improvements shall be due within forty-five (45) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment and any assessment levied that is not paid when due shall bear a penalty of five percent (5%). An additional ten percent (10%) penalty will be levied thirty-one (31) days after the due date, and any unpaid assessment shall accrue eight percent (8%) per annum interest, except for those property owners participating in the Installment Payment Plan, as outlined below, and shall continue to accrue and be liable as provided by law. The City’s portion of the entire improvement cost shall be paid within thirty (30) days from the acceptance of said work under the contract. INSTALLMENT PAYMENT PLAN A property owner may have the option to finance the payment of their assessment bill over a specified period of time subject to the total amount of their assessment. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $400, but less than $1,000 may finance their bill over a three (3) year period with equal principal payments. Property owners with assessment bills of more than $1,000 may finance their bill over a five (5) year period with equal principal payments. The total amount of the assessment to qualify for the improvement installment plan shall not be less than $400. An interest rate of eight per cent (8%) per annum shall be levied on the unpaid portion of the balance. The first annual installment shall become due and payable on July 1, following the year in which the project was completed. Any interested property owner qualifying for the improvement Installment Payment Plan shall initiate this process by completing an Installment Agreement Form with the City’s Director of Finance within thirty (30) days of the publication of the Ordinance of Apportionment. A non-refundable administrative fee of thirty-five dollars ($35) shall be required to process the Installment Agreement Application Form. Installment payments shall be made to the Finance Office on or before July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement. If any property owner fails to make their installment payment by July 31 of each year as outlined in the Agreement, the entire unpaid balance will become due immediately and payable in full with no recourse. The City shall exercise its rights to proceed to collect all amounts in default of improvement assessment bills by initiating appropriate legal action. SECTION IV The City Clerk is hereby directed to publish an abstract of this Ordinance in the manner provided by law for general ordinances of the City. SECTION V The City Treasurer shall, at the time that the afore-mentioned Ordinance is published, or one week thereafter, give notice by distribution of assessment bills requiring all property owners to pay the improvement tax levied in accordance with Section III of this Ordinance. SECTION VI This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval and publication as designated by law. APPROVED: _______________________ Mary H. Brown, Mayor

1st Reading: February 7, 2011 ADOPTED: February 22, 2011 ATTEST: __________________________ Melissa Kaye Kelly, City Clerk Published: Recorder Name KREMER MICHAEL

MailingAddress 6 ARNO AVE

City, State, Zip FT THOMAS, KY 41075

Street Address 6 ARNO AVENUE

PIDN

% of Project

Frontage

PerFoot

14-780.00

8.11%

75.34

7.44

560.53

Total

OWENS NIKELA S & ORDONEZ MIGUEL

11 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

11 ARNO AVENUE

17-414.00

9.99%

92.76

7.44

690.13

KOSTER JEREMY & SHANK STEFANIE

12 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

12 ARNO AVENUE

17-412.00

5.92%

55.00

7.44

409.20

BRYANT DOUGLAS F & KACIE F

16 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

16 ARNO AVENUE

14-262.00

5.92%

55.00

7.44

409.20

BIEDENHARN JAMES T & TONI L

22 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

22 ARNO AVENUE

12-493.00

4.87%

45.23

7.44

336.51

BIEDENHARN JAMES T & TONI L

22 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

22 ARNO AVENUE

12-494.00

2.21%

20.50

7.44

152.52

HALL BRETT & CONSTANCE

26 ARNO AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

26 ARNO AVENUE

13-993.00

2.21%

20.50

7.44

152.52

VENABLE MICHAEL

70 ROSSFORD AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

70 ROSSFORD AVENUE

13-563.00

10.77%

100.00

7.44

744.00

Total

50.00%

464.33

PIDN

% of Project

Frontage

PerFoot

Name

MailingAddress

City, State, Zip

Street Address

3454.62 Total

MOORE PATRICK G & MARY H

1 CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

1 CRESCENT CT.

13-744.00

4.01%

50.00

7.83

391.50

ARNZEN ROBERT L & JOANNE G

8 GRAND LAKE DR.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

2-4 CRESCENT CT.

12-265.00

4.59%

57.22

7.83

448.03

AN TONY H

3 CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

3 CRESCENT CT.

13-194.00

3.21%

40.00

7.83

313.20

EMERY DAVID E

5 CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

5 CRESCENT CT.

13-375.00

3.21%

40.00

7.83

313.20

WOOD THOMAS J

6 CRESCENT COURT

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

6 CRESCENT CT.

17-440.00

3.21%

40.00

7.83

313.20

KREMER LAURA M PARKS

7 CRESCENT CT.

7 CRESCENT CT.

17-423.00

3.09%

38.50

7.83

301.46

JUETT PHYLLIS & JEFFREY

3967 CLIFTON AVE.

8 CRESCENT CT.

17-124.00

3.21%

40.00

7.83

313.20

HAAS STEVEN T

9 CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075 CINCINNATI, OH 45220 FT THOMAS, KY 41075

9 CRESCENT CT.

15-688.00

1.56%

19.50

7.83

152.69

HEDGER MILDRED B

10 CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

10 CRESCENT CT.

14-138.00

4.65%

58.00

7.83

454.14

REED MARK & CHARLOTTE

37 N CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

CRESCENT CT.

14-919.00

8.02%

100.00

7.83

783.00

SCHIFF PETER & PHYLLIS

41 N CRESCENT CT.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

CRESCENT CT.

16-262.00

8.02%

100.00

7.83

783.00

PAR 6 LLC C/O DOUG RUBERG

735 S GRAND AVE.

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

CRESCENT CT.

15-954.00

3.21%

40.00

7.83

313.20

Total

50.00%

623.22

4879.81

CE-1001623852-01


B6

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

ETTER REBECCA

14 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

14 DESHLER LN.

16-565.00

% of Project 1.78%

TATE ERIC & JANA BETH FETTIG

22 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

22 DESHLER LN.

13-174.00

2.25%

Name

City, State, Zip

MailingAddress

Street Address

PIDN

Frontage

PerFoot

75.04

9.77

733.14

95.13

9.77

929.42

Total

WEITKAMP ROBERT & VIRGINIA S

25 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

25 DESHLER LN.

17-227.00

1.78%

75.05

9.77

733.24

ADLER TIMOTHY & KATHRYN

26 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

26 DESHLER LN.

13-418.00

2.04%

86.02

9.77

840.42

PARTNER HOMES LLC

425 MORRIS RD

FT. WRIGHT, KY 41011

29 DESHLER LN.

16-234.00

1.78%

75.11

9.77

733.82

ROOT JACK H & CAROL A

34 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

34 DESHLER LN.

16-106.00

2.28%

96.16

9.77

939.48

ROSE MARY A & ROSE DONNA

127 MIAMI PKWY

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

35 DESHLER LN.

16-112.00

1.79%

75.67

9.77

739.30

ORRENDER WILLIAM J & KAREN R

39 DESHLER AVE

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

39 DESHLER LN.

14-917.00

1.80%

76.14

9.77

743.89

WRIGHT JOHN & HELEN D

40 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

40 DESHLER LN.

13-492.00

2.01%

85.07

9.77

831.13

POLLARD STEPHEN C AND FRANCES

43 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

43 DESHLER LN.

15-789.00

1.19%

50.41

9.77

492.51

ALLEN JEFFREY & LAURA TRUSTEE

45 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

45 DESHLER LN.

14-160.00

1.78%

75.06

9.77

733.34

KOENIG HARRY R & BETTY J

49 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

49 DESHLER LN.

14-730.00

1.77%

75.00

9.77

732.75

HAUCK OWEN K

50 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

50 DESHLER LN.

14-102.00

2.37%

100.00

9.77

977.00

BURWICK RAY

53 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

53 DESHLER LN.

15-280.00

1.78%

75.03

9.77

733.04

KREBS S DANIEL & MAUREEN A

56 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

56 DESHLER LN.

14-713.00

1.78%

75.27

9.77

735.39

ANDERSON HERBERT G

62 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

62 DESHLER LN.

12-235.00

2.93%

123.99

9.77

1211.38

ODOM HIROKO & WRIGHT HELEN D

40 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

63 DESHLER LN.

17-112.00

3.05%

128.81

9.77

1258.47

ORMSBEE MARILYN A

956 HATCH ST

CINCINNATI, OH 45202

70 DESHLER LN.

15-344.00

2.47%

104.45

9.77

1020.48

HAHN KEITH E & LAURI R

71 DESHLER AVE

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

71 DESHLER LN.

12-380.00

2.79%

118.07

9.77

1153.54

HURTT JACK & SANDRA

77 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

77 DESHLER LN.

16-154.00

1.29%

54.63

9.77

533.74

MATTINGLY TIMOTHY & PENELOPE

78 DESHLER LN

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

78 DESHLER LN.

12-509.00

1.25%

52.73

9.77

515.17

THOMPSON EDMOND C & CHERYL L

86 DESHLER AVE

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

86 DESHLER LN.

15-145.00

1.29%

54.72

9.77

534.61

BROERING INVESTMENT LLC

207 S FT THOMAS AVE

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

821 HIGHLAND AVE.

12-653.00

3.39%

143.45

9.77

1401.51

LAUDER GLORIA & ARTHUR LORRAINE

811 HIGHLAND AVE

FORT THOMAS, KY 41075

811 HIGHLAND AVE

15-874.00

3.36%

142.00

9.77

Total

50.00%

2113.01

Name EAGLE VIEW CONDO HOA C/O TOWNE PROPERTIES TOWN HOMES AT HUNTEMAN PLACE CONDO ASSOC. CONNETT LAWRENCE J & KATHERINE

MailingAddress 500 THOMAS MORE PKWY. 12 GUNPOWDER RIDGE

City, State, Zip CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017 FT THOMAS, KY 41075

11 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

WARF HARLESS E & CAROL A

12 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

FLEDDERMAN EARL & BERTHA

13 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

CULBERTSON WM C JR & ELIZABETH

14 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

MILLER STEPHEN C & CHARLOTTE A

15 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

KUHL DENNIS E & SANDRA

16 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

PLYE RICHARD W & AUDREY A

17 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

KNOX MARJORIE

18 HUNTEMANN LN

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

VOGEL BARBARA E CLIFFGATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOC. C/O TOWNE PROPERTIES LW LIMITED C/O NORTH AMERICAN PROPERTIES

FT THOMAS, KY 41075 CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017 CINCINNATI, OH 45202

PATRICIA STRATMAN NOB HILL HOMEOWNERS ASSOC. C/O TOWNE PROPERTIES THOMAS POINTE HOA C/O ROBERT LUDKE PRES.

20 HUNTEMAN LN 500 THOMAS MORE PKWY. 212 E THIRD ST. STE #300 485 NEWMAN AVE. 500 THOMAS MORE PKWY. 1 THOMAS POINTE DR.

CITY OF FT THOMAS

130 N FT THOMAS AVE

FT THOMAS, KY 41075

Name FIVE ROB ROY LLC

MailingAddress

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075 CRESTVIEW HILLS, KY 41017 FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

City, State, Zip

Street Address

PIDN

0 HUNTEMANN LN. 100 HUNTEMANN LN. 11 HUNTEMANN LN. 12 HUNTEMANN LN. 13 HUNTEMANN LN. 14 HUNTEMANN LN. 15 HUNTEMANN LN. 16 HUNTEMANN LN. 17 HUNTEMANN LN. 18 HUNTEMANN LN. 20 HUNTEMANN LN. HUNTEMANN LN.

37-280.00

% of Project 12.04%

14-914.01

6.80%

1387.34 20644.11

Frontage

PerFoot

808.35

9.25

7477.24

456.70

9.25

4224.48

Total

11-755.00

1.04%

70.00

9.25

647.50

12-050.00

1.49%

100.00

9.25

925.00

11-789.00

0.89%

60.00

9.25

555.00

11-757.00

1.04%

70.00

9.25

647.50

11-914.00

2.37%

159.20

9.25

1472.60

12-074.00

1.04%

70.00

9.25

647.50

11-938.00

1.09%

73.36

9.25

678.58

11-827.00

0.89%

60.00

9.25

555.00

12-043.00

0.74%

50.00

9.25

462.50

00-000.04

7.33%

491.99

9.25

4550.91

HUNTEMANN LN.

14-832.00

3.15%

211.44

9.25

1955.82

HUNTEMANN LN.

16-769.00

7.08%

474.92

9.25

4393.01

HUNTEMANN LN.

00-000.00

0.74%

50.00

9.25

462.50

HUNTEMANN LN. KATHLOU CT. R-O-W

00-000.00

1.49%

99.78

9.25

922.97

9.25

Street Address

00.000.00

0.74%

50.00

Total

50.00%

3355.74

PIDN

% of Project 10.42%

462.50 29655.13

Frontage

PerFoot

247.12

9.53

Total

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

5 ROB ROY AVE.

15-525.00

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

14 ROB ROY AVE.

15-753.00

2.11%

50.00

9.53

476.50

DMR PROPERTIES LLC

66 RIO VISTA DR 243 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY 90 ORCHARD HILL

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

23 ROB ROY AVE.

15-362.00

3.95%

93.60

9.53

892.01 1791.64

TAUL L NELSON & MARGARET B

2355.05

ROSE JOHN G & JUDITH M

26 ROB ROY AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

26 ROB ROY AVE.

13-291.00

7.92%

188.00

9.53

BENES OLIVER J

29 ROB ROY AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

29 ROB ROY AVE.

14-344.00

1.69%

40.00

9.53

381.20

WALTER MOLLY& KUES ROBERT JR

33 ROB ROY AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

33 ROB ROY AVE.

15-962.00

2.11%

50.00

9.53

476.50

TINKER JAMES A & MELISSA M

37 ROB ROY AVE.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

37 ROB ROY AVE.

15-165.00

2.11%

50.00

9.53

476.50

GIBERSON LORI S

41 ROB ROY AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

41 ROB ROY AVE.

14-079.00

4.31%

102.20

9.53

973.97

OSBURG DAVID & HOLLY

42 ROB ROY

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

42 ROB ROY AVE.

12-242.00

7.47%

177.23

9.53

1689.00

HILL CHAS & PAMELA

2 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

ROB ROY AVE.

14-245.00

5.82%

138.00

9.53

1315.14

CITY OF FT THOMAS

130 N FT THOMAS AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

DUMFRIES R-O-W

00-000.00

2.11%

50.00

9.53

Total

50.00%

1186.15

476.50 11304.01

RICHARDSON, BONNIE

24 MIDWAY CT.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

24 MIDWAY CT.

12-872.00

% of Project 3.18%

29.45

5.42

159.62

CLAY, GREENE B. & BARBARA

12 MIDWAY CT.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

12 MIDWAY CT.

12-906.00

4.32%

40.00

5.42

216.80

LUTKENHOFF, ERIC & JULIA

200 KENTUCKY DR

NEWPORT, KY 41071

16 MIDWAY CT.

13-443.00

4.32%

40.00

5.42

216.80

Name

MailingAddress

City, State, Zip

Street Address

PIDN

Frontage

PerFoot

Total

KRAMER, RUSTY J. & AMANDA

20 MIDWAY CT.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

20 MIDWAY CT.

16-089.00

3.88%

36.00

5.42

195.12

PCK INVESTMENTS LLC

1098 BLOSSOM DR.

COLD SPRING, KY 41076

15 MIDWAY CT.

16-430.00

12.50%

115.80

5.42

627.64

WINBURN, MELBA

28 MIDWAY CT.

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

17-367.00

2.83%

26.19

5.42

141.95

MASTERS, JIM & LISA

400 VATER RD. 1035-1037 S. FT THOMAS AVE.

BUTLER, KY 41006

28 MIDWAY CT. 1031 S. FT. THOMAS AVE. 1035 S. FT.THOMAS AVE.

Street Address

PIDN

WARD, MYRNA

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

14-693.00

9.05%

83.90

5.42

454.74

15-724.00

9.93%

92.00

5.42

498.64

Total

50.00%

463.34

HILL CHAS F & PAMELA J

2 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

2 Sterling Ave.

14-245.00

% of Project 1.35%

HEIERT PATRICK J

6 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

6 Sterling Ave.

14-153.00

BANKEMPER MARIAN M

34 SUNSET

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

9-11 Sterling Ave.

15-158.00

Name

MailingAddress

City, State, Zip

2511.30

Frontage

PerFoot

50.00

9.44

Total 472.00

0.67%

25.00

9.44

236.00

1.46%

54.00

9.44

509.76 708.00

STANGER WILLIAM A

10 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

10 Sterling Ave.

16-666.00

2.02%

75.00

9.44

SCHULKERS EUGENE W & MARY T

14 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

14 Sterling Ave.

16-363.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

THOMAS DALE A

1575 ST ANTHONY DR

FT. WRIGHT, KY 41017

15 Sterling Ave.

16-883.00

1.46%

54.00

9.44

509.76

VOGEL CHRISTOPHER & KIM

17 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

17 Sterling Ave.

17-060.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

HARGER BRYON & ANGELA

18 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

18 Sterling Ave.

12-376.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

FROST WM R & SHARON A

21 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

21 Sterling Ave.

13-630.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

HULL MARJORIE & PARADIS PHILLIP

22 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

22 Sterling Ave.

13-229.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

DOMIZLAFF PAMELA

25 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

25 Sterling Ave.

14-743.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

HEILMAN JAMES R

26 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

26 Sterling Ave.

14-518.00

2.42%

89.77

9.44

847.43

THURMAN PAMELA L

29 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

29 Sterling Ave.

16-921.00

1.08%

40.00

9.44

377.60

NEWTON PAUL & CHRISTINA

33 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

33 Sterling Ave.

14-921.00

1.05%

39.07

9.44

368.82

BEYERSDOERFER WM & DOROTHY

38 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

34 Sterling Ave.

17-080.00

1.63%

60.35

9.44

569.70

RARDIN JERRY

143 WARD AVE

BELLEVUE, KY 41073

35 Sterling Ave.

14-989.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

BARRINGER LALLAH LEE

37 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

37 Sterling Ave.

12-337.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

BEYERSDOERFER WM & DOROTHY

38 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

38 Sterling Ave.

12-478.00

1.63%

60.35

9.44

569.70

HEDGER MILDRED

41 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

41 Sterling Ave.

14-137.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

CE-1001624102-01

City of Fort Thomas continued on Next page


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| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

COLD SPRING

Timothy J. Wilch, 59, 5360 Eaglewatch Court, DUI - aggravated circumstances - first offense, speeding, reckless driving, failure of owner to maintain required insurance - first offense at Alexandria Pike and Washington Street, Jan. 30. Gregory C. Mitchell, 30, 11012 Luneberg Court, speeding, operating on suspended or revoked operators license at AA Highway and Grandview Road, Feb. 3.

Tina M. Riley, 20, 15757 Madison Pike, possession of drug paraphernalia, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 1. Joseph E. Bailey, 26, 8887 Tecumseh No. 1, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 1. Naomi E. Haywood, 31, 8887 Tecumseh No. 1, theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 1.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

Report of purse and gallon of milk taken from in front of front door while owner retrieved items from vehicle in parking lot at 900 Brentwood Lane, A, Jan. 27. Report of laptop left beside car taken at 8109 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 7. Report of dirt bike and weed-eater taken from shed at 134 Stonegate Drive, Feb. 11.

Theft by unlawful taking - gasoline Report of gas drive off without paying at 9242 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 2.

Arrests/citations

Incidents/investigations Second degree burglary

Report of tools taken from van in parking lot at 415 Crossroads Blvd., Feb. 15.

Third degree criminal mischief

Theft by unlawful taking

Theft by unlawful taking or shoplifting

Report of car stereo taken from store at 5400 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 30. Report of jewelry and pants taken without paying at 395 Crossroads Blvd., Feb. 17.

Third degree criminal mischief

Third degree criminal trespassing

FORT THOMAS

BELLEVUE

Arrests/citations

Shay Fornash, 22, 424 Lafayette, possession of marijuana at 270 O’Fallon, Feb. 10. Jennifer Michaud, 39, 446 Fort Henry Drive, warrant at Fairfield at Foote, Feb. 13. Erin Marie Kremer, 28, 6 Arno Drive, alcohol intoxication in a public place at Donnermeyer Drive, Feb. 16.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking

Report of door found broken and jewelry box and jewelry taken at 6742 East Alexandria Pike, Feb. 8.

Report of trunk lid damaged at 14 Martha Layne Collins Blvd., Feb. 7.

Report of person who was warned not to enter store because of previous theft inside store at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 28.

Michael Cuneo, 45, 13 Southview, warrant at 13 Southview, Feb. 15. Phillip Watkins, 25, 1037 Considine, warrant at Memorial Parkway, Feb. 18. Jose Lopez Sanchez, 25, 2608 Bushnell St., DUI, reckless driving at I-471 north at U.S. 27, Feb. 18. Mahra Guzman, 31, 1167 Waterworks Road Apt. 6, no license at Waterworks Road at Wilson, Feb. 21. Katherine Wagner, 20, 35 Mayfield No. 2, second degree disorderly conduct at Mayfield Ave., Feb. 22.

At 85 North Grand Ave., Feb. 14. At 11 South Grand Ave., Feb. 8. At Park Lane, Feb. 8. At 26 Washington Ave., Feb. 21.

Theft by unlawful taking, theft of legend drug

Report of pain medication taken at 201 Washington St., Feb. 10.

BIRTHS

|

POLICE

REAL

George A. Baldorff Sr., 86, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 24, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a sergeant in the U.S. Army during World War II and served as a member of Merrill’s Marauders. He was a lithographer with Vivi Color in Eastgate, Ohio. His son, George Allen Baldorff Jr., died previously. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Anderson Baldorff; daughter, Judy Stanton of Cincinnati; sister, Mildred Landell of Covington; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memorials: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, 4420 Carver Woods Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Mary Berendsen

Mary “Pettie” Reeves Berendsen, 87, of Dayton, died Feb. 18, 2011, at Floyd Memorial Hospital, New Albany, Ind. She worked for Keebler Company for 37 years and was a member of St. Bernard’s Church, Dayton, the F.O.E., Bellevue, Women’s Democratic Club and F.O.P. Lodge No. 10, Silver Grove. Her husband, Arthur Henry Berendsen, died previously. Survivors include her sister, Willia Stockton of Mariemont, Ohio, and brother, Aubrey Sumner of Brooks, Ky. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: F.O.P. Lodge No. 10,

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

Arrests/citations

Ronald Hamblin, 31, 6524 Mary Ingles Highway, warrant at 525 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 15. Melissa Wells, 43, 4817 Dodsworth Lane, DUI at 525 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 10. Anthony Fisher, 39, 3834 Old Ohio 32, alcohol intoxication in a public place at I-471 north, Feb. 13. Jeffrey Guidugli, 42, 231 Lafayette Ave., DUI at 7 Crescent Court, Feb. 11. Tiffany Taylor, 23, 3379 Appomattox Drive, DUI at I-471, Feb. 12. Charles Rardin, 19, 4 Clark St., warrant at Rossford and West Kimberly, Feb. 13. Carl Simpson, 51, 981 Old U.S. Highway 52, warrant at I-471, Feb. 12. Brooke Powell, 22, 207 Main St., DUI at U.S. 27, Feb. 12.

Theft of a controlled substance At 101 Inverness Place, Feb. 19.

At 42 north Fort Thomas Ave., Feb. 19.

Theresa Johnson, 39, 994 Cleveland Apt. 5, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 222 York St., Feb. 19. Urias Perez, 27, 721 Isabella, criminal possession of a forged instrument at 57 Carothers Road, Feb. 19. Lesley Atkins, 55, 222 York St. No. 116, second degree possession of a controlled substance at Third and Saratoga, Feb. 19. Manuelita Gonzalez, 22, 1021 Maple Ave., theft by unlawful taking at 1301 Monmouth St., Feb. 17. Gary Wayne Warren II, 37, 1150 Tamarack Circle, fourth degree assault, first degree fleeing, resisting arrest, second degree disorderly conduct at 222 York St., Feb. 17.

Incidents/investigations First degree criminal possession of a forged instrument At 1 Levee Way, Feb. 21.

Fourth degree assault

NEWPORT

Arrests/citations

Bridgette Plausic, 34, 2235 Joyce Ave., public intoxication, possession of marijuana, endangering the welfare of a minor at 82 Carothers Road, Feb. 22. Jeffrey Turner, 25, 10567 Lynn Lane No. 12, second degree possession of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence, warrant at London Acres, Feb. 20. Sarah Sprecker, 27, 231 Alexandria, first degree possession of a controlled substance, theft of identity at 10th and Monmouth, Feb. 21. Kevin Oldham, 50, 514 Camden Court, first degree possession of a controlled substance, first degree possession of drug paraphernalia at 222 York St., Feb. 19. Lawrence Tobergate, 44, 3725 Huntington Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, theft by unlawful taking at 222 York St., Feb. 19. Brittany Wilson, 21, 4990 Colerain Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 222 York St., Feb. 19.

At 300 block of West Eighth St., Feb. 17. At 936 York St., Feb. 13. At Cowens and Linden, Feb. 19.

ws@

unit

Silver Grove.

Anna Boschert

Anna Boschert, 79, of Bellevue, died Feb. 20, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a retired tax examiner with the Internal Revenue Service and was a member of the St. Stephen Mother’s Club. She was a U.S. Navy Korean War veteran. Her husband, Ralph Boschert, died in 1996. Survivors include daughters, Jennifer Barnette of Union and Julie Boschert of Newport; sons, Dave Boschert of Camp Springs, Matt Boschert of Lusby, Md., Chris Boschert of Newport and Nick Boschert of Cincinnati; 10 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Sr. Mary Busse

Sister Mary Constance Busse, CDP, 85, of Newport, died Feb. 20, 2011, at Holy Family Home, Melbourne. She was born Phyllis Mae Busse and was a professed member of the Congregation of Divine Providence for 66 years. During the first 29 years she served in diocesan seminaries in

Maryland and Washington, D.C. Afterwards, she was a teacher’s aide in primary classrooms at St. Thomas School, Fort Thomas. Her sisters Angela Hawk and Ursula Griefenkamp and her brothers George Busse and Joseph Busse died previously. Survivors include her twin sister, Janet Busse, and sisters Marie Cox and Frances Busse and brother, Clement Busse of Florida. Burial was in St. Anne Convent Cemetery. Memorials: Congregation of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

David M. Clephane

David M. Clephane, 77, of Wilder, died Feb. 25, 2011, at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati. He was a retired teacher with Kenton County Schools and a past delegate with the Kentucky Education Association. He was an active member of OHKYIN Radio Club and an usher with the Bengals, Reds and at Riverfront Coliseum. He served in the National Guard. Survivors include his wife, Ruth McCoy Clephane; daughter, Amy Wilson of Fort Thomas; son, David Clephane of Taylor Mill; and four grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: American Diabetes

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

INVITATION TO BID March 3, 2011 PROJECT: Project Material Bid - Copper SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Second degree burglary

At 221 East 11th St., Feb. 19.

Second degree criminal mischief

At 218 East Eighth St., Feb. 16. At 25 Sweetbriar Court no. 4, Feb. 17.

Theft by deception

At 527 West 10th St., Feb. 18.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 726 Monmouth St., Feb. 18. At 175 Main St., Feb. 16.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto At 816 Saratoga St., Feb. 21.

Theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal mischief At 206 Main St., Feb. 20.

Theft of identity

At 34 East Ridge Place, Feb. 17.

Theft of property lost or mislaid At 1 Levee Way, Feb. 19.

Third degree criminal mischief

At Daniel Cater Beard Bridge, Feb. 16. At 307 Chestnut Way, Feb. 17.

Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle

At 900 London Acres, Feb. 17.

DEATHS George Baldorff Sr.

ESTATE

B7

POLICE REPORTS

ALEXANDRIA

Arrests/citations

CCF Recorder

March 3, 2011

Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or Friends of the Shelter/SPCA of Kentucky, Inc., P.O. Box 93, Union, KY 41091.

George DeMarrero Jr.

George H. DeMarrero Jr., 74, of Camp Springs, died Feb. 18, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired river captain and worked as commodore, master and pilot for the Delta Queen Steamboat Company. He was the fifth generation of master-pilots on steamboats and served as master or pilot on 80 different vessels. He retired as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Coast Guard. Survivors include his wife, Connie DeMarrero; son, Keith DeMarrero of Vero Beach, Fla.; daughter, Kim DeMarrero of Byhalia, Miss.; sister, Senator Beverly Marrero of Memphis, Tenn.; and one grandchild. Memorials: The Grateful Life Center, 305 Pleasure Isle Drive, Erlanger, KY 41017.

Deaths continued B8 Laptops from $

1599

per week

78 weeks

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

Date: Time:

March 15, 2011 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: to supply the Northern Kentucky Water District with 35,000 feet of ¾inch type K soft copper (100’ coils) and 5,000 feet of 1-inch type K soft copper (100’ coils), as described in the Specifications and other Documents prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. Freight shall be included in the bid price. All deliveries are to be made to the Northern Kentucky Water District at 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated above by contacting Ed Prather at (859) 426-2701. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bids may be submitted for any one item, multiple items, or all of the items listed in the Bid Form. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Also if, in Owner’s opinion, a particular product and/or supplier offer distinct advantages over other Bidders, the Owner may award to a Bidder that is not the lowest. Distinct advantages may include shipping time, standardization or ultimate economy. Owner reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner further reserves the right to reject all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modification of any bid, or to accept a bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 72 hours after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering/ Water Quality & Plant Production Northern Kentucky Water District 4603

City of Fort Thomas continued from previous page MARTIN CHRISTOPHER D

42 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

42 Sterling Ave.

15-518.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

ARMSTRONG JASON W & JENNIFER L

45 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

45 Sterling Ave.

13-602.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

NEWBANKS JEFFREY S

46 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

46 Sterling Ave.

15-667.00

0.90%

33.40

9.44

315.30

BRODERICK JACOB & SHERRI

47 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

47 Sterling Ave.

17-102.00

1.08%

40.00

9.44

377.60

GRIFFIN DORA ANN

48 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

48 Sterling Ave.

12-522.00

0.90%

33.40

9.44

315.30

PHILIPPE TERRELL & LANEE E

49 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

49 Sterling Ave.

16-907.00

1.62%

60.00

9.44

566.40

BAUER CARLA L

50 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

50 Sterling Ave.

14-849.00

0.90%

33.40

9.44

315.30

GLENN JENNIFER S

54 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

54 Sterling Ave.

17-181.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

VAUGHAN C DUFFEY JR & KIMBERLY

57 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

57 Sterling Ave.

13-521.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

PATTEN JOHN GERARD & DORCAS

58 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

58 Sterling Ave.

15-681.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

ROSENHAGEN DAVID A

61 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

61 Sterling Ave.

16-121.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

MARTIN BARBARA R

62 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

62 Sterling Ave.

15-121.00

1.35%

50.00

9.44

472.00

LANGHEIM MEGAN

66 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

66 Sterling Ave.

15-122.00

1.38%

50.99

9.44

481.35

RICE GABE M & MARGARET K

69 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

69 Sterling Ave.

15-985.00

2.16%

79.91

9.44

754.35

STOKES KEVIN S & DIANE W

70 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

70 Sterling Ave.

12-956.00

0.79%

29.42

9.44

277.72

DANKEL RAYMOND A

73 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

73 Sterling Ave.

14-002.00

0.70%

26.06

9.44

246.01

DANKEL RAYMOND A

73 STERLING AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

73 Sterling Ave.

14-000.00

0.72%

26.56

9.44

250.73

CITY OF FT THOMAS

130 N FT THOMAS AVE

FT. THOMAS, KY 41075

INVERNESS PARK

13-225.00

2.48%

92.00

9.44

868.48

Total

50.00%

1852.68

CE-1001624103-01

17489.30


CCF Recorder

From B7

Patricia Dixon

Patricia Dixon, 74, of Highland Heights, died Feb. 24, 2011. She retired from LaNormandie restaurant after 32 years of service. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Bernard ‘Dutch’ Dutle

Bernard “Dutch” Dutle, 86, of Newport, died Feb. 24, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired electrical/mechanical technician with the post office and a retired deputy sheriff and court bailiff with the Campbell County Sheriff’s

HDTV’s from

$

1599

per week

104 weeks

Leas e Z one Latonia 859-431-8666 Turfway 859-647-2160

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III (NMHCIII) will be accepting sealed bids for lead hazard reduction services on 926 Hamlet St., located in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, March 17, 2011, at the offices of the NMHCIII, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked “926 Hamlet lead hazard Project #11-01”. The information for Bidders, Form of Bid, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifications and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract documents may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speech-impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-2533, ext. 290. The NMHCIII will have a pre-bid walkthrough of the building at 10:00 a.m., local time, March 3, 2011. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. The NMHCIII reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHCIII to do so. It is the intent of NMHCIII to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHCIII is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001622702

Deaths

March 3, 2011 Department for 28 years. He served in the U.S. Army and was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, Knights of Columbus, Democratic Men’s Club and a Kentucky Colonel. His wife, Irene; a son, Chuck Dutle; brother, Howard Dutle; and a sister, Jeanette Herbol, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Jim Dutle and John Dutle; sisters, Gert Dutle, Dot Oldiges and Mary Ann Fisk; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Anthony W. Foellger

Anthony W. Foellger, 74, of Southgate, died Feb. 26, 2011. A sister, Jean White, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Jennifer Foellger; son, Michael Foellger; brother, David Michael “Mickey” Foellger; sister, Sharon Broxterman; and four grandchildren. Memorial Service will be 11 a.m.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Campbell County & Municipal Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, KY on Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 7:00 PM, for the purpose of reviewing and hearing testimony on the following: CASE NUMBER: BA-02-11 APPLICANT: William & Juanita Ridings LOCATION: The property is located at 12937 Pleasant Ridge Road a mile south of Kenton Station Road, Unincorporated Campbell County. REQUEST: The applicant is asking for a 15’foot variance to the front yard setback to build a pole barn reducing the minimum 50’ foot front yard setback to 35’ feet. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours _______________________ Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning Date: February 24, 2011 Published: March 3, 2011 Campbell County Recorder

Thursday, March 3, at Highland Country Club, Fort Thomas. Reception will follow. Memorials: Carmel Manor Nursing Home, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Juanita Gaupel

Juanita Gaupel, 74, of Alexandria, died Feb. 18, 2011, at her residence. Survivors include her daughters, Rhonda Wells, Charlotte Harris, Lori Fookes and Flo-Ann Wilson; son, John Gaupel; 10 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Alexandria Cemetery.

Sr. Maria Guidugli

Sister Maria Maddalena Guidugli, CDP, 82, of Newport, died Feb. 20, 2011, at Holy Family Home, Melbourne. She was born Ruth Louise Guidugli and was a professed member of the Congregation of Divine Providence for 55 years. She served as a teacher at St. Thomas School, Fort Thomas, was a parish minister, and taught high school at St. Agatha Academy, Winchester, and Our Lady of Providence Academy. She created the “Young for Old” program, uniting elementary students with senior members of St. Bernard Parish, Dayton, and was the director of a food pantry. Her sisters Mary Martin, Helen Guidugli and Frances Guidugli and brothers Gino, John, Angelo and David Guidugli died previously. Survivors include her sister, Anna Marie Flag of Finneytown, Ohio, and brother, Joseph Guidugli of Bellevue. Burial was in St. Anne Convent Cemetery. Memorials: Congregation of Divine Providence.

Ralph L. Hamberg

Ralph L. Hamberg, 80, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 22, 2011, at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati. He was a store manager for Thriftway Food & Drug Store in Western Hills and worked at Kroger stores throughout the Cincinnati area. He was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran and a member of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Fort Thomas and the Michigan Snowmobile Association.

Survivors include his wife, Elizabeth Bezold Hamberg; daughters, Mary Keller of Waynesville, Ohio, and Diane Hamberg and Mimi Reynolds, both of Fort Thomas; sons, Michael Hamberg of Montgomery, Ohio, Ralph Hamberg of Villa Hills and Steve Hamberg of Alexandria; 14 grandchildren; one great-grandchild. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Catherine of Siena Parish, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY. 41075.

Jack D. Holmes

Jack D. Holmes, 79, of Cold Spring, died Feb. 22, 2011, at The Highlands of Fort Thomas. He was a retired security guard with Procter & Gamble. His wife, Lela Wells Holmes, died previously. Survivors include his son, Dan Holmes; daughter, Cheryl McClain; brother, Bill Holmes; sister, Jean Branstutter; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Virginia Keenan

Virginia Keenan, 92, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 22, 2011, at Carmel Manor, Fort Thomas. She was an office manager with A. Bruce Crock Inc. Her husband, Joseph Keenan, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Brendan Keenan of Covington and Geoffrey Keenan of Cincinnati; brother, Robert Lichtefeld of Frankfort; five grandchildren; one great-grandchild.

Gene E. Landrum

Gene E. Landrum, 72, of Cold Spring, died Feb. 20, 2011. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was a member of DeJaco Knights of Columbus, NRA, American Airlines Vanguards and Triple Diamond Clubs. Survivors include his wife, Patricia Newman Landrum; daughter, Tina M. Tepe; sons, Mark and Michael Landrum; sister, Nancy Coors; brother, Paul Landrum; and seven grandchildren. Memorials: Catholic Charities of Northern Kentucky, 3629 Church St., Covington, KY 41015.

FREE PAYDAY LOANS Betty Laurin CE-0000446201

B8

to New Customers Check Exchange

Turfway 859-647-2160 Latonia 859-431-8666

Betty Laurin, 86, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 22, 2011, at home. She was a homemaker and a member of the Southgate Super Seniors. Her former husband, Charles O.

NOTICE OF ADOPTION AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE The undersigned City Clerk of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, hereby states that on the 19th day of February, 2011, the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, adopted emergency Ordinance No. 2011-02-03 titled ORDINANCE 2011-02-03; AN ORDINANCE CREATING CHAPTER 121 IN THE BELLEVUE CODE OF ORDINANCES TO ESTABLISH A VACANT PROPERTY PAYROLL TAX INCENTIVE PROGRAM. In summary, this is an ordinance declaring an emergency and dispensing with a second reading because of an immediate necessity to establish an incentive program to promote the continued economic vitality of the City by Creating Chapter 121 of the Bellevue Code of Ordinances and providing necessary definitions, incentives, standards, authority and requirements for an economic incentive program. In substance the incentive program is as follows: A) Any person relocating a business to the City of Bellevue that will create new jobs and generate a minimum payroll of $500,000 may be granted a rebate of up to 50% of the City of Bellevue’s Payroll Tax collected from the new jobs if that business relocates to an Eligible Property. The duration and commencement date of any rebate incentive period under this section shall be determined by Agreement, but shall under no circumstances exceed ten (10) years in duration. B) Any person relocating a business to the City of Bellevue that will create new jobs and generate a minimum payroll of between $300,000 to $499,000 may be granted a rebate of up to 50% of the City of Bellevue’s Payroll Tax collected from the new jobs if that business relocates to an Eligible Property. The duration and commencement date of any rebate incentive period under this section shall be determined by Agreement, but shall under no circumstances exceed five (5) years in duration. The City Clerk of the City of Bellevue hereby certifies that the above summary is true and correct and written in a way to inform the public of its contents. Full text of the above Ordinance is available in the Office of the Clerk-Treasurer, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky. Mary H. Scott City Clerk / Treasurer The undersigned, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, hereby certifies that he prepared the summary of ordinance referred to above and that the summary represents an accurate depiction of the contents of the ordinance adopted by the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, on the 19thth day of February, 2011. /s/ Paul Alley City Attorney

INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: Durable Outdoor Uniform Apparel Date: March 3, 2011 SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) P.O. Box 18640 or 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018-0640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018-0640 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

March 17, 2011 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud.

Downard Sr., and grandson Michael Timberlake, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Wilfred Laurin; son, Charles O. Downard Jr. of Copperas Cove, Texas; daughters, Bonnie Nutley of Florence and Jane Tomlin of Hebron; brother, Donald Moore of Xenia, Ohio; and seven grandchildren. Entombment was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Margaret Reik

Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Ed Prather at (859) 426-2701. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bidder shall also submit the following items within 14 days of the bid opening or within 14 days of a formal request to do so: A. Samples representative of the following apparel items listed in the Bid: (i) hooded sweatshirt, pullover or zip front; (ii) jeans (traditional or relaxed fit); (iii) arctic bib overall; and (iv) duck active hooded jacket (quilt lined or thermal lined); and B. At least one (1) copy of catalog(s) representative of uniform apparel items listed in the Bid. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and KAR 200 5:400. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder, and/or to accept a Bid that is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Owner also reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Jack Bragg, V.P. Finance Northern Kentucky Water District 4626

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Margaret Donaldson Reik, 92, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 22, 2011, at the Barrington of Fort Thomas. She was a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Fort Thomas, the Altar Guild at church, Highland Country Club, Fort Thomas Garden Club and the Captiva Island Yacht Club. Her husband, Karl M. Reik, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Betsy Baumgartner of Baltimore, Md.; sons, Karl M. Reik Jr. of Fort Thomas and Thomas D. Reik of Eddyville, Ky.; 10 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 3 Chalfonte Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

24, 2011, at Richwood Nursing Home, La Grange, Ky. She was a homemaker, tennis player, member of the Campbell County Republican Women’s Club, Walk to Emmaus and Stephen Ministries and a volunteer at St. Luke Hospital. Her husband, W. Bruce Ross, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Mary Dee Schulte of La Grange, Ky.; son, Bob Ross of Alexandria; and five grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: International House of Prayer, 3515 E. Red Bridge Road, Kansas City, MO 64137.

Grace Pickett Roberts

John ‘Jim’ Rowekamp

Grace Pickett Roberts, 87, of Newport, formerly of Corinth, died Feb. 24, 2011, at Hospice of the Bluegrass, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and enjoyed gardening, sewing, carpentry and hair styling. She was known as “Doc Pickett” for her ability to diagnose and treat minor illnesses and injuries. Her former husband, Howard Pickett; husband, Clay Roberts; a son, Robert Pickett; a sister, Mertie Marshall; and brothers, Aaron Smith, Ernie Smith and Edgar Smith, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Brenda Pickett McClanahan of Lexington and Agnes Pickett Perry of Dry Ridge; son, William Pickett of Florence; sisters, Helen Meyer of Hamilton, Ohio, and Bessie Squires of Brandon, Miss.; four grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Burial was in Corinth Cemetery.

Florence Jeanne Roell

Florence Jeanne Roell, 86, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Bellevue, died Feb. 22, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a retired bookkeeper of 16 years with Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. Her sons Michael Roell and Patrick Roell; daughter, Jeanette Roell; and sister Jane Kreinest died previously. Survivors include sons, Kevin Roell of Hebron, Douglas Roell of Fort Thomas, Dennis Roell of Cold Spring and Gary Roell of Edgewood; brothers, Edward Mader of Alexandria and Robert Mader of Cordova, Tenn.; sister, Joan Fischer of Florence; and three grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mildred ‘Millie’ Ross

Mildred L. “Millie” Roudebush Ross, 91, of Fort Thomas, died Feb.

The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: The sale and delivery to various designated locations in Kenton and Campbell Counties, Kentucky of selected durable outdoor apparel, all as specified in the periodic orders of the District placed during the period from April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2012, with up to two one-year extensions of the period at the sole discretion of the Owner. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018.

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NOTICE Fort Thomas Planning Commission Public Meeting The Planning Commission of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a Meeting on Public Wednesday, M arch 16, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the City Building at 130 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Ft. Thomas, KY to discuss the Comprehen sive Plan Land Use Map. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accomassist to modation disabled qualified persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at (859) 5721210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. General Services Department 1001624430

John Raymond “Jim” Rowekamp, 84, of Newport, died Feb. 19, 2011, at his residence. He was a member of St. Therese Parish of Southgate, the Newport Elks No. 273 and the Bellevue Veterans Club. He served in World War II. His first wife, Ruth Ann Rowekamp; son Thomas William Rowekamp; and brothers, Ben, Ken and Bobby Rowekamp, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Betty Rowekamp; son, Craig Rowekamp of Newport; daughter, Deborah Ann Morse of California; stepsons, Jim McManis of Goshen, Ohio, and Steve McManis of Latonia; stepdaughter, Judy Ball of Newport; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; four stepgrandchildren; and two step great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice.

Michael Sebastian

Michael Wayne Sebastian, 54, of Newport, died Feb. 19, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked at Schwan’s Food Service. He loved his work, family, computers and spending time with his pet, Spike. Survivors include his wife, Kathy Sebastian of Newport; father- and mother-in-law, John and Emma Miller of Cincinnati; and three siblings. Entombment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Lee Dale Sexton Sr.

Lee Dale Sexton Sr., 65, of Highland Heights, died Feb. 23, 2011, at his residence. He was a retired maintenance worker with the Newport Board of Education. His wife, Velma Kay Sexton, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Brittany Sexton, Dorothy Harris and Sandra Jones, all of Newport, and Jessica Barnes of Highland Heights; son, Lee Sexton Jr. of Newport; sisters, Florine Phillips of Hazard, Ky., and Loraine Walliser of Dayton, Ohio; brothers, Ferris Sexton of Iowa and John Sexton of Chicago, Ill.; 14 grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Maysville Cemetery.

Henry Warf

Henry Warf, 65, of Dayton, died Feb. 23, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired mechanic with Kenmont Dodge in Kenwood, Ohio. Survivors include his son, Jimmy Lee Warf; sisters, Barb Hicks of Dayton, Wanda Paul of Bethel, Ohio, and Mary C. Marquis of Fort Meyers, Fla.; and brothers, James Carl Warf of Bethel, Ohio, and Larry Wayne Warf of Dayton. Burial was in Linden Grove Cemetery, Covington.

Gerald Weckbach

Gerald Nicholas Weckbach, 64, of Grants Lick, died Feb. 23, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired mechanic for Midas and a member of Grants Lick Baptist Church. His brothers David Weckbach and Charles Weckbach and sister Patricia Rawls died previously. Survivors include his wife, Billie Jean Weckbach; daughter, Kathy McIntosh of Butler; sons, Gerald Weckbach Jr. of Grants Lick, Mark Weckbach of Butler and Michael Weckbach of Melbourne; brothers, Jeff Weckbach of Florence, Steven Weckbach of Alexandria and Donnie Weckbach and Randy Weckbach, both of Grants Lick; sisters, Ella Rose Ivy and Sandy Goshorn of Florence, Janet Stewart of Illinois and Beverly Watson and Virginia Murrell, both of Grants Lick; and three grandchildren.


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