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Jessica Hartig helped save the life of a 69-year-old man having a heart attack outside the Alexandria Community Center Dec. 5. THANKS TO JESSICA HARTIG

Samson and Delilah

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Sometimes, the things you read in the Bible end up on stage at the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. The KSO has teamed up with the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre for a complete concert presentation of Camille Saint-Saens’ “Samson and Delilah.” This will be the fifth opera the KSO has done in concert since 2000. News, A3

Wowing students Campbell Ridge Elementary School is looking to “wow” students with fruit each Wednesday breakfast. Grant money from Kellogg’s and the National Action for Healthy Kids and Kentucky is paying for the school to offer taste tests of fruit smoothies, yogurt parfaits and cereal bars to students at breakfast each Wednesday. Schools, A4

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Bellevue welcomes new fire chief By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

BELLEVUE — The new year has brought a lot of change to the City of Bellevue, with the retirement of the chiefs from both the fire and police departments at the end of 2011. The Bellevue-Dayton Fire Department’s fire board has hired Mike Auteri, previously a captain in the department, to take over as fire chief, taking the place of Denny Lynn, who became chief of the Dayton Fire Department in 1990 and remained chief when Dayton and Bellevue merged to become the Fire Department of Bellevue-Dayton. Auteri, who is from Bellevue and now lives in Fort Thomas, started as a volunteer firefighter with the department in 1986 and became full-time in 1990. With his experience in the department and familiarity with the cities, Auteri said he feels he can excel as the new chief.

Mike Auteri, the new chief of the Fire Department of Bellevue-Dayton, poses for a picture. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER “Being the chief offers me new challenges,” Auteri said. “We have a great group here, and we all work well together.” Auteri said he doesn’t plan to make any big changes in the department, but does hope to get the department more involved in the community. Bellevue City Administrator Keith Spoelker said the city tries to promote internally when they have a good option to do it.

“Mike was a very clear option,” Spoelker said. “He just has a presence and demeanor that made him a natural candidate.” With the fire department taken care of, Spoelker and other members of city staff are going through the process to hire a new police chief to replace William “Bill” Cole, who retired at the end of 2011 after more than 25 years of service to the city. Cole said he had just gotten to

the point that he was ready to retire. “It was time to end a quarter century of work,” said Cole, who is now working as a Regional Safety Manager for Rumpke. “For me it’s a new year with new challenges.” Spoelker said so far, the police chief selection committee, made up of he and other city staff members, has narrowed the pool of candidates down from 34 to seven, and will be holding interviews in the next several days. After the first interview, Spoelker said the committee will hold at least one more interview, then narrow it down to two or three candidates, who will be presented to Mayor Ed Riehl, who will make the decision and present it to council. Spoelker said even though the city lost 25 years of experience with Cole’s retirement and no one can replace that, the city is hoping the new chief can carry on the traditions he began.

FLOORED FOR READING Teetering For decades, the Fort Thomas Recreation Department has been getting children and their parents, grandparents and guardians moving through the Teeter Tots program. The program, which consists of several five-week sessions during September through April, gives children ages 2-4 an opportunity to get some exercise and practice coordination skills. Life, B1

Children's programmer Ashley Wright, left, reads aloud from the book "Penguin" by Polly Dunbar as from left, Rylee Powell, 5, of Highland Heights; Erin Frey, 4, of Melbourne; and Joann Faulhaber, 4, of Melbourne, gaze upwards from the floor of the Cold Spring Branch of the Campbell County Public Library Tuesday, Jan. 10. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Accident a reminder of dangers of road By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

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COLD SPRING — Before the fatal Jan. 6 accident on Pooles Creek Road in Cold Spring the city's mayor had advised people in December to use other routes and stay off the two-lane road for safety reasons. Mattie Johnson, 92, of Highland Heights, was pronounced dead by a doctor after being pinned underneath the dash of a vehicle she was a passenger in that slid off the roadway shortly after noon Jan. 6, according to a Cold Spring Police Department news release. Johnson was wearing only the lap portion of her seat belt with the shoulder por-

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tion tucked behind her back. Pooles Creek Road begins at the AA Highway in Wilder and goes uphill through an unincorporated area of the county, Highland Heights and Cold Spring to U.S. 27. The road continues on the other side of U.S. 27 as Industrial Road to Silver Grove. The issue of Pooles Creek Road safety had already been a topic of serious discussion prior to the most recent accident. Most recently, the city council asked the state to consider a potential ban of trucks using Pooles Creek in September 2011. Residents have previously voiced their concerns about drivers having accidents and leaving the road to both the city and in articles in

The Community Recorder – most recently in the Oct. 20 edition. Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine said Pooles Creek has become one of the biggest unresolved road issues in the county. The city has been particularly concerned and put together a video interviewing residents that aired on local public cable access and was sent to state legislators and to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet's District 6 of the Kentucky Department of Highways, Horine said. "The mayor in the very beginning of it basically says stay off Pooles Creek," Horine said. "They are appealing to the state to make improvements to make it

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a safer road." Since the video started airing in December, the county police have been conducting speed patrols on Pooles Creek in coordination with Cold Spring police, he said. Cold Spring is also appealing for the state to make improvements to Pooles Creek to make is safer including the possibility of "high friction pavement" on some of the bad curves are where cars go off the roadway around the Highland Heights Nature Center trail head, Horine said. The issue is that Pooles Creek is a state-maintained highway, and traffic probably increased in See ROAD, Page A2

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NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

All Campbell County city council spots open in elections By Chris Mayhew NEWPORT — In Campbell, election ballots will feature a spate of local offices up for grabs in addition to the draw of voting for a president on Nov. 6. For select local races, there is candidates primary filing deadline of Jan. 31. Candidates for Newport mayor and city commission as well as for the city councils for Bellevue, Dayton and Fort Thomas have to file by the Jan. 31 deadline, said Jennifer McGrath, a deputy clerk at the Campbell County Clerk’s office. “They all have to register by Jan. 31, and we won’t know until Feb. 1 whether or not they need a primary,” McGrath said. The four cities require there to be double the number of candidates plus one more candidate than there are available seats before there is a primary, she said. For example, Bellevue’s six-seat council will have to have 13 or more candidates before there is a primary. Newport is the only mayoral job on the 2012 ballot, with the rest of the cities mayors and the fiscal court not on the ballot again until 2014. The Jan. 31 candidate deadline also applies to the Campbell County Com-

monwealth Attorney, and circuit clerk races in addition to all state representatives and U.S. Fourth Congressional District candidates seeking to be on the ballot. Incumbent Republican Circuit Clerk Taunya Nolan Jack has filed for reelection already, and Democratic candidate Mary Ann Mader Jones of Alexandria has filed as a challenger candidate. Incumbent Commonwealth Attorney Michelle Snodgrass has filed for re-election and as of Jan. 12 did not have a challenger. All other city council and commission candidates in the county besides Newport, Bellevue, Fort Thomas and Dayton Aug. 14 filing deadline for candidates. Candidates for the Soil and Water Conservation District board and local school board positions up for grabs have until the Aug. 14 filing deadline as well to register to be on the ballot. School boards never have a primary, McGrath said. Local school board members having to seek re-election by school district are: » Bellevue Independent: The seats occupied by Vanessa Groneck and Julie Fishcer will be on the ballot. » Dayton Independent: The seats occupied

by Roseann Sharon and Bernard T. Pfeffer will be on the ballot. » Campbell County School District: The district two seat occupied by Susan Fangman, the district three seat occupied by newly appointed board member Kim Fender, and the district five seat occupied by Rich Mason will be on the ballot. » Fort Thomas Independent: The seats occupied by Karen Allen, Jeff Beach on seat currently vacant beause of the death of a board member will be on the ballot. » Newport Independent: The seats occupied by board members Andrea Janovic, Julie Smith-Morrow, and Melissa Sheffel will be on the ballot. » Silver Grove Independent: The seat occupied by Melanie Pelle and Bernard T. Pfeffer will be on the ballot. A vacancy created by the resignation of board member Joey Pelle will mean the remaining two years of that board seat’s term will also be on the ballot. » Southgate Independent: The seats occupied by Diane Hatfield and Jeff “Jay” Paul will be on the ballot.

Index

Road

to the curves that are getting knocked down already. There are still countless wrecks on Pooles Creek, and now there has been a third death since about 2000, Stoeber said. "To make matters worse, the road caves-in on a regular basis," he said. In 2000 Jimmy Geiman died at age 16 on Pooles Creek Road when his car

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2011 as people, especially truckers, tried to get around the road construction on I-275, he said. Cold Spring Mayor Mark Stoeber said the state install about 20 reflective signs along the road's edge to alert people

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State funding keeps draft budget 'tight' By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — The Campbell County Schools Board of Education has approved a projected a draft budget of about $36.68 million that covers staff positions no longer being funded by federal Edujobs stimulus money that has run out. “We know we are predicting a tight budget with no new revenues at the state level,” said Superintendent Glen A. Miller at the Jan. 9 board meeting. The district anticipates about $530,000 in federal Edujobs money will run out. The money has paid for counselors and staff developers – very crucial positions the district has used to boost student achievement, Miller said. That money will now come out of the district’s general fund, “We will keep those positions,” he said. Miller said the district by state law will approve a “tentative” budget by May, and a final “working” budget in September. The draft budget is the earliest and roughest form of the budget, he said. In the draft budget, the district also anticipates pension increases for teaching positions of about $124,000, and for classified staff pension

slid off the roadway and hit a tree. It was a death "deeply felt" by the city, and Geiman's parents and their neighbors still have cars "pinballing" through their yards "day or night" as cars leave the roadway, Stoeber said. There was also another death, a teenage girl, since then, and now the Jan. 6 tragedy has happened, he said. "Ever since I have been in office, we have been complaining to the state about how dangerous and deadly that road is," Stoeber said. Stoeber said the city has proposed many suggestions to the state, and has petitioned state Rep. Jose Fischer and Sen. Katie Stine. Stoeber said he is glad the county is now showing energy towards helping in the solution. "The only answer is to stay off Pooles Creek," he said. "If you are on the road, you are taking a serious chance." Stoeber said he knows many residents who refuse to travel on Pooles Creek – especially at night. "I have even heard suggestions to close the road to through-traffic," he said. "It is simply that bad."

The district by state law will approve a “tentative” budget by May. increase will be about $243,000. The district also anticipates a state-mandated pay “STEP” increase of about $263,000 for certified staff, and about $99,000 for classified staff. The plan for making up the additional expenses comes mostly from eliminating about $1.8 million in one-time expenses from last year’s budget that included $880,0000 for athletic field improvements at Campbell County High School, $352,580 for new pavement at the transportaton garage, and $100,000 less in technology improvements spending, Miller said. The extracurricular pay for coaching and other positions has been frozen, he said. State funding (SEEK Support Education Excellence in Kentucky) levels have always been a challenge for Northern Kentucky school districts and this year will likely be no different, said board chairman Janis Winbigler. Last year’s cut to the

In addition to the injury and danger, Pooles Creek Road takes a tremendous amount of police and fire emergency services, Stoeber said. "Because of the exorbitant amount of accidents, we will be soon sending the state a quarterly bill for our police response to accidents on Pooles Creek," he said." We want to cooperative, but the street is horrific." The city has a similar danger in the intersection of Glenridge subdivision onto the AA Highway, Stoeber said. The city has tried for eight years to no avail to alert the state to the dangers of Glenridge and the AA. Hopefully a death isn't required off Glenridge to get the AA intersection fixed, he said. "Something must be done about Pooles Creek and Glenridge," Stoeber said. Stine said her role in government in the legislative branch is generally to make laws, and when she receives calls from people in cold Spring concerned about Pooles Creek Road she forwards them onto the executive branch. And Rob Hans, the executive director of the Kentucky Transportation

district’s state funding was between 3-4 percent of the balance from the previous year’s funding, Winbigler said. The state simply didn’t appropriate enough money to go around, and didn’t officially make any cuts, she said. “It’s kind of a sneaky way of cutting SEEK without saying they actually cut SEEK,” Winbigler said. Winbigler said every year the district works under the assumption there will be cuts in state funding. “We’ve been able to always have a balanced budget in past years, and I know that this year is going to be just as challenging,” she said. Board member Rich Mason said it is not too late to contact state legislators and ask them to do whatever they can for Northern Kentucky school districts in terms of state funding. The SEEK cuts over the years have impacted Northern Kentucky more than most of the state and put more budget expenses on the local revenue sources the district has, he said. “Just remember that we have gone from state funding down from about 61 percent 10 years ago to about 39 percent now,” Mason said.

Cabinet’s District 6 Department of Highways for Northern Kentucky has always been very responsive, Stine said. “They’ve gone out and inspected it, and they’ve made some changes,” she said. “It would be helpful if we were to ban truck traffic from that road altogether,” Stine said. Hans has advised eliminating trucks from using Pooles Creek Road will require an alteration of the law. Stine said she has also been in contact with Lafarge North America in Silver Grove about trucks traveling to and from the plant. Lafarge doesn’t own the trucks that service its plant, but they’ve been willing to talk to the truck companies that service their plant to advise drivers to take U.S. 27 to I-275 instead of detouring to the AA Highway over Pooles Creek Road, she said. As for the idea of bisecting Pooles Creek Road, Stine said she hopes improved signage and other limits might help be better ways to ease some the problems on the road. “Limiting particular types of traffic might be a better first,” she said.

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NEWS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Ky. Symphony performing biblical-based opera ssalmons@nky.com

Sometimes, the things you read in the Bible end up on stage at the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. The KSO has teamed up with the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre for a complete concert presentation of Camille SaintSaens’ “Samson and Delilah.” This will be the fifth opera the KSO has done in concert since 2000 and the fourth time collaborating with the Opera Theatre, KSO music director James Cassidy said. The production will be held at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion and will be followed by a performance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22, at the Singletary Center in Lexington. Tickets are $28 for “A” seats and $23 for “B” seats. Prices for the ”B” seats are reduced to $18 for seniors and $10 for students. Tickets can be purchased by calling 859-4316216 or by visiting www.kyso.org. “It’s an Old Testament story,” Cassidy said. “To do

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra and University of Kentucky Opera Theatre's 2007 performance of "La Boheme" at Lexington's Singletary Center. The two groups will join forces again for two performances of "Samson and Delilah." The first is set for 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion. THANKS TO JIM FAUSZ that at Florence Baptist Church makes some sense.” The operatic version, however, focuses “more on the idea of Delilah trying to get Samson and not all of the things Samson had (done),” he said. It’s an interesting show with some “very pretty music,” Cassidy said. Even though the singing is in French, English translations will be projected so the audience can follow the story, he said. Bellevue resident and nationally renowned mezzo soprano Stacey Rishoi sings the role of Delilah

while tenor Michael Hendrick of Baton Rouge tackles the role Samson. "It’s kind of nice to pull artists together and share that with UK’s talents and put it all together,” Cassidy said. This performance is also a chance for the KSO to do something they haven’t done before, he said. While KSO shows are “always different anyway,” Cassidy says a typical concert will normally have several different selections. An opera, he said, is a continuously sung story. This production, howev-

er, isn’t a fully staged opera, Cassidy said. “When you strip away all the effects and the big lighting and the sets and the costumes, you’re actually focusing more on the music itself – what the composer wrote in that story ... than you are the pageantry of the opera,” he said. According to Cassidy, this is a return to how the piece was first performed in America. It can be said the opera is the “ultimate art form,” bringing in visual arts, acting, singing and dancing,

Cassidy said. Whereas, when it’s done as a concert, the audience is listening more and focusing more on the music. “I think this is an interesting way to hear it,” Cassidy said.

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Spaghetti dinner at VFW

The Ladies Auxiliary of Campbell County Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No.

3205 in Alexandria will have a spaghetti dinner from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Friday Jan. 27 at the VFW Hall, 8261 Alexandria Pike. The cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children . Proceeds will benefit troops overseas, cancer aid and research. For more call 859-3943068.

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SCHOOLS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Highlands class recruits future educators By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Makenna Watson of Alexandria, a first-grader at Campbell Ridge Elementary School, enters her meal plan code for breakfast including milk and a fruit cereal bar and sausage as school nutritionist and cafeteria worker Donna Groneck, left, watches Wednesday, Jan. 11. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

School looks to ‘Wow’ students By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell Ridge Elementary School is looking to “wow” students with fruit each Wednesday breakfast. Grant money from Kellogg’s and the National Action for Healthy Kids and Kentucky is paying for the school to offer taste tests of fruit smoothies, yogurt parfaits and cereal bars to students at breakfast each Wednesday. The weekly fruit test runs, started in December, are known in the school as “Wow Wee Wednesday.” The most popular fruit options, as voted upon by the students, will have the chance to make it onto the regular breakfast menu. The new fruit options being tested are in addition to tradition-

al servings of fruit cups and juice. The taste tests are an attempt to interest more students on free or reduced lunch plans in eating breakfast at school, said Linda Hardy, the school nurse. About 45 percent of Campbell Ridge’s students are eligible for free or reduced price lunches, and it would be great to have more of them eating breakfast at school, Hardy said. Full price for breakfast is $1. “Most of the kids who come to my office with stomach aches didn’t have breakfast,” she said. In an attempt to give students an incentive to eat a healthy breakfast, the school gives out prizes including cups, pencils and football cards to get them into the cafeteria, Hardy said. A kiosk of food for students skipping the cafeteria in the

morning is also in the works and should be in place soon, Hardy said. Any student who misses breakfast serving time from 8 a.m. to 8:20 a.m. already has an extra 10 minutes to pick up a breakfast “to go” in the cafeteria, she said. The school is also working to test out low fat and low calorie muffins and bagels or bagel bites during the Wednesday breakfast, Hardy said. A fruit “breakfast round” the school called a “breakfast cookie” was something many students didn’t like, she said. “But, at least they tried it,” Hardy said. Hallie Taylor, a fourth-grader of Alexandria, said she loves fruit as she took her breakfast of sausage, fruit cereal bar and milk. Fruit is healthy and tastes

good, Taylor said. Shian Southerland, a thirdgrader of Alexandria, said her favorite fruit is apples. Eating fruit is enjoyable, she said. “Yes, because it makes your body strong,” Southerland said. Donna Groneck, a school nutritionist works one of the two lunch line registers each morning in the cafeteria. One of Groneck’s duties is making sure each child who goes through the line has some type of milk or juice and fruit-based food. Groneck asked a student to go back and get some apple sauce, orange juice or a fruit bar during breakfast Jan. 11. “You’ve got to have some fruit,” she said.

Cell phones now welcomed in class By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Using a cell phone or wireless computer at Campbell County Middle School in class isn’t forbidden – it’s encouraged. The main caveat is all student data devices must be registered with the school – and use is strictly for school work. Students in eighth grade were allowed to start bringing their personal devices into school starting Jan. 10 as part of the Campbell County School District’s wireless campus initiative. The middle school will be allowing students in grades 6-7 to also register and use their personal devices by Jan. 24. Matt Wilson of Alexandria was one of 117 of the school’s about 398 eighth-grade students to register his wireless devices by the end of Wednesday, Jan. 11. Wilson said he was registering his Apple iPhone and an iPad. The technology allows him to look something up whenever a question pops into his mind, Wilson said. “Teachers are always saying get a dictionary, and it’s kind of out-dated,” he said. Some people have legitimate concerns that asking students to use their own personal devices at school will create a culture of haves and have-nots, said Principal Dave Sandlin.

Zach Nicely, left, of Alexandria, uses an iPad as he works with Angela Ratliff, right, of Alexandria to answer a question in an eighth grade U.S. history class at Campbell County Middle School Wednesday, Jan. 11. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER That’s why the district school board and site based council for the school have been purchasing devices, Sandlin said. “Our goal is to have six schoolowned devices in every classroom,” he said. History teacher Mark Hegyi has already been using wireless computers in his instruction since the start of school in the fall, Sandlin said. During a group activity on Jan. 11 in Hegyi’s U.S. history course, students used school iPads and their phones to look up and form their own study guide answers to questions provided by Hegyi. In an activity like that, it’s not necessary for every student to

have their own device – they could work collaboratively, Sandlin said. Students are comfortable working electronically, and the school is making sure the professional development is there for staff to be able to integrate the technology into the classroom more, he said. “Kids are electronically handing in work to get feedback on, and it is sent back electronically,” Sandlin said. Doing everything electronically takes away not only paper, but some of the complications of handing in written work, he said. “The days of the dog at my homework are gone,” Sandlin said. “Of course now it might be

the dog chewed on my iPad.” Of coure, when the Internet is down it can cripple the school, but that’s where teachers have back-up plans and lectures, he said. Hegyi said he has found giving students assignments to complete using their iPads and data devices keeps them from tuning out a lecture. “Anytime you can use technology, the students are always a lot more engaged,” he said. Giving students a question to answer by typing an instant answer on an iPad or mobile device keeps them motivated, Hegyi said. “They know that their answers are going to be seen by everybody on our site,” he said. Zach Nicely, an eighth-grader from Alexandria, used an iPad to answer one of Hegyi’s questions for the study guide by typing in the main difference between federalists and anti-federalists in U.S. history was that federalists advocated for a strong central government. Nicely said he has already registered his phone and a tablet computer. Using technology allows him to find more sources instead of relying on just one book source, he said. “I wasn’t really a fan of books, so I think this will be able to get me a wider variety of answers,” Nicely said.

FORT THOMAS — Students at Highlands High School who are interested in teaching have a way to test the waters, and earn college credit, through the school’s Intro to Education class. The class, in its fourth year, offers seniors a chance to see what being a teacher is all about, and if they’re cut out for the job. Gene Kirchner, the district’s assistant superintendent for teaching and learning, who co-teaches the class with Kent Juett, said the Intro to Education class is one of several of the school’s dualcredit courses, meaning students can earn high school and college credit by taking the class. “This particular class is unique because it is focused on recruiting bright kids to the field of education,” Kirchner said. “This benefits our district and education as a whole by encouraging some of our best students to look at pursuing a career in education.” The class gives students a chance to see if education is really what they want to do with their lives, a lesson that could save them time and money in college. Throughout the school year, the class covers the foundations of education, roles of a teacher, how to work with different personalities, class environments, effective instructional practices and teacher standards. Earlier this year, students spent time observing classes at various grade levels, from elementary to high school. Kirchner said this semester, the students will spend time working in classes throughout the district as assistant teachers, leading lessons, working with small groups and more. Senior Sarah Schklar said when it comes to her future, she can’t imagine being anything besides a teacher. “I figured why not take this opportunity to teach where I went to school,” Schklar said. “The teachers here are who made me want to teach.” Schklar, who plans to major in education in college, said she has learned a lot in the class so far, including what grade levels she doesn’t want to teach and which ones she does. Senior Ryan Hanson, who plans to major in mathematics and get his certificate to teach, said the class has shown him what it’s really like to be a teacher. “It’s a lot harder that a I thought it would be,” Hanson said. “There is just so much that the teachers do that the students don’t see.” Kirchner said so far, the class has gone well and received good feedback. “Our biggest goal going forward is to increase our numbers by encouraging more students to consider education,” Kirchner said. “It’s an uphill battle that we fight to compete with everything else students are interested in doing with their lives.”


NEWS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A5

COLLEGE CORNER

CCHS CLASS OF 1966

Escalante named to dean’s list

Zink earns master’s degree

Mario Escalante Jr. of Highland Heights was named to the dean’s list for the fall 2011 semester at Heidelberg University in Tiffin, Ohio.

Gregory Adam Zink of Cold Spring graduated with a master of theology from Campbellsville University on Dec. 16.

Bray, Stein named to dean’s list

Grosser named to dean’s list

Dominique Anna Bray and Luke Elliott Stein, both of Newport, were named to the fall 2011 dean’s list at Gardner-Webb University in Boiling Springs, N.C. The dean’s list recognizes students who maintain a grade point average of 3.7 or better. Bray is a communication studies major. Stein is studying economics/finance.

Christopher James Grosser of Fort Thomas was named to the dean’s list at Drury University in Springfield, Mo. To be named to the dean’s list, a full-time student must earn a 3.6 or greater grade point average.

Muench named to high honors list

The Campbell County High School Class of 1966 met up for their 45-year reunion on Nov. 5. THANKS TO SHAWNA KOPP

HONOR ROLL Here are the local honor roll students for the first quarter at Covington Latin School:

First Honors Alexandria: Tristan Britt, Samantha Hamilton, Elisa Hernandez, Bridgette Hildreth,

Kendall Smith and Emma Snyder. Cold Spring: Bridget Barbara, Grace Bradtmueller and Amy Enzweiler.

Second Honors Alexandria: Gabrielle Er-

ickson, Michael Haas and Jessica Wooldredge. Bellevue: Mark Barnett. California: Matthew Waters. Cold Spring: Sam Braun, Kassie Fogarty, Nicholas Grosser, Brett Mockbee and Matthew Waters.

Dayton: Abigail McQueen. Fort Thomas: Sean Bailey, Jonathan Dunwoody, Madeline Grote and Elias Ordonez. Southgate: Mindy Reutter. Wilder: Patrick Becker, Jonathan Nelson and Marcus Villareal.

Care packages

Corryn Muench of Cold Spring was named to the fall 2011 dean's high honors list at Marietta College. To be named to the dean's high honors list a full-time student must complete at least 15 credit hours with a grade point average of 3.75 or better for the semester. Corryn, a graduate of Newport Central Catholic High School, is double majoring in advertising and public relations, and graphic design at Marietta.

Wolfzorn named to dean’s list

Brent M. Wolfzorn, son of Tim and Linda Wolfzorn of Alexandria, was named to dean's list for the winter quarter at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio. The dean's list includes students who attain a 3.5 or better grade point average. Brent is a sophomore majoring in accounting.

The soldiers are still serving our country and the children of St. Joseph, Cold Spring are working to help them. The sixth grade students at St. Joe's collected personal items and fun snacks to send with their letters to the men and women in Jesse McDonald's Marine unit serving our country in Afghanistan. Jesse is a former student of St. Joe's. Shown: Gregg Racke, Grace Schmidt, Holly Farwell, and Bryce Donnelly help pack boxes to Jesse McDonald's Marine unit in Afghanistan. THANKS TO LINDA GABIS

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responsible for clothing, medications, cosmetics, motor fuel, and a host of other items that enhance our quality of life. I encourage all Kentucky teachers to get their students involved in the Poster and Essay Contest so they can learn about all the things agriculture does for them.” The contest is open to all Kentucky students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Students may submit a poster or an essay. Entries must be postmarked no later than Feb. 10 and mailed to Kentucky De-

partment of Agriculture, Poster and Essay Contest, 100 Fair Oaks Lane, 5th Floor, Frankfort, KY 40601. Winners in each grade will be notified on Feb. 20 and will be honored at the annual Kentucky Agriculture Day luncheon in March in Frankfort. Each winner will receive $100. For more information, including contest rules, contact Elizabeth McNulty at 502-564-4983 or elizabeth.mcnulty@ky.gov or go to www.kyagr.com, click on Programs, and click on Agriculture Education.

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

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NEWS

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A7

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NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Grad students head to high school

NCC gives scholarships

When students in the Northern Kentucky University Master of Social Work program started last semester, they were a bit surprised to be returning to a high school classroom. The 15 MSW students and their faculty are part of an innovative Dixie Mentorship program at Dixie Heights High School. Classes for the secondyear MSW students are held at Dixie and each NKU student is assigned a Dixie student who has been identified as “at risk.” The MSW students offer a “listening ear” and provide direction to help their Dixie counterparts overcome barriers toward completing their education. “A parent of a student at Dixie Heights, Benita Rubio, noticed that there was a rapid increase in homeless students at that school,” said Dr. Holly Riffe, who directs the NKU

The eighth-grade students who obtained the top 10 scores on the High School Placement Test (HSPT) will receive scholarships to Newport Central Catholic. Four-year $1,000 scholarship: Kaiya Linkugel of St. Therese. Four-year $750 scholarship: Scott Barrett of St. Therese. Two-year $750 scholarship: Luke Wormald of St. Catherine, Parker Osburg of St. Therese, Walter Johnson of Newport Middle and Michelle Murrin of St. Catherine. Two-year $500 scholarship: Johnathon Harris of Holy Trinity, Ansley Davenport of St. Mary, and Cameron Hoover and Alexandra Heck, both of St. Joseph.

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Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY), homelessness among school-age children is on the rise, with 39 percent of US school districts reporting more homeless students in the first six months of the 2009-10 school year than the entire previous year. Programs like the Dixie Mentorship will hopefully make a difference. The MSW students in the program will have the opportunity to directly address Dixie administrators and influence future policy making and support systems at the school. The first-hand information the students gain from their mentees can change the way the schools address the problem. Acquiring practical, first-hand experience with adolescents from diverse background is a part of the MSW program.

Thomas More hosts preview night Jan. 24

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program. “She mentioned it to her colleague, Jan Ising, the McKinney Vinto Homeless outreach coordinator.” Ising and Rubio began working with NKU and Dixie to brainstorm a mutually beneficial partnership. The Dixie Mentorship program was born. When the mentorship program began, no one knew just how far-reaching it would be. The NKU students quickly became aware of issues their mentees were facing that even the high school administration wasn’t aware of. One MSW student recalls, “At our first meeting my mentee told me that he was living out of a duffle bag in the woods near the football stadium. I was a little shocked but when I reported it to the administration, they found him a place to live.” According to the National Association for the

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High school students preparing for or in the midst of their college search can learn more about the admissions proc-

ess at Thomas More College’s Preview Day on Tuesday, Jan. 24, in Crestview Hills. The event kicks off at 6:30 p.m. with check-in and a departmental browsing

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fair in the Student Center. Presentations by admissions, financial aid and student life staff will follow. A campus tour is included. In addition, students can learn more about TMC3, the college’s new threeyear degree program that enables students to earn a four-year degree in three years. Thomas More faculty members and representatives from athletics, campus ministry, student life, financial aid and admissions will be available to speak one-on-one with guests. Thomas More College is located at 333 Thomas More Parkway in Crestview Hills. Students interested in attending are encouraged to RSVP at thomasmore.edu/preview or call 859-344-3332.

Ising said the Dixie Mentorship program provides a unique opportunity. “Social workers rarely get to experience the inner workings of their clients’ environment,” she said. “These interns are exposed to a variety of experiences and opportunities to work with students, but also to work with our staff, learning the behind-the-scenes issues of serving at-risk students. This is a real world experience.” The NKU graduate students get a first-hand look at the problems at-risk students face on a daily basis such as lack of housing or eviction, food, and medical attention. “Interesting insights have emerged.” said Ising. “The at-risk students respond positively to the interns for at least two reasons: one-on-one contact focuses on the at-risk student’s specific needs and concerns, and the interns

are young adults, in tune with children and youth.” The NKU students are trained in a cutting-edge technique called “photovoice,” which gives at-risk children and adolescents the opportunity to communicate through photographs. As one Dixie student stated, “I don’t believe that my opinion is valued and respected. No one really listens to me when I speak. But these pictures tell the story for me.” Despite the fact that many students needed motivation to take the photographs and several even lost their cameras, all of them completed the project successfully and will share the images with Dixie administration during a gallery forum this spring. NKU officials say they hope to get other schools involved where student homelessness is an issue.

JOHNSON ANNOUNCES SPELLING BEE WINNER

Olivia Smith (center), winner of the Johnson Elementary School's spelling bee, poses for a picture with second place winners Clara Bushman and Ben Starzec. The win qualified Smith to complete an online spelling test. Up to 70 of the highest scoring school champions will qualify for participation in the 2012 WCPO Regional Spelling Bee. THANKS TO JON STRATTON

Inaugural parade featured Newport High School band A cannon shot from the Kentucky Military History Museum officially kicked off the inaugural parade for Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear Dec. 13 in Frankfort. More than 4,150 parade participants, including 54 high school marching bands, traveled up Capital Avenue toward the Capitol where Beshear took the

oath of office for his second term as the state’s 61st governor. 2012 Teacher of the Year Kimberly Shearer, an English teacher at Boone County High School, was grand marshal and traveled the parade route with singing and community theater groups, Boy Scout troops and other state dignitaries. Beshear and first lady Jane

Beshear traveled the parade route in an open horsedrawn carriage provided by the Kentucky Horse Park. Ryle High School Marching Raiders, Newport High School Wildcat Marching Band and the Beechwood High School Marching Tigers were among high school marching bands in the parade.

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Elementary students at Villa Madonna Academy donated blankets, hats, gloves, and personal hygiene items to be given to members of Cristo Rey parish in Erlanger and Church of the Resurrection parish in Cincinnati. The Christmas season collection was spearheaded by Villa art, French, Spanish, library, music, and physical ed teachers. Helping to pack the items are: Fiza, Henri, Laney, Olivia, and Drew. The students hail from Cold Spring, Edgewood, Highland Heights, and Independence. THANKS TO DEBBIE YOUNG


SPORTS

K1

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A9

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Two teams head to All ‘A’ state By James Weber jweber@nky.com

CAMPBELL COUNTY — Bishop Brossart and Newport Central Catholic have been in the All “A” Classic state basketball tournament together several times in recent years, but just in the boys bracket. Whether the boys teams from both schools punch their return tickets this week, the girls teams are already there. Newport Central Catholic won the Ninth Region championship with a 40-24 win over St. Henry in the championship game Jan. 21 at Newport. At the same time, Brossart was knocking off St. Patrick 45-29 in the 10th Region final at Nicholas County. It’s NewCath’s sixth straight All “A” Ninth Region title and 10th in the 22-year history of

Bishop Brossart girls basketball with its All "A" 10th Region championship trophy Jan. 14. PROVIDED the tournament. Brossart won its first title since 2003. They

Newport Central Catholic forward Nicole Kiernan drives past Holy Cross defenders Jan. 13 in Ninth Region All A action. GREG LORING/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

will both play in the 16-team state tournament, which has a new home this year in the Frankfort Convention Center. The girls tourney starts Wednesday, Jan. 25. NewCath (11-3) plays the 14th Region champion at 10 a.m. Leslie County is the preseason favorite to win that tourney, which ends Jan. 21. Brossart will play Harlan at 1 p.m. As the scores suggested, both county private schools got there on defense. The Thoroughbreds, who lost three starters and three other seniors off last year’s team, held St. Henry to 18.2 percent from the field for the game and forced 18 turnovers. Sophomore center Nicole Kiernan, who was named the

tournament’s Most Valuable Player, scored 16 points in the final. Alex Schalk had nine, Aubrey Muench seven and Olivia Huber six. Huber and Muench were all-tourney picks. Brossart improved to 15-3 by routing a St. Patrick team that had won the title last year. Sarah Futscher led the team with 17 points and 12 rebounds, as well as three assists, three blocks and four steals. She was an all-tournament pick with sophomore Morgan Eisenmann and junior Rachel Hartig. Eisenmann had 13 points and 10 rebounds in the final. Brossart limited St. Pat’s to 20.8 percent shooting. Brossart had to win twice on Saturday because of weather postponements after a tough four-point win over Bracken

Newport Central Catholic forward Jamie Kohls takes the ball to the glass Jan. 13 against Holy Cross in Ninth Region All A hoops action. GREG LORING/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

County in the first round. Eisenmann had 15 points against Bracken. “This is a total team of 12,” said Brossart head coach Josh Feldmann on the team’s web site. “I am so proud of this team. I was very happy for them tonight.” NCC and Brossart, plus county rivals Bellevue, Dayton, Newport and Silver Grove, will try for the boys titles this week. The Ninth Region is at Beechwood and the 10th is at Bracken County. The championship games are 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21 at both places.

Camels build momentum with NKAC title By James Weber jweber@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Campbell County’s wrestling program has been a regular winner of the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference championship, but the Camels have not claimed the Region 6 postseason title since their 2004 state title team. Whether this year’s Camels break that spell, head coach Mike Bankemper is pleased with his team’s progress after they won the 2012 conference championship last week. The win qualifies the Camels for the state duals tournament Jan. 28 in Lexington. “We wanted to win it because that’s our qualifier for the state duals,” Bankemper said. “The No. 1 team in our conference has a chance of being seeded in the top four, and hopefully we can get a top seed in the state duals. We have a competitive conference.” Ryle has won the region each of the past seven years, but has not sent its full lineup to the NKAC meet in that span, sending its top wrestlers to a major

Campbell County wrestler Paul Hamilton wrestles in the state tournament. FILE PHOTO

Top to bottom, Simon Kenton High School Kevin Cooper controls head and body of Newport High School Landon Bullings during their 145 lbs. match Jan. 10 in Campbell County. Kevin Cooper won the match. JOSEPH FUQUA/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Cincinnati meet in December. That has helped Campbell win nine of the past 10 conference titles. With the conference meet moved to January this season, the Camels faced the full squads for both Ryle and Simon Kenton and proved they were still strong enough to win the title. SK was the No. 1 seed going in, and Ryle No. 2. Campbell beat Simon 34-32 then beat Ryle 42-26

in the championship match Jan. 11. In the Simon match, the teams split the 14 individual bouts, but the Camels earned more points in their wins. Points for a win go from three for a close win to six for a pin, with earnings of four or five points possible for larger margins of victory. “In duals, the key is always the pins,” Bankemper said. “You have to have the pins and you cannot get

pinned. If you can pull off a pin or a major (decision), you’re getting an edge.” Bankemper said a key win was Kent Bachman’s pin of SK wrestler Ryan Stevens at 152 in one of the most evenly matched bouts of the meet. Both are ranked in the top 20 in the state in that weight class. Against Ryle, Campbell won eight of the 14 matches. Garth Yenter won by a 15-3 score over Ryle’s Keegan North at 120 pounds. Paul Hamilton (138), Wesley Collins (145), Dustin Turner (160), Elisiah Matthews (170), Brett Keeton (182), Dakota Key (195) and Mason Franck (285) all won matches.

Yenter is a defending state champion and entered the conference meet coming off a championship at the Fairfield (Ohio) Invitational Jan. 6. At Fairfield, he won two matches by pin and two by technical fall over a strong field of Cincinnati-area foes and was voted Most Outstanding Wrestler of the Meet. “That’s unusual because the Ohio coaches don’t know us very well,” Bankemper said. “But he dominated so much that he got a lot of attention.” Franck, a state runnerup at heavyweight last year, had missed most of the season with a football injury, and is working his way back into wrestling

shape. He was cleared to wrestle before the Fairfield tourney. “He’s hungry and ready to go,” Bankemper said. “He’s not sharp yet, he’s out of shape. The next four weeks are critical for him, but he’ll be fine. He works hard.” In all, the Camels used eight state qualifiers from 2011 against Ryle, and four state placers. Sean Fausz, a sophomore and state runner-up last year, also won at Fairfield, finishing first at 126. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/blogs/ preps, www. facebook.com/ presspreps or visit James on Twitter at @RecorderWeber.

Campbell County wrestler Garth Yenter participates in the 2010 state tournament. FILE PHOTO

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Boys basketball

» Bellevue senior Brandon Hoffmann became the 18th player in school history to score 1,000 career points. He had 24 against Nicholas County Jan.13 in a 63-52 loss, ending the night

with 1,008 points. » Campbell County beat Conner 60-40 Jan. 11. Nate McGovney scored 22 points as the Camels improved to 11-5 Jan. 13 with a 60-37 win over Ludlow. » Newport beat Highlands 71-69 Jan. 10. » NCC had a big week, beating Boone County 5249 Jan.11, Covington Catho-

lic 63-53 Jan. 13 and Campbell County 59-58 in overtime Jan. 14 in key games. Zach Ryan scored 16 points against Boone. Michael Bueter led the way against CCH with 18 points. Bueter and Brady Hightchew each had 20 points against Campbell as the Thoroughbreds improved to 9-4. Nick Seibert hit a three-

pointer at the buzzer against Campbell. » Bishop Brossart beat Pendleton County 76-71 in overtime Jan. 13. Justin Saunders had 19 points. » Highlands beat Ryle 63-61 Jan. 13 for its fourth win of the season. Samson Lewis had 21 points and Patrick Towles 17. » The All “A” boys re-

gionals will be this week. The Eighth Region is at Trimble County, the Ninth Region at Beechwood, and the 10th Region at Bracken County. The finals are 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21 for all tourneys.

Girls basketball

» Highlands beat Conner 67-53 Jan. 10. Vanessa

Fisse had 20 points and Leah Schaefer as Highlands avenged a loss from December. » Local all-tourney picks in the All “A” Ninth Region tournament were Heather Wayman (Dayton), Kylie Orr (Newport) and Makayla Bishop (Bellevue).


SPORTS & RECREATION

A10 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Bowling rolls into new year By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Week 5 was snowed out Jan. 12 in the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference for bowling. Action resumes Jan. 19. Several teams will participate in Cooper's tournament Jan. 21 at Super Bowl Erlanger. Here are the standings through Jan. 12. The first number is total record, the second number is division record for seeding.

Boys

Division I: Campbell County 26-2 (1-0), Boone County 25.5-2.5 (1-0), Cooper 24-4 (1-0), Dixie Heights 20-8 (0-0), Cov Cath 17-11 (0-1), Simon Kenton 15-13 (0-1), Scott

%"$ ($+) #-! )/ 2$) "/1$+ -0& .$/.2$ 30& $-'" /)"$,*

13-15 (0-1). Division 2: St. Henry 15.5-12.5 (1-1), Holy Cross 14-14 (2-0), Highlands 1315 (1-1), Brossart 13-15 (1-0), Newport 11-17 (1-0), NCC 9-19 (1-1), Lloyd 5-23 (0-2), Beechwood 3-25 (0-1), Dayton 0-28 (0-1). Week 4: Campbell over SK 6-1 (2,913-2,391), Brossart over Beechwood 6-1 (2,075-1,666), Newport over Highlands 4-3 (2,5572,433), NCC over St. Henry 4-3 (2,386-2,232), Holy Cross over Lloyd 4-3 (2,331-2,038), Dixie over Dayton 7-0 (2,362-1,552), Boone over Cov Cath 5-2 (2,590-2,456), Cooper over Scott 6-1 (2,366-2,017). Top averages: Brad Hightchew (Boone) 217.5, Jake Harris (Campbell) 204.88, Trey Brun (Campbell) 204.63, Zach Lawson (Scott) 200.13, Chris Hamilton (Dixie) 200, Tyler Widmeyer (Campbell) 199.6. High games: Brad Hightchew (Boone) 270, Logan Krey (St. Henry) 267, Darren Quinn (NCC) 256, David Zalla (CCH) 249.

Girls

Division I: Boone County 27-1 (1-0), Campbell County 25-3 (1-0), Dixie 22.5-5.5 (0-0), Notre Dame 15-13 (0-1), Cooper 14-14 (1-0), Scott 12-16 (0-1), SK 7-21 (0-1). Division 2: Holy Cross 23-5 (2-0), Brossart 19-9

(1-0), Newport 19-9 (1-0), NCC 13-15 (1-1), St. Henry 11-17 (2-0), Lloyd 6-22 (0-2), Beechwood 5.5-22.5 (0-1), Dayton 4-24 (0-1), Highlands 1-27 (0-2). Week 4: Campbell over SK 7-0 (2,222-1,541), Brossart over Beechwood 6-1 (1,833-1,478), Newport over Highlands 6-1 (1,8071,405), St. Henry over NCC 4-3 (1,720-1,656), Holy Cross over Lloyd 4-3 (1,830-1,668), Dixie over Dayton 6-1 (1,984-1,439), Boone over NDA 6-1 (1,943-1,750), Cooper over Scott 5-2 (1,807-1,673). Top averages: Katlyn Hoeh (Newport) 187.63, Erica Biddle (Campbell) 184.13, Erica Hickman (Campbell) 183.75), Alli Haggard (Dixie) 179.5, Brianne Vogelpohl (Campbell) 170.5, Delaney Elam (Brossart) 165.13. High games: Erica Hickman (Campbell) 263, Alli Haggard (Dixie) 243, Katlyn Hoeh (Newport) 234, Brianne Vogelpohl (Campbell) 223, Melissa Rodriguez (Holy Cross) 223. Jan. 19 schedule: La Ru - Highlands vs. NCC, Cov Cath/NDA vs. St. Henry; Super Bowl Erlanger Scott vs. Campbell, Dixie vs. Cooper, SK vs. Boone; Walt's - Newport vs. Lloyd; Southern Lanes Brossart vs. Holy Cross; Super Bowl Bellewood Dayton vs. Beechwood.

SUPER BOWL HIGH ROLLERS

The Super Bowl High Rollers, composed of Lynn Winkler of Cincinnati, Deana Johnson and Penny Wichman, both of Petersburg, Patsy Poor of Dry Ridge and Debbie Evans of Edgewood, were team champions at the 43rd annual Louisville Derby Fillies Tournament. The tournament ran from April through June and had teams from 10 states and Canada. In addition to prize money, each member received a "Louisville Derby Fillies 2011" jacket. THANKS TO PENNY WICHMAN

RED DEVILS WIN SUPER BOWL

The Red Devils celebrate their Super Bowl Championship in the Junior Division of the Northern Kentucky Youth Football League. The Red Devils from Campbell County defeated the Fort Mitchell Spartans 22-14 to capture their seventh Super Bowl Championship in the past 11 years. PROVIDED

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SPORTS & RECREATION

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • A11

Schwaeble not backing down for NKU Norse By Tom Skeen

2009 Colerain grad said. “I started playing right field my freshmen year and will continue to play there this season. Whatever they want me to do, I will. I love to be part of the game and will play wherever.” As a freshmen, Schwae-

ble was named to the AllGLVC Third Team after hitting .319 with a team-high 13 doubles and 42 RBI while posting a 1.70 earned run average, including a one-hitter against Missouri-St. Louis in her first career complete game at NKU. The Norse have appeared in the NCAA Tournament in Schwaeble’s first two seasons, including a 1-0 loss to Ashland University in May in the NCAA Midwest Regional and an 8-2 loss to Lewis University in 2010. “Postseason play is my favorite part (of the season). It’s a lot of fun and a whole different experience. The environment is really cool and you have to play your hardest knowing that it’s all on the line.” After losing just four seniors to graduation, Schwaeble sees good things for the 2011-12 Norse, who are entering their last season in Division II and moving to the Atlantic Sun Conference in Division I. “I’m more excited about this year because we have the best team I’ve seen since I’ve been here,” said

For more information contact the NCC Development Department at 2920001. NCCHS will award the Coach Jim Connor Award to Paul Devoto, 1970. The Coach Jim Connor Award is an award being given to Devoto for exemplifying the ideals and traditions of Newport Central Catholic

and for the excellence he has achieved in his work and his personal life. In addition, the Fr. John Hegenauer Community Service Award will be given to Fr. Robert Urlage, for his commitment to Newport Central Catholicand to the family values NCCHS strives to impart to its students.

tskeen@communitypress.com

It’s hard to imagine a two-time Cincinnati Enquirer Division I softball Player of the Year trumping what she did at Colerain High School, but Northern Kentucky University sophomore Emily Schwaeble is on her way. This past season Schwaeble, entering her third season on the fastpitch squad, led the team with 13 doubles and 44 RBI while finishing second in batting average (.340), hits (50), home runs (8) and slugging percentage (.592). She also finished the season with a perfect fielding percentage while playing right field and pitcher. With her stellar play Schwaeble was awarded with multiple honors, including being named to the All-Great Lakes Valley Conference First Team, Second-Team National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-Midwest Regional Team and the Daktronics All-Midwest Second Team. “Getting these personal awards is awesome,” Schwaeble said. “I always work as hard as I can for

Emily Schwaeble, a sophomore at Northern Kentucky University, was an All-GLVC first-team selection. THANKS TO EMILY SCHWAEBLE my team. I wasn’t expecting first team (All-GLVC) this year, but when I heard it, I was really excited. It was great.” The sophomore appeared in 14 games on the mound this past season and recorded an earned run av-

erage of 3.36 and a 4-3 record. She appeared in 14 games, starting eight, including three complete games while striking out 66 batters and walking just 19 in 58.1 innings. “I love to pitch, I’ve done it my whole life,” the

BRIEFLY Hall of fame

Newport Central Catholic High School is inducting its 12th class of inductees into its Athletic Hall of Fame: Dick Ziegler, class of 1946; Phil Popp, 1963; Mike Crusham, 1968; Mark Camm, 1978; Jamey Neltner, 1990; and Shanna Ziegler Rauen, 1995.

Also being honored as the “Team of Distinction” is the 1984 girls state champion softball team. The induction ceremony for these men and women will occur on Saturday, Feb. 18, in the Newport Central Catholic Gymnasium. The evening will begin with a social hour at 6 p.m.

followed by dinner and the induction ceremony at 7 p.m. Tickets are available for $25. Sponsorships for the event are available for $250 and include 10 tickets and your name in the program. Additional tickets can be purchased through the achool office prior to Feb. 10.

Schwaeble. “I’m really excited to see what we can do. We are all out to do our best and leave behind a great legacy as the last softball team (at NKU) to play Division II.” While Emily has had two great seasons with the Norse, she knows she couldn’t do it alone. “If I were not involved with the softball team I don’t know what I would be doing. I’m with my softball team on and off the field, they are like my second family. I never thought I would be able to go far away (for college) and I’m glad I didn’t. My family comes to almost every home game and my dad makes it to some road games, which means the world to me.”

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VIEWPOINTS

A12 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

NKY Head Start provides safe, quality services You may have seen recent news stories about an Inspector General report outlining safety violations in Head Start centers throughout the country. While the news reported the violations as “widespread,” in reality violations were found in 24 programs identified among more than 1,600 grantees as being most at risk for noncompliance of health and safety standards. Given the seriousness with which we take health and safety regulations at our Head Start program, I was not surprised that 21 of the 24 grantees acted swiftly and corrected their deficiencies. Nor was I surprised that the remaining three grantees lost their funding. If anything, the Inspector General investigation proves that there are systems in place to ensure that Head Start grantees comply with stringent health and safety standards.

In case you are concerned about Northern Kentucky’s Head Start program, proudly operated by Northern Kentucky CommuFlorence nity Action Tandy Commission COMMUNITY since 1965, here RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST are some facts. At NKCAC, child safety is our No. 1 concern. Period. Beyond safety of the child, we make sure that the children in our program are prepared for success in kindergarten. They learn numeracy and literacy skills, receive comprehensive medical and dental screenings, and have any special needs addressed. We have seven Head Start centers serving 444 3- and 4-year-

Gatewood: More than the Ky. Fried Candidate

A Kentucky folk hero has passed. For 20 years, Lexington attorney and activist Gatewood Galbraith served as an also-ran in statewide races. Earning a cult following of independent voters while annoying the establishment, Gatewood always made election season interesting. Since his first quest for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 1991, Galbraith served as the poster boy for opposing government intrusion on civil liberties and for his chief goal: legalizing marijuana. One of his early fundraisers, an outdoor music festival, was billed as “Gatewoodstock.” His chief endorsement came from Willie Nelson. A native of the Bluegrass and a fixture around the University of Kentucky campus for years, onlookers could spot Gatewood from afar by his tall, lanky frame, signature hat, and friendly demeanor. I first encountered him outside the Kentucky Theater on Lexington’s Main Street when he asked me to sign his petition to get on the ballot. I declined. Over the following election cycles I watched this man develop a following that made him the champion of Kentucky’s socalled freedom fighters from potheads to militia groups. He also became the hope for that slice of the electorate that sought an alternative to frustrating partisanship. He became synonymous with legalization, but expanded his platform to include additional issues like a freeze on college tuition prices and mountaintop removal. Gatewood would surely reject a label, but he followed libertarian principles. He rambled on at rallies he wanted to “Take the government and the police out of your bedroom and your blood-

streams and your brains and your bladders your billfolds and your back pockets and put ‘em back into a little box where David they belong.” Wolfford He claimed he was Tea Party COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST before Tea ParCOLUMNIST ty was cool. His propensity to grab the spotlight landed him a brief comedy gig, a Lexington radio show, and a trip to jail when he blocked a 4th of July parade. The mayor had put the UN float ahead of the USA float. In this last quest for the governor’s office, he embraced the slogan, “A Perennial Candidate for Perennial Problems.” I had the occasion to meet and talk with him last October. One could tell he had weathered more than a few rough campaigns. His autobiography, “The Last Free Man in America,” entertainingly recounts his travails across the country, his attempts to pass the state bar exam, and a variety of other risks. The airlines would have charged a fee for the bags under his eyes. But I, like anyone who paid attention to Gatewood, soon found a considerate, intelligent, articulate, and determined man who cared about the commonwealth. He was more than a distraction in Kentucky politics. He challenged the status quo. He provided comic relief to campaigns. He will be missed, more than every four years. Gatewood was more than the Kentucky Fried Candidate. David Wolfford, an Ashland native and UK graduate, teaches government and politics in Cincinnati.

WHEN THEY MEET Campbell County Fiscal Court

Address: 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 Phone: 859-292-3838

Meets: 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main St. And meets at 5:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of the month at the county administration building, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport.

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER

A publication of

olds in four Northern Kentucky counties. Nearly all of the families are low or very low income. About 10 percent are Hispanic; and 34 percent are AfricanAmerican or bi-racial. Eleven percent has a disability. Each center provides a healthy breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack along with nutrition counseling for parents. Children with disabilities receive individualized services that address their specific needs. Parent involvement is emphasized because we are trying to foster a lifetime commitment to education. Head Start, with about 75 percent of our funding from federal grants, is governed by a complicated set of regulations – some 2,000 in all – set out by the Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, we undergo health, fire, childcare licensing, financial and USDA reviews ev-

ery year. Every three years, the Office of Head Start conducts an intensive review of the program. All the research points to the critical window of opportunity from birth through age 5 as the key to a child’s success in life. As early childhood expert W. S. Barnett concluded in his 2008 study, “Well-designed preschool education programs produce long-term improvements in school success, including higher achievement test scores, lower rates of grade repetition and special education, and higher educational attainment. Some preschool programs are also associated with reduced delinquency and crime in childhood and adulthood. The strongest evidence suggests that economically disadvantaged children reap long-term benefits from preschool.” Sadly, many low-income children do not have the opportunity

for a quality preschool experience. But when these children walk through the doors of Northern Kentucky’s Head Start program, they are entering a safe learning environment designed to give them a range of educational, health, and family support services that will place them on a pathway to success. At NKCAC we are proud of our Head Start program, the safety of our centers, the quality of the services we provide, and the outcomes our children achieve. Our teachers and support staff will accept no less, because these children deserve – and the region needs –the strong start that Head Start provides. Florence Tandy is executive director of the Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission

GLOBETROTTERS VISIT MOYER ELEMENTARY

Moyer Elementary School Principal Jay Brewer poses for a picture with Harlem Globetrotters Flight Time (left) and Tiny during their visit to the school in December. SUBMITTED BY JAY BREWER

CAMPBELL COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES AND CONTACT INFO Senator Katie Kratz Stine – District 24

Local address: 21 Fairway Drive, Southgate KY 41071 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 236, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-781-5311 Frankfort phone: 502-564-3120 Email: katie.stine@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/S024.htm

Representative Joseph Fischer – District 68

Local address: 126 Dixie Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave., Annex Room 429D, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-781-6965 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 742 Email: joe.fischer@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H068.htm

Representative Dennis Keene – District 67

Representative Adam Koenig – District 69

Local address: 1040 Johns Hill Road, Wilder, KY 41076 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 358, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-441-5894 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 626 Email: dennis.keene@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H067.htm

Local address: 3346 Canterbury Court, Erlanger, KY 41018 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 432D, Frankfort KY 40601 Local phone: 859-578-9258 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 689 Email: adam.koenig@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H069.htm

Representative Thomas McKee – District 78

Congressman Geoff Davis – District 4

Local address: 1053 Cook Road, Cynthiana, KY 41031 Frankfort address: 702 Capitol Ave. Annex Room 332B, Frankfort, KY 40601 Local phone: 859-234-5879 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 667 Email: Tom.McKee@lrc.ky.gov Website: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ legislator/H078.htm

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

Local address: 300 Buttermilk Pike Suite 101, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 Washington address: 1119 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515 Local phone: 859-426-0080 Washington phone: 202-225-3465 Email: (link on website) Website: http://geoffdavis.house.gov/

Campbell Community Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

CATCH A STAR

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Teeter Tots teams toddlers and parents

Classes offered through April

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Hartig

Hartig in the right place to save a life By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Jessica Hartig of Cold Spring is a real lifesaver. Hartig and members of her personal training class grabbed an automated external defibrillator (AED) from the Alexandria Community Center and used it to help save the life of a 69-year-old man having a heart attack outside on Dec. 5. "She saved my life, along with others who helped, and I'm very grateful for what they did," said Henry Racke, 69, of Alexandria. Racke said he and his wife Margy had just finished walking three miles inside the community center. Racke said his wife waited underneath the building's canopy while he went to pull their truck around to pick her up. While driving under the overhang, Racke said after he pulled the truck out of a parking space he blacked out and struck another truck at a speed he was told by police his speed was between 3-5 miles per hour. "She shocked me and did some chest compressions and got my heart beating," Racke said of Hartig. Racke said he was taken to the hospital by ambulance, and he underwent surgery and now has an internal defibrillator and a pacemaker. Hartig, a personal and athletic trainer, said she was running a fitness boot camp class at the community center when she saw a truck bump another truck outside through the set of glass front doors. A woman came in yelling to dial 911. With a background in sports medicine, Hartig said she did what she was trained to do and ran outside. "I tried to get him to lay down, but there was a console there," she said. "I checked his pulse, and it went faint." Other people inside searched for and found an automated external defibrillator Hartig said she used to shock Racke twice in between administering CPR. Hartig said others from her fitness boot camp deserve an equal share of the credit for helping Racke. Anita Neufelder and Dana Paterno, both of Cold Spring, helped get Racke out of the truck and just helped by being there. And Debbie Fleckinger of Alexandria called 911 and an Alexandria police officer helped out as well until the ambulance arrived. Anyone would have done the same thing she did given the circumstances, Hartig said.

FORT THOMAS — For decades, the Fort Thomas Recreation Department has been getting children and their parents, grandparents and guardians moving through the Teeter Tots program. The program, which consists of several five-week sessions during September through April, gives children ages 2-4 an opportunity to get some exercise and practice coordination skills. Class instructor Margaret Powell said the class helps children learn listening skills, use their imaginations and interact with other children. During the classes, which are held once a week, parents, grandparents or guardians stay with the children and participate in the dances and activities including tumbling and basic exercises. “Everyone seems to really enjoy it,” Powell said. Parent Kristan Vennefron has been coming to Teeter Tots for years, first with her older children who are now 10 and 7, and now with her youngest, Kyle, who is 3. Vennefron said the program is reasonable priced and definitely worth the money. “This program is a great outlet for their energy,” Vennefron said. “They just have so much fun, that’s what keeps us coming back.” Vennefron said the thought has already crossed her mind that in couple years, her son will start kindergarten, and her Teeter Tot days will be over. “After all these years, I’m going to miss it,” Vennefron said. Penny Kramer, assistant director of the recreation department, said the city has been offering the Teeter Tots for more than 30 years.

Mary Twehues and Max Leuderalbert (left) and Kelly Twehues and Wren Twehues participate in the Teeter Tots class Tuesday, Jan. 10. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Danyelle Hollingsworth dances during the Teeter Tots class. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY

Crosley Crail, 3, points out her mouth during a song at Teeter Tots, a program put on by the Fort Thomas Recreation Department. AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

RECORDER

Kramer said it’s a good way to give children a way to have fun with their parents or other adults in their life. “That interaction is important for families,” Kramer said. “I’ve seen moms come through here with their fifth and sixth child, they just really enjoy it.” Kramer said the program, which is open to anyone with children ages 2-4, has always had a good turnout and new songs and activities are added yearly. Classes are held weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays for five weeks sessions. Registration for the next session, which begins Tuesday, Feb. 21, starts Tuesday, Jan. 31, and will continue until the class has reached it capacity of 48. Registration is required and can be made by calling the recreation department at 781-1700.

Wood ashes could harm gardens

Question: I’ve been keeping the fireplace going with all the cold weather we’ve had. Are wood ashes good for the garden? Answer: Wood ashes contain potash and have some use as a liming material. Their rather low neutralizing value ranges from 30 percent to 70 percent, expressed as calcium carbonate. The ash of hardwoods, such as maple, elm, oak and beech, contains about one-third more calcium mainly as the oxide, but, on exposure to moisture, they are largely in the carbonate form by the time they are applied to soil. So, if a soil test shows that your soil pH is too low for the crops you are growing (i.e., if it’s below pH 6.3 for most vegetables), then lime or wood ashes may be added to raise the soil pH. However, most garden and

landscape soil samples brought in to the Boone County Extension Office are already too alkaline or basic, so adding more lime or Mike wood ashes to Klahr “sweeten the soil” would actually HORTICULTURE CONCERNS make the situation worse, and it becomes difficult for the plants to absorb the nutrients out of the soil. Thus, the answer is the same as that to the question, “should I add lime to my soil?” The answer is: “Never add lime or wood ashes unless a soil test reveals the need.” Soil testing is a free service through your local Northern Kentucky Cooperative Extension

Service Office. Coal ash has little or no liming value. Do not use it on garden soils because it contains a fairly high concentration of heavy metals and other toxic compounds which may be taken up by the plants. With regard to garden planning, it’s best not to plant tomatoes in the same spot each year. As you continue your vegetable garden from year to year, try to avoid planting the same or even closely related crops in exactly the same spot more than once every three years. Crop rotation helps prevent insect and disease buildup. The vegetables listed together in groups below are subject to the same disease and insect problems as other vegetables in that same group, and thus should not

be planted in the same part of the garden year after year: • chives, garlic, leeks, onions, shallots • beets, Swiss chard, spinach • cabbage, cauliflower, kale, collards, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kohlrabi, turnips, rutabaga, Chinese cabbage, mustard • peas, broad beans, snap beans, lima beans • carrots, parsley, celery, celeriac, parsnip • potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers • pumpkins, squash, watermelons, cucumbers, muskmelons • endive, salsify, lettuce In addition, root and bulb crops are susceptible to many of the same soil pests so try to rotate these every year.

St. Mary School – OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Jan. 29, 12-2 p.m. CE-0000494669

Preschool, Half- & Full-Day Kindergarten, Gr. 1-8 635-9539 saintmaryparish.com/school


B2 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Exhibition celebrates the highprofile world of hair. Artwork both made from, and inspired by, locks by Wella Professionals. Barbie Style Heads on display. Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-11 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, 8406 U.S. 42, Works by local artists. Featured artist: Emily L. Figueroa-Wolfe, presenting her first solo show. Using her own unique style paired with classic techniques, Emily takes us on a journey around the world and to our own back yards. Free. Through Jan. 31. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-4 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, 333 Thomas More Parkway, Original colorfield oil paintings by Bonita Williams Goldberg. Free. Through Feb. 12. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Attractions

Stacey Rishoi, pictured, of Bellevue will perform the role of Delilah in Kentucky Symphony Orchestra's "Samson & Delilah" at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion. The University of Kentucky Opera Theatre and international singer Michael Hendrick will join KSO for the performance. For more information, visit www.kyso.org. THANKS TO J.R. CASSIDY

Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Special engagement. No coupons or passes will be accepted. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Winter Family Days, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Two children ages 2-12 admitted for $2 with each adult paying full admission price of $22. Children under 2 always free. Strollers welcome. Through Feb. 29. 859-261-7444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Peter Pan, 7 p.m., St. Catherine of Siena School, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Musical by junior high students. $7, $5 children. Through Jan. 21. 859-781-4216. Fort Thomas.

Education

Saturday, Jan. 21

Target your Resume/Highlight with Word, 10 a.m., Mary Ann Mongan Library, 502 Scott Blvd., Develop effective resume to catch interest of prospective employers with specific jobs. Free. Registration required. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4071; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

Music - Concerts Samson and Delilah, 8 p.m., Florence Baptist Church at Mount Zion, 642 Mount Zion, UK Opera Theatre and international singers join KSO for Saint-Saen’s opera of the Biblical tale of love and betrayal. $28 A seats, $20 B seats, $18 ages 60 and up, $10 ages 18 and under. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 859-371-7141; www.kyso.org. Florence. Fusion Fest, 8 p.m. With Red Soul Rising, Sinful Crow, Dirtbag, Community Service, Camp David, PerryLouisRich, Six Pack Superheroes and Detrimental. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Standing only on the main floor. $10, $8 advance; plus fees. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Music - Rock Cait Janes and Refranes, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-491-3500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. Two Headed Dog, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. With Pop Empire and Feedback Revival from Nashville., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., 859-261-6120. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy John Witherspoon, 8 p.m. $25., 10:30 p.m. $25., Funny Bone

On Stage - Student Theater

Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Auditions American Girl Fashion Show Model Auditions, 9-11:30 a.m., Kerry Toyota, 6050 Hopeful Church Road, Girls ages 4-13 of all ethnic backgrounds who would like to model historical and contemporary American Girl Doll fashions at the American Girl Fashion Show the weekend of April 27-29 at Music Hall. Free. Presented by Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp Children’s Trust Foundation. americangirl@aubreyrose.org; www.aubreyrose.org. Florence.

Cooking Classes Meatballs and Sauce Class, 2-3:30 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., $35. Registration required. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Cruises Belle of Cincinnati ’37 Flood Cruise, 8 a.m. Board at 7:30 a.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Riverboat with historians on board visits Ohio River sites hit by the worst flood ever to inundate the Queen City. River crested at record 79.9 feet on Jan. 26, 1937, and caused $20 million in damage. One-fifth of Cincinnati and one-third of Newport and Covington were under water. Breakfast and dinner served on board. Lunch served at the Belle’s stop in

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Rabbit Hash, Ky. Cruise returns at 8 p.m. $120, $110 seniors; $65 ages 4-12; free ages 3 and under. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Education Digital Photography: Elements of Composition, 2 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn about rule of thirds, visual lead-in, balance and other concepts to take your photography to the next level. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

SUNDAY, JAN. 22 Art Exhibits Color Passions, 2-8 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Music - Jazz Phil DeGreg Trio, 4:30 p.m. Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic

On Stage - Comedy

Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics, $2 jello shots. With DJ Love MD. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. 859-781-1211. Newport.

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m. $25., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport. Live Bait Comedy, 8 p.m. Comedians Adam Minnick, Mike foley, Jonathan Craig, Tim Berenato and Ally Bujdoso., 701, 701 Bakewell St., Drink specials include $5 pitchers of Long Islands or domestic drafts and $3 Wells. No cover. 859-431-7011. Covington.

Music - Big Band Swingtime Big Band, 7:30 p.m. $10., York St. Cafe, 738 York St., 859-261-9675; www.swingtimebigband.com. Newport.

Music - Latin Jorge Wojtas, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Free. 859-426-1042; www.argentinebean.net. Crestview Hills.

Music - R&B Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 859-344-1413; basictruth.webs.com. Crescent Springs.

Music - Rock Danny Frazier Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. The Soul Pushers, 9-11:45 p.m., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., 859-261-6120. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m. $25., 10 p.m. $25., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Student Theater Peter Pan, 7 p.m., St. Catherine of Siena School, $7, $5 children. 859-781-4216. Fort Thomas.

Recreation

Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington will offer "Ice, Ice Mammoth," a day full of ice-age, family friendly fun. The program features guest presenters, hands-on demonstrations, displays and more. Admission to the museum that day is free. For more information, visit www.bcmuseum.org. THANKS TO SUSANNA KNADLER

sales benefit Wave Foundation. $15 per tournament, $20 for two. Registration required. 859-815-1389; www.newportonthelevee.com/events/details.aspx?id=975. Newport.

Cornhole at the Levee Winter Classic presented by GameWorks, 1-8 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Indoors, throughout Levee Gallery Building. Eight American Cornhole Organization Open Doubles Cornhole Tournaments, starting each hour. All ages and skill-levels welcome. Limited to 32 teams per each hour. Beer

Erin Morgenstern, pictured, will discuss and sign for her debut novel "The Night Circus" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Crestview Hills. Photo by Kelly Davidson. THANKS TO RANDOM HOUSE Literary - Signings

THURSDAY, JAN. 26

Erin Morgenstern, 7 p.m., Joseph-Beth Booksellers, 2785 Dixie Highway, Author discusses and signs "The Night Circus.". Free. 859-912-7860; www.josephbeth.com. Crestview Hills.

Art Centers & Art Museums

Recreation Bridge, 12:30-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Open play. All ages. Family friendly. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-9 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, Free. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

MONDAY, JAN. 23

Clubs & Organizations

Art Centers & Art Museums

Teen Council, 4-6 p.m., Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St., Studio Building. Have your voice heard about things you would like to see happening at the Covington Library. Free. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 859-962-4068; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Music - Jazz

Recreation

Music - Rock

Duplicate Bridge, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Open to all players. Family friendly. $5. Presented by Boone County Bridge Center. 859-391-8639; www.boonecountybridgecenter.com. Elsmere.

TUESDAY, JAN. 24 Art Centers & Art Museums The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-9 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, Free. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington. Birdbrain Crash, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Sidebar, 322 Greenup St., Country/rock music. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-3456. Covington.

Senior Citizens Senior Movie Day, 1 p.m. Frank Capra classic "You Can’t Take it With You" starring Jean Arthur and James Stewart., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Includes theaterstyle snacks and discussion. Family friendly. Free. 859-9624002; www.kentonlibrary.org. Erlanger. Tai Chi for Seniors, 10-10:45 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Lower Level. Designed to help improve quality of life for people with arthritis, limited mobility or anyone wanting to work on balance, strength and/or breathing issues. Slowpaced, graceful, low-impact form of exercise. For seniors. $1. 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

The Art of Hair, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com/galleries/ gallery.php?page=the_art_of_hair. Covington.

Art Exhibits Universal Vision from a Local Perspective, 7-11 p.m., Boleros Dance Club, Free. 859-379-5143; www.bolerosdanceclub.com. Florence. Color Passions, 7:45 a.m.-10 p.m., Eva G. Farris Gallery at Thomas More College, Free. 859-341-5800. Crestview Hills.

Community Dance SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 9-11:30 p.m. Family friendly. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. Through Dec. 27. 513-290-9022; www.swingallery.com. Covington.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke/DJ, 8 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-3561440. Independence. Thirsty Thursday Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Birk’s Bar, 912 Monmouth St., Drink specials include: $2 bottles, $2 wells and $2 shots. With Jay and DJ Love MD. No cover. 859-491-0007. Newport.

Music - Acoustic The Turkeys, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., Zola, 626 Main St., Folk rock. Free. 859-261-7510. Covington.

Music - Jazz Lee Stolar Trio, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Music - Rock After Edmond and Rocky Loves Emily, 7 p.m. With Ohio On High, Cardboard Derby, Drum Machine and Role Models., Bangarang’s of Covington, 620 Scott Blvd., $10. 513-4603815; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

Schools Open House, 6:45-8 p.m., St. Catherine of Siena School, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Presentations showcasing primary and junior high curriculum. Babysitting provided. Free. 859-5722680. Fort Thomas.

Shopping Thrift Sale, 7 a.m.-noon, United Christian Volunteers of Elsmere, 15 Kenton St., Weekly thrift sale. Family friendly. 859-727-4417. Elsmere.


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Pork tenderloin that looks as good as it tastes A couple of weeks ago I was on Ron Wilson’s garden show on the radio and we were talking about cooking and gardening trends. I brought Ron and his executive Rita producer, Heikenfeld Joe Strecker, this RITA’S KITCHEN pork tenderloin. I gave the recipe over the air and it garnered a huge response – I’m still getting requests for it. I thought I’d share it with you since it really is a nice way to prepare pork and looks as good as it tastes.

Peppered bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin Friend and Kentucky reader Carolyn Grieme served us this delicious stuffed tenderloin. Here’s my adaptation: 4 tablespoons butter or olive oil ¾ pound fresh mushrooms, sliced (I used Kroger blend

which the restaurant’s does not contain. If you like, leave the cheese out.

with wild mushrooms but button and/or cremini work great, too) 1 cup chopped onion 1 ⁄3 cup chopped pecans, toasted (toast before chopping) Two tenderloins, about 1 pound each, trimmed Salt and pepper to taste (start with a teaspoon of each) 8 slices thick peppered bacon 1 ⁄3 to ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar, dark or light

Preheat oven to 450. Melt butter and add mushrooms, onions and sauté until tender. Stir in nuts and set aside. Butterfly pork by cutting a slit into the middle about 2⁄3 of the way down. It will open like a book. Then pound it out to even thickness and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spread mushroom mixture evenly, leaving a bit of a border so the filling doesn’t ooze out too much. Roll up and wrap 4-5 bacon slices around tenderloin. If you like, you can get the pork ready to this stage the morning of your party but let sit out

1 15 oz. can creamed corn 1 15 oz. can whole kernel corn, drained 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 cup sour cream 1 cup shredded cheddar or Colby cheese 6 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 1 small box corn muffin mix

Rita's stuffed pork tenderloin features mushrooms, onion, pecans and peppered bacon. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. about 30 minutes prior to baking. (Now if you forget, that’s OK – just remember that it will take longer to bake). Place, seam side down, in roasting pan. Rub evenly with brown sugar and bake uncovered at 450 degrees for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 400 and bake about 15 more minutes, or until meat thermometer registers 150. Don’t over bake so that meat stays moist. To toast pecans: Toast in single layer in 350 degree oven just until they

smell fragrant, about 6 minutes or so.

Corn pudding No. 1 similar, to City BBQ

For Gary, a Bethel reader, who loves the corn pudding at this restaurant and wants to make it at home. I called the restaurant and they told me their pudding contained basically creamed corn and regular corn, milk, eggs, sour cream and corn meal, among other things. Here’s one from my files that readers say is similar except for the cheese,

Preheat oven to 350 and butter a 13- by 9-inch pan. Mix everything together well and pour into pan. Bake 45-60 minutes. Let sit 10 minutes before serving.

Five-star classic corn pudding

Check out my blog Cooking with Rita at Cincinnati.com for this heirloom recipe. The texture is a lot lighter than the one above, and it’s a classic.

Sautéed carrots with sage

I first tasted this when daughter-in-law Jessie brought this side dish to dinner. She found it online and everybody loved them. I made a double recipe of this last night

when we were having our neighbors over for dinner. It’s easy, full of good nutrition (did you know sage is good for your mind?) and pretty on the plate. Here’s how I made it: 1 tablespoon each butter and olive oil 3 cups diagonally sliced carrot ¼ cup water Salt and pepper to taste Palmful chopped fresh sage

Melt butter in large skillet over medium heat, add oil and blend. Add carrots and water. Partially cover pan and cook until carrots are crisp tender, about 10 minutes. Add seasonings and increase het to medium high. Cook until carrots are tender and lightly browned, stirring frequently, about 5-10 minutes. Sprinkle with sage and serve. Serves 4-5. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Foster care board volunteers needed in NKY The Northern Kentucky Citizen Foster Care Review Boards are seeking volunteers to make a difference in the lives of local children in foster care, especially those in Harrison, Grant, Nicholas and Pendleton counties. Volunteers are needed to review cases of children placed in foster care because of abuse, dependency and neglect . Volunteers are not required to reside in the county where a board meets. All volunteers must complete a six-hour initial training session and consent to a criminal record and central registry check. A recommendation is then

made to the chief judge of the District Court or Family Court for appointment. All Northern Kentucky CFCRBs meet in the Northern Kentucky area. The meeting schedules for the boards most in need of volunteers are:

Harrison/Nicholas County CFCRB

The Harrison/Nicholas County CFCRB meets quarterly on the fourth Wednesday of the meeting month. Meetings take place at 9 a.m. local time.

Grant County CFCRB

The Grant County CFCRB meets quarterly on the third Monday of the

meeting month. Meetings take place at 4 p.m. local time.

Pendleton County CFCRB

The Pendleton County CFCRB meets quarterly on the fourth Wednesday of the meeting month. Meetings take place at 1 p.m. local time. For more information, contact Jamie Bergman, Family Services Coordinator for the Northern Kentucky CFCRBs Administrative Office of the Courts at 859-334-3245 or jamiebergman@kycourts.net.

Nosey wearing the Christmas sweater he had chewed on. THANKS TO MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD.

Cold weather can be hard on cats and dogs “Nosey!” I cried, walking into the living room and finding my basset hound chewing a hole in her sweater. “What do you think you are doing?” “What does it look like?” she Marsie Hall asked defiNewbold antly, pausMARSIE’S ing for a MENAGERIE moment to spit out a clump of red yarn. “I'm acting out, showing my displeasure over being forced to wear clothing.” “Listen Missy,” I said, wrestling the now shredded and slobber soaked garment from her, “You may not like to wear clothes, but I'm the mommy and I know what's best!” Sometimes as a responsible pet owner it can be difficult to know what's best. I know that Nosey has fur and can go outside to do her business without a sweater to keep her warm, but there are times that that fur coat of hers could use a little help if she's going out for a long walk. The flannel pajamas I bought for her at Target were just for fun, not for warmth. Just know that cold weather can be as hard on pets as it is on people. Keep your pets safe and warm this winter with these helpful tips! Shelter First, let me say that I am not an advocate of keeping pets outdoors! It seems to me, personally, if you are going to keep a pet, that you want to keep it indoors with you so it can be a “proper” companion. Domestic cats and dogs are not meant to be outdoors pets. Having

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Nosey wearing his new doggie pajamas. THANKS TO MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD.

said that, I understand that others do not share my opinion. Dogs and cats that sleep outdoors need a snug, dry, draft-free place to sleep. The floor should be raised from the ground to keep cold and moisture away. Ideally the shelter should be heated and have a door to keep the elements out. Bedding should be plentiful; straw is a good insulator. Check it often to make sure it stays dry. If you don't want to invite them indoors during sub-zero temperatures, consider a heated garage or heating a doghouse especially for them. Diet and water Pets need more protein and fat in the winter, especially if they spend time in the cold. Outdoor water bowls need to be checked often as the water can freeze. You can purchase heated dog dishes or even put a tennis or golf ball in the water dish to keep it from freezing. Use plastic dishes in the winter as metal ones can get so cold that their tongues can stick to it, much like poor Flick's did to the flagpole in the movie, “A Christmas Story.” Paws It is important to keep your dog’s paws free of clumps of ice and snow. They can cause injury due to the cold or even cut into your dog’s pads. Salt and chemical de-icers can be irritating as well. If your pet has walked on ground treated with these items, when you get home wash the paws with warm water and dry thoroughly. Check the legs and stomach as well. Always dry your pet’s paws when they come in from out of the snow. You might even want to consider boots for your dog if he/she will tolerate them. Keeping warm If your pet is short haired or very small, you will want to buy him a coat or sweater. Elderly, arthritic dogs will appreciate this as well. Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, they need the fur for warmth. Our indoor pets are used to central heat and air conditioning; so if you feel cold, chances are they will as well! Smaller caged pets such as birds have needs, too.

Make certain that their cages are kept in a part of the house that is free from drafts. The same spot they sit in during warmer months may not be appropriate in the cooler months, so check! Dangers Antifreeze is toxic to your pet’s kidneys and a tiny bit (as little as 1/4 teaspoon can be deadly to a cat or small dog.) It has a sweet taste so make certain to clean up any spills in the driveway or garage right away. There is non-toxic antifreeze. Check the labels when you shop. Many wild animals and outdoor cats seek shelter underneath the hoods of automobiles because the engines stay warm. Knock on the hood of your car on cold days before starting it. More dogs are lost in the winter time when there is snow and ice on the ground, especially during snowstorms. This happened to my next door neighbor's beloved, elderly dog. The problem is, if they get away from you, finding their way back is difficult because they may be weak to move through the snow/wind and the elements diminish their sense of smell. This is another reason to make sure you dog has tags and/ or a microchip. Always make sure this information is up to date and thorough. I have found dogs with collars but no ID tags and ones with vet issued rabies tags, but nothing else. This happened on weekends where it was impossible to get through to the vet's office for the names of the owners. (This is a big pet peeve of mine!) Your home should be pet-proofed! Make certain that your pets can’t knock over space heaters, knock candles off of low tables with their tails, or get too close to the fireplace. They can be burned or worse, start fires. Also, keep your hot drinks up off of low surfaces. If you have any other tips for cold weather pet care, please share them with me! For more pet care tips, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com.


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Challenge: try tracking fruit for five days as a cup, while ½ cup dried fruit counts as a cup. The key is to eat a variety of fruits of all Diane colors for Mason the most EXTENSION benefit. NOTES While 100 percent fruit juice can be part of a healthful diet, it lacks dietary fiber. It also can provide excess calories. Fruit provides many essential nutrients. Fiber is provided by whole

fruits. It can improve cholesterol levels and aid digestion. Some fiber-rich fruits include apples, Asian pears, blackberries, kumquats, pears, persimmons, pomegranates and raspberries. Many fruits are a good source of potassium. Potassium plays an important role in healthy blood pressure. It may help reduce artery stiffness and protect against the damage from excess sodium intake. Good fruit sources of potassium include bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew melons,

Yearlings gala celebrates 25 years The Yearlings celebrated its 25th anniversary with a classic Hollywood theme at their Nov. 11 gala at Triple Crown Country Club in Union. This group of women volunteer their time and efforts to raise funds for local charities in need. Proceeds benefit the Wood Hudson Cancer Research, Wilson Animal Rescue, Charity Night at the Tables supporting the Brighton Center, Food Pantry and Children's Advocacy Center; along with the Yearlings College Scholarships.

Members of The Yearlings pose for a photo during the club's 25th anniversary gala at Triple Crown Country Club. From left: Susan Bush, Jean Loewenstine, Rusty Sheehan, Karen Wesdorp and Barbara Moran Johnson. THANKS TO BRENDA SPARKS

Triple Crown winning jockey Steve Cauthen of Verona serves as emcee during the oral auction at The Yearling's 25th anniversary gala at Triple Crown County Club. THANKS TO BRENDA SPARKS

Mark Noll as Elvis, Jack-Nathan Forman as Captain Jack Sparrow and Pam Porter as Marilyn Monroe greeted guests at The Yearlings' 25th anniversary gala at Triple Crown Country Club. THANKS TO BRENDA SPARKS

support. More than 120 women arrived for a light lunch, wearing purple and donating purses for YWCA Battered Women’s Shelter clients. There was a brief program that included YWCA President & CEO Charlene Ventura, Allstate Agency Owner Alison Doner, YWCA Protection from Abuse Director Theresa Singleton, Cincinnati Police Department Assistant Chief Lieutenant Colonel Cindy M. Combs and survivor and former YWCA client Angela Lewis. The crowd listened intently to the shocking statistics such as one in four women will experience do-

mestic violence in their lifetime. Combs, assistant to Cincinnati Police Chief James Craig, shared with the audience that there has been a decline in reported domestic violence in the community, but the police force will not be happy until there are no incidents. “Events like this give me hope that we will continue to decrease the number of domestic violence incidents,” Combs said. Angela Lewis, a survivor and a former YWCA client shared her personal experience and told the group “if it wasn’t for the YWCA, I do not know where I would be today.”

New Hope Center offers training Community Recorder The New Hope Center is offering volunteer training for men and women interested in mentoring people facing unplanned pregnancy.

most are naturally very low in sodium and fat. And, because most fruits are about 85 percent water they can fill us up and help reduce our urge to indulge in other less-healthy choices. If you are concerned about pesticide contamination in fruits, choose organic or consider pineapple, mango, domestic cantaloupe, kiwi, watermelon, and grapefruit for their rating of lowest in pesticide residue. Regardless of the source of fruit, it should be rinsed to remove dirt

and microorganisms. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises rinsing fruits under clean, running water while rubbing briskly with your hands. Then dry with a clean cloth. Start your day off with a piece of fruit at breakfast or for a mid-morning pick-me-up. You might be surprised of how little you eat! Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

Clerks attend college

Circuit court clerks from Northern Kentucky participated in the 2011 Circuit Clerks Fall College that took place Nov. 15-17 at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Conference Center in Frankfort. The Administrative Office of the Courts provided the education program for the state’s circuit court clerks. The theme for the event was Building Excellence in Changing Times. Participating were: » Boone County Circuit Court Clerk Dianne Murray » Campbell County Circuit Court Clerk Taunya Nolan Jack » Kenton County Circuit Court Clerk John C. Middleton “The Office of Circuit Court Clerk provides important services for the public and judicial system

and the college offered information to help us carry out those duties,” said Stephanie King-Logsdon, McLean County circuit court clerk and president of the Kentucky Association of Circuit Court Clerks. “We attended an indepth session on processing case appeals, covered handling and disposing of evidence and heard from other circuit clerks about their best practices.” Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. was the keynote speaker for the college. The clerks also heard from AOC Director Laurie K. Dudgeon and AOC Budget Director Carole Henderson, who provided an update on the Judicial Branch budget and upcoming legislation. John Wilson, president of the Kentucky Association of Counties, was the guest

speaker for a circuit clerks’ luncheon. Wilson is the county judge-executive for Garrard County. The circuit clerks also attended sessions about driver licensing. During one of the sessions, Bill Heise, director of the state Division of Driver Licensing, discussed the new process for Offices of Circuit Court Clerk in issuing commercial driver licensing that will begin in midJanuary.

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Allstate Foundation gives $10,000 to YWCA The YWCA was recently presented with a check for $10,000 from The Allstate Foundation in support of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which is acknowledged in October each year. The Allstate Foundation challenged the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati to bring 100 members of the local community together to learn about domestic violence and to learn about a new website to help women have access to more resources. A standing room only crowd came to the “Purple Purse TweetUp” at the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati on Oct. 11 to show

dried plums, dried apricots and orange juice. Vitamin C is another nutrient provided by fruits. Vitamin C helps our bodies heal cuts and wounds, and keeps our teeth and gums healthy. Some fruits highest in vitamin C include blackberries, cantaloupe, grapefruit, kiwi, lemons, limes, mangoes, pineapple, strawberries, watermelon, oranges and tangerines. Most fruits are nutritional standouts for what they do not contain. They are cholesterol free and

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Give yourself a simple challenge: track the amount of fruit you eat each day for five days. Fresh, frozen, canned, dried and 100 percent juice all count toward the recommended daily intake of fruit. Fruit consumption is linked to a decreased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some fruits are also thought to protect against some types of cancers. It is recommended that adults eat about two cups of fruit a day. Generally, one cup of fruit or 100 percent fruit juice counts

The next training session is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 18 and 6-9 p.m. Feb. 20-21. Choose from three Northern Kentucky locations: Crestview Hills, Latonia or Alexandria. Call Denise Nevins at

859-341-0766, ext. 13, or email dnevins@newhope center.com. Registration fee of $25 covers the training manual.

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

Reserve seeks members Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps provides citizens of both medical and non-medical backgrounds with a way to help their communities during a public health emergency. Anyone interested in joining the Medical Reserve Corps is invited to attend an orientation session at 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Northern Kentucky Health Department’s District Office, 610 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood. A light meal will be provided. The Northern Kentucky Medical Reserve Corps is a branch of the federal government’s Medical Reserve Corps program, and its goal is to provide a volunteer pool for the Northern Laptops from

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Kentucky region that can enhance and support public health agencies and the health care infrastructure during a crisis. Volunteers would be asked to serve in their own community; but may also choose to volunteer for the Tristate region or for communities in need around Kentucky. Volunteers will be offered training throughout the year that will support personal preparedness and basic disaster response skills, as well as developing specialized skills needed for a public health emergency response. Anyone age 18 or older is eligible, and people with both medical and non-medical training are encouraged to join. For more information or to register, contact Jean Caudill at 859363-2009 or Jean.Caudill@nkyhealth. org, or visit www.nky health.org/mrc.

Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center (NKCAC) extends thanks to the Advocates, Fidelity Investments and the Northern Kentucky community for providing gifts and holiday support for the children and families served by the NKCAC. The NKCAC provides a coordinated response to concerns of child abuse in a child-focused environment, offering prevention, evaluation and treatment to children and families. The Advocates are the volunteer fundraising organization of the NKCAC. NKCAC provides an opportunity during the Christmas holidays for the community to show support for children that are seen at the Children’s Advocacy Center through a “Giving Tree.” Children and their siblings are identified throughout the year by staff as families in need. Families are contacted in November to ask if they need assistance with Christmas gifts. Children and their caregivers create a wish list. The lists are compiled, and volunteers select children from the list and shop for the gifts. NKCAC organizes the gifts, and the gifts and wrapping paper are provided to the families. This year, 21 families were helped by the program.

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Doug Doty, Melody Ludwig, Curtis Poland, Jennifer Morgan and Donny Stephens of Northern Kentucky were among Santa's helpers who brought gifts for the children served by the Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

Tabitha DeMoss of Independence coordinated the efforts of 20 Fidelity Investments staffers who supported Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center with their holiday donations. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS “Many of these children had a year filled with difficulty and trauma,” said Vickie Henderson, executive director of the NKCAC. “The generosity from the community reinforces to the children that

they are special and are not forgotten by Santa.” The families who received holiday support from the NKCAC were the most appreciative. The items donated may have been trucks, LEGOs and

Sally Wilson of Silver Grove is pictured with the bags of gifts that her team of Fidelity Investments employees gathered to help Santa bring Christmas to the children served by Northern Kentucky Children's Advocacy Center. THANKS TO GAIL MYERS

Barbie dolls, but the meaning was celebration, affirmation and restoration. The help of so many contributed to the healing of 55 children who would have had nothing or very little to open on Christmas.

IN THE SERVICE Schultz graduates from basic training

Navy Seaman Recruit Jacob C. Schultz, son of Andrew C. Schultz of Highland Heights, completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill.

During the eight-week program, Jacob completed training in classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. The capstone event of boot

camp is “Battle Stations,” an exercise that gives recruits the skills and confidence needed to succeed in the fleet. Jacob is a 2011 graduate of Loveland High School.

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NOW THAT I’M HERE, I HAVE TO ASK MYSELF: “WHAT TOOK YOU SO LONG?” Not only are the residents of Elmcroft living happy lives, they’re growing in experience – trying new things, making new friends, having fun and going places. Call Jenny at 859.980.7200 to schedule a visit. Assisted Living | Memory Care 2112 Main i S l 4 212 Street | Florence, KY 41 41042 | elmcroft.com Written information relating to this community’s services and policies is available upon request.

CE-0000491892


LIFE

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B7

READERS ON VACATION

John and Jill Fessler visited the Biltmore Estate in Ashville, N.C., on Dec. 21. They toured the Vanderbilt home during a evening candlelight tour with live holiday choral music. THANKS TO JILL FESSLER

Tri-State Diversity Conference Feb. 16-17 The eighth annual TriState Diversity Conference will bring nationally known speakers and informative seminars to provide diversity training for Tristate citizens. The conference will take place Feb. 16-17 at the Marriott, Cincinnati Airport in Hebron. The host universities are Ohio State University, Purdue University, Kentucky State University and University of Kentucky’s Extension programs. The conference is for everyone that would like to have in-depth training in aspects of diversity. Attendees have included school teachers, administrators, human resource personnel, social workers, college faculty and staff, government agencies, and community development professionals More than 200 participants attend annually from 20-plus states. Many local businesses have had large

delegations. The 2012 theme is “Diverse Communities – Common Unity.” The keynote speakers are Victor Lewis and Hugh Vasquez, cast members of "The Color of Fear," a film about race relations in the U.S. Drawing upon decades of experience as educators and activists in multicultural work, the pair creates a context for honest and forward-moving discussion around the role of race and ethnicity in our lives. The Tri-State Diversity planning committee is offering a half-day training prior to the conference for early arrivals. Dr. Michael Washington, a professor of history and past director of the Afro-American Studies Program at Northern Kentucky University, will lead participants in an in-depth discussion of diversity. Topics at the conference will include: » Slow Burn: The effects of interpersonal im-

plicit discrimination » Reframing the Expert Mode: a new approach to engaging multicultural audiences » 25 years of “Each One Teach One”: The University of Cincinnati’s racial awareness program » Different Strokes for Different Folks: Local champions addressing the three ‘R’s’ of health equity » What’s Cash Got to Do with It? The business case for economic inclusion » Diversity Takes Flight: An introduction to diversity education » Celebrate Diversity with a 4-H Global Education Curriculum » Walk One Hour in My Shoes: A cultural competence/multicultural training program on working with Latino communities. More workshops, information and registration: http://ces.ca.uky.edu/tri statediversityconference/

Agency honored for preventing substance abuse The Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy and the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy has awarded the Northern Kentucky Local KY-ASAP Board the 10-year Celebration & Achievement Award for outstanding accomplishments in providing substance abuse education, prevention, treatment and law enforcement initiatives for the past 10 years. The award was presented Nov. 10 at the Northern Kentucky Health Department. The Northern Kentucky Local KY-ASAP Board includes Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton counties. The Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy (KY-ASAP) was created in 2000 to develop a strategic

plan to reduce the prevalence of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use among youth and adult populations in Kentucky and coordinate efforts among state and local agencies in the area of substance abuse prevention. “KY-ASAP continues to embrace and incorporate the philosophy of ODCP to involve the three-pronged approach of prevention, treatment and enforcement in the area of substance abuse,” said Van Ingram, executive director of ODCP. “The local boards have become an excellent local community tool and much needed component in educating, preventing, treatment and enforcing substance abuse issues.” Ingram added that local KY-ASAP boards work with their respective com-

munities to help implement policy and ordinance changes to reduce the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. During 2011local boards received more than $1.6 million in state and federal funds to implement their efforts. Currently, there are 75 local KY-ASAP boards that cover 113 of 120 counties in the commonwealth. Sixteen of these boards are regional and consist of two or more counties that have joined efforts to address substance abuse issues affecting their area. The local boards consist of stakeholders in each county or multi-county jurisdiction. For more information on KY-ASAP contact Amy.Andrews@ky.gov or Heather.Wainscott@ky.gov.

YEARLINGS MEMBER HONORED

The Southern Gateway Chorus, the first local group to join the World Choir Games, performs under the direction of acclaimed singer Joe Connelly, front standing, winner of four international barbershop quarter gold medals. THANKS TO DAVID BEAUDRY

Male chorus offers free singing lessons The Southern Gateway Chorus is offering men from the Cincinnati area free group singing lessons. Southern Gateway Chorus is a men’s a cappella group led by four-time gold medal quartet singer Joe Connelly. The five-week series will include 90-minute lessons on Tuesday evenings beginning Feb. 7 at Harmony Lodge, 646 E. Epworth

Ave. in Cincinnati. Topics covered will include posture, breathing, singing basics, vowels, diphthongs and dynamics. The series concludes with an opportunity to perform a song on March 10 with the Southern Gateway Chorus at its ArtsWave Sampler Weekend event in Fairfield. The 85-man chorus is composed of singers ages 10-81. Space is limited. For-

mal musical background is not required. For more information or to register, visit www.SouthernGate way.org/sing or call 1-877474-2463 ext. 2.

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012 ADVERTISEMENT

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE

ROBERT C. CETRULO, J.D. ROSE CLASS & CHILDREN MICHELLE CLIFF & FAMILY SR ELEANOR COLGAN, SND DEN PEGGY COLLOPY LIBBY COLVILLE, GLM TOM, KRIS, & MEGAN CONDIT MR & MRS JOSEPH H CONLEY RITA CONNELLY JON CONNELLY APRIL COVINGTON COVINGTON On this thirty-ninth anniversary of the infamous HAYLEY JESSE CRAIL decision of the Supreme Court exercising its raw EMILY CRAIL CRAIL judicial power over the lives of the defenseless JONAH JOSIE CRAIL unborn, we join with a multitude of others in many JUDE CRAIL CRANLEY cities across this nation, to carry the message of JANE JAMES C CROWLEY, J.D. PAT CUELTE Life to President Barrack Obama and to the 112th DANKS Congress. We join the over 100,000 people who HENRY MICHAEL T DANT marched in a circle of life around the capitol in KIMBERLY S DANT JACK & MARION DAUER Washington DC on January 23. TOM DAUGHERTY As much as we would like to be there, for many SAMANTHA DAUGHERTY BUCHER DAUGHERTY, JR it is impossible to travel to Washington. Again, TOM JEANNE DECKER we March on Paper. We openly lend our names FRANK DECKER R. DEE to urge The adoption of a mandatory Human Life INJANET MEMORY OF JIM DEE ROBERT S DEHNER Amendment to the Constitution of the United ROBERT C DEHNER States of America. MICHAEL S DEHNER We pledge to strive to attain that goal in memorial JOSEPH M DEHNER STEPHEN P DEHNER of those little ones who have no identity and bear CHRISTOPHER R DEHNER no names but nonetheless are written on the JOHN A DEHNER DEHNER consciences of all Americans. We are all manner BARBARA FRANNI DENKE of people - We are Democrats, Republicans, PAUL & PERI DENKE DENKE Independents, Conservatives, Liberals and all the ALICIA JOHN DENKE shades in between. ELENA DENKE DENKE The beautiful red rose, symbol of short life CHRISTOPHER JAMES DENKE and martyrdom, will again bloom in Washington LUCIA DENKE GEMMA DENKE January 22. JUSTIN DENKE WE HAVE TAKEN A STAND! MICHAEL DENKE TOM DENNIS WE WILL NOT COMPROMISE! JAMES R DETERS AND WE WILL BE HEARD! DOROTHY L DETERS SHARON M DIETZ MIRIAM DIEZ ANDREW DIEZ NORB BOH NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN AILENN ADAMS GRACE DILLON ANGELA BOH NATASHA BRUEGGEMANN DEAN ADAMS IN LOVING MEMORY OF AARON BOH ISABELLA BRUEGGEMANN GRACE ADAMS THOMAS X. DILLON JACK BOH CHRISTINA BRUEGGEMANN JANET ALBERS TIMOTHY DILLON DOUGLAS BOH BENEDICT BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT ALBERS BRENDAN DILLON DENNIS BOH PATRICK BRUEGGEMANN KATHLEEN ALBERS KATERI DILLON GARY & RUTH ANN BOLTE ANNA BRUEGGEMANN MARTIN ALTER P. SEAN DILLON MATTHEW & HANNAH BOLTE MICHAEL BRUEGGEMANN TERESA ALTER MARY ELLEN DILLON MARY L. BOND GRACE BRUEGGEMANN ANTHONY ALTER CHRIS DILLON J.D. BOND, SR ANGELA BRUEGGEMANN ANNA ALTER LISSA DILLON WHITNEY BOONE THERESA BRUEGGEMANN CATE ALTER CLAIRE DILLON LAWRENCE R BORNE, PHD ELIZABETH BRUEGGEMANN EDWARD & MARILYN APPIARIUS TERRY DILLON JOHN D BOURKE JAMES & EMILY BRUEGGEMANN MR & MRS WILLIAM APPLEGARTH ANNE DILLON JULIE A BOWLING RICK BRUEGGEMANN PATRICK APPLEGARTH VIANNEY DILLON ROBERT BOWLING PATTI BRUEGGEMANN BARB APPLEGARTH KATIE MARIE DILLON JEANNINE BOWLING FRANCISCO BRUEGGEMANN STEVE & CATHY ARLINGHAUS JACK BOWLING MR & MRS NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN BRIAN DINEEN PAUL & MARLYSARLINGHAUS & FAMILY CAITLIN DINEEN MEGAN BOWLING & FAMILY TAMMY & CHARLES ARMITAGE SHANNON DINEEN COURTNEY BOYLSON RICHARD BRUEGGEMANN, JR RON AUTERI ADRIENNE DINEEN CONSTANCE BRADY RAYMOND BERNARD BRUEGGEN JACKIE AYRES AMY G DINEEN MARY L BRANDT E JAMES BRUN BOB & ROSE BACON MRS JOAN DIORIO JANE & JEFF BRAULEY ANN MARIE BRUN ROSSANNA BAGIALTSALIEF PENNY S (WEED) DIRR RONALD BRAUNWART CHARLIE BRUNE CHRISTOS BAGIALTSALIEF GEORGIANN DISCHAR CHARLES BREWER PAT BRUNE MR & MRS LUIS BALLESTER ALICE DITRICK LISA BREWER BOB & HONEY BRUNSON DOTTIE BANKEMPER NANCY DITRICK BETTY BREWER LOIS BUERGER STAN BARCZAK DIANE DITRICK BILLIE BRIDGES TIM BUERGER CATHY BARCZAK GREG DITRICK WENDEL BRIDGES AMY BUETER MARY BARCZAK TONY & GAIL DOANE ROBERT E. BROCKMAN BETTY BURK ELIZABETH BARCZAK DOMVILLE NICHOLAS JANE BROCKMAN JAMES BURK RACHEL BARCZAK JANE DONADIO PHILIP BROCKMAN BETH BURWINKEL SARAH BARCZAK BILL & KAY DORNING ANTHONY BROCKMAN MICHELE BURWINKEL ROSE BARCZAK BEVERLY DRAUD ANDREW BURWINKEL IN MEMORY OF WALTER BARCZAK BRIAN BROCKMAN JON DRAUD JESSICA BROCKMAN JOYCE BURWINKEL CHERLYN BARCZAK THOMAS & DARLA DRESSMAN EMMA BROCKMAN JOE BURWINKEL IRENEUSZ BARCZAK LAURA DUCKWORTH LUKE BROCKMAN RITA BUSHELMAN IN MEMORY OF MARIA BARCZAK JOHN W DUNN ROBERT F BROCKMAN D.J. BUSHELMAN IN MEMORY OF JOE BARKET TED & BETTY DUPONT FAMILY LISA BROCKMAN CASEY BUSHELMAN WILLIAM BARKIE GERI DURITSCH JOHN BROCKMAN SUSAN BUSHELMAN EVAN BARKIE MARIE DURITSCH HELEN ANN BROCKMAN SHERI BUSHELMAN EMMA BARKIE EASTSIDE CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE JACK BROCKMAN MARGARET BUTLER DEANNA BARKIE LOIS EDWARDS LUKE BROCKMAN CAROLYN BUTLER ETHAN BARKIE NANCY B EGAN DANNY BROCKMAN BILL BUTLER CRAIG AND KAREN BARTH ARICA EGAN PATRICK BROCKMAN JERILYN BUTLER CAITLIN BARTH DAN EGAN BERNIE BROSSART ANITA BUTLER KYLE BARTH ISABEL EGAN PATRICIA BROSSART MARY DOLORES BUTLER MARILYN BAUMGARTNER JOSIAH EGAN BARBARA BROWN JULIANNA BUTLER ROSE BECKERICH VERONICA ROSE EGAN BARBARA A. BROWN MICHAEL BUTLER FRANK BECKERICH EVANGELINE EGAN ROBERT J. BROWN HELEN BUTLER MALIA BECKERICH SUE EILERS FRED BROWN CHRISTOPHER BUTLER WAYNE BEIL DICK EILERS ROBERT & BARBARA BROWN FAMILY GABRIEL BUTLER TIERSA BEIL BRENT ELLIOT ROSE BRUECKNER ANNE BUTLER NICHOLAS BEIL EUGENE ENGEL PAUL BRUECKNER MARIA BUTLER CRISTIN BEIL RON & DEBBIE ENGELMAN MRS MAE BRUEGGEMAN SUZANNE BUTLER CATHY BEIL JOSEPH & ELVERA ENZWEILER AL BRUEGGEMAN ANTHONY BUTLER PHILOMENA BEIL JOSEPH III & CINDY ENZWEILER ANN BRUEGGEMAN CHUCK BUTLER ISABELLA BEIL MARILYN ESSELMAN BOB BRUEGGEMANN CHRISTI BUTLER GEMMA BEIL LOU ESSELMAN JOHN BRUEGGEMANN REID BUTLER ROSARIE BEIL JAMES & GINA EVANS & FAMILY MARIA BRUEGGEMANN NINA BUTLER WAYNE BEIL, II CATHERINE EXELER JEROME BRUEGGEMANN HEATHER BYERLY WAYNE BEIL, III SEAN & SEAN FARLEY FAMILY MARILYN & BON CAHILL GLENN & THERESE BEIMESCH FAMILY JOACHIM BRUEGGEMANN DOTTIE M FARRELL MARIA BRUEGGEMANN KAY CAPETILLO AUDREY BEITING JOAN FASOLD JOSEPH BRUEGGEMANN THE CAREY FAMILY ABRAHAM BELL DON FASOLD BERNADETTE BRUEGGEMANN DAVID CARNOHAN MONICA BRUEGGEMANN BELL CONNIE FEARS LUKE ANTHONY BRUEGGEMANN DONNA CARNOHAN CHRISTY & NICHOLAS BELL FRANK FEINAUER MARY MAGDALENA BRUEGGEMANN CHRISSY CARNOHAN GENEVIEVE BELL CHRISTANNA BELL GIOVANNI BELL CLAUDIA BELL TH RO IFE OSARY ALEXANDER BELL ANNA BELL ROCESSION ALLY ANTHONY BELL In Reparation for Years of Legalized Abortion ATHANASIUS BELL BLAISE BELL Saturday, January 21, 2012 BOBBY BELL DENISE BELL KRISTEN BELL Seth Morgan, former OH State Rep. LUCY BELL PATRICK BELL and “Think Talk Radio” host PHILOMENA BELL PATRICK BELL Julie Busby, OH Heartbeat Bill strategy team SOPHIA BELL Tom Brinkman, former OH State Rep. MR & MRS NICK BELL & FAMILY ABRAHAM BELL, JR PATRICIA BENDEL MARY BENNETT Time: 11:00 AM FRED BENNETT Where: Cincinnati City Hall – 801 Plum Street MIKE BENNETT JAMES & CHARLOTTE BERLING MARY ELLEN BERTKE JOHN F. BERTKE JERRY & LOIS BIEDENBENDER Time: 11:45 AM Where: Fountain Square BRUCE J BIEDENHARN MARY JO BIEDENHARN J. SEBASTIAN BRUEGGEMANN TRUDY FEINAUER CORRINE CARNOHAN THOMAS L BIEGER AMBROSE A. BRUEGGEMANN TINA FELDMAN THOMAS W. CARR TRUDY A BIEGER DIANA M. BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY FELDMAN MARY S. CARR R. CYRIL BIEGER THOMAS J. BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT FELDMAN BRIAN CARRILLO META BIEGER-SHERMAN ELEANOR G. BRUEGGEMANN LARRY J FELTHAUS ANGIE CARRILLO VICKI BIERY LISA BRUEGGEMANN NORMA FESSLER WILLIAM CARRILLO BILL BIERY, III MARY BRUEGGEMANN DENNIS FESSLER SAMUEL CARRILLO WALTER BIRCH MATTHEW BRUEGGEMANN STEPHEN E FIEGER ISABELLA CARRILLO RONALD W. BITTER JIM BRUEGGEMANN MARIANNE C FIEGER VINCENT CARRILLO RITA F. BITTER ROBERT BRUEGGEMANN JEANNE A FINCK JOSEPH CARRILLO MARY & ZACHARY BITZER JACINTA BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY A FINCK MR & MRS JOSIAH CARTER PATRICK & MARY ANN BLACK CATHERINE BRUEGGEMANN AMY W. FINDLEY PAT CARUSO THE BLADES FAMILY GABRIEL BRUEGGEMANN CHRIS FINDLEY GAYLE & WANDA CAYTON REV LESLIE F BLOWERS MM IGNATIUS BRUEGGEMANN JACOB FINDLEY MICHAEL P CETRULO MARY J BLUM REGINA BRUEGGEMANN ALLISON FINDLEY IN LOVING MEMORY OF CHARLEY & TRACY BLUM STANISLAUS BRUEGGEMANN MR. & MRS. JAMES FINKE CAMILLO D. CETRULO WILL BLUM MERCEDES BRUEGGEMANN MARIA C FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF MICHAEL BLUM VICTORIA BRUEGGEMANN JEFFREY E FINKE ESTELLE MCGRATH CETRULO ANDREW BLUM DIEGO BRUEGGEMANN THOMAS R FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF MARY K BLUM CARMELITA BRUEGGEMANN PETER E FINKE CATHLEEN M. CETRULO CHARLEY BLUM DAVID J FINKE IN LOVING MEMORY OF GREG & ELIZABETH BODDY & FAMILY DOMINIC BRUEGGEMANN MELISSA BRUEGGEMANN JOSEPH R.L. FINKE JOAN ESTELLE CETRULO FRED BOERGER

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ANNUAL P -L P &R

SPEAKERS:

PROCESSION: RALLY:

R

JENNIFER A FINLEY CATHY FLAIG ROBERT FLAIG DANIEL FLAIG DAVID FLAIG ADAM FLAIG JAKE FLAIG PATRICIA FLAIG CALEB FLAIG KATIE FLANAGAN LARRY FOLTZ BETTY FOLTZ MARY ANN FOSTER JANET FOUSHEE BETTY A FRAGGE RONALD G FRAGGE, MD THE FRAMBES FAMILY STEVEN J FRANZEN FRED FREIHOFER FAMILY CAROL FRERMAN JOAN FRILLING IN MEMORY OF MR AND MRS NORBERT J FRILLING IN MEMORY OF MASTER NORBERT W. FRILLING INEZ FROHN ROBERT A. FROHN DONNA GABEL RIK GABEL ROBIN GABEL TONYA GABEL DYLAN GABEL DUSTIN GABEL DONNA A GADDIS AL GARNICK LOIS GARNICK MARGIE GERHARDT PATRICIA GERKE MARY JO GERMANN HANK GERMANN NICK GERMANN MEGAN GERMANN SARA GERMANN CORINNE A. GERRITY PATRICK GERRITY EAMON GERRITY NORA GERRITY KIEREN GERRITY KEVIN GERRITY, ESQ. MOLLY GIESLER VINCE & BETTY GIGLIO THE JOHN GILKEY FAMILY THE GLENMARY LAY MISSIONERS MRS ELLARIE GLENN BRENDA GLUCK KEITH GLUCK ANTHONY GLUCK LUCAS GLUCK VALERIE GLUCK HOLLY GLUCK VERONICA GLUCK LAWRENCE V. GOEBEL DOROTHY GOLD ROY GOLD KEVIN GOLDADE THERESA AND BEN GOLDADE MICHELLE GOLDADE ASHLEY GOLDADE FRANCIS GOLDADE TERRANCE L GOOD IN LOVING MEMORY OF BILL & EILEEN GRADY JOAN GREEN JAMES GREEN MICHAEL GREEN MICHAEL GREENWELL JENNIFER GREENWELL JANE GREENWELL BRAD GREENWELL THE GREER FAMILY MICHAEL GREVER MR & MRS ROBERT GRIPSHOVER & FAMILY ANGELA GROESCHEN ERIC GROESCHEN GERALD G. GRONEMAN TERRY GRONEMAN MRS MARY K. GRONOTTE MARY ANNE GRONOTTE TIM GRONOTTE ELIZABETH GRONOTTE DOROTHY GROTHAUS JACK GROTHAUS PAUL GRUNENWALD, M.D. BARBARA GRUNENWALD, R.N. EVELYN HABERMEHL MRS ELAINE M HAIGIS IN MEMORY OF MEL HAIGIS JOAN M. HALL ROBERT T. HALL NATHANIEL T. HALL BRENDAN J. HALL MAURY & PEGGY HALPIN III ANNA HAMMONS JUANITA Z HANNA JEAN L. HARMEYER MARTHA HAUSER DR & MRS SIEGFRIED HAUSLADEN PAULA HAY STANLEY & BEVERLY HAY JEROME HAY DAVID HAY GARY HAY BRIAN HAY BRENT HAY CARLA HAY SARA HAY DANIEL HECKMAN ANNE BRUEGGEMANN HECKMAN ROSE HECKMAN HENRY HECKMAN VERONICA HECKMAN ELIZABETH HECKMAN CAROL HEHEMANN KRISTI HEIST HAYDON HEIST LOUIS E HELLMANN LOUIS & MARLENE HELLMANN KEMBER HERRING VICTOR HESSLING RUTH HESSLING JAN HIGDON MARK HIGDON RUTH M. HIGDON KIRT HIGDON GERALD HIGDON CHRISTINE HIGDON CLAIRENE HIGDON TIMOTHY HILLEBRAND MICHAEL HILLEBRAND KATRINA HILLEBRAND PATRICK HILLEBRAND CATHY HILLEBRAND VON HILLIARD BERNARD HILLMAN AUDREY HILLMAN MARJEAN HILS JUDE HILS EILEEN HILS JOE HILS KEN HINCHEY FAMILY JIM & MARY K. HOCHHAUSLER BETTE HOFACRE COURTNEY AND JUSTIN HOFFER GRACE E HOGAN MARTHA HOLLAND ANDY HOLLAND JOHN HOLLAND TOM HOLLAND FRED & MARIANN HOLLMANN ELLEN HOLTZ PAUL HOLTZ CHARLENE M. HOLTZ JOHN L. HOLTZ BETTY HOLTZLEITER LAURA HORAN MARY DARLENE HORTON STEPHEN HORTON REV FATHER JOSEPH HORVATH MR & MRS SCOTT HOUP & FAMILY IN MEMORY OF PHILIP & KATHRYN HUBER

BARRY HUESING WILLIAM HUESING ROSEMARY HUESING BILL HUESING BOB HUESING MARIANN HUESING JANET HUESMAN LEO HUESMAN JAMES T HULL LAWRENCE HULL CARRIE HULL CHRISTOPHER J. HULL JOHN & MARLENE HUMMEL CAROL HUMMELL ED HUMMELL SARA & BEN HUMMMEL JOHN HUMMMEL MRS MARGE HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF DR TOM HUTH MRS MARGARET HUTH DAVE & TERRI HUWEL FAMILY TAUNYA NOLAN JACK JEFF JACK MARILYN JANSON MIKE JANSON PAUL JANSON, M.D. DIANA JAVINS JAMES JAVINS JOSEPH JAVINS MRS MARJORIE C JOHANNEMAN MARY ELLEN JOHNSON DOUGLAS W. JOHNSON PATRICIA A. JOHNSON LARRY W. JONES JULIA C. JONES KATHERINE M. JONES JOHN WYNNE JONES CARROLL J. JONES SANDRA JONES, CPA GERRY KEAVENEY MIKE KEIPERT PATTI KEIPERT REV THEODORE A KELLER CRAIG KELLEY MR JACK KENKEL, SR KATHLEEN KENNEDY DR MARY C KENNEDY MARY THERESA KENNEDY THOMAS KENNEDY LUCY KENNEDY OWEN M. KENNEDY, ESQ OWEN M. KENNEDY, JR E.B. KERN MARY K. KERN TONY & TAYLOR KESSEN HEATHER KIMBRELL RYLIE KIMBRELL BRYAN KIMBRELL KARLIE KIMBRELL KATHLEEN KING KAITLYN KING ROBERT KIRKOFF DIANE KIRKOFF VIRGINIA KITCHEL JUDY KITCHEN NICOLE KITCHEN KELLY KITCHEN JAMES B KLUEMPER JOSEPH G KLUEMPER JAMES H. KLUEMPER CHRISTOPHER J. KLUEMPER NIKOLAUS C.W. KNIPPER LUKE M KNIPPER SHERRI L KNIPPER BENJAMIN G KNIPPER MARK W. KNIPPER, II MARK W. KNIPPER, SR WILLIAM E KOCH EUNICE KOCH CHRISTINA KOCHANOWSKI JAMES KOCHER MARK KOENIG FAMILY MICHAEL KOLB STEFANY KOO CASSI KOWAL ENRIQUETA A. KRAUS WALTER S. KRAUS BERNICE KREBS JERRY KREMER JEANNE KREMER MONICA KRIVANEK RYAN KRIVANEK MARTHA KUCHLE ROGER KUCHLE ROSE KUEBLER NOAH KUEBLER RAPHAEL KUEBLER COLLEEN P KUNATH STEPHEN A. KUNATH CAITLIN KUNATH G. COLIN KUNATH A. CONOR KUNATH SEAN KUNATH AIDAN M. KUNATH ARTHUR M. KUNATH, M.D. BERNIE & ANGELA KUNKEL ANGELA E KUNKEL ANTHONY KUNKEL ANTHONY & CATHERINE KUNKEL DONALD & THERESA KUNKEL ADAM KUNKEL JAMES KUNKEL MARIANNE KUNKEL LISA PHILOMENA KUNKEL MARK KUNKEL ERIC KUNKEL VIRGINIA KUNKEL NORA KUNKEL MARGARET KUNKEL MICHAEL KUNKEL LAURA KUNKEL ZACHARY KUNKEL ALBERT KUNKEL MATTHEW KUNKEL BILL & KAREN KUNKEL ANDREW KUNKEL JOHN KUNKEL LEO KUNKEL JOAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL CAELI KUNKEL WILLIAM KUNKEL MARIANNA KUNKEL LIAM KUNKEL MARIA KUNKEL RACHEL KUNKEL JULIANNA KUNKEL MELISSA KUNKEL KATHERINE KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL BRIDGET KUNKEL GEORGE KUNKEL BENJAMIN KUNKEL GERARD KUNKEL JOSEPH & MARY KUNKEL NATALIE KUNKEL PAUL & ANNE KUNKEL AUDREY KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL

GABRIELLA KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL JOSEPH KUNKEL KATERINA KUNKEL ANASTATIA KUNKEL TONY KUNKEL AUSTIN KUNKEL TOMMY & MELISSA KUNKEL TIMOTHY KUNKEL EMMA KUNKEL ELIZABETH KUNKEL JACOB KUNKEL GABRIEL KUNKEL RAPHAEL KUNKEL MONICA KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL ANNA KUNKEL MARTIN KUNKEL AMELIA KUNKEL OLIVIA KUNKEL DAVID & ELIZABETH KUNKEL CLAIRE KUNKEL DAVID KUNKEL VINCENT KUNKEL ISAAC KUNKEL LEONARD KUNKEL PHILIP & MARIA KUNKEL DOMINIC KUNKEL LUKE KUNKEL PHILIP KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL REBECCA KUNKEL CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL SARA KUNKEL ANTHONY KUNKEL MONICA KUNKEL CHARLIE KUNKEL JOHN & CHRISTIANA KUNKEL JOSEPH KUNKEL, JR DONALD J KUPER M.TRINETT KUPER SETH D KUPER MARY M. KUPER DUSTAN J KUPER DONNA S. LA EACE MARY JO LA EACE IN MEMORY OF GEORGE & RITA LA EACE MR & MRS GEORGE LAHNER MR & MRS PAUL LAJOYE FAMILY THE ROBERT LANG FAMILY MARGARET LAUER RAYMOND LAUER JOE LAWRIE STEPHANIE LAWRIE JOHN LAWRIE JOSIE LAWRIE MAX LAWRIE MAYA LAWRIE ADDIE LAWRIE SARRIE LAWRIE FRED LEMKER EVELYN LENHOFF FAMILY DAVID & MELISSA LEYLAND DAVID LIGHT MR & MRS JOHN LINDSLEY KAIYA LINKUGEL PATRICIA LITTLE MICHAEL LITTLE DANIEL LITTLE ANNA LITTLE PAT LITZLER TOM LITZLER MARY ANN LOHRE DOUGLAS LOHRE T.J. LONGSHORE NICK & MARGARET LUCARELLI MARY LUEBBE RALPH LUEBBE MARY LUEBBE, GLM REV FATHER PATRICK MACKIN AGNES MADER EDWARD MADER, SR ANTHONY & ELVERA MAIER VICKI MALEY DENNIS E MALIK PATRICIA A MALIK MARY ANN MALONEY DAVID MANN MEGAN MANN GIANNA MANN AUDREY MANN ANDREW MANN SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS JO MARTIN MICHAEL C MARTIN MATTHEW MARTIN CARLY MARTIN JOANNA MARTIN MASON MARTIN IN LOVING MEMORY OF MICHAEL L. MARTIN OLIVIA MARTIN SOFIA MARTIN EMILY MASON MICHAEL MASON FRED MASON MICHELLE MCCLOREY JOSEPH MCCLOREY LUCY MCCLOREY ANDREW MCCLOREY HELEN MCCLOREY JANE MCCLOREY CLAIRE MCCLOREY GREGORY MCCLOREY DAVID MCCLOREY MARK MCCLOREY LACI MCDANIEL DAVID L MCGRATH MARY C MCGRATH LAURIE MCKINLEY SCOTT MCKINLEY JACK & JUDY MCMAHON FAMILY JOAN MCNALLY TIM MCNALLY CANDY MCNAY FRED MCNAY IN LOVING MEMORY OF TOMMY MCNAY NICK MCNAY BRIDGETTE MCNAY LIAM MCNAY THE BOB MCNAY FAMILY MR ALOYSIUS MEESE EILEEN MEHURON ROBERT J. MEIHAUS THE MENKE FAMILY BARRY MENKHAUS LYNDA MENKHAUS KEN MERTLE HILDA MESSMER THE METTEY FAMILY GEORGE & DIANE MEYERRATKEN VERA MEYERS & FAMILY MARLENE MICELI LISA W MICHEL ASHLEY MICHEL TIM MICHEL KYNDAL MICHEL

CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL ALEXANDER KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL XAVIER KUNKEL SOPHIA KUNKEL CHARLES KUNKEL LARRY & ALICE KUNKEL SAMANTHA KUNKEL LAWRENCE KUNKEL

KASSIDY MICHEL KARLEY MICHEL KRISTEN MICHEL JIM MIDDENDORF GAY MIDDENDORF DAVID MIDDENDORF LISA MIDDENDORF MICHELLE MIDDENDORF AMY MIDDENDORF CHRIS MIDDENDORF GREG MIDDENDORF

BOBBY SCHABELL FRED H. SUMME, ESQ JEFF SCHABELL CONNIE R. SUMMERS TERRY SCHAEPER CHARITY SUMMERS STEPHEN SCHAEPER DOTTIE SWIKERT MR & MRS DONALD SCHAEPER RON & MARY JO SYBERT PATRICIA SCHAEPER AL TALLARIGO LEO SCHAPPACHER JAN TALLARIGO MARI SCHAPPACHER JOHN TALLARIGO ELIZABETH SCHAPPACHER JEN TALLARIGO SUSANNA SCHAPPACHER JOSEPH TALLARIGO VIRGINIA SCHAPPACHER AL & JAN TALLARIGO FAMILY VICTORIA SCHAPPACHER MR FRED TAYLOR MICHAEL SCHAPPACHER MARYBETH THEMANN LEO SCHAPPACHER, JR. MR. & MRS. JOSEPH E IN MEMORY OF GEORGE & THEMANN FAMILY ANN SCHAROLD REV FATHER DANIEL THEMANN, SSPX DANIEL SCHELLENBERGER JOSEPH TILLMAN “Since the first century, the Church has affirmed the moral evil of MONTE SCHELLENBERGER ALLISON TOBIS every procured abortion. This teaching has not changed and remains ELIZABETH SCHELLENBERGER MARY LOU TOELKE CATHERINE SCHELLENBERGER JUDY TRAME unchangeable. …Since it must be treated from conception as a person, CALEB SCHELLENBERGER DEACON TRAME the embryo must be defended in its integrity, cared for, and healed, EMILY SCHELLENBERGER HAO DO TRAN as far as possible, like any other human being.” Catechism of the JOSHUA SCHELLENBERGER HHUE N TRAN Catholic Church, 2270-2274. JANE-MARIE SCHELLENBERGER MICHAEL TROTTA VIRGINIA SCHEPER LINDA L TROTTA If one would examine each of these so-called “exceptions,” one RUTH SCHEPER GLENN & MARTI TUNGET realizes that not only are the teachings of the Church morally correct, THOMAS SCHEPER ALL UNBORN CHILDREN but when these teachings are ignored, more violence, oppression, and MARY LEE SCHEPER FATIMA URIBE JACK SCHEPMAN CHRIS VENESKY suffering result. MARGIE SCHEPMAN MARY A.VENNEMANN MRS ROBERT E. SCHERRER ROBERT F.VENNEMANN Life of Mother STATE SEN. JOHN SCHICKEL IN LOVING MEMORY OF JACK SCHIERER ELIZABETH VENNEMANN RICH VENNEMANN Promoters of abortion have long argued that abortion can be morally MARTHA L. SCHMEING HELEN (HULL) SCHMUDDE LINDA VENNEMANN justified to save the life of the mother. However, are there any real life DARREN SCHMUDDE RANDY VENNEMANN situations where the mother would die if she would carry her child to KAITLYN SCHMUDDE DANIEL VENNEMANN term, but would live if she destroyed her child by an abortion? BRYAN SCHMUDDE NICHOLAS VENNEMANN KEVIN SCHMUDDE JACKIE VEZINA SCHMUDDE MEGAN FRED VEZINA “Today it is possible for almost any patient to be brought through JORDAN SCHMUDDE THOMAS & CAROL VOET pregnancy alive, unless she suffers from a fatal illness such as cancer MARY E SCHNEIDER JOSEPH & KATHLEEN VON HAGEL or leukemia, and if so, abortion would be unlikely to prolong, much YANDELL P SCHNEIDER MRS BETTY VOORHEES MARCELLA SCHNEIDER MARY ANN WAINSCOTT less save, life. “There is little evidence that pregnancy itself worsens DONNA A. SCHNEIDER BUTCH WAINSCOTT a psychosis, either intensifying it or rendering a prognosis for a full GERALD SCHNEIDER ELLY WAINSCOTT recovery less likely,” wrote in 1967, Alan Guttmacher, M.D., past CECILIA MARIE SCHNEIDER MEGAN WAINSCOTT president of Planned Parenthood. ANDREW SCHNEIDER JULIE WARTMAN BRIDGET SCHNEIDER JENNIFERWARTMAN SCHNEIDER KYLE WARTMAN “In my 36 years of pediatric surgery, I have never known of one instance CHARLIE ELENA SCHNEIDER DEVIN WARTMAN where the child had to be aborted to save the mother’s life,” stated THOMAS E SCHNEIDER TYLER WARTMAN former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, M.D., renowned pediatric GERTRUDE N SCHNEIDER KARA WARTMAN ERIC & MARY SCHNEIDER FAMILY MACY WARTMAN surgeon at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. BUTCH & GINA SCHNEIDER FAMILY LARRY WARTMAN, JR A. PATRICK SCHNEIDER, MD, MPH JEREMY WARTMAN, JR What about an ectopic pregnancy or cancer? JOYCE SCHREIBER EVAN WARTMAN, JR FRANK SCHREIBER LARRY WARTMAN, SR MARY G. SCHROER JEREMY WARTMAN, SR A woman carrying a child is always entitled to receive reasonably DICK & BLANCHE SCHUH JOHN WEBB necessary medical treatment for a pathological physical condition KEN & PATRICIA SCHULTE MRS GAYE WEBSTER which imminently threatens her physical life, even if the unintended MARY SCHUMER LOUISE WEED CARL SCHUMER JOHN A WEED, III result is the death of the child. PHILIP J SCHUTTE JOHN A WEED, JR LILLY SCHUTTE JOHN & DONNA WEGENER “An exception is not needed in the law to authorize such operations GREGORY SCHUTTE PAUL & ELIZABETH WEGENER (cancerous womb or an ectopic pregnancy) which can be justified KRISTEN SCHUTTE CINDY WEHRY STEPHEN SCHUTTE DAN WEHRY morally under the principle of the double effect: The justified operation ANDREW SCHUTTE JULIANNE WEHRY to remove the cancerous womb which imminently threatens the LYNNE SCHUTTE CHRISTINA WEHRY mother’s life may have the unintended effect of ending the life of the CARL E SCHUTTE SANDY WEHRY child. In the law they are not even abortions,” teaches Professor DR ROBERT A SCOTT DAVE WELLER MARIANNE SCOTT DAVID WELLER Charles E. Rice, University of Notre Dame’s College of Law. MEGAN SCOTT CHRISTINA WELLER EMERSON SCOTT MICHAEL WELLER Incest ERIN SCOTT GERI WELLER LARRY SENDELBACH MARLENE WENDLING KAY SENDELBACH DOUGLAS WENK “Abortion for incest victims sounds compassionate, caring, and MICHELLE SENDELBACH JOHN WENK heroic; but, in actual practice, it is simply another violent and deceptive ANDREW & EMILY SHAW RYAN WENK tool in the hand of the abuser…abortion does absolutely nothing to CECILIA SHAW ANDREW WENK protect a young girl from continued abuse and, in fact, aids and abets ANDREW SHAW, JR THOMAS WENK GERALD SHAWHAN SUSAN WENK, M.D. the abuser in his crime,” expresses Mary Jean Doe (a pseudonym), a MARIAN SHAWHAN BERNARD & ANGELA WESSELMAN member of Feminists for Life and a victim of incest. MICHAEL SHAWHAN WEST COVINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH KATE SHAWHAN JACK & KELLEY WESTWOOD Rape ANDREW SHAWHAN PAULA WESTWOOD WILLIAM SHAWHAN GREG WESTWOOD “I soon discovered that the aftermath of my abortion continued MONICA SHAWHAN ABIGAIL WESTWOOD a long time after the memory of my rape had faded. I felt empty and GABRIEL SHAWHAN MARY WESTWOOD horrible,” recalls Jackie Bakker, a victim of rape. CHRISTOPHER SHAWHAN IN MEMORY OF GAYLE WHALEY MARY ELIZABETH SHAWHAN IN MEMORY OF JUDITH WHALEY TIM SHERMAN ROBERT & JUDITH WHEELER “Rape and incest victims actually suffer considerably from the MEGAN SHERMAN ED & CAROL WHELAN abortion. The woman feels dirty, guilty, sexually violated, down on CHARLOTTE SHUTER RANDELL WICAL herself, angry, and fearful or hateful toward men; she may experience ROSE R SIEGRIST TRACEY WICAL ALLAN & JEANIE SMILEY VIVIAN WICAL sexual dysfunction, or feel she has lost control of her life. “Now let’s look SMITH JERRY GENEVIEVE WICAL at the symptoms of abortion. The woman feels dirty, guilty, sexually violated, SUZANNE SMITH KENNETH E WILHELM down on herself, angry, and fearful or hateful toward men; she may experience AVERY SMITH THERESA WILHELM sexual dysfunction or a loss of control of her life – all the same symptoms. BRANDON SMITH CORILLA WILHELM RICARDO D. SMITH JASON WILSON “So instead of curing the problem, we are intensifying the same symptoms by SHARON L. SMITH TRISHA WILSON offering abortion. Abortion, then, is a ‘cure’ that only aggravates the problem,” JOSEPH SOLDANO LAURA WILSON teaches David C. Reardon, Director of Eliot Institute for Social Sciences ANDREW SPOOR HOPE WILSON Research. DEAN SPOOR PAUL WILSON IRIS SPOOR JOHN WILSON RICHARD SPOOR THE WILTSES FAMILY It’s A Child ROBERT SPOOR RUTH WINCHESTER RICHARD SPOOR ALICE R WINTERSHEIMER The acceptance of abortion in the case of rape, incest, or the life of the PAM SPOOR JUSTICE DONALD C.WINTERSHEIMER REGINA STAMBUSH BLAISE Q.WINTERSHEIMER mother promotes the culture of death by proclaiming that the right to life is not JOSEPH STAMBUSH CRAIG P.WINTERSHEIMER after all “inalienable,” but rather a right that is very negotiable. RICKY STAMBUSH MARK D.WINTERSHEIMER, J.D. CARA STAMBUSH ED WOESTE No matter how a child is conceived, it is a child. FLORENCE STEFFEN RICK WOESTE CINDY STEFFEN TONY WOESTE DAN STEFFEN NATALIE WOESTE RUTH M. STELTENKAMP CAROLINE WOESTE STEVE STELTENKAMP STACEY WOESTE ROB & LAURA RICHEY HANNAH NIEPORTE JAY MIDDENDORF, DVM TOM STELTENKAMP DONNA WOESTE MARILYN RIEHLE CHRISTINE NIEPORTE WILLIAM MILLER DOLORES STEWART MARK WORMALD ELLIE RITTER HELEN NIEPORTE RUTH ANN MILLER JACK STEWART ANGIE WORMALD WILL RITTER SAMANTHA NIEPORTE ANN MILLER MICHAEL STRUNK MARIA WORMALD THE JIM & TERRY ROESSLER FAMILY VIRGINIA STRUNK JULIA NOLAN WILLIAM M MILLER ROBBY WORMALD BLANCHE ROGERS JOHN NOONAN JULIA MILLER ANNA STYERS MARK S.YAEGEL LLOYD ROGERS SUSAN NUXOLL PEGGY S MILLER STEPHANIE STYERS ANNA V.YAEGEL KENNETH ROGERS GABRIEL NUXOLL ART MINGES ERIK STYERS GARY L YAEGER ANNA ROMITO ROBYN NUXOLL KIM & GLENN MINTON MARTHA SUETHOLZ HANNAH ZALLA JOAN ROSE SARAH BETH NUXOLL KEVIN & MARIA MOLONY JIM SUETHOLZ HILARY ZALLA JEFF ROSENSTIEL JOSEPH NUXOLL, I ANDREW Y MOORE AMY SUETHOLZ CAROLINE ZALLA CAROLYN ROSENSTIEL JOSEPH NUXOLL, II JAMES Y. MOORE PAUL SUETHOLZ LILY ZALLA SAM ROSENSTIEL MARGARET O’BRIEN THOMAS J MOORE OD ERIC SUETHOLZ THOMAS W ZEMBRODT BEN ROSENSTIEL JOHN O’BRIEN CLAIRE MORICONI DAVEY SULLIVAN JOAN ZEMBRODT AVA ROSENSTIEL DANIEL O’BRIEN BOB MORICONI ANDREA SULLIVAN WILLIAM & BARB ZERHUSEN LOUISE E ROTH PEGGY O’BRIEN KIM MORICONI JOE SULLIVAN ANGELA ZERHUSEN RONALD RUST KAREN O’BRIEN ROB MORICONI, JR MAUREEN SULLIVAN EVAN ZERHUSEN KATHLEEN RYAN KATHLEEN O’BRIEN DAN MOSER PATRICK SULLIVAN JADEN & KELLY ZERHUSEN PATRICK RYAN BARBARA O’BRIEN THERESE MOSER MICHAEL SULLIVAN HANNAH ZERHUSEN MIKE RYAN BEBE O’BRIEN LEON MUELLER CAROLYN SULLIVAN ISABELLE ZERHUSEN MATT RYAN MRS MARGARET O’CONNER LAURA & MIKE MUELLER JOEY SULLIVAN LILIAN ZERHUSEN SHAWN RYAN MARGARET O’CONNER & FAMILY LUCIA MUELLER TONY & DARLENE SUMME MONICA ZERHUSEN DOLOURES RYAN ROBERT L OERTHER PHILOMENA MUELLER SAMANTHA SUMME ZACHARY ZERHUSEN MIKE RYAN MARGARET C OERTHER CAROL J. MUENCH MARK SUMME WILLIAM J ZERHUSEN JAMES E SANDER PHILIP C OSBORNE EDWARD J. MUENCH BILLY SUMME MR & MRS JOHN E ZINNER, SR DIANE L. SANDER BRIAN & SULINDA PAINTER MRS RUTH E MURPHY PAM SUMME MARY LEE ZUMBIEL HENRY SARGENT JOHN L. & MARY BETH PEAVLER MISS KATHLEEN M MURPHY THERESA SUMME ROBERT W. ZUMBIEL MRS JEANNE SCHABELL DOROTHY PHIRMAN JAYNE & PAUL MURPHY MATTHEW SUMME WALT & KATHY PIESCHEL JOE MURPHY GAYLE PIRON SHANE MURPHY DAN PIRON PATRICK MURPHY Thanks to the generosity of the above DAVID PIRON CECILIA MURPHY Northern Kentucky pro-lifers, this ad runs in SARAH PIRON XAVIER MURPHY AL PLOEGER MR STEPHEN MURRAY Community Recorders on Jan. 19th & Jan. 26th JO ANN PLOEGER REV ROBERT B. MUSSMAN and the KY Enquirer on Jan. 21st & Jan. 22nd MIKE PLOEGER DANIEL NAEGELE JOHN PLOEGER THOMAS NAEGELE Name AVA PLUNKETT CHRISTOPHER NAEGELE REV ROBERT POANDL MARY RUTH NAEGELE PEGGY PREMEC DONALD NAEGELE KATHY PURCELL DONALD & JANET NAEGELE Address JIM PURCELL MATTHEW NAEGELE REV FATHER ADAM PURDY ROBERT NAEGELE DONALD J. QUINN JAMES NAEGELE City Zip Phone SANDRA L. QUINN STEPHEN & MARY NAEGELE MONICA RAHE JOE NEYER RYAN RAMDASS BRENDA NEYER BRENDAN RAMDASS FRANK NEYER Church BECCA RAMDASS BARB NIEPORTE JILL RAMDASS, RN VERN NIEPORTE Northern Kentucky Right To Life REV JAMES R REBER BRYAN NIEPORTE LOIS M REBER PATTY NIEPORTE 859-431-6380 DR JOHN D REDDEN AND FAMILY JAKE NIEPORTE Your Contribution Brings You DORAN REED KEVIN NIEPORTE GEORGIANA REED KATE NIEPORTE The Newsletter & Special Mailings JACKIE REGNER JUSTIN NIEPORTE MS MARY BARBARA REINERT JOSHUA NIEPORTE Donation Membership (any amount) JOHN & MARY LORETTO RESING FRANCES NIEPORTE PAULINE REUTER FRAN NIEPORTE Regular Membership W.A. REUTER RON NIEPORTE MARY AURELIA RICE AARON NIEPORTE Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1202 • Covington, KY. 41012 JENNIFER A RICE GINA NIEPORTE www.nkyrtl.org JAY & LYNN RICE LINDSAY NIEPORTE GLENN RICE, SR AVERY NIEPORTE

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ON THE

RECORD

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B9

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

BIRTHS | DEATHS | POLICE | REAL ESTATE

CommunityPress.com

POLICE REPORTS Arrests/citations Floyd A. Scott, 41, 3228 North Talbot Ave., warrant at 24 Shaw Drive, Jan. 2. Saundra R. Saylor, 39, 24 Shaw Drive, warrant at 24 Shaw Drive, Jan. 2.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of credit card Report of debit card used without authorization at 3 Shadow Wood Court, Jan. 3. Second degree burglary Report of door broken open and multiple items taken from residence at 8225 Riley Road, Dec. 19. Second degree burglary first degree criminal mischief Report of door broken and office ransacked at 7500 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 23. Theft by unlawful taking Report of vehicle taken from auto sales lot at 8229 Alexandria Pike, Dec. 22. Report of chain saws taken from building at 13 Whispering Woods Drive, Jan. 2. Report of digital camera taken from car at 337 Rose Drive, Jan. 8. Theft by unlawful taking gasoline Report of gas drive-off without paying at 7930 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 1. Report of gas drive-off without

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. paying at 7740 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 1. Theft by unlawful taking or purse snatching Report of purse taken from cart in store at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 4. Third degree burglary Report of person saw three people dressed in black running into woods and found dresser doors found open money and gift cards taken at 3728 Ridgewood Court, Jan. 1. Third degree criminal mischief Report of mailbox damaged at 61 Viewpoint Drive, Dec. 25. Third degree terroristic threatening Report of woman threatened to kill another woman over phone at 3688 Parkview Drive, Jan. 8.

BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Alfred Evans, 49, 13 Jacob Price,

theft by unlawful taking, second degree criminal mischief at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, Dec. 28. Jamie Bradford, 40, 212 Prospect, warrant at 339 Washington, Dec. 29. Nicholas Ritter, 26, 243 Fosdick St., first degree trafficking a controlled substance at 95 Riviera, Dec. 29. Matthew Mendell, 22, 112 Foote Ave., disorderly conduct at Foote Avenue, Dec. 30. Kilo Moton, 42, 6303 Lisbon Ave. No. 1, reckless driving, DUI, no license at Route 8 at Linden, Dec. 24. Danny Crail, 51, 339 Center St., warrant at 200 Berry Ave., Dec. 31. Matthew Knoebber, 25, 626 Grandview, DUI, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana at 400 block of Taylor, Jan. 1. Ciarra Helton, 21, 509 Craig St., warrant at 616 Poplar, Jan. 4. Troy Cromer, 26, 356 Lafayette Ave., warrant at 238 Walnut, Jan. 5. Daniel Roa, 32, 106 Van Voast, warrant at 104 Ward, Jan. 6. Timothy Kirk, 43, 438 Mainring, warrants at 100 Fairfield Ave., Jan. 6. Charles Kuhl, 36, 234 West Ninth St., third degree terroristic threatening at David Cowens Drive at i-471, Jan. 7. James Baird, 40, 410 Fairfield Ave., warrant at 410 Fairfield

Ave., Jan. 9.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrests/citations Jeffrey M. Pate, 25, 1332 Poplar Ridge, warrant at 1332 Poplar Ridge Road, Dec. 22. Anthony E. Whitson, 23, 643 Kelly Road, giving officer false name or address, warrant at 1054 DavJo Drive, Dec. 20. Sherri K. Green, 46, 884 Trellisses Drive Unit 813, receiving stolen property at 1986 Poplar Ridge Road, Jan. 3. Brandon Forge, 27, 173 Picketts Charge, alcohol intoxication in a public place - first and second offense at 9059 Oakview Drive, Dec. 29. Micah J. Walton, 33, 9072 South Oak Lane, warrant at 5247 Four Mile Road, Lot 38, Dec. 31.

Incidents/investigations Animal complaint Report of unknown horses found on property after lingering in area without being claimed for about a week at 12320 Kennedy West Road, Dec. 23. Domestic Reported at Emma's Way Drive, Dec. 24. Reported at Kenton Avenue, Dec. 27. Fourth degree assault domestic violence Reported at Frye Street, Dec. 24. Reported at I-275 and Ky. 9, Dec.

Kenneth E. Glahn, 79, of Grant’s Lick, died Jan. 10, 2012. He was the owner/operator of Glahn Construction and a member of Main Street Baptist Church in Alexandria. His daughter, Kim Glahn, died in 1979. Survivors include his wife, Jean Glahn; sons, Kenny, Rick and Randy Glahn; sisters, Norma Crouch and Gladys Ruf; brothers, Bill, Ervin and Keith Glahn; and six grandchildren. Memorials: Main Street Baptist Church, 11093 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Annie Harrison

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. for the Hilton Terrace Garden Hotel in Cincinnati and a member of Sts. Boniface & James Church in Ludlow. Survivors include her husband, John Harrison; sons, Tony Harrison of Fort Thomas, Richard

Harrison of Elsmere, Robert Harrison of Ludlow and David Harrison of Harrison, Ohio; mother, Cruz M. Gonzalez of Tampa, Fla.; brothers, Juan Gonzalez of Tampa, Fla., and Andy Gonzalez of San Antonio;

from residence at 400 Garfield Ave., Dec. 30.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Wade Hensgen, 36, 1712 Lindale Nicholasville Road, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at I-471 south, Jan. 9. Dresden Salatin, 35, 28 Kyles Lane No. 2, warrant at 28 Kyles

See POLICE, Page B10

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DEATHS Kenneth Glahn

26. Property damage Report of vehicle ran through front of property and left two tire marks in wet grass at 3520 Ivor Road, Dec. 23. Recovered property Report of professional set of lock picks found in vehicles at AA Highway and California Crossroads, Dec. 26. Second degree attempted burglary Report of suspicious male between ages 18-20 wearing brown/blue hooded sweatshirt, jeans and white shoes tried to enter residence by removing window and crawling in fled when confronted by resident at 5316 Mary Ingles Hwy. Unit 205B, Dec. 25. Second degree burglary Report of front door kicked in and copper taken from residence at 14381 Hissem Road, Dec. 27. Second degree criminal mischief Report of domestic in progress at bar and patrons asked to leave at 956 Kenton Station Road, Dec. 24. Report of interior of vehicle damaged in parking lot at 415 Crossroads Blvd., Dec. 28. Theft by unlawful taking Report of purse taken from residence at 7182 Stonehouse Road, Dec. 26. Theft of controlled substance Report of medication taken

CE-0000491938

ALEXANDRIA

sister, Edmee Gindlesperger of Orlando, Fla.; and six grandchildren. Memorials: Sts. Boniface & James Church, 304 Oak St., Ludlow, KY 41016.

Robert Hartman Robert R. Hartman, 87, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 6, 2012, at Barrington of Fort Thomas. He was an engineer with Sam P. Wallace Mechanical Contractors, a member of the 8th Air Force Historical Society and a U.S. Army Corps World War II veteran.

See DEATHS, Page B10

Annie Harrison, 66, of Ludlow, died Jan. 1, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a finance manager

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LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Here are Northern Kentucky volunteer opportunities from NKYHelps.org

Homework help Dayton YMCA Teen Center, Dayton. Call 859-291-0490. Need volunteers to help kids with their homework grades 4-12.

Mentoring Dayton YMCA Teen Center, Dayton. Call 859-291-0490. Perform one-on-one, site-based mentoring (meet only at a YMCA, school or library).

Meals on Wheels driver Senior Services of Northern Kentucky, Covington. Call 859292-7953. Donate a few hours a day to help feed hungry seniors.

Community service Children Inc., Covington. Call

859-431-2075. Children Inc. Growing Sound is research based children’s music promting social emotional health. The Growing Sound program needs a volunteer to unwrap some manuals and individually labels each cover highlighting the newest award.

Dog walkers, transporters Pawzitive Petz Rescue Ltd, Verona. Call 859-803-8428. Dog lovers needed to transport dogs to adoption events. Also need volunteers to come out and walk the dogs during events.

Foster homes Pawzitive Petz Rescue Ltd, Verona. Call 859-803-8428. Open your hearts and home to dogs/ puppies. Provide safe, temporary care and transport to adoption

Deaths Continued from Page B9

NON-DENOMINATIONAL Family Worship Center 97 Three Mile Rd. Wilder, Ky. 41076 859-441-5433

SERVICE TIME Sunday, 10:45 a.m.

LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

His wife, Margaret Strebel Hartman; and a nephew, Kenneth Robert Hartman, died previously. Survivors include his brother, Bill Hartman of Newport; nephews, Bill Hartman of Southgate and Richard Hartman of Massena, N.Y.; and niece, Theresa Hutchins of Batesville, Ind. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery in Pendleton County.

Michael Igo Michael D. Igo, 40, formerly of Northern Kentucky, died Jan. 4, 2012, in Morganton, N.C. He was a graduate of Campbell County High School. Survivors include his wife, Jamie Igo; sons, Ivon and Alex; mother, Diane Drew; stepfather, Jim Drew; brothers, James, Danny and Tony Drew; and sister, Melissa Canaday.

Donald Kaeff Donald Gregory Kaeff, 62, of

events.

Volunteer Income Assistance Program Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. Help provide free tax help for low to moderate income famiiles who need assistance preparing their tax returns in Campbell, Boone and Grant counties.

Grant writer Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation, Independence. Call 859-795-1506. Opportunity for individual with proven grant writing talent to work on a volunteer basis developing funding requests on behalf of the Northern Kentucky Youth Foundation.

Fort Thomas, died Jan. 6, 2012. He attended First Assembly of God and was a retired supervisor for BAWAC. Survivors include his wife, Lily Kaeff; sons, Donald Kaeff, William Kaeff and Alan Kaeff, all of Fort Thomas; daughter, Dawn Kaeff of Fort Thomas; brother, Roger Smith of Augusta, Ky.; sister, Bambi Ratcliff; and four grandchildren. Interment was at Peach Grove Cemetery.

Thelma Keim Thelma L. Keim, 94, formerly of Florence and Fort Thomas, died Jan. 7, 2012, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Her husband, Kenneth H. Keim; a daughter, Marjorie L. Keim; and siblings, Evelyn Zimmerman and Howard Schlake, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Carolyn J. Prigge of Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Shirley A. Kowdley of San Jose, Calif.; seven grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be 11 a.m. Friday Feb. 3 at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger.

Police Continued from Page B9 Lane No. 2, Jan. 9. Dexter Campbell, 53, 534 Linden Ave., DUI at Churchill at Newman, Jan. 5. Donald Herthel, 45, 5 Custis Ave. No. 5, warrant at 5 Custis Ave., Jan. 6.

Incidents/investigations Theft by unlawful taking At 100 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 7. At 110 Ridgeway Ave., Jan. 3. Theft by unlawful taking from auto At 142 North Grand Avenue, Jan. 5. At 220 Little Round Top, Jan. 4. At 1175 South Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 4. At 210 Little Round Top, Jan. 4. Theft of identity, theft by deception At 85 North Grand Ave., Jan. 7.

Memorials: Good Samaritan Society, 840 E. Elva St., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, a non-profit nursing home where she resided for the last five years, or charity of donor’s choice.

Dorothy Miller Dorothy Estelle Kendall Miller, 86, of Union, formerly of Bellevue, died Jan. 5, 2012, at her residence. She retired in 1990 from the trust department of Star Bank/ US Bank in Cincinnati after 28 years of service. She volunteered at BAWAC Community Rehabilitation Center in Florence and was one of the three originators of “Operation Orange Ribbon” Northern Kentucky chapter during the Gulf War. Survivors include her daughter, Pamela Thompson of Florence; sons, J. Randolph Miller of Florence and John Miller of Jacksonville, N.C.; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial of ashes will be in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: BAWAC Community Rehabilitation Center, 7970 Kentucky Drive, Florence, KY 41042 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Robert ‘Bob’ Padgett

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Robert “Bob” Padgett, 96, of Cold Spring, formerly of Newport, died Jan. 4, 2012, at his home. He retired from H&S Pogue Co. as an assistant manager of the Tri-County store. He was a U.S. Army veteran and served as a cryptographer aboard the USS Ingham in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. He was a founding member and parishioner of St. Therese Church in Southgate for 85 years. His wife, Mary Padgett, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Jeanie Smiley of Cold Spring; sons, Bob Padgett of Austin, Texas, and Tom Padgett of Independence; 11 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen’s Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Therese Church, 11 Temple Place, Southgate, KY 41075 or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

George Patterson Jr. George A. Patterson Jr., 86, of Columbus, Ohio, died Jan. 10, 2012, at his residence. He worked as an attorney for 30 years and retired as a labor relations attorney for EaglePicher Industries in Cincinnati. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a fighter pilot in World War II from 1944-1946 and was a Kentucky Colonel. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus and St. Patrick Catholic Church of Columbus, Ohio. His wife, Lorraine Patterson, died previously. Survivors include his sons, George Patterson III of Arlington, Va., Timothy Patterson of Columbus, Ohio, and Gregory Patterson of Paris, Ky.; daughters, Monica O’Keefe of Columbus, Ohio, Mary Patterson of Wilder, Jennie Gallastegui of Belleair Beach, Fla., and Judy Pike of New Palestine, Ind.; 16 grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was at St. Patrick’s Cemetery, Verona. Memorials: All Saints Catholic Church, 62 Needmore St., Walton, KY 41094.

NEWPORT Arrests/citations Heath White, 24, 713 Betton St., trafficking marijuana, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon at 429 Chestnut Way, Jan. 10. Leon Patrick Madden, 26, 2253 Vine St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 410 Central Ave., Jan. 8. Bryan Fester, 20, homeless, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 1 Levee Way, Jan. 6. Joshua Gray, 20, 3554 Haven St., first degree trafficking a controlled substance, warrant at 75 Carothers, Jan. 4. Timothy Owens, 20, 3568 Wilson Ave., first degree trafficking a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence at 75 Carothers, Jan. 4. Symone Madison, 23, 409 Chestnut Way, second degree crimi-

Rosemary Purcell Rosemary Winters Purcell, 93, of Campbell County, died Jan. 5, 2012, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, lifetime member of the Newport Elks and past president of the Ladies Auxiliary. She was a member of the Lawlor Hanlon VFW Ladies Auxiliary, St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring and the St. Mary’s Ladies Society. Her first husband, Alvin O. Winters; husband, Donald J. Purcell; and sister, Elizabeth Henninger, died previously. Survivors include her son, Leroy Winters of Tacoma, Wash.; daughters, Joyce Schalk and Nancy Rust, both of California, and Patricia Schmitt of Cold Spring; brother, Robert Ryan of Cold Spring; 12 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017 or Sts. Peter & Paul School, Financial Aid Fund, 2162 California Crossroads, California, KY 41007.

John Ross Sr. John William Ross Sr., 89, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 8, 2012. He was a retired general manager with Billboard Publishing Co. of Cincinnati, a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and a U.S. Army World War II veteran. Survivors include his wife, Majorie L. Littleford Ross; sons, John Ross Jr. of Cynthiana, Dr. Bob Ross of Maysville and Jim Ross of Dayton; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 3 Chalfonte Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Betty Seeger Betty R. Seeger, 85, of Bellevue, died Jan. 10, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired legal secretary of 32 years with Union Central Life Insurance Co. of Cincinnati. She was a member of Sacred Heart Church of Divine Mercy Parish in Bellevue and a member and past president of the Northern Kentucky Guild for the Retarded. Her husband, Ed Seeger; daughter, Kathy Tassemeyer; and a son, Capt. Mark A. Seeger, died previously. Survivors include her son, Michael Seeger of Fort Myers, Fla.; sister, Bernice O’Hara of Newport; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Bellevue-Dayton Fire Department, 514 Sixth Ave., Dayton, KY 41074.

Arthur Stevins Arthur C. Stevins, 52, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 6, 2012, at his residence. He was self employed and worked in commercial maintenance. Survivors include his wife, Cindy Stevins; daughters, Avery Stevins and Sydney Stevins; sister, Kathleen “Cookie” Wilson; and brothers, Craig Stevins and Rowland Stevins. Memorials: Children’s Hospital, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229.

John Studer John F. Studer, 81, of Highland Heights, died Jan. 6, 2012, at

nal abuse at 409 Chestnut Way, Jan. 3. April Tuttle, 34, 8564 Wicklow Ave., first degree possession of a controlled substance, second degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at 11th and Brighton, Jan. 2. Robert Perkins, 22, 3 East Sixth St. No. 2, fourth degree assault at 3 East Third St. No. 2, Jan. 12. Bobby Sebastian III, 23, 101 Rebel Drive Apt. 1, fourth degree assault at 24 West 10th St., Jan. 1. Ernest Conyers, 31, 124 East Ninth St., fourth degree assault at 124 East Ninth St., Jan. 1. Matthew Mendell, 22, 112 Foote Ave., fourth degree assault at 100 Riverboat Row, Jan. 1.

Highland Spring of Fort Thomas. He was a retired tile setter and member of St. John the Baptist Church in Wilder. He enjoyed playing cards with his family and friends. Survivors include his wife, Gertrude Nordman Studer; son, John R. Studer; daughter, Connie Hehman; brother, Alphonse Studer; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Stephen Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017 or American Heart Association, 240 Whittington Parkway, Louisville, KY 40222.

Dolores Toebbe Dolores Rita Regg Toebbe, 46, of Villa Hills, died Jan. 7, 2012, at her residence. Survivors include her husband, Donald L. Toebbe; children, Nancy Moreland of Dry Ridge, Penny Muench of Wilder, Bob Toebbe of Latonia, Donald Toebbe of Fort Mitchell, Susan Toebbe and Bill Toebbe, both of Villa Hills, and Jaime Halpin of Edgewood; brother, Albert Regg of Withamsville, Ohio; and 14 grandchildren.

Lucia Vaniglia Lucia “Lucy” Rose Vaniglia, 91, of Paducah, formerly of Cold Spring and New York, died Jan. 8, 2012, at Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. She was a retired licensed practical nurse with Lakeside Place Nursing Home and formerly worked on Wall Street in New York. Her husband, Leandro C. Vaniglia; and two brothers, Michael Campagnale and William Campagnale, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Christopher L. Vaniglia of Pisgah, Ohio, Gregory N. Vaniglia of Florence, Leo M. Vaniglia of Erlanger and Milo M. Vaniglia of Cold Spring; daughters, Regina L. Russell of Paducah and Sandra L. McMinn of Irvine, Calif.; brother, Mario Campagnale of New York; sisters, Rose U. Reed of Norwich, N.Y., Dorothy A. Frederico of Walhalla, S.C., and Rae Peterson of Newark, Del.; 19 grandchildren; and 12 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Susan Webster Susan B. Webster, 61, of California, died Jan. 9, 2012, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She enjoyed camping and boating, and was an avid Harley Davidson motorcycle enthusiast. She was a longtime supporter of animal rights and the Susan G. Komen for the Cure movement. Survivors include her husband, Cliff Webster; daughters, Marsha Anderson of Walton, Melissa Beach of Erlanger and Melody Dalton of Hebron; stepson, David Webster of Dry Ridge; seven grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: Protect 4 Paws NO Kill Shelter, 105A Three Mile Road, Wilder, KY 41076 or Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, 522 Cincinnati Mills Drive, Suite C281, Cincinnati, OH 45240.


LIFE

MARRIAGE LICENSES Anne Andrews, 30, of Trinidad and Eric Juntunen, 31, of Ann Arbor, issued Dec. 27. Meghan Gaddes, 21, of Nashville and Dru Risk, 21, of Cincinnati, issued Dec. 27. Zeng Ying, 26, of China and Matthew Sebastian, 40, of Fort Thomas, issued Dec. 27. Michele Raisor, 44, of Fort Thomas and William Hofstetter, 8, of Dayton, issued Dec. 28. Rebecca Vanover, 27, of Covington and Francisco Olivares, 52, of Mexico, issued Jan. 3. Audry Fothberry, 69, of Cleveland and Joseph Danguah, 49, of Ghana, issued Jan. 3. Brittany Brown, 35, of Long Beach and John Torres, 41,of Binghamton, issued Jan. 3.. Paula Holmes, of Adams and Louis Amsitoff, 45, of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 6. Lisa Owens, 28,and Chad Snowden, 31, both of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 6. Jennifer Munoz, 18, of Miami and Ahmen Mtoor, 25, of Palestine, issued Jan. 6. Jennifer Bradley, 24, and Dirk English, 26, both of Greenville, issued Jan. 6. Stephanie Gaines, 22, of Edgewood and Clarence Bailer, 24, of Fort Thomas, issued Jan. 7. Linda Niehaus, 46, and Daniel Niehaus, 46, both of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 7. Meketa Garrett, 27, of Providence and Seth Webber, 29, of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 7. Ester Baker, 51, of Fort Thomas and Donald Drewry, 72, of Clifton Forge, issued Jan. 9. Valerie Adams, 24, of Hastings and Peter Lynch, 27, of Schaumburg, issued Jan. 9.

QUIT HAPPENS START BUILDING

JANUARY 19, 2012 • CCF RECORDER • B11 SUMMARY OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND ORDINANCE The City Council of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky gave second reading to and adopted the Ordinance No. 2010-10-01 (the "Ordinance") at a Regular Meeting of the City Council on November 10, 2010. A "Notice of Adoption and Summary of General Obligation Bond Ordinance" was originally published in the Campbell County Recorder on December 2, 2010. The following Summary is intended to provide additional information concerning the Ordinance. As required by KRS 83A.060, the following Section 5 of the Ordinance is set forth in its entirety: "Section 5. Compliance with Constitution; Designation and Certification of Public Project; Authorization of Tax; Pledge of Tax, Facility Revenues and Pledged Receipts to Payment of Bonds or Lease, as Applicable; Designation as General Obligation Refunding Bonds. (A) That the debt represented by the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, is hereby determined to be within the maximum indebtedness of the City permitted under Section 158 of the Constitution of Kentucky.

INVITATION TO PROPOSE

Date: January 19, 2012

Date: January 19, 2012

PROJECT: SCHEDULE OF RATE QUOTATION FOR ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Attention: Kevin Owen, Plant Maintenance Supervisor UNTIL:

Date:February 8, 2012 Time:due by: 9:00 a.m., local

PROJECT: SCHEDULE OF RATE QUOTATION FOR PLUMBING MAINTENANCE SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Attention: Kevin Owen, Plant Maintenance Supervisor UNTIL:Date:February 8, 2012 Time: due by: 10:00 a.m., local time.

(B) That the City is authorized to contract the indebtedness represented by the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, pursuant to Section 159 of the Constitution of Kentucky and provide for the collection of an annual tax sufficient to pay the interest on said Bonds or Lease, as applicable, and establish the hereinafter identified Sinking Fund to provide for the payment of the principal thereof.

time.

The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Furnishing rate quotations to perform electrical maintenance at various Northern Kentucky Water District facilities.

The proposed work is generally described as follows: Furnishing rate quotations to perform plumbing maintenance at various Northern Kentucky Water District facilities.

(C) That pursuant to Section 157 of the Constitution of Kentucky and KRS § 66.111, there is hereby authorized to be levied, and the City hereby covenants to so levy and collect, each year that the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, remain outstanding, a Tax in an amount sufficient to provide for the full payment of the principal and interest requirements on said Bonds or Lease, as applicable; provided, however, that said Tax shall be levied only to the extent that the Facility Revenues or other receipts from taxes or other sources are not sufficient to provide for the full payment of the accruing interest and maturing principal on the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, each year.

SCOPE: Perform electrical preventive/corrective maintenance at all District facilities. Assist the District’s in-house electrician as needed on projects/repairs. Perform as needed light replacements, switch repair/replacement and electrical outlet repair/replacement. Perform as needed electrical upgrades due to remodeling/renovating. Perform breaker and circuit repair/replacement as needed.

SCOPE: 1. Perform plumbing preventive/corrective maintenance at all District facilities. 2. Drain line cleaning/repairing at all Dis -trict facilities. 3. Pump out sanitary holding tank at the Ohio River intake. Perform faucet repairs, toilet repairs and/or replacements. As needed perform diagnostic analysis on sewage systems.

(D) That by the adoption of this Ordinance, the City covenants with Owners of the Bonds or the lessor of the Lease, as applicable, that it shall levy each year a Tax in a sufficient amount and appropriate in its annual budget, together with other moneys available to it, including the Facility Revenues, an amount of funds sufficient to pay the “debt charges” on the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, as defined in KRS § 66.011(4). (E) That the Tax shall include the ad valorem property taxes permitted under Section 157 of the Constitution of Kentucky, occupational license fees, insurance premium taxes, excises and any other receipts from taxes, excises, utilities and service revenues, permits, licenses, fines or other sources of revenue of, or of revenue distributions to, the City. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Tax shall only be levied, collected and applied to the payment of said “debt charges” on the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, to the extent the Facility Revenues are not sufficient to meet such “debt charges.” (F) That there is hereby pledged to the payment of the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, the Tax, to the extent required each year, and the Facility Revenues, which together, shall constitute the “Pledged Receipts” securing said Bonds or Lease, as applicable, in accordance with the terms of this Ordinance. (G) That the City hereby declares, determines and certifies that the Facility constitutes a “public project” within the meaning of KRS § 66.011(17). (H) The City covenants to levy, collect and segregate the Tax to the extent the Facility Revenues, if any, or the general revenues of the City, are inadequate to meet the current annual debt service requirements of the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, and hereby designates the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, as full general obligations of the City to the payment of which the full faith, credit, revenue and taxing authority of the City are hereby pledged for the prompt payment thereof.

NOTICE OF SCHEDULE OF REGULAR MEETINGS The Campbell County Court House Commission ("CCCHC") hereby gives public notice of the following schedule of regular meetings for the first half of 2012: January 26; February 23; March 29; April 26; May 24; and June 28. All regular meetings start at 5:00 p.m. and are held on the 1st Floor, office of the CCCHC, at 330 York Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071. The general public and/or those interested individuals are encouraged to attend and provide public input to the CCCHC. Campbell County Court House Commission Charles Peters, Chairman 1684650 NOTICE OF SCHEDULE OF REGULAR MEETINGS The Campbell County Project Development Board ("CCPDB") hereby gives public notice of the following schedule of regular meetings for the first half of 2012: January 25; February 22; March 28; April 25; May 23; and June 27. All regular meetings start at 5:00 p.m. and are held on the 2nd Floor, Courtroom 1 or 2, Campbell County Court House, 330 York Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071. The general public and/or those interested individuals are encouraged to attend and provide public input to the CCPDB. Campbell County Project Development Board William Wehr, Chairman 4659

INVITATION TO PROPOSE

All Rate Quotation Proposals must be in accordance with the Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Rate Quotation Documents may be obtained from the Water District’s office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at 859-4262718. There is no charge for these documents. Any questions on the Rate Quotation Documents can be answered by contacting Kevin Owen at 859-547-3277. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Rate Quotation Proposals, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Proposal, to waive informalities, and to reject the Proposal of any Contractor if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Contractor(s) to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. The bid prices shall remain in effect for the full term of the contract, regardless of the quantity of work. The contract will start from the effective date of the Agreement and ending on December 31, 2012 with the District’s option to extend the contract for up to two additional one year terms.

(I) That the Tax, to the extent required, and the Facility Revenues, shall, as received, be deposited in the appropriate Sinking Fund for the Bonds or Lease, as applicable, and applied solely to the payment of the principal and interest requirements of and administrative expenses for the Bonds or Lease, as applicable."

Proposals shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of the proposal are due.

A copy of the Ordinance and of the form of the documents in connection with the issuance of the Bonds are on file in the office of the City Clerk, 616 Poplar Street, Bellevue, Kentucky 41073.

Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering and Water Quality & Production 1001685033

CITY OF BELLEVUE, KENTUCKY By: /s/ Mary H. Scott City Clerk/Treasurer PREPARATION CERTIFICATE The undersigned Attorney at Law, licensed to practice in Kentucky, hereby certifies that the foregoing summary was prepared by the undersigned and, together with the "Notice of Adoption and Summary of General Obligation Bond Ordinance" originally published in the Campbell County Recorder on December 2, 2010, constitutes a general summary of essential provisions of Ordinance No. 2010-10-01 of the City of Bellevue, Kentucky, reference to the full text of which is hereby made for a complete statement of its provisions and terms. /s/ Roger L. Peterman Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP 50 East Rivercenter Blvd, Suite 1150 Covington,Kentucky 1001684354

41011

NOTICE OF BOND SALE Notice is hereby given that electronic bids will be received by the County of Campbell, Kentucky (the "County"), until 11:00 a.m., E.T. on January 31, 2012 (or at such later time and date announced at least forty-eight hours in advance via the BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ system) for the purchase of approximately $1,705,000 of the County’s General Obligation Refunding Bonds, Series 2012 (the "Bonds"). Alternatively, written sealed or facsimile bids for the Bonds by the designated time will be received by the Judge/Executive, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky 41072 (FAX: (859) 292-3822). The Bonds will be dated their date of initial delivery, will be issued as fully registered bonds in denominations in multiples of $5,000 (within the same maturity) and will mature as to principal in varying amounts on December 1 of the years 2012 through 2022. Additional information, including the Preliminary Official Statement, the Official Terms and Conditions of Bond Sale and the Official Bid Form, may be obtained from the County’s Financial Advisor, J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, LLC; 500 West Jefferson Street, Louisville, Kentucky 40202; Telephone: (502) 588-1124 or at http://pos.hilliard.com. Further information regarding BiDCOMP™/PARITY™ may be obtained from BiDCOMP™/PARITY™, 1359 Broadway - 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10018, Telephone: (800) 850-7422. Sale of Bonds on tax-exempt basis, subject to approving legal opinion of Peck, Shaffer & Williams LLP, Bond Counsel, Covington, Kentucky. The County has designated the Bonds as "qualified tax-exempt obligations" pursuant to Section 265 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Right to reject bids or waive informality reserved. COUNTY OF CAMPBELL KENTUCKY By: /s/ Steven Pendery Judge/Executive

Minority firms are encouraged to respond.

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Historic Preservation Commission will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, January 25, 2012. The meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the Multipurpose room of the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The meeting will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: Review 522 E. 4th St.- Appeal of COA decision for installation of vinyl window on the side façade. Review of 815 Park Ave.-Appeal of staff’s decision of door replacement. Amy Able, City Clerk City of Newport, Kentucky

1001684871

LEGAL NOTICE City of Fort Thomas Design Review Board Public Hearing The Design Review Board of the City of Fort Thomas, Kentucky, will hold a meeting at the City Building, 130 North Fort Thomas Avenue, Fort Thomas, Kentucky, on Thursday, January 26, 2012 beginning at 6:00 P.M. for the following: Public Hearing: A Signage Application for property located at 15 N. Ft. Thomas Avenue, Mio’s Pizza, applicant and owner. Public Hearing: A Signage Application for property located at 1437 S. Ft. Thomas Avenue, YMCA of Greater Cincinnati, applicant and owner. The City of Fort Thomas will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in obtaining access to available services or in attending City activities. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City of Ft. Thomas General Services Department at (859) 572-1210 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the delivery of the service or the date of the meeting. City of Fort Thomas General Services Department (Publishing Date: 1/19/2012) 1001685050

All Rate Quotation Proposals must be in accordance with the Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Rate Quotation Documents may be obtained from the Water District’s office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at 859-4262718. There is no charge for these documents. Any questions on the Rate Quotation Documents can be answered by contacting Kevin Owen at 859-547-3277. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Rate Quotation Proposals, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Proposal, to waive informalities, and to reject the Proposal of any Contractor if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Contractor(s) to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. The bid prices shall remain in effect for the full term of the contract, regardless of the quantity of work. The contract will start from the effective date of the Agreement and ending on December 31, 2012 with the District’s option to extend the contract for up to two additional one year terms. Minority firms are encouraged to respond. Proposals shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of the proposal are due. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering and Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001685006 Notice to Respondent: Jodie Lynn Daniels Van Nuys Courthouse East Case Number: LD060543 6230 Sylmar Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91401 Mr. Levon Petrosyan is seeking dissolution of marriage from Jodie Lynn Daniels. A petition for dissolution of marriage was filed in the above court on 9/22/11. You have 30 calendar days from the date of viewing this notice to respond. A blank response sheet may be obtained from the Judicial Council of California or by contacting the Petitioners attorney: Ara Saroian, Esq., Aghabegian & Associates,PC, Ph 818507-4311. It is highly recommended that you obtain legal representation in this matter. Important: THERE ARE SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT THAT HAVE BEEN EDITED OR OMITTED. TO RECEIVE FULL COPIES OF SAID DOCUMENTS, PLEASE CONTACT THE PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY. 1001684749 LEGAL NOTICE Advertisement for Business-Community Leaders The Campbell County Board of Education is accepting nominations until January 27, 2012 for business-community leaders to serve on the Campbell County School’s Local Planning Committee. Members of the Local Planning Committee (LPC) will be responsible for the development of a District Facility Plan for the Campbell County Schools that will assist in determining future school facility construction priorities and major renovation needs. The Campbell County School board will select 3 members from nominations received to serve on the Local Planning Committee (LPC). Residence in the school district is Please submit nominaa requirement. tions, including a letter of agreement to serve on the Local Planning Committee to: L.P.C. Search Campbell Board of Education 101 Orchard Lane Alexandria, KY 41001 Glen Miller, Superintendent Campbell County Schools 1001685188


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • JANUARY 19, 2012

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