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B OONE COUNTY RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Boone County

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2014

75¢

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Cooperative Extension celebrates 100 years

Dedden will be challenging Moore for judge-executive

B

URLINGTON — The Boone

County Cooperative Extension Office celebrated 100 years of national cooperative extension with a Community Activity Fair on May 10.

By Amanda Van Benschoten avbnky@enquirer.com

On May 20, Boone County Republicans will decide whether to stay the course with longtime Judge-executive Gary Moore or vote for a fresh face in the county’s top job. Their choices are Moore, who has held the job for 15 years, or firstterm County Commissioner Matt Dedden. Moore said Boone County has become one of Kentucky’s fastestgrowing and most vibrant counties under his watch. But Dedden says Boone County needs to offer more tax incentives to small businesses and build its budget reserves, according to his campaign literature. (Dedden has run a lowprofile campaign, declining to answer questions about the details

Mother and daughter Linda and Laura Campbell of Florence select honey products from Keith Crigger of Crigger Farm of Warsaw. PHOTOS BY AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

The Boone County Cooperative Extension Office's Community Activity Fair featured music by Velvet Soul, a Cincinnati-based band which includes Chuck Rigney, Glen Baldridge, Paul Collins, Scott Doyal and Steve Martin.

Grace Weaver of the Northern Kentucky Herb Society tells Darlene Smink and William Robertson of Florence about different types of basil during the Boone County Cooperative Extension Office's Community Activity Fair.

Dedden

Moore

of his platform.) A top issue for Boone County’s next judge-executive will be managing growth: Boone County has added 38,000 people since 2000 and is projected to add 30,000 more by 2020. The footprint of the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport is also expected to grow in the coming years, as CVG prepares to develop hundreds of acres of land it owns just north of Florence. The winner of the primary is expected to face Libertarian J. Kyle Sweeney and possibly also Independent Pat Wingo in the November general election.

2 vying for 66th House seat blast each other for same flubs By Scott Wartman swartman@enquirer.com

The two candidates in the Republican primary in Boone County’s 66th House District have both fired accusations of dodging votes and missing council meetings. State Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Burlington, has represented Boone County’s 66th District since 2005 and is the only House incumbent in Northern Kentucky to draw a challenge in the primary. Former Wilder City Councilman David Martin, 35, is running as a Republican against Wuchner, 58. Whoever wins the primary wins the seat in November since no Democrat filed for the office. Martin criticized Wuchner’s decision not to vote on some bills in committee, while Wuchner criticized Martin for not attending some meetings

when he served as a Wilder city councilman. Martin said those who encouraged him to run for state House brought to his attention Wuchner’s abstained votes in committees. Martin went to Frankfort and analyzed all of Wuchner’s committee votes in the 2013 General Assembly session and found that, in 21 out of 79 votes, she either didn’t record a vote or passed on the bill in committee. “When I decided to run, this is one of the things that put me over the top,” Martin said. “By the time it gets to a final floor vote in the House and Senate, a lot of times it’s a formality. They know whether it’s going to pass or not. So the real action is made in these committees, and if we’re not getting a position taken by our leadership ... then I look at that as failed leadership.” Wuchner, however, said leg-

ELECTION COVERAGE For the most complete coverage of candidates and issues in the May 20 Kentucky primary, go to Cincinnati.com/news/ election-coverage/.

RITA’S KITCHEN With the warmer weather, it’s a great time for bacon asparagus quiche. B3

ORTHOPAEDIC CENTERS

islators often abstain from voting in committee because the bills are works in progress. Bills go to committee before they move to the House and Senate floors for final votes. Lawmakers will often pass on voting in committee if they are trying to get amendments attached or hold off on voting until changes are made, Wuchner said. “Often we’ll say in committee we’ll be discussing adding an amendment and pass or refrain from voting until we see the bill in perfected form,” Wuchner said. “That’s not an uncommon practice.” The Kentucky Legislative Research Commission doesn’t compile statistics on committee votes. Martin said he would pass on voting only in rare circumstances. Wuchner countered with minutes from Wilder City Council meetings showing Martin

missed 14 out of 51 meetings between 2010 and 2012. “What would concern me is his inconsistency of service,” Wuchner said. “It’s important to be there in meetings.” “If I did miss a meeting, it was nothing major; we didn’t take a vote,” Martin said. “Some meetings are routine business. As far as voting on the budget and any vote that was seriously related to city business, I was there to vote.” Martin left Wilder for Petersburg in 2012 after marrying Boone County property valuation administrator Cindy Arlinghaus. If elected, he said one of the first bills he would file would be to implement term limits on state lawmakers. “If they can’t get done what they want to get done in eight to 10 years, then how long does it take – 20 years, 30 years?” Martin said. “How long does it take?” Wuchner, a registered nurse,

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serves as vice chairwoman of the Health and Welfare committee and has led the charge on many medical issues. The governor this month signed into law a bill she sponsored that requires some doctors to receive regular training on treating pediatric head trauma from abuse. Like many Republicans, Wuchner wants to eliminate some taxes on businesses and enact right-to-work laws that would prevent unions from compelling membership at work places. Wuchner said the state should eliminate the taxes businesses have to pay on gross-receipts, which she believes will allow businesses to hire more and bring in more payroll tax to the state. “For those job creators, we have to make sure we’re getting out of the way,” Wuchner said.

! No appointment necessary ! Urgent orthopaedic care ! Same cost as an office visit CommonwealthOrthoCenters.com

Vol. 138 No. 30 © 2014 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • BOONE COUNTY RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

LaRosa’s expands with Hebron pizzeria Share your N. Ky. prom photos Community Recorder

High school prom is a night to remember. Now you can share your memories with your friends and neighbors. The Recorder invites you to share your best prom photos for publication in the newspaper and in an online photo gallery. Send a photo and caption identifying everyone in the photo, from left to right. Tell us which high school prom it is, as well as the date and any other interesting details. Please send your digital photo (with “Prom Photos” in the subject line) to ndaly@communitypress.com by Thursday, May 22.

Cincinnati-based LaRosa’s opened its newest pizzeria in Hebron this month. The pizzeria is located at 3065 North Bend Road, near the intersection of Route 237 and Route 20 in a fast-growing retail area that includes a Kroger Marketplace. LaRosa’s is a strong addition to this neighborhood home to many young professionals and their growing families. LaRosa’s Hebron includes a traditional dining room as well as carry out, pick up and delivery. Tarik Daoud and his son, Chase, current LaRosa’s franchise owners, will operate the Hebron location. Chase is looking forward to his dad’s guidance as they embark on this new franchise opportunity. “I am excited to work side-by-side with my dad in the restaurant business. It’s been quite an experience being a part of building this one from the ground up.” Chase Daoud said. “LaRosa’s has meant a lot to our family; my dad has worked with the company for over 40 years. It’s great to be carrying on the tradition.”

Share your prom photos with the Recorder by May 22.PROVIDED

BOONE

COUNTY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

News

Nancy Daly Editor ..............................859-578-1059 ndalyl@communitypress.com Stephanie Salmons Reporter .................578-1057, ssalmons@communitypress.com Melissa Stewart Reporter .....................578-1058, mstewart@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@communitypress.com To place an ad .................................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police ................... B10 Schools ..................A7 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A11

Delivery

For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager ..442-3464, sschachleiter@communitypress.com

Classified

To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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The Ryle cheerleading team captured first place in the medium division at the Northern Kentucky Cheerleading Coaches’ Association competition at Conner High School. They went on to seize the grand championship for the second year in a row and recently ended their season ranked No. 1 in the region, second in state, and listed in the nation’s top 20.PROVIDED

By Karen Meiman

SAVE

sary milestone this year. In 1954, founder Buddy LaRosa opened his first pizzeria with friends and family members as part-

After victorious year, it’s their time to be cheered

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The Daoud family owns and operates 11 LaRosa’s pizzerias. LaRosa’s is celebrating its 60-year anniver-

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LaRosa’s celebrated the opening of its 64th pizzeria in Hebron last week with a ribbon cutting ceremony. From left: Tarik Daoud, franchise owner of 11 LaRosa’s restaurants and resident of Covington; Buddy LaRosa, LaRosa’s Inc. founder and chairman and resident of Price Hill; Chase Daoud, franchisee of LaRosa’s Hebron and resident of Covington; Danielle Miller, general manager and resident of Fort Mitchell; and Michael LaRosa, LaRosa’s Inc. CEO and resident of Delhi. PROVIDED

ners. “LaRosa’s has always been a family pizzeria - in terms of the guests we serve and who is serving them,” said Michael LaRosa, CEO of LaRosa’s and son of Buddy LaRosa. “It’s been the help and support of family and friends that has enabled us to achieve our success. We’re all proud to see the legacy of the company - the importance of family - carry on with Tarik and his son Chase,” LaRosa said. LaRosa’s offers over 40 menu choices for dine in, pick up or delivery; including LaRosa’s famous family-recipe pizzas, special kids’ meals, hoagys, pastas and desserts. For pick up or delivery orders, Guests can order online or mobile devices at www.larosas.com, or call LaRosa’s at 513-3471111.

Nicole Pellerin suffers from tendonitis in her wrists. Casey Springer suffers from back fractures. Cassie Hanser has been left with enough aches and pains to call her cheerleading career quits. These three senior Ryle High School cheerleaders represent the physical toll this oftenoverlooked sport can take on the body. Members of the Ryle cheerleading squad spend countless hours tumbling and perfecting mounts. They stay late at school to finalize routines. They juggle academics and two-and-a-half hour practices before heading out to cheer for another sport – the women and men’s basketball teams. Fall weekend nights are spent cheering the players of the gridiron. They rush to open gyms and have supported a family at Christmas and raised funds for someone suffering from cancer. They decorate lockers, lead pep rallies, cup fences and encourage their football big brothers. Their season is the longest of any Ryle sport – nine months. Parents say their season never seems to stop. But they wouldn’t have it any other way. These 40 some Ryle women are known for always cheering for others.

But recently the athletes of this sport were the recipients of all the cheers. Last month, the Ryle cheerleading team captured first place in the medium division at the Northern Kentucky Cheerleading Coaches’ Association competition at Conner High School. They went on to seize the grand championship for the second year in a row and recently ended their season ranked No. 1 in the region, second in state, and listed in the nation’s top 20. “They deserve a lot of cheers,” coach Debbie Pyles said. “They work hard. They are smart. They spend a lot of late nights studying and they certainly have to have a lot time management skills to juggle this sport with studies.” “To be a part of this team is a full on commitment,” added Christy Pellerin, mother of four-year cheerleading veteran Nicole, who will be a nursing student at the University of Louisville this fall. “This team is way more than a group of girls who get together to toss a few people in the air and stand on the sideline cheering for their team.” The team’s philosophy of working together paid off in their grand champions win. The season has been plagued by illness and injuries. Back injuries forced veteran Haley Bouvin to bow out of the event at the

last minute. “It was definitely an ‘oh crap’ moment, but the team work paid off,” said Nicole. “It all came together. I think because of our ability to cooperate and work together.” Hallie Wilburn, who had just been released from knee surgery, filled in for Haley Bouvin with no previous experience. They captured the grand prize. Many of the cheerleaders at Ryle have spent years in the sport. They have tumbled together at local gyms and many cheered for Pee Wee Football teams. Like many more recognized sports – such as football or basketball – their journey to the high school level has at time been grueling. It has required years of long practices and parental and athlete devotion. “I’ll miss it all,” said Cassie Hanser, a senior who plans to attend Northern Kentucky University in the fall and study finance. “We are kind of like sisters. We are all different, but equal.” Casey Springer, a senor co-captain, is one of a long line of Ryle cheerleaders who will move on to cheer at the collegiate level. She is deciding between Morehead State University and Western Kentucky University. Her devotion to cheerleading will help pay for her college education.


NEWS

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NEWS

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NEWS

A6 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

Charity teams up with schools

Master Provisions president Roger Babik explains bicycle refurbishment to Boone County students. Master Provisions ships donated bicycles to communities in Africa, providing transportation and creating jobs in bike repair.PROVIDED

Community Recorder

Student Advisory Council members from all Boone County schools came together recently at Master Provisions for a service learning experience. Master Provisions is a not-for-profit organization based in Florence that connects resources to

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people in need locally, regionally and globally. Master Provisions staff members and strategic volunteers gave the students an overview of their work and mission. The students then worked in smaller groups in a series of hands-on activities in each of Master Provisions’ mission and resource areas: food management and distribution, clothing distribution, shoe and accessory processing, orphan care, sewing projects, bicycle refurbishment, recycling initiatives, and trucking and logistics. These activities occurred at the Borland Family Distribution Center, which houses Master Provisions’ warehouse, conference facility and offices. Advisory council members, who are student leaders selected to represent their respective schools, attend elementary, middle and high schools in the Boone County school district. These leaders will now go

back to their schools to share the information and the story behind their service learning activities. “We are excited to be engaged with Boone County schools, and enjoy the opportunity to work side by side with the wonderful young people who are student leaders today and community leaders of tomorrow,” said Master Provisions’ President Roger Babik. Locally, Master Provisions receives, manages and distributes 150,000 pounds of food each week to over 200 area soup kitchens, shelters and neighborhood food pantries and other nonprofit groups. It also provides clothing to some of these nonprofit partners to help them serve their clients. Overseas, Master Provisions works with mission partners to provide orphan care as well as resources for clothing and sewing shops, bicycle repair shops, and agriculture projects.

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SCHOOLS Flavors of the world offers educational treats K1

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ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • A7

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith Recorder Contributor

Morgan Mitchell of Erlanger plopped down on the carpet. The 13-year-old was soon joined by her friends. Crowded around an array of exotic-looking foods, they tasted and talked. “I feel like I have half of Europe on a plate,” Mitchell said. “You get to try almost every different type of food from around the world,” added her friend, Aaron Byrd. That night, April 21, more than 50 students of the Kenton County Adult Education’s ESL (English as a Second Language) program each prepared a dish from their home country. The event, held at the Erlanger branch of the Kenton County Public Library, was called International Food and Flavors. The dishes were displayed on tables that lined the perimeter of the library’s meeting room. Hanging from each table was a paper flag representing the country where the food, and the person who made it, originated. “We’ve never been to Indonesia or Turkey,” said Colleen Nuttall of Fort Mitchell, who brought along her son. “I’m enjoying all the culture here.” “This is an opportunity for us to share our food and culture,” said Elif Yildrim of Villa Hills. She was born and raised in Turkey. “Turkey’s food takes a long time to prepare,” she shared. “For example, this,” she said pointing to her dish, stuffed grape leaves. “You have to roll them, one by one.” “This is the third time we’ve done the food night,” said Jon Reynolds, the ESL coordinator for Kenton County Adult Education. “This is great because we can meet with people from different countries,” shared Nati Moser of Hebron, who grew up in the Dominican Republic. “We hear different accents. It’s good for our ears.” To learn more about the Kenton County Adult Education’s ESL program, visit www.kentonesl.org.

A traditional food of Japan, sushi, prepared by Kayo Fuji of Walton for the International Food and Flavors event at the Erlanger library.

From left: Morgan Mitchell, 13, Aaron Byrd, 14, and Morgan Clark, 14, all of Erlanger, enjoy food from different countries at the International Food and Flavors event at the Erlanger library on April 21. More than 50 adults prepared dishes for the event.

Kateryna Sheremet, left, serving food of her home country of Ukraine for Colby Nuttall, 11, of Fort Mitchell at International Food and Flavors at the Erlanger library.PHOTOS BY KAMELLIA SMITH FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

A traditional dish of Turkey, stuffed grape leaves, prepared by Elif Yildrim of Villa Hills for the International Food and Flavors event. Food was prepared by students of Kenton County Adult Education’s ESL program.

The nations of Russia and Ukraine may currently be at odds, but Ekaterina Dianova from Russia, left, and Kateryna Sheremet from Ukraine enjoy each other’s company at the International Food and Flavors event.

Rosa Maria of Florence, representing her home country of Mexico, serves chicken and pepper with molé sauce at the International Food and Flavors evening at the Erlanger branch of the Kenton County Public Library.


SPORTS

A8 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Raiders double up for regional track title

Freedom third baseman Jacob Tanis tags out a Wild Things runner in a rundown heading back to second base last July 14 game against Washington (Pa.) in Frontier League last year.JAMES

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

WEBER/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Florence Freedom return key players for 2014 By Adam Turer FLORENCE — Two straight playoff appearances and a host of fun promotions should have fans excited to welcome back the Florence Freedom in 2014. The season begins at 6:35 p.m., Thursday, May15, at UC Health Stadium as the Freedom welcome the Washington Wild Things. “This is a team that’s returning some key players that went to the playoffs in 2013,” general manager Josh Anderson said. Third baseman and defending Frontier League MVP Jacob Tanis returns, along with All-Star closer Jorge Marban. Local products on the roster include pitchers Dave Middendorf (Cincinnati La Salle/ Northern Kentucky University) and Casey Henn (Cincinnati Colerain), and outfielder Kyle Bluestein (Cincinnati Oak Hills). “It's great to have continuity from year to year,” manager Fran Riordan said. “Guys who have played here before understand what the coaching staff expects from them on a day-to-day basis and help them in many other ways getting ac-

RECORDER

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

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customed to new surroundings.” In addition to putting out a competitive product on the field, the Freedom are again doing their part to make baseball fun. On June12, the Freedom players will wear U.S. Men’s National Team replica soccer jerseys on World Cup Night. On July 10, they will wear Captain America jerseys as part of Superhero Night at the ballpark. Both nights are “jersey off the back” nights - fans will have the opportunity to bid on the game-worn jerseys following each game. The Freedom will make history on July 26. According to Anderson, the Freedom will put on the first murder mystery conducted during a live baseball game. Players will wear Holmes-inspired Deerstalker hats while fans attempt to solve the whodunit. On Aug. 3, University of Kentucky men’s basketball coach John Calipari will meet with and speak to fans before the game and fans in attendance will receive a Coach Cal bobblehead. These are just a few of several notable ballpark promotions at UC Health Stadium this season, in addition the standard celebrations like Thirsty Thursday and Fire-

works Friday. This season, all 96 games will be broadcast via florencefreedom.com or the Florence Freedom app. The Freedom are also the first baseball team to offer a completely peanutfree stadium. The Freedom will offer allergy-friendly options at the stadium concession stands. On the field, the pitching staff will be the team’s strength. “We have a very experienced starting rotation and our bullpen has a lot of great arms with great stuff,” Riordan said. “They have a chance to be very special.” The organization has seemingly reached the balance that most minor league and independent league teams strive for. The Freedom has been able to bring fans to the gate through a combination of creative and innovative promotions while putting a quality product on the field. According to Anderson, the season ticket holder base has increased 50 percent over the past two seasons. “Going to the playoffs has helped,” said Anderson. “Cincinnati is starving for a winner and the Freedom have given them just that the past two seasons.”

UNION — Alexandra Patterson already had plenty of credentials and experience at longer races such as the 400 and 800 meters. The Ryle High School freshman tried out the blink-and-you-miss-it 100meter dash in the first meet of the season after running well in it in practice. The results were eyeopening for everybody. “Our first meet, we decided let’s just have some fun, go out and run the 100 and see what happens,” said Ryle head coach Jim Wihebrink. “She’s like ‘Huh?’” Patterson ran well enough that day and kept on getting better, winning the 100 at the Class 3A, Region 5 championships May 10 at Dixie Heights. She later won her third consecutive regional title in the 800 for an unusual combination of titles, winning by nearly five seconds and also finishing third in the

400. “The 100 we threw together this year,” she said. “It was just an experiment, and it turned out to be a very good experiment. I run the 800 differently than most girls. I run the first lap really fast, then hold on the second lap, but it works.” Patterson was one of many standouts for the Raiders Saturday, as they dominated team competition to win their secondever title, first since 2008. Ryle scored 138.5 points to 93 for second-place Dixie Heights. Patterson had a third title to end the day at a third distance, anchoring the 4x400 with Ashley Murray, Christy Hadley and Jacqueline Jones. “It was a great day. I’m so proud of my team. They’re amazing,” Patterson said. Ryle had five event champions overall and three second-place finishSee TRACK, Page A9

Cooper junior Zachary Stewart, right, won the 3,200 and Connor Greenhalgh was third. Campbell County junior Mark Chaplin, right, was fourth. The NKY 3A regional track and field meet was May 10, 2014 at Dixie Heights High School. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Boone County teams well-represented in state tennis By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Jake Honschopp of Cooper, left, and A.J. Berk of Scott are friends who both qualified for the 2014 KHSAA state tennis tournament in singles. The Ninth Region tournament ended May 6 at Boone Woods in Burlington. THANKS TO MARK HONSCHOPP

hard in three sets. Honschopp has been seeded in the top eight in the region the last three years and had lost in the quarterfinals the past two seasons. He is the first boys tennis player at Cooper to qualify for state, joining Chelsea Nibert, who played in girls singles in 2011. St. Henry sophomore Audrey North will play in the girls singles tournament, which will take place Thursday at the Sayre High School athletic complex. She will play at 9:15 a.m. against unseeded Anna Caroline Braka of Owensboro. The winner plays at 3 p.m. Thursday against Ninth Region runner-up Caroline Krumme of Notre Dame, or fifth seeded Julian Mok of Sayre. North lost to Krumme in the regional semifinals. North missed all of last season with a knee injury. Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber

Paid for by Tony Jones for Commissioner

Cooper’s Jake Honschopp serves during the regional in 2014. THANKS TO MARK HONSCHOPP

ELECT

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TONY CE-0000592880

UNION — Boone County will have several representatives at this week’s state tournament in Lexington, some returning, some new. Conner seniors Jacob Eberhard and Casey Garnett will return for a second trip in doubles after reaching the semifinals of the Ninth Region Tournament. The Cougar duo won a match last year at state and will have to be in top form to repeat that feat this season. The Cougars were unseeded and drew a team from Henry Clay, freshman Noah Tapp and sophomore Kiefer Mays, who are listed in the second tier of seeded duos. The KHSAA lists the top four seeds separately, then the next four seeded teams – which Henry Clay is part of - are considered equally when filling out the bracket.

Conner is set for first serve at 9:15 a.m. Thursday, May 15, with the match taking place at the University of Kentucky. A win pits the Cougars against an unseeded team from either Morgan County or Lawrence County in the second round, no sooner than 2:15 p.m. The third round would be Friday morning. Cooper senior Jake Honschopp also drew misfortune in the bracket, taking on South Oldham sophomore Jordan Pitts, who is one of four players listed as No. 5 seeds. His match is at 1 p.m. Thursday, with the winner playing at 4 p.m. against either Anthony Bosch of Covington Catholic or Hunter Norris of Bullitt East, both unseeded. Honschopp, in his seventh and last year as a varsity player, the last five as Cooper’s No. 1 player, qualified for the state boys tennis tournament by winning his quarterfinal match against Conner’s Nathan Eber-

COMMISSIONER

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SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • A9

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Baseball

» A look at district matchups taking place next week. Region 8, District 32: No. 4 seed Williamstown will face No. 1 Simon Kenton and Grant County will face Walton-Verona. Region 9, District 33: Top-seed Boone County will face Cooper and Conner will face Ryle. Region 9, District 34: Seeding was finished after deadline. Dixie Heights has the top seed. Region 9, District 35: Top-seed Covington Catholic will face Holmes, and Holy Cross will face Beechwood Region 9, District 36: Highlands has the top seed, with other seeding being finished after deadline. Region 10, District 37: Seeding took place after deadline. » Boone County won four games last week, including district wins over Conner and Ryle, to improve to 15-4. » Conner beat Bishop Brossart 3-2 May 5. Dillon Lockstead picked up his first win of the year. Ryan Ward had two hits. » Walton-Verona beat Owen County 5-3 May 9. Garrett Lehkamp had a home run, triple and four RBI. » Covington Catholic beat Newport Central Catholic 5-1 May 5. Senior pitcher Brian Haughey threw a complete game three-hitter, striking out two. Senior Grant Schreiver had a double

and two RBI for Covington Catholic. Senior Ben Heppler added an RBI. » St. Henry beat Lloyd 17-0 May 6. Rex Rogers had two hits and four RBI.

Softball

» Boone County beat Cooper 15-0 May 6. Dallis Knotts had four hits and three RBI. Ryley Grau, Shelby Wright and Kiersten Maines each had three hits, and Maines drove in three as well. » Conner beat Campbell County 16-4 May 8. Sydney Himes had three hits. That was Conner’s fifth win in six games, counting triumphs over Notre Dame and Boone County. » Walton-Verona won the Bart Rison Derby Classic at Montgomery County May 3. Walton-Verona beat Estill County 5-2 and Montgomery County 1-0 behind senior pitcher Hannah Thacker, who allowed just four hits in 14 innings. Leadoff batter Olivia Dezarn was 6-for-8 with two doubles, a triple and four stolen bases.

Coaching News

» A little over a week after Silver Grove announced that former St. Henry girls’ basketball coach Brian Coburn was going to become its head girls’ basketball coach, he opted to take the girls’ head coaching position at Villa Madonna instead. Coburn replaces Don Shields, who retired after this past season with 401 career wins. Coburn coached St. Henry from 2008-13 and in his five seasons compiled a 98-42 record and

led the Crusaders to the Ninth Region tournament each season, including the semifinals in each of his first four seasons. He didn’t coach this past season. St. Henry and Villa Madonna are both in the 34th District and Coburn’s daughter Jessica will be a senior this coming year at St. Henry, where she plays golf and is a member of chamber choir. “St. Henry will be treated like any opponent on the schedule,” Coburn said. “We will scout and prepare for them and give them the same respect as every team we play.”

TMC Notes

» Thomas More College shortstop Ana Walter has been named the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Player of the Year by the conference’s head coaches. Ana Walter, who was named second team All-PAC last season, was also named first team AllPAC this season. She is second-straight Thomas More player to earn PAC Player of the Year honors (Alex Walter won the award in 2013) and the fifth Saints player to be selected as the league’s Player of the Year since Thomas More entered the PAC in 2005-06. Walter led the league in hits (61), runs scored (38), runs batted-in (36) and total bases (92) to go along with a PAC-best .516 average with runners in scoring position. Also on All-PAC first team were third baseman Alex Walter, pitcher Ronni Burns, utility player Mamee Salzer, and designated player Haley Shuemake.

Track Continued from Page A8

ers who secured automatic berths to the state meet May 24 in Lexington. The Raiders got plenty of points elsewhere as the maximum two entries in each event often did maximum damage. “It’s great for our program,” Wihebrink said. “We really did it with the depth of our team. We double-scored in most of our events and that was the key to our margin of victory. We were wellbalanced and when you’re scoring in all the areas, that’s strong.” Ryle also won the 4x800 with Jones, Jensen Bales, Maria Truitt and Katelyn Nichols. Casey Springer took the pole vault. Bales also took second in the 1,600, and Alexis Stockton was second in both shot and discus. Springer tied her personal best 10-foot-6 in the pole vault, and clearing that at state should put her in the running for the state championship. She finished fifth last year. “I train with pretty much all the state people in Louisville,” said Springer, a senior who is also a cheerleader and will try to partake in both disciplines at Morehead State University. “The next two weeks I’ll be working hard. It’s a blast, it’s a different feeling, but I like being able to be flown up in the air and over a bar. It took a lot of time to get used to.” Ryle was fourth in the

boys competition. Zane Siemer won the long jump and Mitchel Bateman was second in the 100. Boone County was second in the boys 4x800 with Akram Abdulle, Robert Beneker, Logan Vier and Mathew Koons. Boone won the 4x400 with Abdulle, Ordu, Donald Brumley and Koons. Koons won the 400 and Barry Ordu was second. Tony Leroy won the 100 and Abdulle won the 800 to join Koons with a pair of crowns. In girls, Marissa Jutzi was second in the 300 hurdles. Jena Doellman won the triple jump and high jump. The Cooper boys won the 4x800 with Zachary Stewart, Jake Vandermosten, Mitchell Greenhalgh and Aaron Kelter. Greenhalgh won the 1,600 and Stewart was second. Stewart turned around and won the

3,200. Cooper was second in the 4x200 with Greyson Winiger, Tyson Jackson, Caleb Watson and Kyle Henderson, and also second in the 4x400 with Winiger, Kelter, Watson and Henderson. Kelter took second in the 800. Tanner Schmoll was second in high jump. For the Cooper girls, Julia Henderson was second in the 400 and Hannah Held second in the high jump. Conner junior Nolan Gerlach was second in the boys 3,200 to advance. In girls, Olivia Panella won the long jump and was second in the triple jump. In addition to the top two finishers in each event, the next best 10 performances statewide gain a berth to the state meet. Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber

CENTRE OF ATTENTION

Ryle High School senior Peyton Wohlwender recently signed to play volleyball at Centre College. She is pictured with Ryle Principal Matthew Turner.THANKS TO TOM WOHLWENDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

A10 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

Wurtzler, Nare lead Thomas More track in PAC

NKY River Monsters end ‘unbelievable experience’ By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Thomas More College earned four championships at the Presidents’ Athletic Conference championships in New Wilmington, Penn., April 25-26. Two individual champions reached their potential, while a relay team surprised. Senior Matt Wurtzler won his final collegiate race. Junior Lucas Nare continued his development with an individual win and led his relay team to an impressive championship. Wurtzler, a cross country and distance track star for the Saints, won the PAC’s 10,000-meter race. It was a fitting end to his time running for Thomas More. When he arrived on campus, the track team was just a club team. It became a varsity squad by his sophomore year. He captained the Saints as a junior and senior and also led their cross country program. He set the standard for the program in practice every day. Winning the10K was just the icing on the cake. “What he’s done over the last three years has been remarkable,” said Saints track and field head coach Jeff Hill. “He has given us an identity and given us a goal to shoot for.” His time of 32:39.54 gave him the championship in the final race he ran representing the Saints. The victory was satisfying for the senior from Cincinnati Roger Bacon High School. “I definitely wanted to go out on top,” said Wurtzler. “I let my run-

Thomas More College junior Lucas Nare, left, continued his development with an individual win at the Presidents’ Athletic Conference championships in New Wilmington, Penn., April 25-26. He also led his relay team to an impressive championship. THANKS TO THOMAS MORE COLLEGE

ning do my leading. I really felt like the 10K was my race.” After graduation Wurtzler will inevitably feel the urge to compete. Whether he starts training for marathons or half-marathons or other events is to be determined. There is little doubt that he will race again within the next year. “That itch is always going to be there to race competitively,” said Wurtzler. Nare won both the 100 and 200 meter sprints, setting a PAC championship meet record with a time of 21.48 in the 200. Upon arriving on campus in 2011, Nare has done nothing but get better. “You could tell he worked hard in the offseason between his freshman and sophomore years,” said Hill. “We knew we were on to something. It was all due to his work in the offseason and his work ethic.” He knew that this year was his opportunity to take over the PAC. In addition to winning both sprints, he led the Saints to victory in the 4x100 relay. ”The difference in confidence is huge,” said Nare. “I was more confident and more used to the environ-

ment. I’m having more fun now.” Now, he has a chance to qualify for the NCAA championships, after narrowly missing qualifying as a sophomore. His fate will likely be determined by the performances of other runners as they race to qualify in the top 20. After the PAC championships, Nare was ranked 12th in the 200 meter dash. The top 20 qualify for nationals. “It’s something I’ve been working toward for a long time,” said Nare. “That would be huge.” Sophomore Scootie Middleton, freshman Colin Trammel, and junior Galen Curry, joined Nare as 4x100 champions. Expectations will be even higher next season with all four runners back. The still young program is in great hands and continues to improve each season. Wurtzler leaves the program much better off than it was when he arrived. “It’s a little bittersweet. I’m really going to miss my teammates, most importantly,” Wurtzler said. “It is kind of nice to have accomplished so much in the last four years.”

The Northern Kentucky River Monsters wrapped up their first season in the Continental Indoor Football League with a loss in their first playoff game. The Marion Blue Racers defeated Northern Kentucky 56-40 on May 10 to advance to the CIFL championship game. Despite falling short of winning the program’s first postseason game, the River Monsters can look back fondly on the progress made this season. “It’s been very satisfying, and the great thing about this team is we have been through more than any other team but the tougher things got the closer the team became,” head coach Mike Goodpaster said. “A lot of coaches and teams talk about being a family, but this team really has that feel about it.” The River Monsters won five straight games before losing in the South Division championship game at Marion. Northern Kentucky finished the season 7-4. Maurice Douse led the River Monsters effort with three touchdowns in the loss. He was one of several bright spots who emerged over the

course of the season. Linebacker David James led the CIFL in tackles. Butch Abshire returned an interception for a touchdown in the Marion game. The team bonded together and developed under new leadership. The players bonded with their fans and the community. The River Monsters feel good about how the 2014 season turned out. “Our season has been an unbelievable experience with everything we have overcome,” Goodpaster said. “Our general manager John Jackson has done a great job and, as a head coach, it’s very rare to work with a G.M. who will do whatever a coach needs to make the team a success, and always puts the players’ problems first.” “John and our owner Jill (Chitwood) have come together to make this season one that will never be forgotten by any of us.”

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NO APOLOGIES, NO EXCUSES; CHILDREN NEED YOU

P

lease see the images on the van photo. Kids are being hurt every day. Some people find the black and white image hard to view. We make no apologies. The real children suffer far worse than the photo illustrates, but maybe it got your attention? Help us write a better ending to their story. Help us pick a child up off the street, feed, clothe and give them refuge from the storm. Help us mend their broken bones, broken spirits and wipe their tears away. Last month in Northern Kentucky, we have received 174 referrals for children who needed a home. That is almost six children a day, every day. We can’t keep up with the need. Good families are being called upon to serve these children. We are desperate to find strong, caring families able to meet this epidemic.

One of the 40 youth in residence at DCCH recently asked me point blank, yet innocently and without anger, “What are you Ronald M. doing to Bertsch COMMUNITY PRESS find me a forever GUEST COLUMNIST family?” He pleaded, “I don’t want to spend another birthday or Christmas here.” I dared not tell him that for a 14-year old boy, his chances of our recruiting an adoptive home for him were very slim. What do I tell the 9-year-old girl, the 6-year-old boy? Where can we place the sibling group of four? The littlest ones were found by the police out in the street during a lightning storm. They were cold and their little lips were

purple, wearing only their dirty diapers. This thought haunts me that there are children for whom I cannot find a good home. I have to think that people just don’t know that there are children needing a warm bed and a caring adult. Please hear my plea and recognize the need of the children in our own community. Some people express a willingness to help out but feel they are not financially able to do so. Subsidies are available to assist families with the care of a child placed with them, both during the foster care phase and throughout the adoption. Some people say, “I could not give the child up,” as if their loss will be harder than seeing a child die from abuse, or know that children sit in anguish with no family at all. Maybe some fear that the work involved will be

CH@TROOM May 8 question

“Turn signals or lack of use. A friend of mine is a 29-plus-year highway patrol man. I said give me a ticket book and an unmarked car and I will fill the book in eight hours. His response was I'll give you three books and you will fill them in eight hours. Turn signals not used.” cjh

“My biggest pet peeve about other drivers - is how most people don't stop on red lights before making a right-hand turn. And then will blow their horn and make obscene gestures at the driver that does.”

S.K.

“There are a few habits of other drivers that bug me: One is tailgating i.e. following too closely behind me when I am going the proper speed. “The other is the lack of using a turn signal. “The final one would be those driving without insurance. It seems that half the accidents are with drivers who do not have the proper insurance. The Ohio DMV needs to be authorized to check for and actually see an insurance card from anyone getting license tags or a driver’s license renewal.

tough. It will be! Fostering and adopting is probably the hardest job any parent will undertake. It will most certainly mean sacrifice. Yet during these tough times, Jesus says he will be with us always, as promised in Matthew 28:20. The Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home recruits,

trains and supports individuals who choose to provide both temporary and permanent placements for children. The DCCH Center is currently begging for more foster and adoptive parents. To receive additional information about foster parenting or adoption, contact Ron Bertsch or

Gene Blair at DCCH, 331-2040, ext. 8463. A free informational meeting is also planned for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at DCCH in Fort Mitchell.

Ronald M. Bertsch is therapeutic foster care and adoption director for the Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home Center for Children and Families.

CIVIC INVOLVEMENT

Go Figure!”

What drives you crazy about other drivers?

DCCH Center is driving around town in their new van, sharing a message of hope that new foster or adoptive families can offer a child.PROVIDED

T.D.T.

“1. Drivers who don’t stop at crosswalks. Pedestrians who don’t use crosswalks. “2. Drivers who turn right right, then immediately wait to turn left into a corner property. They could have continued straight and just made one right turn without obstructing traffic. “3. Drivers that block an intersection when the light is green. If there wasn’t room for you to clear the intersection, just wait until the next light cycle. This also leads to the other annoying drivers that take this opening to make a ‘right turn on red,’ taking advantage of the driver waiting until there was room for them to advance. If everyone would just be a bit more patient, traffic should flow better as designed and if you don’t make that traffic light cycle your car will be first in line for the next green light.” “4. Two way left turn lanes (chicken lanes or suicide lanes) are not passing lanes.”

M.T.

“Staying too close to my trunk.”

Mary Ann Maloney

“Cutting corners left of center ...”

Chuck Gibson

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION What advice would you give to graduating high school and college seniors? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to rmaloney@communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

BOONE

COUNTY RECORDER

Boone County Businessman Association Meeting time: 11:30 a.m. final Thursday of each month Where: Florence Holiday Inn, 7905 Freedom Way, Florence Contact: Bill D’Andrea, 859-240-7692

Boone County Jaycees

Meeting time: 7 p.m. first Wednesday of each month

Where: Florence Government Center, 8100 Ewing Blvd., Florence (lower level) Contact: President Katie Beagle, 859-466-8998 Description: Community and young professional organization.

Covington Rotary Club

Meeting time: 12:15 p.m. Tuesdays Where: Radisson Hotel in Covington Contact: President David Miller at jdmiller-

group@fuse.net

Daughters of the American Revolution Rebecca Bryan Boone Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution of Fort Thomas Meeting time: Second Wednesday or Saturday of each month Where: Various spots Contact: Zella Rahe, 1106 Craft Road, Alexandria KY 41001, 859-635-

5050, zella.rahe@twc.com Description: Members prove lineage back to a Revolutionary War patriot. Offer service to troops, veterans and schools.

Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary

Meeting time: 7 p.m. third Tuesday of each month Where: DAV national headquarters, 3725 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring Contact: Commander Kim Hempleman, 859-7816110

WHO IS ON THE MAY 20 PRIMARY BALLOT Here is the ballot for the May primary and November’s general election. *Denotes incumbent Bold denotes May 20 primary

Federal

R

U.S. Senate Mitch McConnell, R* Matt Bevin, R James Bradley Copas,

Chris Payne, R Shawna Sterling, R Alison Lundergan Grimes, D Burrel Charles Farnsley, D Gregory Brent Leichty, D Tom Recktenwald, D U.S. House Thomas Massie, R* Peter Newberry, D

State General Assembly

Senate District 24 (Campbell County, Pendleton County, Bracken County) Wil Schroder, R Deb Sheldon, R Brandon Voelker, R Jason Michael Steffen, D House District 60 (Boone County) Sal Santoro, R* House District 61 (Southern Boone, South-

A publication of

ern Kenton and Grant counties) Brian Linder, R* House District 63 (Boone and Kenton counties) Diane St. Onge, R* House District 64 (Kenton County) Tom Kerr, R* House District 65 (Kenton County) Arnold Simpson, D* House District 66 (Boone County) Addia Wuchner, R* David Martin, R House District 67 (Campbell County) Dennis Keene, D* House District 68 (Campbell County) Joseph Fischer, R* Shae Hornback, D House District 69 (Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties) Adam Koenig, R* Justice of the Supreme Court (6th District) Teresa L. Cunningham Michelle M. Keller* Judge of the Court of Appeals (6th District, First Division) Allison Jones* Justin Sanders Judge of the Court of Appeals (6th District, Second Division) Joy A. Moore*

executive Gary W. Moore, R* Matthew J. Dedden, R Commissioner, District 1 Anthony (Tony) Jones, R Mike Bailey, R Cathy Flaig, R Christy Vogt Mollozzi, R Adam Chaney, R Commissioner, District 2 Phyllis Sparks, R Charles Kenner, R* Franklin Messer, D Commissioner, District 3 Charlie Walton, R* Thomas Szurlinski, R Boone County Jailer Edward Prindle, R* Scott Goodridge, R Brian Landrum, R Boone County Sheriff: Michael A. Helmig, R* Boone County Property Valuation Administrator Cindy Arlinghaus, R* Boone County Clerk Ramona B. Croushore, R Kenny Brown, R* Jim Sallee, R Boone County Attorney Robert Neace, R* Justice of the Peace, 1st Magisterial District Michael D. Harness, R* Boone County Justice of the Peace, Boone County Judge- 2nd Magisterial District

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Pat Valentine, R Eric Shane Grinnell, R* Justice of the Peace 3rd Magisterial District Susan Lynn Caldwell, R* Constable 1st Magesterial District David C. Flaig, R* James L. Nelson III, R Constable, 2nd Magisterial District Ken Baumgartner, R* Constable, 3rd Magisterial District Joe Kalil, R* Boone County Coroner Douglas M. Stith, R* Boone County Surveyor Thomas H. Bushelman Jr., R* Circuit Judge (54th Circuit, First Division) Rick Brueggemann Edward Drennen Howard L. Tankersley Marcia Thomas Circuit Judge (54th Circuit, Third Division) J.R. Schrand* Circuit Judge Family Court (54th Circuit, Second Division) Linda Rae Bramlage* District Judge (54th District, First Division) Jeff S. Smith* District Judge (54th District, Second Division) Charles T. Moore*

Boone County Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@communitypress.com, 859-578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


A12 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

NEWS


LIFE

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 2014

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Appreciation dinner honors

AN ARMY OF VOLUNTEERS St. Elizabeth thanks more than 1,000 for their service

Community Recorder

S

t. Elizabeth Healthcare recently recognized hundreds of volunteers at its Volunteer Appreciation Dinner at Receptions in Erlanger. During 2013, 1,238 individuals volunteered for a combined 120,765 hours, including 232 teenagers. Twelve volunteers are 90plus years old; the oldest is 94. Volunteers contributed to more than 120 departments across the Northern Kentuckybased health care system. “I can’t stress enough the high regard in which we hold our volunteers,” said Jenelen Dulemba, St. Elizabeth Healthcare director of volunteer services. “They are an invaluable asset to our organization, our patients, our staff and this community. We continue to be humbled by how much they give of themselves. It’s inspiring to all of us.” At the appreciation event, volunteers honored included: » Anita Cherry and Jacqueline Jones, Volunteer Advocates of the Year: A grandmothergranddaughter team that worked with Susan Jones, CEO of Seed Strategy, to create new electronic patient greeting card options now called Care Cards. » Bill and Ann McWhorter: A husband and wife team that volunteers in the Edgewood PrimeWise/Volunteer office, as well as leads the

PrimeWise exercise classes and safe driving classes. » Mimi Conti, Mary Claire Schnier and Alli Sweitzer, teen volunteers: Conti has the most hours recorded for any teen that began volunteering in 2013. Schnier has been volunteering for more than three years and has contributed more hours than any active teen volunteer. Sweitzer began volunteering in June 2010 and is the teen who has volunteered the longest. » Mike Evans, and Joceil Kinman: Volunteered more than 1,000 hours in 2013. » Jessica Tate: A firstyear volunteer at Fort Thomas totaled more than 500 hours in 2013. » Jean Clinkenbeard, Beverly Cobb, Wanda Farrar, Mary Grosenbach, Louise Howard, Bill Lense and Shirley Lense: All have amassed more than 10,000 hours of cumulative service. Howard, who leads the way with 30,000 hours, has recently retired after 21 years of volunteering. » Clinkenbeard and Mary Ann Menke: Both have been volunteering for more than 40 years. The Florence and Fort Thomas Auxiliaries and the Covington Second Time Around Shop raised more than $67,400 supporting St. Elizabeth Healthcare initiatives such as Player Piano for Florence lobby, the Fort Thomas history wall and the Nursing Education Endowment Fund.

CE-0000594292

Among those honored were, back row from left, Jessica Tate of Dayton, Ky., Anita Cherry of Edgewood, Mimi Conti of Villa Hills, and Jerry Kaufman of Edgewood; and, front row from left, Jean Clinkenbeard of Florence, Wanda Farrar of Burlington; and St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO John Dubis.THANKS TO ST. ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE

Among those honored were, back row from left, John Kappes of Independence, and James Conti of Villa Hills; and, front row from left, Dave King of Villa Hills, Mary King of Villa Hills, and Mimi Conti of Villa Hills; and St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO John Dubis.THANKS TO ST. ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO John Dubis, left, helped recognize hundreds of volunteers, including, back row from left, Jack Thornberry of Fort Thomas, and Tom Green of Cold Spring, and, front row from left, Ruth Thornberry of Fort Thomas, Mary Grosenbach of Cold Spring, and Carol Warf of Fort Thomas. Warf is holding a picture of her granddaughter, Mary Claire Schnier, who was honored but unable to attend.THANKS TO ST. ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO John Dubis, left, helped recognize hundreds of volunteers, including, back row from left, Gail Cecconi of Union, Brenna Cummings of Warsaw, and Ethan Grimes of Florence; and, front row from left, Janet Jackson of Florence, and Ann Goeke of Erlanger.THANKS TO ST. ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE

Paid for by Addia Wuchner for State Representative,


B2 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MAY 16 Art Exhibits Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., All galleries. Artists: Jessie Boone, Evan Hildebrandt, Amanda Hogan Carlisle, Alison Shepard, Katie Parker and Guy Michael Davis, Marci Rosin, Elmer Hendren, Cole Carothers and more. 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Trifecta, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., Curated by Paige Wideman. Brings three unique exhibitions, featuring 48 artists from the region, under one roof. Recent Works by Jean Grangeon and Marc Leone; Like Mushrooms from Damp: works by Clint Woods and Lily Woods; Tripletta. Free. Presented by Covington Arts District. Through June 20. 859-292-2322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Cooking Classes Cooking the Books, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Book: “The Queen of Katwe.”, Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Prepare foods inspired by monthly book selection. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101. Burlington.

Education Little Learners, 10 a.m.-noon, The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, $10. Registration required. 859-3715227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, 126 Barnwood Drive, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood. Lean and Mean Circuit Class, 5:30 a.m.-6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.-8 a.m., Yolo Fitness, 1516 Dixie Highway, $15. 859-429-2225. Park Hills. Sombo/Russian Judo, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Hebron Lutheran Church, 3140 Limaburg Road, Downstairs. Ages 6-adult. Learn Russian art of self-defense and how to fall properly to prevent injury. Ages 6-. $85 per year. Presented by Sombo Joe. 859-609-8008. Hebron.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit with series of lectures, panel discussions and other special events. Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-4914003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Festivals Maifest, 5 p.m.-11:30 p.m.,

MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Arts and crafts booths, German and international foods, music, children’s play area, amusement rides, street chalk art contest and more. Music on four stages. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington. Jazz, Arts and Wine Festival, 6 p.m.-10 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Art, jazz music and wine available for purchase. Through May 17. 859-291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Literary - Libraries Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, All skill levels welcome. Through May 30. 859-342-2665. Union.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Mansion Hill Tavern, 502 Washington Ave., $4. 859-581-0100. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Sarah Colanna, 8 p.m. 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 1 Levee Way, $17-$20. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Bat Boy the Musical, 8 p.m.-10 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Based on a tabloid story of a half boy, half bat creature discovered in the woods, the musical has become a cult classic of theater fans everywhere. $20, $17 students and seniors. Presented by Falcon Theater. Through May 31. 513479-6783; falcontheater.net. Newport. 9 to 5: The Musical, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Pushed to their boiling point, three female co-workers concoct a plan to get even with the sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot they call their boss. They conspire to take control of the company and learn there’s nothing they can’t do - even in a man’s world. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through May 17. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Shopping City Wide Yard Sale, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., City of Taylor Mill, , Shoppers may visit website or Facebook page to obtain list of locations of yard sales throughout community. Free. 859-5813234; taylormillky.gov. Taylor Mill.

Sports Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:35 p.m. vs. Washington Wild Things., University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, 7950 Freedom Way, $14 VIP, $12 dugout, $10 reserved. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 859-594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

SATURDAY, MAY 17 Art Exhibits Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, noon-3 p.m., The Carnegie, 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Cooking Classes Sushi Rolling and Dining, 7 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 130 W. Pike St., $25 per person, three rolls, includes training and BYOB, reservations required. Reservations required. Through Dec. 27. 513-335-0297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8:15 a.m.-9:15 a.m. 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Festivals Maifest, noon-11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington. Jazz, Arts and Wine Festival, noon-11 p.m., Newport on the Levee, 859-291-0550; www.newportonthelevee.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m., Southgate VFW, 6 Electric Ave., With DJ Ted McCracken. Free. Presented by VFW Post 3186. Through July 26. 859-441-9857. Southgate.

Literary - Libraries PAWS to Read (grades K-5), 10 a.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Read to therapy dog. Call to schedule 15-minute time slot. 859-342-2665. Union.

Music - Acoustic Saturday Night Music, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Music by Ma Crow and the Ladyslippers (bluegrass/folk)., Velocity Bike & Bean, 7560 Burlington Pike, Fresh baked goods, desserts and coffee available. Free. 859-371-8356; www.velocitybb.com. Florence.

Music - Jazz Karl Dappen on Sax, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Music - Rock Able Danger, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Revival Room. With Russ Baum and Huck Finn. Ages 21 and up. $6. 859-431-2201. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy Sarah Colanna, 7:30 p.m. 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Bat Boy the Musical, 8 p.m.-10 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $20, $17 students and seniors. 513479-6783; falcontheater.net. Newport. 9 to 5: The Musical, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation

A vintage clothing display to benefit the Friends of Gaines Tavern is 1-4 p.m. Sunday, May 18, at Gaines Tavern Historical Center, 150 Old Nicholson Road in Walton. $3, $2 students, free ages 4 and under. 859-485-4383.FILE PHOTO

Mascot Madness Mini-Golf Fundraiser, 2 p.m.-7 p.m., World of Golf, 7400 Woodspoint Drive, Mini golf with mascots and child-friendly activities. Benefits The Dragonfly Foundation. $10. Presented by The Dragonfly Foundation. 513-474-6474; dragonfly.org. Florence. Brady Scanlon Memorial Ride to Remember, 9 a.m., South Hills Civic Club, 10 Blue Grass Ave., Motorcycle ride and picnic honors memory of Brady Scanlon, avid bike rider and outdoor enthusiast who lost his life to melanoma at a young age. Ride travels to Rabbit Hash, Ky. Picnic noon-5 p.m. at Civic Club. Benefits Melanoma Know More and Four Leaf Family Foundation. $25. Presented by Four Leaf Family Foundtaion. 859-6559600; www.rideremember.com. Fort Wright.

Sports

Maifest is May 16-18, at MainStrasse Village in Covington. Arts and crafts booths, German and international foods, music, children’s play area, amusement rides, street chalk art contest and more. Music on four stages. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org.FILE PHOTO Florence Freedom Baseball, 6:05 p.m. vs. Washington Wild Things., University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, $14 VIP, $12 dugout, $10 reserved. 859594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

Tours Newport Gangster Tour, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Tour of historic sites. See buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. Explore Newport’s connections to some of most well-known crime figures. $20. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8900; www.americanlegacytours.com. Newport. Cavalcade of Homes, noon-5 p.m., Northern Kentucky, Northern Kentucky, Scattered-site new home show features 13 homes in Northern Kentucky. Free. Presented by Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky. 859-331-9500; www.homebuildersnky.com. Covington.

SUNDAY, MAY 18 Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. 4 p.m.-5 p.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Vintage Clothing Display, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Gaines Tavern Historical Center, 150 Old Nicholson Road, Vintage clothing will be on display. Benefits Friends of Gaines Tavern. $3, $2 students, free ages 4 and under. Presented by Friends of Gaines Tavern. 859-485-4383. Walton.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. Bellevue.

Music - Big Band Jammin’ at Jane’s, 3 p.m.-6 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Free. 859-384-6617; www.janessaddlebag.com. Union.

Music - Choral Saint Thomas Choir and the Contemporary Liturgical Ensemble, 3 p.m., St. Thomas Church, 26 E. Villa Place, With Christina Nam, 11-year-old violinist who won numerous competitions performing as soloist in China, Korea and Iceland. Under direction of Esther Nam. Donations accepted. 859-441-4092. Fort Thomas.

On Stage - Children’s Theater Kinderballet Presents: Tales of Beatrix Potter, 2 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Six tales from Beatrix Potter, including Peter Rabbit. Performed by Kinderballet Touring Company. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

On Stage - Comedy Family Fun Show, 3 p.m.-4:30 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Unique blend of magic and comedy, all while sharing message of the gospel. $15. Presented by Brad Brown. 859-957-1940; www.familyfunshow.com. Covington. Sarah Colanna, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Festivals

Recreation

Maifest, noon-9 p.m., MainStrasse Village, 859-491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Bingo, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., Southgate VFW, 6 Electric Ave., Early games start at 6 p.m., regular games at 7 p.m. Free. Presented by VFW Post 3186. Through July 20. 859-441-9857. Southgate.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., With DJ Will Corson. $10 buckets and $4 grape and cherry bombs. Ages 21 and up. Free. Through Aug. 28. 859-4916659. Covington. DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin.

Tours Cavalcade of Homes, noon-5 p.m., Northern Kentucky, Free. 859-331-9500; www.homebuildersnky.com. Covington.

MONDAY, MAY 19 Art Exhibits Trifecta, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans

Enterprise Center, Free. 859-2922322; www.covingtonarts.com. Covington.

Civic Tea Party Meeting, 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. Through Dec. 29. 859-586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Dance Classes Square Dance Lessons, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Casual dress and smooth-soled shoes. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 859-441-9155; www.sonksdf.com. Covington. Cardio Dance Party Dance Fitness Class, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip-hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. Ages 18 and up. $7-$12. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Florence.

Education Power Point Basics, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn to create slides, use custom animation, change backgrounds, add transitions and more. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Plate it Up, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Learn about local produce and enjoy taste of recipes. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859-586-6101. Burlington. Little Learners, 10 a.m.-noon, The Lively Learning Lab, $10. Registration required. 859-3715227. Florence.


LIFE

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B3

Great time for asparagus bacon quiche

Here we were, wishing for warmer weather and it finally arrived. That means asparagus, and lots of it. Every day I go out to the asparagus patch and harvest a couple of pounds at least. And it’s not a big patch. With all the other spring chores, like tilling and planting and sowGuest ing, Columnist there COMMUNITY isn’t a lot RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST of time to plan for or prepare supper. Luckily, the “girls”/hens are keeping up with our demand of eggs, so between that and the abundance of asparagus, supper is a no brainer.

Asparagus bacon quiche

Leftovers microwave well. The ends of asparagus are tough. After cleaning, snap tough ends off. Use for soup. There’s a natural “break” between the tough and tender parts. 9 or 10 inch pie pan lined with pie dough 8 slices bacon, cut into small pieces 8 ounce or so asparagus, cut on angle in 1 inch or so pieces 4 large eggs, room temperature 2 cups half and half or milk About 1 teaspoon salt and half teaspoon pepper

1 heaping cup shredded cheese or more Preheat oven to 375. Saute bacon and remove. In remaining drippings, sauté asparagus a couple of minutes only, just until it turns bright green. Remove from pan with slotted spoon. Whisk eggs with milk. Add seasonings, cheese, bacon and asparagus. Pour into pie pan. Bake 40-45 minutes until puffed all around. That means it’s done. If you’re not sure, insert a knife an inch from the edge. If it comes out clean, you’re good to go.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen:

If crust browns too much before quiche is done, make a “collar” of foil around the crust.

Asparagus: spears of protection

Asparagus is a powerhouse when it comes to folic acid, necessary for blood cell formation and a healthy liver. Pregnant women especially need to get enough folic acid for healthy babies. Asparagus is also low in sodium, a good source of potassium for healthy hearts and muscles, and a good source of fiber. Oh, and one more thing: it’s low in calories and has zero fat or cholesterol.

Very veggie chili

For the reader who attended one of my presentations and asked for a good vegetarian chili recipe. “I want it to be full of flavor, not wimpy”, she said. I think this

Saute asparagus and bacon then combine with eggs and cheese for a delightful quiche.RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

recipe will work just fine for her. Thanks to Cindy W., who shared this a while back. I’m glad I keep a file of readers’ recipes! Olive oil 1 cup chopped onion 1 large bay leaf 1-1/2 teaspoons cumin 1 tablespoon dried oregano or more to taste 1 nice tablespoon minced garlic or more to taste 2 ribs celery, with leaves, chopped 2 bell peppers, chopped Jalapeno peppers, chopped, to taste (start

with 1 and go from there) 8 ounces canned chopped green chile peppers, drained 12 ounces vegetarian burger crumbles 3 cans, 28 ounces each, whole peeled tomatoes, crushed 3-4 tablespoons chili powder Beans: 15 ounce can each of black, kidney and chickpeas, drained 2 cups frozen yellow corn Salt and pepper to taste Extra sharp cheddar for garnish Film pot with oil and

turn heat to medium. Add onion, bay, cumin, oregano, garlic, celery and bell peppers. Cook until onion is tender. Stir in Jalapenos, canned chile peppers, burger crumbles and cook about 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, chili powder, beans and corn. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer and cook 30-45 minutes or until done to your liking. Adjust seasonings, garnish and serve.

Readers want to know:

Measuring out sticky cookie dough. Marianne

G. says her ice cream scoop gets so sticky when making balls out of cookie dough. “I don’t want to use a cooking spray,” she said. Dipping the scoop into cold water before you scoop each ball of dough works well. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Paid for by Addia Wuchner for State Representative, Jim Dolwick - Treasurer

Addia Wuchner Wife - Mother - Grandmother - Nurse - Businesswoman

PROVEN CONSERVATIVE LEADERSHIP

FOR BOONE COUNTY. AS OUR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, ADDIA WUCHNER: FIGHTS HEROIN ADDICTION AT EVERY TURN AND KEEP IT HER NUMBER ONE PRIORITY IN FRANKFORT RETURNS YOUR TAX DOLLARS TO CHAMPION FUNDING FOR BOONE COUNTY SCHOOLS & 200 % INCREASE IN MAJOR ROAD PROJECTS HAS A STRONG RECORD PROTECTING OUR SENIORS AND OUR MOST VULNERABLE CITIZENS ONLY CANDIDATE ENDORSED BY NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION THE ONLY CANDIDATE ENDORSED BY KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE PAC & NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE - 100% PRO-LIFE

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LIFE

B4 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

Walton women get self-help advice

BAPTIST

HEBRON BAPTIST CHURCH

3435 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048 (corner of Cougar Path & North Bend Rd.)

9:30 AM Morning Worship & Adult Sunday School 11:00 AM Morning Worship & Sunday School 6:00 PM Evening Worship 6:45 PM Wednesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study Youth & Children’s Activities

859-689-7282

http://www.hebronbaptist.org

LUTHERAN Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS) 9066 Gunpowder Rd. Florence, KY

(Between US 42 & Mt Zion Rd., Florence)

746-9066 Pastor Rich Tursic Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00 Sunday School - All ages 9:45 AM www.goodshepherdlutheranky.org

One hundred and 20 ladies enjoyed the spring event on Saturday at First Baptist Church. Lynnae Bussell was the speaker for Beauty Through God’s Eyes. Lyannae is a Ruth wife, Meadows mom, friend, WALTON NEWS community volunteer and administrative assistant turned work from home mom. She resides in Walton with her husband and two children. The program featured wonderful self-

Immaculate Heart of Mary School Openings in grades 1-8

IHM SAIN S

Call for a tour 859-689-4303

BE A SAINT!!!

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improvement advice with Lynnae providing information on body shapes, type of clothing and makeup to wear. The highlight of the day was a style show with some of the Planning Committee modeling beautiful outfits from Dress Barn especially coordinated for the models’ particular style. Voni Pierce of Somerset has been visiting her family in Butler and friends in Walton. She was my guest at the tea on Sunday at the Gaines Historical Tavern. Letters have gone out for the Walton Verona Alumni Banquet on June 7. If you missed getting one, call Joella Flynn at 859-485-7279. The Diggers and Planters plant sale is scheduled for May 17 at the Walton Christian Church parking lot starting at 8 a.m. Glad to report that Jean Phipps is now at home and improving

each day. Tina Crase, our Walton Verona school board chairman, is very ill and is a patient at St. Elizabeth Florence. Please keep her in your thoughts and prayers. Our sympathy to the family of Mrs. Georgia Greene. Mrs. Greene had been staying with her daughter Kaye of Erlanger for several years, but was a longtime resident of Walton. She was a faithful member of First Baptist Church. Preceded in death by her husband Woodrow, Mrs. Greene is survived by two daughters, Rheda Harper of Walton and Kaye Ellis of Erlanger, and many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Services were Friday at First Baptist Church. Interment was at New Bethel Cemetery.

Ruth Meadows writes a column about Walton. Feel free to call her at 859-391-7282 with Walton neighborhood news items.

You have to look up to see the rainbow Have you ever needed a sign from God? “A rainbow like Noah sign?” I often wonder why God gave a rainbow as a sign for Noah. There must have been great destruction all around after the flood. As he exited the ark and witnessed the horrible aftermath, I wonder if there was a moment when he looked up and said, “Uh oh, did I do the right thing?” In a land of trying to balance discipline and rewards, focusing on the needs of my immediate family as well as extended family, making wise financial decisions, preparing for the future while leaving a little room for fun, I am constantly asking myself (and God) “did I do the right thing? Am I heading in the right direction?” The other morning as

Calling ALL Current K-4th

graders

Join us June 23-26, 8:30am-12:30pm for First Church of Christ Day Camp M, T, W @ First Church | Th - Family Trip to Creation Museum

We are hosting a dinosaur-sized DAY CAMP on the Burlington Campus for all current K-4th Grade kids. Together, we will unearth basic truths about creation, dinosaurs and much more! Cost: $40 per child with a multi-child discount. Register online at www.firstchurch.me, click Burlington Campus, then Events.

6080 Camp Ernst Rd | Burlington, KY 41005 www.firstchurch.me | 859.586.4673

CE-0000592012

Registration Deadline May25

I was juggling checkbooks, and school books and boxes as we Julie House prepare FAITH NOTES for a potential move, the question lingered in my mind, “Are we doing the right thing Lord?” And along with a choir of sweet birds outside the bedroom window, a still small voice answered me and gently whispered, “Trust in me with all your heart, lean not unto your own understanding. In all your ways, acknowledge me, and I will direct your path.” Proverbs 3:5, 6. It was just what I needed, and although I felt quite content with that one Scripture God laid on my heart, He provided more. “And my God shall supply all your needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” Philippians 4:19. So what’s my plan for today? Relieve a little stress and fear by acknowledging God and trusting in Him to supply all my needs according to His riches. May you be blessed with a few rainbows in your path today, but remember, you have to look up to see them. Julie House is a resident of Independence and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian-based health and wellness program.

PURSUANT TO KRS 424.290, “MATTERS REQUIRED TO BE PUBLISHED,” THE FOLLOWING RACES WILL APPEAR ON THE VOTING MACHINES AND PAPER BALLOTS IN THE PRECINCTS LISTED IN BOONE COUNTY FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION, MAY 20, 2014. OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR BOONE COUNTY - PRIMARY ELECTION HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 20, 2014. STATE OF KENTUCKY)

SCT COUNTY OF BOONE) I, Kenny Brown, County Clerk in and for the county and state aforesaid, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and correct list of candidates for the offices of United States Senator (4th Congressional District), State Representative (66th Representative District), and Circuit Judge (54th Judicial Circuit - 1st Division), as certified to me by the Secretary of State for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. All petitions for these candidates are on file in the Secretary of State’s office as required by law. I further certify that the foregoing is a true and correct list of candidates for the office of County Judge Executive, County Clerk, Jailer, County Commissioner 1st, 2nd and 3rd Districts, Constable 1st Magesterial District and Justice of the Peace 2nd Magisterial District. All petitions for each of these candidates are on file in my office as required by law. These candidates are to be voted on at the Primary Election in Boone County, State of Kentucky, on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. This given under my hand and official seal this 5th day of May, 2014. Kenny Brown, Boone County Clerk

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LIFE

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B5

BUSINESS UPDATE Hale joins Forza Marketing

Forza Marketing, a downtown public relations and marketing agency, announces the hiring of Juli Hale, of Florence, as manager of multiple local and internaHale tional accounts. Hale is the former director of community relations for Campbell County Schools and has been an editor for The Community Recorder in Northern Kentucky. A graduate of Northern Kentucky University, she will be responsible for content development, media relations and project management for Forza clients. Forza also announces the hiring of Bill Bangert, a former reporter and news anchor for 700 WLW and a WEBN personality, and Laura Arnold, who worked for two local marketing agencies as well as a law firm.

Hemmer expands with new hires

Paul Hemmer Co. is growing, with new commercial construction and real estate development projects and new clients, in the Tristate and beyond. To meet demand, Hemmer recently added two new members to the Hemmer team. David Middendorf has joined Hemmer as senior project manager. He brings 30 years of project

management experience, spending nearly his entire career as vice president and project manager at Klenco Construction in Taylor Mill. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in construction technology and design from Eastern Kentucky University. Christian Mains has been named project manager at Paul Hemmer Co. With six years experience in commercial, industrial, and residential construction experience, he worked most recently at Lithko Contracting in Hamilton, Ohio, as a project engineer and field lead. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in construction management, graduating at the top of his class at Northern Kentucky University. He is currently pursuing a Master of Science in construction management through Florida International University’s online program.

Meyer becomes Tastefully Simple consultant

Sarah Meyer of Erlanger has become an independent consultant with Tastefully Simple Inc., a national direct sales company featuring more than 60 delicious, easy-to-prepare foods. As an independent business owner, Meyer offers food samples at home taste-testing parties. All of Tastefully Simple’s products are openand-enjoy or can be prepared by adding only one or two ingredients.

Simpson among honorees

Debbie Simpson, president of Multi-Craft in Newport, has been recognized as one of the 2014 Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky. Since 1984 the Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards have honored more than 140 women for achievement, integrity, professional service and community leadership. In 2014, the Outstanding Women award celebrated 30 years of honoring nearly 150 women. “I am humbled and honored to be recognized among such esteemed women” Simpson said. “As the current Northern Kentucky Chamber Chair and longtime Northern Kentucky business owner, I am dedicated to Northern Kentucky and am so proud of the accomplishments our region has experienced.” Simpson began her career in 1969 as a receptionist/bookkeeper with Multi-Craft and spent 21 years in various roles until she became president

in 1990. The 2014 Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky luncheon and awards ceremony was April 30.

Kirkpatrick join convention bureau

Julie Kirkpatrick has joined the Northern Kentucky Convention and Visitors Bureau as director of convention sales. Kirkpatrick will oversee effort to promote and sell Northern Kentucky as a preferred destination for groups, meetings and conventions. Kirkpatrick began her sales career as national sales manager with

Wyndham Hotels in 1997. She has also served as director of sales and marketing at Hyatt Hotels and Resorts in Cincinnati. Most recently she served as director, sales and marketing for Marriott Hotels Kirkpatrick and Resorts at the Marriott RiverCenter in Covington. Kirkpatrick serves as an adjunct professor in hospitality sciences at Cincinnati State. A native of Lexington, she attended the University of Kentucky and re-

ceived her Bachelor of Science in organizational leadership from Northern Kentucky University in 2010. She resides in Fort Thomas with her husband, Brad, and two children.

Legion Logistics cited for hiring veterans

Legion Logistics of Florence is a winner of the Most Valuable Employers for Military. The recognition is awarded by CivilianJobs.com to help military-experienced job seekers and veterans identify the top employers to target for civilian careers.

Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Thomas More Parkway

Vacation Bible School 9 - noon June 7

Register at: Mainstreetbaptist churchvbs@gmail.com or call 859-620-6221 Church located across from the Florence Post Office on Main Street. CE-0000593728

No Dental Insurance? Ask about our wonderful discount plan! Used by families, retirees, self-employed… Anyone without dental insurance! CE-0000587741

859-757-1002 • www.BeitingDental.com

BOONE COUNTY PRECINCT LOCATIONS - MAY, 2014

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Boone Precinct AIRPORT BEAVER BELLEVIEW BULLITTSVILLE BURLINGTON 1 BURLINGTON 2 BURLINGTON 3 BURLINGTON 4 BURLINGTON 5 BURLINGTON 6 BURLINGTON 7 BURLINGTON 8 BURLINGTON 9 CAMP ERNST CARLTON CONSTANCE DEVON #1 DEVON #2 DEVON #3 FLORENCE #1 FLORENCE #2 FLORENCE #3 FLORENCE #4 FLORENCE #5 FLORENCE #6 FLORENCE #7 FLORENCE #8 FLORENCE #9 FLORENCE #10 FLORENCE #11 FLORENCE #12 FLORENCE #13 FLORENCE #14 FLORENCE #15 GLENVIEW GREENVIEW HAMILTON HEARTHSTONE HEBRON # 1 HEBRON #2 HEBRON #3 HEBRON #4 HEBRON #5 HOPEFUL KENSINGTON LIMABURG LINKVIEW OAKBROOK PETERSBURG PLEASANT VAL RICHWOOD SHAMROCK SUMMITVIEW UNION #1 UNION #2 UNION #3 UNION#4 UNION # 5 UNION # 6 VERONA WALTON #1 WALTON #2 TOTAL 62 PRECINCTS

LOCATION

As of 1/15/2014 C123 B114 A102 A103 A104 A105 A111 A112 A113 A115 A116 A120 A122 A123 A106 A107 C102 C110 C117 C124 C125 C126 C127 C128 C129 C130 C131 C132 C133 C134 C135 C136 C137 B133 B115 B116 A118 B132 A108 A109 A114 A117 A121 B117 B134 A119 B118 B119 A110 B120 B121 C121 B131 B122 B123 B124 B125 B129 B130 B126 B127 B128

POINT PLEASANT FIREHOUSE BEAVERLICK BAPTIST CHURCH BELLEVIEW MCVILLE FIREHOUSE CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH OLD COURTHOUSE BURLINGTON BAPT. FAM. LIFE CENTER STEPHENS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BURLINGTON FIREHOUSE BOONE CO. LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH BURLINGTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST CAMP ERNST MIDDLE SCHOOL KENTUCKY ARMY READINESS CENTER LONGBRANCH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL RABBIT HASH GENERAL STORE LAKESIDE CHRISTIAN CHURCH FLORENCE FIRE STATION #2 MARKESBERY MOVING AND STORAGE FLORENCE FIRE STATION # 3 FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH BOONE CO. LIBRARY - FLORENCE BRANCH FLORENCE ELEMENTARY - RALPH RUSH CTR BOONE CO. HEALTH DEPT. BOONE CO. HIGH SCHOOL HILLARD COLLINS ELEM. SCHOOL COLONIAL HEIGHTS RETIRE. CENTER OCKERMAN ELEM. SCHOOL KENTABOO BAPTIST CHURCH (ACTIVITY CNT) R.A. JONES MIDDLE SCHOOL ERPENBECK ELEM. SCHOOL A.M. YEALEY ELEM. SCHOOL PANORAMA PLUS APTS. FLORENTINE RECEPTION HALL SHIRLEY MANN ELEM. SCHOOL BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE CLUBHOUSE HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH BIG BONE STATE PARK GARAGE VINEYARD CHRISTIAN CHURCH HEBRON CHURCH OF CHRIST HEBRON FIREHOUSE CONNER MIDDLE SCHOOL NORTH POINTE ELEM. SCHOOL SANDRUN BAPTIST CHURCH HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH GREENVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH BOONE LINKS GOLFCOURSE CLUBHOUSE CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH PETERSBURG FIREHOUSE FLORENCE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SADDLEBROOK RESERVE CLUBHOUSE FLORENCE ALLIANCE CHURCH NEW UNION FIREHOUSE BOONE CO. LIBRARY UNION BRANCH GRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL RYLE HIGH SCHOOL UNION BAPTIST CHURCH ST. TIMOTHY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH NEW BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH BOONE CO. LIBRARY - WALTON BRANCH WALTON FIRE STATION

ADDRESS 3444 TURFWAY ROAD 11460 US HIGHWAY 42 6900 MCVILLE ROAD 3920 PETERSBURG ROAD 2988 E. WASHINGTON ST 3031 WASHINGTON STREET 5687 NORTH BEND ROAD 6050 FIREHOUSE DRIVE 1786 BURLINGTON PIKE 5946 ORIENT STREET 6080 CAMP ERNST ROAD 6515 CAMP ERNST ROAD 2676 CONRAD LANE 2805 LONGBRANCH ROAD 10021 LOWER RIVER ROAD 1980 NORTH BEND ROAD 7201 INDUSTRIAL ROAD 7370 INDUSTRIAL ROAD 1152 WEAVER ROAD 300 MAIN STREET 7425 US HIGHWAY 42 103 CENTER STREET 7505 BURLINGTON PIKE 7056 BURLINGTON PIKE 9000 SPRUCE DRIVE 6900 HOPEFUL ROAD 8250 US HIGHWAY 42 7037 CURTIS AVE. 8000 SPRUCE DRIVE 9001 WETHERINGTON BLVD 10 YEALEY DRIVE 8510 OLD TOLL ROAD 8605 HAINES DRIVE 10435 HIGHWAY 42 19 CLUBHOUSE DRIVE 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD 3380 BEAVER ROAD 7101 PLEASANT VALLEY RD 2966 DAMASCUS ROAD 3120 NORTH BEND ROAD 3300 COUGAR PATH 875 NORTH BEND ROAD 1327 NORTH BEND ROAD 6431 HOPEFUL CHURCH RD 1070 RICHWOOD ROAD 1050 BURLINGTON PIKE 19 CLUBHOUSE DRIVE 1440 BOONE AIRE ROAD 6517 MARKET STREET 8585 OLD TOLL ROAD 1070 RICHWOOD ROAD 466 SADDLEBROOK LANE 980 CAYTON ROAD 9611 US HIGHWAY 42 8899 US HIGHWAY 42 10400 US HIGHWAY 42 10379 US HIGHWAY 42 HWY 42 & MT ZION ROAD 10272 HIGHWAY 42 2022 VERONA MUDLICK RD 21 SOUTH MAIN ST. 12600 TOWNE CENTER DR

CITY ERLANGER UNION BURLINGTON HEBRON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON BURLINGTON UNION BURLINGTON HEBRON FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION FLORENCE HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON HEBRON FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE FLORENCE PETERSBURG FLORENCE WALTON FLORENCE FLORENCE UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION UNION VERONA WALTON WALTON

ZIP 41018 41091 41005 41048 41005 41005 41005 41005 41005 41005 41005 41005 41005 41091 41005 41048 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41042 41091 41042 41042 41091 41042 41048 41048 41048 41048 41048 41042 41094 41042 41042 41042 41080 41042 41094 41042 41042 41091 41091 41091 41091 41091 41091 41092 41094 41094


LIFE

B6 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014 !0'- )(% /# 1&0%.$ )(% "(,,'$$'(*+%

Vote for

Edward Drennen for Circuit Judge LEGAL EXPERIENCE

Because Experience and Service Matter

Ed Drennen has practiced law in Boone and Gallatin Counties for the last 37 years; having successfully handled both civil and criminal cases at all levels: District Court, Circuit Court, Court of Appeals and Supreme Court of Kentucky. Ed has also handled cases at all levels in the Federal Court system, United States District Court, United States Court of Appeals and is one of a select few Kentucky attorneys to argue before the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, D.C. Ed presently serves as Vice-chairman of the Boone County Sheriff's Merit Board; being selected by the Deputies of Boone County themselves. Ed is a past President of the Northern Kentucky Bar Association. He is a past Assistant Commonwealth Attorney for Kenton County, Kentucky. He was the past Administrator of the Boone/Gallatin Public Defender System, Inc.; a non-profit corporation created to represent indigent defendants in Boone and Gallatin Counties.

SERVICE TO COUNTRY Ed Drennen proudly served his country in the United States Army as a 2nd Lieutenant.

SERVICE TO COMMUNITY He is a past member of the Boone County Jaycees and was elected by the Kentucky Jaycees in 1985 as one of the Outstanding Young Men in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. He is a past Chairperson of the Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission which oversees the care and assistance for needy citizens in the Northern Kentucky area. Ed is a past President of the Boone County Businessmen's Association. He is a past Chairperson of the Maplewood Children's Home which cared for needy and dependent children of our community; being appointed to this position by both Judge Executives Ken Lucas and Gary Moore.

ELECT EDWARD DRENNEN ON MAY 20TH

Like us on facebook at www.facebook.com/EdwardGDrennen CE-0000595258

Paid for by Drennen for Circuit Judge, Joe Bishop, Treasurer


LIFE

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B7

Soil test before applying lime or fertilizer Question: How much lime and fertilizer should I put on my lawn and garden? I have clay soil. Is a high-nitrogen fertilizer the best? I’ve heard our soils don’t need Mike any phosKlahr phorus. Is HORTICULTURE that true? CONCERNS Answer: The only way to know whether you need to add any lime, phosphorus or potassium to your soil is to do a soil test. Free soil-testing analysis and fertilizer and lime recommendations are available through your local Northern Kentucky Cooperative Extension

Service office. Here are some things to keep in mind before submitting your soil sample for testing. Use a garden trowel, or borrow a soil probe from the Extension Office, to take the individual soil cores that will make up the soil sample. Collect a total of two cups of soil from each area in a bucket. Collect at least 5 to 10 soil cores to represent each landscape bed, lawn or garden area. Designate each sample area with a letter or numbers on an area map for record-keeping purposes. All soil core samples should start at the soil surface (after removing mulch, grass and stones) and go down to the recommended depth: 2-4 inches for

lawns, 6-8 inches for annual flowers, 6-12 inches for perennial flowers, trees, shrubs, vegetable gardens, bush fruits and vine fruits, and 12-18 inches deep for tree fruits. Air-dry the sample on newspaper (not in the oven), label and bring in to the Extension Office. Results take about two weeks.

General suggestions

» Never apply lime to horticultural crops unless a soil test indicates the need. Many soils are ruined by annual applications of lime. Most horticultural crops prefer acid soils, around pH 6.4, with some needing pH 4.5 to 5.5 (i.e., blueberries and azaleas). It is easier to raise soil pH above 7.0 (with lime)

than it is to bring it back down (with sulfur). » When you get back your soil test results, realize that the University of Kentucky did NOT do a test to determine the level of nitrogen in your soil. Nitrogen is leached out and used up regularly by all crops, so a basic, generic nitrogen recommendation is given (the same for everyone ... for that specific crop), based simply on the known nitrogen requirements of the crop indicated. Therefore, if you have just applied nitrogen fertilizer before you sent in your soil sample, do not apply more just because the soil test says you need nitrogen. Remember, they did not actually test the level of

nitrogen in your soil. » All Kentucky soils benefit from added organic matter such as peat moss, compost or well-aged manure. These improve the drainage and nutrient

holding capacity of clay soils, and improve the water and nutrientholding capacity of sandy soils.

Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture

Extraordinary Gratitude During National Hospital Week, we want to honor our associates. You work day and night to bring the highest quality healthcare to the community. Thank you for your commitment to our patients, your dedication to our mission and for making St. Elizabeth extraordinary.

stedocs.com CE-0000595171

stelizabeth.com


LIFE

B8 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

Schwalbach is marathon man for Alzheimer’s By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@communitypress.com

FORT THOMAS — Running in a single 26-mile marathon is an accomplishment, and from May 17-24 Steve Schwalbach will run a marathon distance daily on U.S. 27 as he treks 200 miles across Kentucky. Schwalbach, 47, of Fort Thomas, said Jackie’s Run is in honor of his 77-year-old mother who has been living with Alzheimer’s disease for more than 12 years. All of the money will

go to the Cincinnati chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Cincinnati. He is also running on behalf of his friend Clem Fennell, 62, of Fort Thomas, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2005. He will begin in the morning of May 17 by running six miles from Cincinnati to Northern Kentucky University in Highland Heights with his regular running group Pain in Numbers. “At that point I’m hopping in the car and

I’m driving to the Tennessee line,” he said. Schwalbach said he will get out of the car and run north on U.S. 27 May 17 from Pine Knot, Ky., an additional 31.5 miles to Somerset. “I’m going to be getting up and running approximately 30 miles each day,” Schwalbach said. Schwalbach said he plans to finish at Tower Park in Fort Thomas by 6 p.m. Saturday, May 24. After the run’s completion, a benefit with live music has been

planned for 6:30 p.m. at The Old Fort Thomas Pub, he said. “If I’m having a bad day I’m going to break it up into two parts of 15 miles and 15 miles,” Schwalbach said. If there is bad weather, Schwalbach said he will run for two hours and take breaks as needed until he can safely continue. Training for the run has entailed doing regular runs of 20 miles and running a marathon for six weekends in a row, he said. He ran in the Cin-

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cinnati Flying Pig May 3 in three hours and 58 minutes. Completing the run was how Schwalbach thought he could show support for his mother and raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease. “About three years ago I went out on a long run and this idea popped in my mind,” he said. “And I wanted to do something special for Alzheimer’s and my mom.” Schwalbach’s willingness to run 200 miles in eight days and his commitment to his mother shows he has a passion when it comes to Alzheimer’s, said Diana Bosse, special events manager for the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Cincinnati. The chapter typically receives between $35,000 and $40,000 in donations specifically from thirdparty fundraisers, Bosse said. One of the biggest annual events is the annual Valentine’s Day dance in Boone County organized by the Cris Suesz family of Burlington, Bosse said. This year’s dance at the Marriott Cincinnati Airport in Hebron raised $11,000 Other fundraisers range from estate sales dedicated to the association to bake sales, Bosse said. Schwalbach’s 200-mile run is an example of how

Steve Schwalbach of Fort Thomas runs across the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge into Covington wearing a Jackie’s Run shirt as he preps for a 200-mile run across Kentucky starting May 17 to benefit the Cincinnati chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. THANKS TO STEVE SCHWALBACH

people get creative, she said. “So far he’s raised more than $2,500, and even more importantly he’s raised a lot of awareness and that’s even more important,” Bosse said. For information about Jackie’s Run including a daily schedule and ways to donate visit www.jack ieclemrun.com.

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LIFE

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B9

DEATHS David Bauer David Robert Bauer, 69, of Florence, died May 6. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran who served during Vietnam and retired from Cincinnati Bell as a splicer after 29 years of service. His wife, Doris Ann Bauer; parents Robert and Agnes Bauer; and sister, Donna Millay, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Michelle Selena Bauer; sons Timothy and David Paul Bauer; a granddaughter; sister, Diane Barth; and brother-in-law, Chester Millay. Memorials: Alzheimer's Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026 Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Earl Bodenbender Earl Lee Bodenbender, 58, of Hebron, died May 6. He was a superintendent for Hinkle Contracting Corp., a member of Sand Run Baptist Church, and enjoyed cooking and spending time with his family. His parents, Earl and Thelma Brown Bodenbender, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Jennifer Bodenbender; daughters Kerry Bodenbender of Ft. Mitchell, Jenilee BodenbenderMcKiddy of Burlington, and Sarah Bodenbender-Hodges of Hebron; brothers Keith Bodenbender and David Bodenbender, both of Florence; and grandsons Alexander, Brady, Mercer and Bennett Bodenbender-McKiddy. Burial was at Sand Run Cemetery in Hebron.

for Senator Bunning, and a teacher's assistant in Cincinnati Public Schools. He graduated from Covington Latin High School in 2006 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Affairs from George Washington University in 2010; He was a member of the Kappa Alpha Fraternity and was pursuing a degree in education from Northern Kentucky University. He aspired to be a teacher and writer. Survivors include his mother, Tami Carlisle Ragone; father and stepmother, Bryan and Kimberly Carlisle; siblings Madison, Blake, Colton, and Annashea Carlisle, and Giovani, Bella, and Marco Ragone; and grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Memorials: Community Foundation of Northern Kentucky in memory of Clayton A. Carlisle, 31 Spiral Dr., Florence, KY 41042.

Robert Dufresne Robert T. Dufresne, 59, of Florence, died May 4, at Bridge Point Care Center. He was the owner of RTD Construction. Survivors include his sons Andrew Dufresne and Robert Dufresne Jr.; brothers Roger

Dufresne and Louie Emmons III; sisters Melody Dufresne and Kim Dufresne; and one grandchild.

Michele Macdonald Michele Alexandra Kaye Macdonald, 67, of Walton, died May 5 at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati. She was a retired language teacher for Glenview Park Secondary School in Cambridge, Ontario. She enjoyed clogging, dancing, playing bridge, and entertaining friends. Survivors include her husband, Norm Macdonald; sisters Janice Kaye, Marcia Kaye, and Jacqui Tucker; mother-in-law, Edith Macdonald; sister-in-law, Dianne Burlington; brothers-inlaw, Bill Macdonald and John Macdonald; and several aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews. Interment was at Park Lawn Cemetery in Cambridge, Ontario. Memorials: May be made to Norm Macdonald for a memorial at Glenview Park Secondary School, care of Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

See DEATHS, Page B10

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B10 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

LIFE

K1

ADMISSION ADMISSION IS FREE!

DEATHS

ABOUT OBITUARIES

IS FREE!

Visit Northern Kentucky’s Largest Celebration of New Homes with Featured Homes from

Continued from Page B9

For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at cincinnati.com/ northernkentucky. Funeral homes may submit basic obituary information to bwalpole@ communitypress.com. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details.

Patricia Daniel Patricia Daniel, 61, of Florence, died May 6 at the Baptist Convalescent Home in Newport. She was retired from Boeing in Seattle, Wash., a U.S. Air Force veteran of the Vietnam War era, and a member of the First Church of Christ in Burlington. Her parents, Charles and Hazel Marie Chipman Mann; and brother, Bruce Mann, died previ-

ously. Survivors include brothers Steven Mann of Crittenden, Dennis Mann of Burlington, Kevin Mann of Crittenden, Leslie Mann of Walton, and Dwight Mann of Independence; sisters Linda McCormick of Dry Ridge, Tessie Barlow of Crittenden, Karen Daniel of Washington, and Lisa Mann of Independence.

POLICE REPORTS BOONE COUNTY Arrests/Citations Vilmos N. Kossuthi, 62, driving under the influence, April 20. Arnulfo Quinto-Reyes, 27, careless driving, driving under the influence, April 22. Nicole L. Snyder, 39, possession of open alcohol container, driving under the influence, April 21. Darvic D. Barbary, 30, wanton endangerment, theft, suspended license, leaving scene of accident, April 21. John Joseph Hoh Jr., 37, theft, April 21. Michele N. Wehby, 25, possession of controlled substance, drug paraphernalia, April 22. Tracy L. Baker, 46, theft, possession of marijuana, April 22. Rickki L. Burgin, 30, theft, April 22. Emily A. Cogan, 22, theft, April 23. Julie M. Corman, 25, public intoxication, possession of marijuana, April 24. Tabatha A. Kirtman, 39, theft, April 24. Mary J. Erickson, 53, theft, April 24. Harvard D. Cates, 53, public intoxication, April 15. Sharon L. Herzner, 29, driving on DUI suspended license, possession of marijuana, April 25. William D. Chandler, 27, public intoxication, April 25. Brett Roberts, 23, driving under the influence, April 26. Justin Bernard, 22, public intoxication, April 26. Pedro Arvizu-Martinez, 22, public intoxication, April 26.

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See POLICE, Page B11

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LIFE

MAY 15, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B11

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B10 Ian R. Flint, 40, alcohol intoxication in a public place, April 27. Tyler E. Meza, 26, racing a motor vehicle on a public highway, DUI, April 27. Jason M. Lay, 41, shoplifting, April 27. Eduardo M. Morales, 30, possession of open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle, no operator's license, failure to use child restraint device in vehicle, DUI, April 27. Alfred Evans, 51, receiving stolen property under $500, April 27. Brandie N. Miller, 29, receiving stolen property under $500, April 28. Julio Reyes, 25, second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument, April 29. Nicole L. Hamilton, 35, shoplifting, April 29. Tiffany B. Boles, 20, shoplifting, April 29. Amanda Hensley, 36, theft by unlawful taking between $500 and $10,000, April 29. Cheryl D. Effiom, 54, shoplifting, April 29. Evan A. Ellis, 20, shoplifting, May 1. Tami L. Rees, 46, shoplifting, May 2. Rosie M. Ehling, 28, shoplifting, May 2. Adaire C. Evans, 21, receiving stolen property $10,000 or more, May 3. Raymond J. Adams, 22, receiving stolen property $10,000 or more, May 3. Karya L. Hunter, 25, seconddegree fleeing/evading police, receiving stolen property $10,000 or more, May 3. Buffie A. Oggy, 45, shoplifting, May 3.

20. Reported at 100 block of Lloyd Ave., April 21. Reported at 7100 block of Spruce Dr., April 21. Reported at 7800 block of U.S. 42, April 23. Reported at 9000 block of Spruce Dr., April 26. Criminal possession of forged instrument Reported at 8400 block of U.S. 42, April 21. Criminal trespassing, terroristic threatening Reported at 5 Sandstone Ct., April 23. Fraudulent use of a credit card Reported at 4900 block of Houston Rd., April 28. Reported at 8800 block of U.S. 42, May 1. Reported at 6900 block of Burlington Pk., May 2. Reported at 7500 block of Turfway Rd., April 21. Reported at 4800 block of Houston Rd., April 24. Narcotics Reported at 8000 block of Holiday Pl., May 3. Possession of controlled substance Reported at 6800 block of Burlington Pk., April 22. Possession of forged instruments

Reported at Alan Ct., April 29. Receiving stolen property Reported at 7600 block of Mall Rd., April 27. Reported at 7200 block of Turfway Rd., April 28. Shoplifting Reported at 4900 block of Houston Rd., April 27. Reported at 7700 block of Mall Rd., April 29. Reported at 7600 block of Mall Rd., April 29. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., May 1. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., May 2. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., May 2. Reported at 5000 block of Mall Rd., May 3. Theft Reported at 7800 block of U.S. 42, April 21. Reported at 8400 block of U.S. 42, April 21. Reported at 7500 block of Dixie Hwy., April 21. Reported at 7700 block of Burlinigton Pk., April 22. Reported at 6700 block of Dixie Hwy., April 22. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., April 22. Reported at 1000 block of Mall Rd., April 22.

See POLICE, Page B12

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Sunday, May 18 f rom 1- 4 PM

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Incidents/Investigations Burglary Reported at 4900 block of Houston Rd., April 23. Attempt to obtain controlled substance by fraud, theft at 7900 block of Mall Rd., April 25. Criminal mischief Reported at Roger Ln., April 30. Reported at U.S. 42, May 1. Reported at Rideway Ave., April

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LIFE

B12 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 15, 2014

NEIGHBORS IN THE NEWS Cadet graduates from West Point

Cadet Benjamin Trey Huff, son of Tara Lipps of Florence and Ben Huff Jr., Hebron, will graduate from the U.S. Military Academy on May 28. Huff graduated from Conner High School in 2009. While at West Point, he concentrated his studies

in engineering management. He will be commissioned as a second lieutenant Huff in the U.S. Army within the engineer’s branch and will report to Fort Knox for his first post assignment.

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B11 Reported at 7400 block of Turfway Rd., April 22. Reported at 6700 block of Dixie Hwy., April 22. Reported at 7600 block of Industrial Rd., April 23. Reported at 1000 block of Hansel Ave., April 24. Reported at 6700 block of Dixie Hwy., April 24. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., April 24. Reported at 7600 block of

Industrial Rd., April 25. Reported at 6700 Parkland Plc., April 25. Reported at 30 block of New Uri Ave., April 25. Reported at 7300 block of Turfway Rd., April 26. Reported at 1100 block of Hansel Ave., April 26. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., April 26. Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., April 26. Reported at 4800 block of Houston Rd., April 28.

Reported at 7600 block of Doering Dr., April 29. Reported at Wallace Ave., April 30. Reported at 8500 block of U.S. 42, May 1. Reported at 7100 block of Manderlay Dr., May 2. Reported at 7100 block of Houston Rd., May 2. Theft by deception (cold checks) Reported at 7700 block of Mall Rd., April 27. Theft from auto Reported at 8500 block of Almahurst Trl., April 28. Reported at 200 block of Center St., May 1. Reported at 7700 block of Kernal Dr., May 1. Reported at Russell St., May 1. Reported at 7600 block of Catawba Ln., May 2.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Boone County Sheriff Mike Helmig at 334-2175; Florence Police Chief Tom Szurlinski at 6475420.

Theft of gasoline under $500 Reported at 8200 block of U.S. 42, May 1. Theft of identity Reported at 9300 block of Hardwicke Ln., May 1. Reported at 20 block of Rio Grande Cir., April 16. Reported at 8500 block of Tulane Ct., April 21. Theft, receiving stolen property Reported at 60 block of Spiral Dr., April 21. Unauthorized procurement of controlled substance Reported at 4900 block of Houston Rd., April 21. Wanton endangerment, theft, operating on suspended license Reported at 6000 block of Mall Rd., April 21.

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Boone county recorder 051514