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B OONE COUNTY RECORDER THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014

Burlington teen is

‘Making a Difference’

Sophomore’s nonprofit, Rob’s Kids, earns her an award more than $30,000 to the annual Cincinnati Walks for Kids in support of Chilam Potdren’s Division of ter, no Psychiatry, more relation than $12,000 in supto Harry, plies needed by menshe jokes, tal health profesis just 16. sionals as part of Petite and perRob’s Kids’ Christsonable, the Burmas in July program lington teen, a sophand has delivered omore at Conner more than 100 High School, is bagged gifts each well-spoken and year in 2012 and 2013 blithe when we for the annual Rob’s meet at the Boone Kids Christmas ProCounty Public Liject. brary’s main Rob’s Kids does branch in Burlingfundraisers throughton. out the year to fund Those who don’t these endeavors. know better would Sam said it’s imbe hard pressed to portant for her to guess that Sam had give back to Chilever battled against dren’s because “I depression and post-traumatic was in that mindset stress disorder. (suicidal and depressed) at one time But she did. Sam Potter of Burlington received Cincinnati in my life and I reAnd now, beChildren’s Hospital and Medical Center’s cause her efforts to “Making a Difference” award. member just feeling help other children STEPHANIE SALMONS/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER helpless and alone, even though I in the same fight, wasn’t. I never want another kid to feel Sam was awarded the Cincinnati Chilthat way, especially when Rob’s Kids is dren’s Hospital Medical Center’s “Making there to help them get back up.” a Difference Award.” She was surprised to receive the award. Sam is the founder of the Hebron-based According to Stephanie Potter, Sam’s nonprofit Rob’s Kids, an organization grandmother and executive director of “passionately committed to making a Rob’s Kids, there were hundreds of nomidifference in the lives of children who nees and Sam was one of the five finalists. struggle with depression and post-trau“Every person was worthy of winning matic stress disorder,” according to its the award,” she said. “I wish they all could website. have won the award.” After losing her father, Rob, to suicide When they called her name, Sam said in 2008, Sam struggled with depression her first thought was “I’m going to have to and post-traumatic stress disorder. More go up there.” than two years after his death, Sam Recognition, she said, increases awarethought about suicide herself and on two ness. different occasions spent time at Chil“I’m not being recognized for what I dren’s Hospital. did, I’m being recognized for what we do Sam was nominated for the award by and we’re still doing,” Sam said. “That the hospital’s psychiatric staff. makes me feel amazing.” She received the award April 3, the Her goal is to find a drug directly for sixth anniversary of her father’s burial PTSD. She wants to study into biochemand the day after her birthday. istry and psychiatry, and eventually take a “I’m the first patient to step forward top spot at Children’s. and she (the nominator) told me she was For more information about Rob’s Kid, just amazed by my story,” Sam said. visit robskids.org. Since 2011, Rob’s Kids has donated Community Recorder

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Three run for Boone jailer GOP primary is May 20

Community Recorder

Incumbent Edward Prindle faces two challengers in the May 20 Republican primary for Boone County jailer. Challenging the incumbent are Scott Goodridge and Brian Landrum. Goodridge, 45, of Hebron, worked at the jail for 21 years before retiring in 2011. He’s concerned about the release of immigration prisoners into Boone County. As reported by The Kentucky Enquirer, the Boone County Jail is the only facility in Kentucky authorized to hold federal immigration detainees for more than 72 hours and the program generates significant revenue. The jail is reimbursed $44.65 daily for each detainee and the program generates more than $2 million annually. Goodridge cited a 2009 incident where he was sent to Indianapolis to pick up eight immigration prisoners. When he returned, Goodridge said five were booked and was told to release the others. “If immigration wants a prison release, they will come and pick up the prisoner,” Goodridge said. The jailer’s office is in need of a change, Goodridge said. “It’s been running the same way for so many years, it’s getting stale.” If elected, Goodridge says he will “put my community first and think the jail will gain more honor and integrity than it has now.” A Conner High School graduate, Goodridge is married to Laura Pieper Goodridge and has three children. Landrum, 53, of Union, says he has always wanted to get into politics, and has experience in jail operations – he’s a watch commander at the Kenton County Detention Center and an assistant team leader for its tactical response team. A Lloyd High School graduate, Landrum was in the Marine Corps for seven years. He was out for 12 years before joining the Kentucky Army National Guard, from which he retired last year. Landrum says the biggest is-

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SCOTT GOODRIDGE Incumbent: No Lives in: Hebron Age: 45 Job: Works for Endeavor Air. Retired from the Boone Goodridge County Jail in 2011 after 21 years. Education: Conner High School. Family: Wife Laura Pieper Goodridge, and three children. Website: N/A Twitter: N/A Facebook: N/A

BRIAN LANDRUM Incumbent: No Lives in: Union Age: 53 Job: Watch Commander at Kenton County Detention Landrum Center Education: Lloyd High School. Political experience: None. Family: Married with four children and eight grandchildren. Website: N/A Twitter: N/A Facebook: N/A

EDWARD PRINDLE Incumbent: Yes Lives in: Florence Age: 53 Job: Boone County Jailer: Education: Covington Prindle Catholic, Northern Kentucky University. Political experience: Began working at the Jail in March 1985 as deputy, was chief deputy under former jailer John Schickel and jailer for 12 years, first appointed in 2002. Family: Wife, Diane, and three children. Website: N/A Twitter: N/A Facebook: N/A

sue facing the office is drugs, particularly heroin. “I believe education is the See JAILER, Page A2

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The Boone County Recorder 3647 O’Hara Rd. Erlanger, KY 41018

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Florence, KY 41042 ISSN 201108 ● USPS 060-780 Postmaster: Send address change to The Boone County Recorder, 3647 O’Hara Rd., Erlanger, KY 41018 Annual subscription: Weekly Recorder In-County $18.02; All other in-state $23.32; Out-of-state $27.56; Kentucky sales tax included

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A2 • BOONE COUNTY RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

Jailer Continued from Page A1

key, but there’s other things involved in education,” he said. If elected, Landrum proposes a 70-bed facility that supports prisoners in recovery. For example, the county would help those who don’t have a GED get one or help participants get vocational training so they can earn an income. Landrum described himself as a doer and said he wants to serve the community, “striving for the better future of the county. “You’re going to see me throughout the community,” he said. “... I want to be seen, I want to bring a name to Boone County.” Landrum is married with four children and eight grandchildren. Prindle started working as a deputy at the jail in March 1985 and has worked as a sergeant and chief deputy under former jailer John Schickel. He was appointed jailer in 2002 to fill an unexpired term. He’s been elected every four years since. From his perspective, drugs are the biggest issues plaguing his office. “In my 29 years of experience, it’s the worst

I’ve seen,” Prindle said. The jail staff makes sure inmates are medically taken care of and begin rehabilitation, he said, working to get those individuals through the court system and into treatment beds. Prindle says he’s seeking another term as jailer because he feels like there are still things to do. “We still need to work on trying to get people off of drugs,” he said. “With county finances the way they are, it’s important to run the jail in a cost-efficient manner and I think I’ve proven I can do that.” Prindle says he’ll “continue to provide a safe, secure jail for the citizens and continue to be cost-effective for the county.” Prindle, 53, is a Boone County native. He went to Covington Catholic High School and studied at Northern Kentucky University. He lives in Florence with his wife, Diane, and has three children.

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A6 Sports ....................A7 Viewpoints .............A9

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Three candidates seek Boone County clerk seat Republicans face off May 20

ABOUT CLERK CANDIDATES KENNY BROWN

By Stephanie Salmons Contributor

Three candidates are seeking the office of Boone County clerk. Incumbent Kenny Brown, 48, of Florence, faces challengers Ramona Croushore, 55, and Jim Sallee, 51, both of Hebron, in the May 20 Republican primary. No Democrats have filed to seek the position. Brown was first elected in 2010. “In 2010 I ran because I felt the office was really outdated, not customer-friendly at all,” he said. “I had a good job at the time so I wasn’t looking for a job, I was looking to make a difference in the clerk’s office.” He’s running for reelection to build on the improvements made so far. Those improvements, Brown said, are “dramatic and obvious” and include installing a self-service copier in the record room, a revamped website with downloadable forms, streamlining delinquent tax process, promotion of the state’s online motor vehicle registration renewal and implementing a phonein renewal system, which he says provides better customer service for those who have to come into the office. “I feel like I’m the best candidate to go forward for the next four years,” Brown said. According to Brown, the clerks’ office will undergo statewide changes in the next term to upgrade the Automated Vehicle Information System (AVIS) and it will take “experienced senior leadership to help edu-

Incumbent: Yes Lives in: Florence Age: 48 Job: Boone County clerk Political experience: Elected as clerk in 2010, chairman of the Boone County Republican Party 2004-06. Education: Boone County High School graduate, attended the University of Kentucky. Family: Single Website: keepkenny.com Facebook: facebook.com/groups/keepkennybrown/

RAMONA CROUSHORE

Incumbent: No Lives in: Hebron Age: 55 Job: Small business owner and paralegal for her husband’s law office Political experience: None Education: Attended Hillsborough Community College Family: Married with three adult children Website: ramonaforclerk.org, ramonaforclerk.blogspot.com Facebook: facebook.com/ramonaforclerk

JIM SALLEE

Incumbent: No Lives in: Hebron Age: 51 Job: Attorney Political experience: None Education: Dixie Heights High School, University of Kentucky for two years before transferring to Purdue University; graduated with bachelor and master degrees in aeronautic and astronautical engineering. Received a juris doctorate degree from Northern Kentucky University Family: Married with three children Website: jimsallee.com

cate the public and work through the bumps in the road that’s going to cause by changing to an all-new system.” Coupled with the senior staff poised to retire, Brown said an experienced leader at the top is needed “to guide the clerk’s office through those transitions.” Croushore, a small business owner and paralegal for her husband’s law office, said she’s running “to restore full-time leadership to the clerk’s office.” She said she believes in merit-based hiring and believes “I can

bring to the clerk’s office integrity and honesty.” According to Croushore, she has the customer service experience the other two candidates don’t have. She wants to “be a servant for the people of Boone County.” Describing herself as a fiscally conservative candidate, Croushore said she wants to look at the possibility of expanding hours at no additional cost as well as a satellite office in southern Boone County. “If the people of Boone County put their trust in me and hire me, I promise them I will serve them and will be

“I can do a great job making sure (the clerk’s) office holds those principles to a very high standard.” JIM SALLEE, candidate

the very best clerk I can possibly be,” she said. Sallee is running “just to make Boone County a little bit better place. I think I can do a little bit better job.” He thinks the clerk’s office should be grounded on three principals: Integrity, efficiency and service. According to Sallee, most people interact with the clerk once a year. “When that happens, the clerk and his deputies ... should try to facilitate and be helpful to those people,” he said The office, he said, is “there to serve the citizens of Boone County and I think I can do a great job making sure that office holds those principles to a very high standard.” While he realizes it may not be possible to do this, Sallee said he’d like to see the technology “brought up to speed” in the land record room. Should he be elected, Sallee says he’ll first look into expanding hours, for example having each office open a few hours one Saturday a month, which is something he thinks could be accomplished “very soon.” The updates to the record room, however, “that’s going to be a very long-term process,” he said. “That’s a monumental task, I think one worth doing and striving to get done.”

BRIEFS ALS Chapter plans walk at Turfway

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FLORENCE — Lace up and head for The Walk May 17, at Turfway Park in Florence. The fourth annual walk is hosted by the ALS Association Kentucky Chapter which works to fund research, patient care and family and caregiver support. Registration and silent auction will be 8:30 a.m. A ribbon-cutting ceremony and one-mile walk will begin at 10 a.m. starting at the Turfway Park paddock and continuing around the grounds. Register at alsaky.org or call 1-800-406-7702. Companies and walkers are encouraged to form teams. Walkers can also join an existing team or participate as individuals. All walkers who raise $75 or more will receive an official Walk to Defeat ALS T-shirt.

Chamber seeks nominations

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The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce is seeking nominations for an award in celebration of the 35th

anniversary of one of its flagship programs, Leadership Northern Kentucky (LNK). The Ruth A. Eger Leaders of Distinction award is named for former LNK Program Director Ruth Eger and will honor graduates of the Leadership Northern Kentucky program who have made significant and notable contributions for the betterment of the Northern Kentucky community. All nominees must be graduates of the Leadership Northern Kentucky program. Winners will be announced at the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner, Sept. 18, and honored at the 35th Anniversary celebration at The Syndicate, Sept. 27. If interested in nominating a leader, visit www.nkychamber.com for more information. All nominees must be submitted by May 30.

Florence Rotary hosts spring concert

FLORENCE — The Florence Rotary Spring Concert will be 6:35 p.m.

Monday, May 12, at First Church of Christ, 6080 Camp Ernst Road, Burlington. Musical guests include David Waits, Joetta Schmitt, Becca Sparks, By Faith and many more. A $10 donation is suggested. Funds raised benefit the Rotary’s efforts to end Polio. For more information, visit florencerotaryconcerts. org.

Massie endorses Dedden

Matt Dedden, Republican candidate for Boone County judge-executive, has received the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie. Dedden, Boone’s District 1 commissioner since 2010, is challenging the 16-year GOP incumbent Gary Moore. Dedden said he applies his business experience and the lessons he and his wife of 21 years, Kim, have learned as taxpayers, homeowners, and the parents of two children.


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MAY 8, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • A3

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A4 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

Central Bank has new online, mobile banking platforms Central Bank has unveiled upgrades to its online and mobile banking platforms (eBanking), as well as brand-new smartphone and iPad apps. Central Bank has branches at 2850 Turkeyfoot Road, Crestview Hills; 2075 Dixie High-

way, Fort Mitchell; and 7310 Turfway Road, Suite, 200, Florence. A feature unique to Central Bank’s new eBanking services is the financial management dashboard, an interactive tool that allows customers to track their entire finan-

cial picture. The dashboard offers information on all of a customer’s accounts, including those not associated with Central Bank, and gives customers easy-to-use tools to design lifestyle-specific budgets and personalized savings goals. In addition to the financial management dashboard, the upgrade introduces a variety of online and mobile banking features. One of those is mobile deposit, the ability to quickly deposit checks via the Central Bank smartphone and iPad apps. Customers will also notice enhancements to the online bill pay platform. It also allows for digital person-to-person payment, meaning customers can send, request or receive payment from just about anyone.

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Two vying for the District 2 magistrate seat Community Recorder

There’s not much to the job, but incumbent Boone County Justice of the Peace and Magistrate for District 2, Eric Grinnell, faces challenger Pat Valentine, of Grinnell Walton, in the May 20 Republican Primary. Although it’s a constitutionally created position, today, the duties of a magistrate are few. Originally magistrates held important judicial duties. In 1978, however, an amendment to the state Consti-

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tution stripped magistrates of their judicial duties so that the only duties that remain are to perform marriages and accept applications for notaries public. This applies to counties such as Campbell, Boone and Kenton, which all have a commissioner form of county government. Even in Boone County, Grinnell said a fellow magistrate does most of the weddings and he’s in

ABOUT THE CANDIDATES ERIC S. GRINNELL Incumbent: Yes Lives in: Florence Age: 41 Job: Attorney and a veteran of the U.S. Navy having served from 1991-1997, Education: Bachelor’s degree from University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, law degree from University of Toledo. Political experience: Victory Center campaign manager for George W. Bush in Oakland County, Mich., and former staffer at the Michigan House Republican Caucus in Lansing, Mich. Former chairman of the Boone County Parking Citation Appeals Board. Family: A single father to a 15-year-old son, Grinnell is recently engaged to Stephanie Curry. Website: N/A Twitter: N/A Facebook: N/A Grinnell uses his role as Justice of the Peace/Magistrate to bridge the gape between citizens and higher level elected officials.

PAT VALENTINE Did not respond

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the strength Friends, ty ve n e u li e o C b I e . n rt o o fo B k r n a a De in Fr and your familys that form the fabric of our children. u yo e rv se to e d familie d grand owing m Thank you for atyll is found in the individualseasnand hopes for our children an of Boone Counshare your traditional valu s as my guidingy basis. ct a t n e community. I m rn ve o g ited role of e decisions I make on a dail two m li e th in f e li e b ve, my es me in th with that in mind, asking As a conservaotiur shared family values guidm s before me to solve? principle and ry piece of legislation that co peroblem the bill is attempting I evaluate eve ions: What is the underlying is problem? essential questf state government to solve th Boone County r u o d n a s ie Is it the role o il m bs, ur fa and represent yo y top priorities:njod Roads. u m s yo a e u rv yo se to to t e n a m rta You have trustheadve kept the issues most impog for our Boone County Schooblslican in u I d p businesses. strong schools, equity fun nd vote in the May 20th Re County and education andumbly ask for your support a tinue to work to lead Boone I once again hion. Be assured that I will cons future. Primary Elect brighter and more prosperou our state to a nd God Bless. a , e m in st u tr r for you Thank you again Addia Wuchner tive - Distrtriicct 66 ta n en se es re ep R te ta KY S

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no rush to change that. “I use my role primarily to help bridge the gap between the citizens and the higher level elected officials,” Grinnell said. That’s a role he enjoys. “It’s a gratifying thing to do and a good place to be,” Grinnell said. “I enjoy being able to help people.” Valentine declined to comment for the story and to provide a photo.


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MAY 8, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • A5

Home Instead offers second careers By Melissa Stewart mstewart@communitypress.com

FLORENCE — Career pursuits don’t necessarily end when a person gets older. “Older workers are one of the fastest growing segments of the workforce – with many choosing to work long past the age of 65,” said Kristin Danley-Greiner who does public relations work for Home Instead Senior Care in Florence. “They continue working for a variety of reasons, but many are looking for careers that will provide them with both an income and the opportunity to help others.” This is certainly true, according to Home Instead senior caregiver Judy Hicks, 72, of Verona. “I like to be able to help others enjoy their life better,” she said. “I love my clients, they’re funny and sweet. I enjoy learning about their lives and hearing their stories.” Hicks, who has worked for Home Instead for almost seven years, said she gets a lot in return. “It’s very rewarding to make someone laugh and to help them however I can to make their lives easier and so they can stay at home.”

“Older workers are on of the fastest growing segments of the workforce – with many choosing to work long past the age of 65.” KRISTIN DANLEY-GREINER, Home Instead

This year, Home Instead is looking for others like Hicks, seniors who want to make a difference in the lives of other seniors. The organization plans to hire 55 additional caregivers by the end of the year. Home Instead serves seniors in Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties. “We’re looking for compassionate and caring individuals who enjoy helping others,” Home Instead general manager Les Murphy said. “These people help to improve the lives of families in our communities which can be very satisfying. For recent graduates, job hunters or employed individuals looking to make a change, a career working with seniors can be a very rewarding experience.” According to Murphy, becoming a professional Home Instead caregiver is a

great option for seniors looking for a job with a flexible schedule and no medical skills or training required. Not only are caregivers able to maintain a healthy work-life balance, they also often develop a personal connection with the seniors and families they support. “Working with Home Instead allows senior workers to make great connections,” he said. “Having senior caretakers is also good for our clients. They have similar life experiences, and can relate to the physical and mental changes our clients are going through.” While training is not a requirement to be hired, once hired individuals participate in the Home Instead’s training program. They will learn skills necessary to help enhance the quality of life of seniors by providing support that enables them to remain in their homes. Caregivers provide non-medical care, such as companionship, light housekeeping, meal preparation, and running errands and taking clients to appointments. For more information on how to apply, visit www.homeinstead.com or call 859282-8682. Want to continue the conversation? Tweet @MStewartReports

Judy Hicks, a senior caregiver for Home Instead Senior Care, was awarded the 2013 Caregiver of the Year award.PROVIDED

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A6 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

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Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@communitypress.com, 859-802-0970

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

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Highlands junior scores perfect 36 on ACT By Chris Mayhew

cmayhew@communitypress.com

FORT THOMAS — Highlands High School junior Clay Campbell studied hard for the ACT, but also believes a little luck helped him earn a perfect 36 on the ACT. “I would imagine there were probably a couple of questions on the test that were just luck, said Campbell,16. “So, there is an element of that. Even if you know all the material there is an element of luck that plays into the test.” He is the son of Andrew and Na Young Campbell of Fort Thomas and has a brother Henry, 7. He took the ACT at High-

lands March 4. The ACT is used by colleges to measure how prepared students are to succeed in higher education. Campbell’s perfect score was Clay the first for a Campbell Highlands student since Madeline Gates aced the ACT in 2012 in her junior year. Campbell said he spent several months “self-studying” for the ACT and was helped by four weekends of an ACT boot camp program in February. He also credits focus gained by partici-

pating in mock trial, academic team and being a musician. Campbell said being on Highlands mock trial and academic teams, and playing flute in the Cincinnati Youth Wind Ensemble through the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music have helped teach him focus – useful when taking tests. “It’s all interpretation and kind of critical thinking and that’s where I think the extracurriculars come in,” he said. Academic team helped with being able to think through answers on the science and math sections of the ACT, and some of the same facts were used on the

test, Campbell said. Many of the questions on the ACT are not specific things a person is supposed to know, but being able to analyze and then answer, he said. “You just have to answer the question that they ask you,” Campbell said. “I think a lot of times people try answering a different question and that doesn’t work out too well.” He took the ACT previously and scored a 34. “With regards to the test I think I’m probably done, this was my second try.” Campbell wants to study biology or biomedical engineering in college and eventually work as a patent attorney.

Doing well on the ACT, which takes about three hours to finish, is as much about endurance as it is about being able to answer the final questions as well as the first questions, said Campbell’s father Andrew. “My opinion is one of the things they’re testing is endurance because it’s hard to stay focused for three hours,” Andrew Campbell said. “He’s got an astonishing focus,” said his father. “He studies very late every night.” Andrew Campbell said his son’s achievement is wonderful. “It takes one of the variables out of the college search,” he said.

Student’s recycling idea has big impact

In 1st week, Catherine Clark collected 30 lbs. of materials Community Recorder

C

atherine Clark, a surgical technology student at the Florence campus of National College, has had success this term with a recycling project. Clark, who will graduate later this year, is taking an environmental science class. When given a recycling project at the beginning of this term, she wanted to be more creative than most students. She already recycled at home and work, so she decided to start a recycling program on campus. Since Clark was depending on fellow classmates and staff to recycle, her biggest obstacle to overcome was people thinking the recycling box was too far away. However, she did

not let this deter her. Clark worked to recruit supporters who ended up saving used paper and then dropping it in the box once a day. “It’s really not that hard to do. Have one can for your trash and one for paper,” Clark said. In just the first week of collecting paper Clark collected 30 pounds of recycling materials. Clark started recycling at home when her waste management company began providing a free recycling bin and free pick-up to customers. She thinks that recycling is here to stay because it’s being encouraged more and more by waste management companies. “Every little bit a person does to help the environment really does make a difference,” she said.

Surgical technology student Catherine Clark began a recycling program at the Florence Campus of National College. PROVIDED

COLLEGE CORNER Banks named to Miami dean’s list

Madeline Frances Banks, of Florence, was named to the Miami University dean’s list for the fall 2013 semester. Students who rank in the top 20 percent within each division for the semester were named to the dean’s list recognizing academic performance.

Boone students make UK dean’s list

The following students from Boone County made the dean’s list for the fall 2013 semester at the University of Kentucky. Jenna Abbott, Shelby Dean Albers, Carrie N. Anderson, Bryan Nolan Angel, Ryan Lloyd Anglin, Ashley Leanne Arlinghaus, Taylor Lauren Atkinson, Victoria Catherine Aulick, Samantha G. Ayotte, Corbin Alexander Bailey, Alex Gregory Baker, Connor Montgomery Bechtol, Alisa Marie Behrens, Maggie Elise Bellhorn, Rachel A. Berling, Erna Marianne Blythe Reske, Brittany Leigh Bowlin, Steven Robert Brashear, Ethan M. Brennan, Alanna Nicole Briggs, Stacey Lynne Brothers, Shawn Michael Brown, Annie E. Browning, Michael Augustine Butler, Emily Lauren Cain, Emily Suzanne Canterna, Michelle Marie Canterna, Brennan Phillip Carroll, Andrew R. Cawman, Matthew Charles Childers, Nicholas Alexander Cobb, Aubrey Lynn Cochran, Darby Anne Cochran, Taylor Lee Collis, Kyle John Cooper, Mary Elizabeth Coughlin, Cassandra Marie Cox, Logan Patrick Craven, Kathryn Grace Cremer, Alison Taylor Culp, Stefanie Rachel Dauwe, Samuel J. Dedden, Erin Noelle Deja, Christopher Joseph Desmarais, Kyle Robert Donovan, Julia Michelle Dubis, Jessica Yesenia Duran, Kaitlyn Nicole Eichinger, Kiefer Eammon Eubank, John Richard Eubanks, Marshall Luke Fegenbush, Sean Tyler Ferguson, Bellina Mia Fiorelli, Toria Elyse Fischer, Catherine E. Garcia, Elizabeth T. Gardinier, Allison Elizabeth Goderwis, Margo Elizabeth Goetting, Shelby Elizabeth Graham, Michelle Lee Grdina, Christopher Guallpa, Mara Kathryn Hafer, John Phillip Hammer, Megan Elizabeth Hannah, Amy Eleanor Hansen, Jessica Marie Harden, Jacob Stanley Hart, Raquel Maureen Hegge, Hannah Kathryn Himmelmann, Sarah Lee-Ann Hodge,

Alexandra Lee Hughes, Lauren Marie Iglesias, Bryan Taylor Ingoglia, Alexandra Nicole Isler, Dylan Perry James, Zachary Joseph Johnson, Kevin R. Joiner, Megan Elizabeth Jordan, Bradley Scott Jury, Paul Richard Kasinski Jr., Neil Joseph Kennedy, Brandon E. Kenney, Allison Nicole Klare, Mary Margaret Kloentrup, Emily Anne Koehler, Erika Louise Koester, Cayla Claire Kunstek, Kathleen Renee Langsdale, Lauren Elizabeth Leeke, Brandon Andrew Loschiavo, Zachary E. Lutes, Zachary K. MacAdams, Hannah Wilson Madden, Olivia Ann Maines, Jordyn R. Mandle, Melanie Kay Manganaro, Kelsey Anna Marciano, Cory Wade Matsko, Bethany Jean McClintock, Alexander Duncan McGarr, Connor Patrick McLaughlin, Ian M. McManus, Austin J. Merchant, Alexandra Cole Michael, James Thomas Middendorf, Rachel B. Mowl, Brook L. Mullins, Jennifer Elizabeth Musgrave, Caitlin Elizabeth Neuhaus, Kim D. Nguyen, Lindsay Otis, Courtney Madison Owens, Grant Hudson Palmer, Ryan Panoushek, Allie Breanne Parker, Cory Gordon Parker, Avani Jayesh Patel, Rooshil Mukesh Patel, Kelsi Jean Pickens, Lee Thomas Pinkston, Stephen Rodes Plowdrey, Alysha N. Poe, Katherine Elizabeth Poe, Emily Claire Ralenkotter, Jacob Tyler Read, Joseph T. Rhyne, Hannah Ray Rich, Allyson N. Roller, Scott Duncan Rowe, Michael Glen Royal, Kelsey Lynn Rozanski, Parker Byron Ryle, Madison Kiara Sands, Maria Lee Schuster, James Cory Siler, Lydia Pauline Slayden, Christopher William Smith, Hagen Elizabeth Smith, Mackenzi Elizabeth Steenken, Austin Carl Stinson, Madeline Strzelewicz, Chelsea Lee Swinford, John Robert Tepe, Cody Joseph Thamann, Adam David Thompson, Andrea Rose Thompson, Anna Marie Trenkamp, Brett Alden Uminger, Courtney Katherine Vanway, Denise Duyen-Ngoc Vu, Katherine Ann Waggoner, Jeremy G. Wakefield, Joshua R. Wakefield, Joseph Andrew Walbourn, John Louis Walker, Jacqueline Hollingsworth Wallace, Austin Frederick Way, Dallas Michael Willoughby, Ashley Nicole Wilson, Renee Lynn Wilson, Olivia A. Winshurst, Matthew T. Woods and Tyler Robert Yake. To make a dean’s list in one of the UK colleges, a student must earn a gradepoint average of 3.6 or higher and must have earned 12 credits or more in that semester, excluding credits earned in

pass-fail classes. Some UK colleges require a 3.5 GPA to make the dean’s list.

Walton student named to dean’s list

Matthew Hartfiel, a sophomore marine-science major from Walton, was named to the dean’s list at Coastal Carolina University for the Fall 2013 semester. To qualify for the dean’s list, freshmen must earn a 3.25 grade point average, and upperclassmen must earn a 3.5 grade point average.

Boone students graduate from Miami

The following local students recently graduated from Miami University: Leonard Beck of Florence, Sarah Foltz of Florence, Amanda Behne of Florence and Sarah Baumann of Union.

Morton excels at Wittenberg

Margo Ellena Morton, daughter of JoAnne Ellena and Ray Morton of Hebron, was named to the dean’s list at Wittenberg University for the Fall 2013 semester. Morton is a junior majoring in computer science. She also was selected into Mortar Board for senior year. Mortar Board is a National Honor Society for seniors in college who have achieved high standards for scholarship, leadership and service. As a freshman, Morton was admitted to Alpha Lambda Delta, a national Honor Society for women.

Nolin makes dean’s list at Rensselaer Polytech

Rebecca Nolin, of Union, was named to the dean’s list at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the Fall 2013 semester. Nolin studies physics. The dean’s list recognizes full-time students who maintain grade-point averages of a minimum of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 and have no grades below “C.”

Vosbury graduates from tech institute

Erika Vosbury, of Florence, recently graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with a bachelor of fine arts degree in industrial design from RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences. Vosbury completed her college career by making the dean’s list during the Fall 2013 semester. Degree-seeking undergraduate students are eligible for the dean’s list if their quarterly GPA is greater than or equal to 3.400, they have no grades of “incomplete”, “D” or “F,” and they have completed at least 12 credit hours.

Boone pair earns language scholarships

Kelli N. Hogue, of Burlington, and Kelly E. Tursic, of Union, were among six students at Western Kentucky University recently awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships. They will use the scholarships to study languages this summer in various locations. Each worked closely with the Office of Scholar Development to prepare their applications for this competitive award. The scholarship includes round-trip airfare, living expenses and tuition for programs throughout the world in which students intensively study a critical-need foreign language and experience the culture first-hand. Hogue, an international affairs and Spanish major, will study Chinese. The daughter of Beth Meuleman, she is a student in the WKU Honors College and the Chinese Flagship program and has been studying Chinese since she was a freshman in high school. “It wasn’t until I was a senior and looking for potential colleges did I decide that I wanted to seriously pursue a career in which Chinese would be an essential part of my daily life,” she said. “I chose to come to WKU because of this decision, and because of the opportunities the Chinese Flagship could give to me.” Tursic, an international affairs and Asian religions and cultures major, will study Chinese. The daughter of Rich and Kathy Tursic, she is a student in the WKU Honors College and Chinese Flagship Program.

“I enjoy interacting with the international community and learning about other cultures,” Tursic said. “The Chinese Flagship Program is what attracted me to WKU because I grew up in China and was determined to continue studying Chinese in college.”

Marsh makes dean’s list

Keren Marsh, of Hebron, was named to the dean’s list at Olivet Nazarene University for the fall 2013 semester. To qualify for inclusion on the dean’s list, a student must have been enrolled as a full-time undergraduate student and must have attained a semester gradepoint average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 grading scale.

Noyes completes master’s degree

Micah Noyes, of Hebron, recently earned a Master of Arts with a focus in counseling psychology from Union Institute and University.

Wilhoite enters honor society

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi recently initiated Andrea Wilhoite of Union. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Wilhoite is pursuing a degree in mathematics at Morehead State University. She is among approximately 32,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership.

Zembrodt makes dean’s list

Jaclyn Zembrodt, of Walton, was named to the Saginaw Valley State University dean’s list for the fall 2013 semester. To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must take at least 12 credit hours and carry a semester GPA of 3.4 or better.


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Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

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Boone County regroups in softball homestretch By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Holy Cross seniors Brandi Trenkamp and Georgia Childers chat with Walton-Verona senior Carli McPhereson and freshman Addie Hincks. The Ninth Region girls tennis tournament began May 3 at Lloyd Memorial High School in Erlanger. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Tennis tourney springs into action T

eams started play in the Ninth Region tennis tournament May 3. The girls tournament was tentatively scheduled to end either May 7 or 8. Here is a look at some local first-round action.

Boone County’s Mary Andrikus, left, and Sami Hare congratulate Ryle’s Megan Guard and Hannah Worley after Ryle won their first-round match. Hare and Guard are shaking hands. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Cooper sophomore Sarah Goodrich hits the ball in first-round singles action.JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Ryle’s Megan Guard hits the ball in a doubles match with teammate Hannah Worley. Ryle beat Boone County. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

FLORENCE — Playing in one of the toughest districts in the state, the Boone County High School softball team knows a misstep can be fatal. So the Rebels are hoping that a recent stumble doesn’t repeat itself as they attempt to improve their footwork for the big dance of the 33rd District Tournament. Boone lost to district rival Conner May 2, snapping a seven-game winning streak for the Rebels, who are 15-5. It was the Rebels’ first loss to a Northern Kentucky opponent this season. “We just didn’t play well,” head coach Andy Petridis said. “We didn’t play all week because of the rain and we looked really rusty. Conner did well and they hit the ball well. They earned it.” While Conner and Ryle have dominated the 33rd in recent years, the Rebels made inroads last season, finishing as district runner-up and losing in the Ninth Region quarterfinals. The Rebels were scheduled to have all their district seeding done by press time May 8, and while they have been one of Northern Kentucky’s best teams all season, they know a bad game in the district tournament semifinals would put a premature end to their season. “We’ve been playing solid,” Petridis said. “It was a little bit of a wake-up call for us. We were getting a little ahead of ourselves and starting to look at the postseason. You have to get there first. It might be a blessing in disguise, like you talk about those college basketball teams that get a loss before the postseason and it does them good. It may be something we needed to kind of bring us back down to earth

Boone County senior Dallis Knotts bunts the ball April 24.JIM OSBORN FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

a little bit.” The Rebels run behind one of the region’s top players in senior Dallis Knotts. She has a 1.75 ERA this season and a .545 batting average. She has drove in 22 runs to rank among the regional leaders and she leads Northern Kentucky on the base paths with 14 stolen bases and 30 runs scored. Junior Caitlyn Palmer hits .507 with 21 RBI. “We’ve beaten some really good teams this year,” Petridis said. “We’ve beaten Conner and Ryle and some other really good teams in the state. We have a number of big games coming up. Overall, the season has been a good one.” Boone hosts Walton-Verona May 9. Key highlights later in the season include a showdown at defending Ninth Region champion Notre Dame May 14. NDA beat Boone 2-1 in last season’s regional tourney. Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber

Boone County’s Caitlyn Palmer is one of the team’s top hitters.FILE PHOTO

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Baseball

» Boone County beat Conner 6-5 April 30 in a 33rd District seeding game. Jeffery Purnell hit a walk-off single in the bottom of the seventh inning, and also got the win on the mound. The Rebels came from behind with two runs in the final inning. Trey Martin tied the game with a bases-loaded walk. Trey Ganns had four hits for Boone, three of them doubles. Cameron Ross led Conner with three hits. Four other Cou-

gars had two hits. » Conner senior catcher Blake Hart has committed to Transylvania, according to Conner coach Brad Arlinghaus. Hart had school-record 17game hitting streak snapped recently, but it set a school record. Through April 30, he was batting .411 with a .515 onbase percentage with six doubles, a homer and 18 RBI, and has thrown out 12 of 22 base runners this year as well. » Ryle beat Bishop Brossart 8-3 April 30. Mason Forbes had three hits including a home run and two RBI. Jake Ziegel-

meyer improved to 2-0 on the mound. » Walton-Verona beat Grant County 9-6 May 1. Garrett Lehkamp had three hits and two RBI. Daniel West also drove in two. Curtis Bramkamp pitched a complete-game shutout to help Walton-Verona shut down Lloyd 4-0 May 2. In addition to the domination on the mound, Bramkamp also drove in the first run of the game with a double to knock in Chris Latimore.

Softball

» Heritage beat Robertson County 15-2 May 2. Sixth grade center fielder

Marisa Cain went 2-for-3 with a triple, five RBI and a run scored, while Siera Berkemeierwent 2-for-4 with two RBI and two runs scored

Track and field

» St. Henry’s girls team won the Diocese of Covington meet April 29. St. Henry totaled 184 points to outdistance runner-up Newport Central Catholic (118). St. Henry’s girls received track- and meetrecord performances from Celia Eltzroth in the triple jump and Tina Felix in the pole vault. Eltzroth won the triple jump with a

leap of 35 feet, 2 1/2 inches. Felix beat sister Laura Felix’s year-old track and meet record with a vault of 8-6, bettering the previous marks by six inches. » Results from the Kentucky Track and Cross Country Coaches’ Association Area 5 Championships, which were May 3 at Dixie Heights. Boys’ team standings: Bishop Brossart 149, Dixie Heights 129, Cooper 128, Boone County 114, Conner 44, Beechwood 39, Scott 38, Bellevue 25, Newport Central Catholic 18, Pendleton County 4.5, Grant County 3, Campbell County 2.5.

Boys’ event winners: Shot Put–Brandon Johnson (Dixie Heights) 46-8 ¼; Discus–Robby Twehues (Bishop Brossart) 134-2 ¼; Long Jump–Gabe Roberts (Bishop Brossart) 20-1; Triple Jump–Drew Berkemeyer (Bishop Brossart) 41-8; High Jump–Matt Isbel (Dixie Heights) 6-2; Pole Vault–Bailey Harrison (Dixie Heights) 11-0; 3,200 Relay–Bishop Brossart 8:33.07; 1,600 Relay–Boone County 3:29.78; 800 Relay–Cooper 1:33.95; 400 Relay–Dixie Heights 45.27; 110 Hurdles–Jose See PRESS PREPS, Page A8


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River Monsters reach championship game By Adam Turer

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Can a local professional football team win a playoff game? The Northern Kentucky River Monsters earned opportunity to do just that by winning their final five regular season games, including a 36-24 win over Dayton May 3. The River Monsters clinched a berth in the CIFL South Division championship game, which will take place against the Marion Blue Racers in Marion, Ohio, on May 10. This playoff appearance was far from a given. The River Monsters weathered much

early season adversity in their debut season in the CIFL. This was a roller coaster of a season. It began with the River Monsters quarterback Jared Lorenzen, the popular High-

lands High School and University of Kentucky grad and Super Bowl champion, putting the team and the league on the map. His performance in the season opener quickly went viral. Unfortunately, he broke his leg in the second game of the season. The River Monsters had to live up to inflated expectations without their star player and leader. Several young and hungry players stepped up, led by quarterback Antonio Davis and running back Maurice Douse. “These boys have overcome so much this year and deserve to be in the championship game,” said River Monsters owner Jill Chitwood. “I am so

pleased and proud of how they have pulled together and have made such a statement with their play and we plan to make a tough run for the championship.” The team also endured an early season coaching change. Mike Goodpaster took over the reins as head coach and director of player personnel. He steadied the organization after its 2-3 start. Now, the River Monsters are just two wins away from bringing home the CIFL championship. “When I had Coach Goodpaster step up to head coach, it helped the morale with each player, the coaches and the or-

ganization,” said Chitwood. “It has been wonderful to see these players come together as well as they have after the situations at the first of the year.” The River Monsters enter the postseason playing as confident and loose as they have at any point this season. They are winning both high and low scoring games. Most importantly, they are having fun on the field. “The players are having fun doing what they love most,” said Chitwood. “When they are happy, they focus more and play harder.” Visit northernkyrivermonsters.com for more details.

Finke sets the table for Notre Dame softball success By James Weber jweber@nky.com

PARK HILLS — When Laura Finke was an eighthgrader, her Notre Dame Academy softball team won four games and played on a home field that had none of the amenities of a high school varsity field. Four years later, Finke and her teammates enjoy a top-notch home facility as they go for their second consecutive Ninth Region championship and third overall. “Our goal is to go back down to state,” said Finke, a senior. “State last year was such an amazing experience. We want to make a run for the state title.” Finke and the Pandas were 17-3 through play on May 2, with none of the losses to a Northern Kentucky team.

Laura Finke, 5, has been one of Northern Kentucky’s top hitters this season.FILE PHOTO

Finke, the team’s leadoff hitter, collected her 100th career stolen base April 16 in a 5-3 win over Highlands. In NDA’s last reported statistics, she was hitting .536 with 11 steals, 23 RBI and 26 runs scored, ranking near the top of Northern Kentucky in all those categories.

The century-mark steal came in the first inning and she eventually scored. “It’s cool, but keep the wins coming,” she said. “That’s what I care most about.” Finke is a big key to the Pandas’ offense. “She’s just a heck of a ball player,” Stephenson said. “She’s our table-setter. She works as hard as anybody out there. She’s a great example for all the younger players: Let them see how somebody practices, prepares and plays the game. She’s a great kid.” Finke is one of seven seniors on the team, counting Amanda Meagher, Kelsey Michael, Maddie Rose, Maria Schaefer, Bridget Stewart and Hanna Sullivan. Finke was one of three who were starting four years ago as eighth-graders.

Giving You A Choice. Opening UC Health’s Newest Location in Florence UC Health is excited to open our new 40,000 square feet physician office in Florence. Conveniently located off Exit 182 - Turfway Road (I-71/75 S).

Opening July 2014 (513) 475-8000

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“We’ve been playing together since eighth-grade year when we were honestly pretty bad,” Finke said. “We’ve been able to be one of the groups that has been able to bring this program up from where it was, and it has just been an amazing experience to be a part of, because not many people get that opportunity.” Said Stephenson: “They’ve been the ones who have helped turn our program around. When they were eighth-graders, I had three of them that started. This is a group who took the time and effort and played summer ball. That was a key to them, to play more year-

round. I think we had 12 girls play summer ball at different levels this year. It allows them to stay sharp and see different types of pitching.” Behind the pitching of Haylee Smith and Abby Jones, the Pandas allow only1.6 runs per game, and both hurlers have an ERA under 1.00. Smith is also one of the top hitters in the area. NDA had senior night with Beechwood May 2, having a cookout that night with its opponents as several Tigers and Pandas played summer ball together. Stephenson’s main priority is shoring up the defense as the Pandas enter a

tough homestretch. NDA was set for a showdown with regional rival Ryle May 7 after Recorder print deadlines. After that, the Pandas play at Glen Este Thursday, May 8, then at Holy Cross May 9 and at Newport Central Catholic May 12. NDA closes the regular season with two top regional contenders, hosting Boone County May 14 and Conner May 16. “That’s why we set it up the way we did,” Stephenson said. “We get to play those guys right before regionals and we get to sharpen up before those games.” Follow James Weber on Twitter, @RecorderWeber

PRESS PREP HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A7

Sanchez (Boone County) 16.08; 300 Hurdles–Jackson Stanek (Dixie Heights) 42.30; 100–Jaylen Hayden (Beechwood) 11.51; 200–Trey Simmons (Dixie Heights) 23.25; 400–Mathew Koons (Boone County) 51.18; 800–Michael Caldwell (Bishop Brossart) 1:58.00; 1,600–Mitchell Greenhalgh (Cooper) 4:34.95; 3,200–Zachary Stewart (Cooper) 9:57.77. Girls’ team standings: Ryle 184, Dixie Heights 153, Bishop Brossart 93, Notre Dame Academy 56, Boone County 54, Beechwood 54, Conner 37, Scott 28, Grant County 10, Bellevue 4. Girls’ event winners: Shot Put–Molly Diamon (Dixie Heights) 33-3; Discus–Molly Diamon (Dixie Heights) 103-9; Long Jump–Olivia Panella (Conner) 16-9; Triple Jump–Jena Doellman (Boone County) 34-10 ¼; High Jump–Jena Doellman (Boone County) 5-0; Pole Vault–Casey Springer (Ryle)10-0; 3,200 Relay–Bishop Brossart 10:30.20; 1,600 Relay–Ryle 4:20.50; 800 Relay–Dixie Heights 1:52.42; 400 Relay–Dixie Heights 51.55; 100 Hurdles–Nicole Goderwis (Bishop Brossart) 16.05; 300 Hurdles–Maddie Bloemer (Ryle) 50.61; 100–Chelsea Perdue (Dixie Heights) 12.97; 200–Nicole Goderwis (Bishop Brossart) 27.18; 400–Nicoile Goderwis (Bishop Brossart) 58.21; 800–Carly Wolnitzek (Notre Dame Academy) 2:31.94; 1,600–Alexis Flynn (Scott) 5:38.79; 3,200–Kendall Schuler (Bishop Brossart) 12:16.87.

Freedom Trail

» The 2014 Florence Freedom team hosts an intrasquad scrimmage 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May

8, then hosts an exhibition game with Frontier League foe Joliet 6:05 p.m. Saturday, May 10. The team will open the regular season at home with three games against Washington May 15-17, then after two off days, the Freedom will host Traverse City May 20-22. The Freedom announced on May1they are taking peanut shells off the entire menu every night. The Freedom are also serving a new line of allergy-friendly products in their concession stands. The Freedom, in partnership with Enjoy Life Foods, will transform UC Health Stadium into an allergy-friendly ballpark that promotes awareness and offers products to families who otherwise would have heightened concern when attending a game. Visit FlorenceFreedom.com. Tickets are available now for the 2014 season by calling (859) 594-4487.

Hall of Fame

» » Ryle inducted six new members into its athletic Hall of Fame April 29 at the Ryle SportsFest. Those inducted were: Kirsten Allen (Class of 2008 - softball and volleyball); Cory Chitwood (Class of 2007 – swimming); Vince Murray (Class of 2007 – football, baseball and basketball); Christina Steiner (Class of 2004 – volleyball and basketball) and Gary and Barbara Christian (soccer public address announcer/spotter since 1997).

Sportsmanship

» Simon Kenton’s Kaitlin Murray (Region 8), Dixie Heights’ Brittany Turner (Region 9), Boone County’s Evan O’Hara (Region 9) and

Scott’s Amber Robinson (Region 10) were among the 16 boys’ and 16 girls’ regional winners of the 2014 Forcht Bank/KHSAA CLASS (Citizenship, Leadership, Athletics, Sportsmanship, Scholarship) Awards Recognition Program. The 32 regional winners will each receive a $350 scholarship and an invitation to the awards banquet May 4. One male and one female from the pool of regional honorees will be selected as the statewide winner, with each individual receiving a $3,000 scholarship.

Tennis

» State qualifiers have been determined in several regional tournaments involving local teams. Cooper’s Jake Honschopp earned the program’s first state berth by reaching the semifinals. The Conner doubles team of Casey Garnett and Jacob Eberhard earned a second berth to state, and Ryle’s David Geis and Drake Hudak also advanced in doubles. Covington Catholic clinched the boys Region 9 team title and all its entrants earned individual berths to the state tourney. The Colonels will compete for the team championship in a separate tourney in Lexington. Austin Hussey, the region’s top seed and defending state champion, reached the semifinals, as did teammate Anthony Bosch. In doubles, representing the Colonels are C.J. Moellering/Danny Schlachter and Jacob Haught/Nathan Wichmann. The Ninth Region girls tourney was set to have its second round on Monday and state qualifiers weren’t determined until May 6 with champions decided later in the week.


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EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

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Judge-exec must be in it for the people

Dear Boone County neighbors, I’m a small business owner here in Boone County. I own Dedden Excavating and have been in business for 26 years. I know what it takes to balance a budget and to meet a payroll. I entered the race for Boone County judge-executive because I believe that we need a judge-executive that is truly in it for the people and their families. The judge-executive needs to be a person who is actually engaged with the people and understands the needs of families operating on twothirds of the pay that they were making eight years ago. We need a judge who is going to stop the out-of-control,

wasteful spending that has occurred over the last 14 years. In 1999, our reserves were $10 million. Through the economic Matt boom and up to Dedden COMMUNITY PRESS 2006, our reserves fell to GUEST COLUMNIST next to nothing. We rebounded to $8 million in 2010, and now we have a reserve over $11 million. But we need to do a better job of planning for the future without that plan being a future tax hike. County government needs to eliminate wasteful spending

Our philosophy is working in Boone County I have been working on your behalf to keep Boone County and Northern Kentucky on the right track. Boone County is a leader in our commonwealth and we are the county others are trying to emulate. Our consistent, commonsense apGary proach is Moore paying off. COMMUNITY Since the PRESS GUEST COLUMNIST economic downturn, families have had to make tough decisions and tighten their belts to make ends meet. Government is not and should not be immune from having to make tough decisions about priorities either. Under my leadership, Boone County has made those tough decisions with responsible spending cuts. We have reduced the county full-time workforce by over 12 percent and reduced per capita spending. We have also completed major projects like Aero Parkway under budget and ahead of schedule. As a result of this strong performance, we now have one of the best bond ratings of any city or county in Kentucky. All the more remarkable is the response citizens of Boone County have had in response to this new approach. A recent Citizen Satisfaction Survey commissioned by the county found that Boone County residents “are increasingly satisfied with the level and quality of services provided” and services satisfaction “measures still indicate strong satisfaction ratings with all services provided.” The survey concluded, “Boone County survey respondents indicate that services have not deteriorated during this period, but in most if not all areas, have

excelled.” We are the second healthiest county and Burlington was recently named one of top five communities to live in the state. We are doing more with less! Government doesn’t create jobs, the private sector does. I realize this basic fact and we have worked to assure that Boone County government helps to foster and create the conditions where businesses can grow and prosper. We lowered our real property tax rate to 6 percent lower and I have never applied a new tax. We actually eliminated a tax on aircraft at CVG to attract new jobs. To sum it up, our philosophy is working. Despite this rough national economy, 82 new and existing companies have created over 9,000 new, good-paying jobs since 2008. For the last two months, Boone County has had the lowest unemployment rate in the state. In 1990 our county’s population was 57,000 and has since grown to over 125,000 today. Companies and families are choosing Boone County because they are finding what we know, it’s a great place. With Toyota’s recent announcement, it will take this kind of strong leadership to succeed. I take seriously this solemn commitment of serving you, the citizens of Boone County. Whether I am in commission meetings, working with civic and business leaders, or listening to a constituent’s concerns, my objective is to make Boone County and Northern Kentucky a great place to live, work and raise a family. We have accomplished so much, but there is more to be done. I ask for your vote on May 20.

and build our reserves, so that we can lower taxes. We don’t need the smoke and mirrors of adjusting the compensating rates. No one I know has ever paid lower taxes in Boone County. As county commissioner, I’ve stood up for families and taxpayers. As judge-executive, I’ll put an end to wasteful spending, while still delivering the highest quality services to our citizens. I will be a judge-executive who will be involved in creating a solid plan, with goals, that is presented to the Fiscal Court and not rely on administration and department heads to do it alone. As judge-executive, I’ll work with the Fiscal Court to

foster an environment where small business owners can create good paying jobs. Right now, we offer all of the large companies in Boone County tax incentives, but not one is in place for the small business owner. In today’s financial climate, small businesses are leading the way by offering higher paying jobs and they need incentives to encourage growth. I will help create the environment for business to succeed. We need a judge-executive who is 100 percent invested in Boone County. One who owns property and pays taxes. I know that I am the candidate that fits that bill. I will be fully engaged with

our institutions and businesses to make Boone County “open for business.” As judge-executive, I plan to be personally involved with the airport board to ensure growth and the possibility of major incentives for the next big airline at CVG. I’m asking for your vote for judge-executive on May 20 so that together, we can make Boone County the best place to live, work, and raise a family in Kentucky. To learn more about my campaign, please visit my website at www.dedden4boone.com.

Boone County Commissioner Matt Dedden is a Republican candidate for judge-executive in the May 20 primary.

Heroin caught in web of politics We know too well the human tragedy of addiction raging through Boone County and our Northern Kentucky communities. Kentuckians have an addiction to opioids; pills like Opana and OxyCotin. But heroin is our deadly opioid, and Northern Kentucky is at the forefront. I have met with families Addia in the trenchWuchner COMMUNITY PRESS es of the heroin battle. GUEST COLUMNIST Fighting the demons that were chancing their child, parents and family members are fighting for answers and treatment options. They feel alone and isolated. Many battle-scarred families share their journey, the initial denial and feelings of isolation, anger and humiliation. Asking themselves, “Heroin? Why heroin? That’s a back alley drug of years past?” Before the 2014 legislative session began, I stood at a press conference along with Northern Kentucky families as Sen. Stine and Attorney General Conway unveiled legislation aimed at curbing the rising scourge of heroin in Kentucky. Senate Bill 5 was a threepronged approach and included education, treatment and intervention, along with tougher penalties for those

caught trafficking the drug in our state. Traffickers could be charged with homicide in cases of overdose deaths. But as the gavel fell at midnight on April 15 and the 2014 session rolled into the pages of history, all hope SB 5’s passage were silenced. “What happened?” you ask. Politics. SB 5 passed the Senate on Jan. 16. But then SB 5 sat in the House Judiciary Committee for two months with no action taken – politics. SB 5 finally passed out of the House Judiciary Committee in late March, just before we left Frankfort for veto period. On the last day of the 2014 session, in the last half hour of session, Senate Bill 5 grossly loaded with over 24 amendments was called to the floor for a vote. One legislator, also a criminal defense attorney, strapped on amendments that would gut the bill of its “tough on trafficking” provisions. One amendment even pertained to the Brent Spence Bridge. Politics. At midnight, the clock ran out. As the gavel fell and session ended, I walked out the door that evening with a heavy heart. Angry and frustrated. My friends, Kentucky must be as tough, if not tougher, on drug traffickers than surrounding states, like Ohio. Our laws and penalties must demonstrate, “We do not want you doing business

in Kentucky.” Also, we need treatment options. Since home from Frankfort, I have visited with families who have lost loved ones, and spent time at Children’s Hospital NICU visiting babies born addicted. Walking door to door speaking with those I serve, all agree, Kentucky cannot wait until next January. Those who know me personally or read my columns from Frankfort know that I am generally opposed to special sessions. But House leadership failed, and played political games with SB 5. Defense attorneys, who make a living defending drug dealers, bogged the bill down effectively killing it. I make one plea to each of you. Join with us in asking that leadership work out the differences on the original provisions of the Anti Heroin and Treatment Bill and when done, have the governor call us back. I make this commitment along with my colleague Rep. Fischer, if called back into session – we pledge our legislative session pay for the week to a Northern Kentucky heroin and drug treatment program. Tougher laws will close our borders to traffickers and intervention and treatment will save lives and futures.

State Rep. Addia Wuchner (R) represents the 66th House District. You can reach her at PO Box 911, Burlington, KY, 41005, or call her at 859-525-6698.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR On Saturday, May 3, our small group of youth and parents participated in the Boone County Trash for Cash Program. We were highly motivated to do this job and to do it well. Much of the trash we collected was recyclables like water bottles and paper. A bet-

ter place for those items would have been in a recycle bin instead of tossed onto the street. We have a littering problem along our roadways. This should be a concern to all of us. The money raised will be used to support ongoing conservation efforts in the Mayan Forest Region through Opera-

tion Wallacea. It is a good feeling to know that the service we provided to our friends and neighbors in Boone County is not only beneficial to all of us here, but will have a positive impact in another part of the world.

Laura Watson and team Boone County

Incumbent Boone County Judge-executive Gary Moore is seeking the Republican nomination for re-election in the May 20 primary.

BOONE

COUNTY RECORDER

A publication of

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Boone County Recorder Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


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COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

ANNUAL DRIVE SUPPORTS NKY FOOD PANTRIES

Postal service program yielded 25,000 lbs. of nonperishable products in ’13 By Stephanie Salmons and Amy Scalf ssalmons@communitypress.com, ascalf@communitypress.com

Putting a bag of nonperishable foods by the mailbox on Saturday, May 10, can help feed a struggling family or a senior on a limited income during the summer months. The U.S. Postal Service Food Drive takes place on the second Saturday in May, but food pantries across Northern Kentucky rely on regular donations in order to feed hungry people throughout the year. According to a release from the USPS, around 50 million people face hunger every day in America, including nearly 17 million children. The postal service food drive brought in 25,000 pounds of nonperishable products in Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties in 2013, 7,500 pounds of which went to stock the Pantry of Hope in Highland Heights. Brandy Medaugh started a Christmas program in December 2007, which grew into the Pantry of Hope at First Baptist Church of Highland Heights, 2315 Alexandria Pike, which offers food, clothing, infant needs, household goods and toiletries from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday. In 2008, the pantry helped 125 families, and by 2013, Medaugh and fellow volunteer Stella Worley provided goods to more than 2,300 families throughout the year. Although they‘re only open to serve the public four hours a week, nearly 400 individuals and families will come through the Pantry of Hope during each month, and the number of visitors rises through the summertime. “We do get more families with children during the summer, but we get a lot of seniors through here all year long,” said Worley. Canned dinners and instant noodles are much-needed nonperishable staples, but Medaugh encourages donors to send more nutritious foods, such as canned meats, canned tuna and breakfast cereals. Canned fruits and vegetables are always needed. “Teens who are home alone during the day can fix themselves a can of Spaghettios, or hot dogs and macaroni and cheese,” she said. “Taco dinner kits are popular, because they’re different, and we can sometimes get a pound of meat to go with it.” Morley said frozen dinners are also easy to prepare. Pantry of Hope has a freezer for hot dogs or microwavable dinners, but not all pantries do.

THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Volunteers Stella Worley and Brandy Medaugh run Pantry of Hope at First Baptist Church of Highland Heights, serving residents from all over Northern Kentucky. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

FOOD PANTRIES IN OUR AREA Boone County

Hebron Baptist Church, Abundant Life Ministry: 3435 Limaburg Road, Hebron; 859-689-7282; serves food in Boone County. Impact Storehouse: 8145 Connector Drive, Florence, 859-446-3434, serves Boone, Campbell, Kenton; food, seasonal, holiday. Master Provisions: 7725 Foundation Drive, Florence: 859-474-0467; serves Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Grant, Hamilton, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton; clothing, education, food, personal care. Vineyard Christian Church: 7101 Pleasant Valley Road, Florence; 859-689-0777; serves food in Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen, Pendleton.

Campbell County

Brighton Center Inc.: 741 Central Ave., Newport; 859-491-8303, ext. 2300; serves Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen, Pendleton; clothing, education, financial assistance, health care, personal care; seasonal. Care Mission: 11093 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria; 859-635-4500; serves Boone, Butler, Campbell, Clermont, Gallatin, Grant, Hamilton, Kenton, Pendleton; clothing, food, health care, personal care, household. Hosea House: 901 York St., Newport; 859-261-5857; serves Boone, Campbell, Grant, Hamilton, Kenton; clothing, financial assistance, food, personal care; seasonal. Pantry of Hope: 2315 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights; 859-441-7274; serves Boone, Butler, Campbell, Carroll, Clermont, Gallatin, Grant, Hamilton, Kenton, Owen, Pendleton and Warren; clothing, food, household, personal care; seasonal.

“The most important thing is, that when you donate, check the expiration dates,” said Medaugh. “I can’t serve it if it’s past the expiration date.” Some of the other big nonperishable needs include toothpaste, feminine products and toilet paper. At Pantry of Hope, they don’t

St. Bernard Food Pantry: 401 Berry St., Dayton; 859291-4393; serves Campbell; food, personal care; seasonal. St. John United Church of Christ: Bellevue: 520 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue; 859-261-2066; serves Campbell; financial assistance; food St. John’s Church: 415 Park Ave., Newport, 859-4311818; serves Bellevue, Dayton and Newport residents; financial assistance and food. St. Paul’s Church Food Pantry: 7 Court Place, Newport; 859-581-7640; serves Campbell; food, health care, personal care; seasonal.

Kenton County

Be Concerned Inc.: 714 Washington St., Covington; 859-291-6789; serves Boone, Campbell and Kenton; clothing, food, personal care, seasonal, holiday, household. Independence Christian Church: 5221 Madison Pike, Independence; 859-356-3525; serves Boone, Campbell, Kenton; food. Rose Garden Home Mission: 2040 Madison Ave., Covington; 859-491-7673; serves Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Kenton; clothing, education, food, health care, seasonal. Society of St. Vincent DePaul: 2655 Crescent Springs Ave., Covington, 859-341-3219; serves Boone, Campbell, Kenton, Pendleton; clothing, financial assistance, food, household, seasonal. St. Augustine Parish: 2523 Todd Court, Covington; 859-491-4584; serves Kenton; clothing, financial assistance, food, health care, household, personal care, seasonal, transportation. United Christian Volunteers: 15 Kenton St., Elsmere; 859-727-4417; serves 41018 zip code only; clothing, financial assistance, food, health care, household, personal care, seasonal.

ask for income or residency information, just what can they do to help. Families in need can visit one time each month. The Abundant Life ministry at Hebron Baptist Church has been in operation a little more than two years, organizer Gale Lawson said. They distribute on the third

Thursday of every month in the lobby of the church, located at 3435 Limaburg Road, Hebron. They typically help between 30 and 35 families “and sometimes more than that,” she said. Those who receive assistance must live in Boone County. Applications are available at the church.

Paid for by Tony Jones for Commissioner

Lawson said during the summer, they’ll ask in the church bulletin for donations needed for children “not getting the food as if they were in school.” While the ministry doesn’t yet have a plan in place for the summer months, Lawson said there are items the food pantry almost always needs, like peanut butter and jelly, cereal, tuna and spaghetti. In the summer, they try to have sandwiches, she said. At Independence Christian Church, 5221 Madison Pike, where the food pantry has operated for nearly seven years, coordinator Susan Lynch said they’ve had to cut back to serving families only once every two months, because their supplies were so low. Independence Christian opens their pantry each Friday night from 6 to 7 p.m. for residents of Independence and southern Kenton County. To donate to the food pantry, visit during serving hours or call the church office at 859-3563525. “We really don’t see a difference because we serve once every two months. I don’t think I’ve seen a difference between the summer and winter months,” said Lynch. “We see them pretty much year-round. A lot of our families are older adults, two-person families, so it won’t make a difference between the seasons.” She said cereals, canned meats and canned fruits are always in need, along with peanut butter. When other church members decided to start a food pantry, Lynch said she didn’t think they would find support or local families in need. “Seven years later, and we’re still doing it and still serving,” she said. “That need is there everywhere. You just don’t realize it.”

ELECT

JONES

TONY CE-0000592879

Pantry of Hope director Brandy Medaugh reminded Highland Heights City Council members of the Postal Carriers Food Drive on Saturday, May 10. AMY SCALF/

COMMISSIONER

Paid for byy Tony Ton JJones for Commissione Commissioner er


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SATURDAY, MAY 10

Art & Craft Classes

Art Exhibits

Pinterest Party, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Make a Summer Deco Mesh Wreath. Ages 18 and up. $30. Registration required. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, noon- 3 p.m., The Carnegie, 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Little Learners, 10 a.m.-noon, The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, $10. Registration required. Through May 30. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Sombo/Russian Judo, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Hebron Lutheran Church, 3140 Limaburg Road, Downstairs. Ages 6-adult. Learn Russian art of self-defense and how to fall properly to prevent injury. $85 per year. Presented by Sombo Joe. 859-609-8008. Hebron.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit with series of lectures, panel discussions and other special events. Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Literary - Libraries Meet Your Match Trivia, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Mahjong, 1 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, All skill levels welcome. 859-3422665. Union.

On Stage - Comedy Loni Love, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, 1 Levee Way, $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Steel Magnolias, 8 p.m., Fort Thomas Woman’s Club, 8 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Written by Robert Harling and directed by Amy Hamilton. $15. Presented by Village Players. Through May 10. 859-392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas. 9 to 5: The Musical, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St. Three female co-workers concoct a plan to get even with the sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot they call their boss. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through May 17. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Parenting Classes Relatives Raising Relatives, noon-1 p.m., Kenton County Cooperative Extension Service Durr Annex, 3099 Dixie Highway, Luncheon to provide you opportunity to ask questions about resources to help you. Free. Presented by Kenton County Cooperative Extension Service Durr Annex. 859-3563155; kenton.ca.uky.edu. Edgewood.

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THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

FRIDAY, MAY 9

Education

PubDate: 05-08-2014

Benefits The Mane Event, 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Milestones Equestrian Achievement Program, 12372 Riggs Road. Student riding demonstrations, dinner by the bite, silent auction, raffles, music by Top of the World Productions. Benefits Milestones Equestrian Achievement Program. $20. 859-694-7669; www.milestonesinc.org. Independence.

Cooking Classes Sushi Rolling and Dining, 7 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 130 W. Pike St., $25 per person, three rolls, includes training and BYOB, reservations required. Reservations required. 513-3350297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8:15 a.m.-9:15 a.m. 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Festivals Spring Fest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Kinman Farms, 4175 Burlington Pike, Pony rides, hayrides, petting zoo, face painting and Kiddie Train Ride. Free. 859689-2682; www.kinmanfarms.com. Boone County.

Garden Shows Open House, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Ammon Nursery, 6089 Camp Ernst Road, Largest nursery in Northern Kentucky. See what’s new at the nursery and try hayride tours. Free. 859-5866246; www.ammonplants.com. Burlington.

Karaoke and Open Mic Karaoke, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m., Southgate VFW, 6 Electric Ave., With DJ Ted McCracken. Free. Presented by VFW Post 3186. 859-441-9857. Southgate.

Music - Classical Williams’ Wondrous World: The Magic of John Williams, 8 p.m., Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion, 642 Mt. Zion, Kentucky Symphony Orchestra highlights legendary composer-conductor’s ascent from TV through his 40-year association with Steven Spielberg. $19-$35. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 859-431-6216; www.kyso.org. Florence.

Music - Jazz Karl Dappen on Sax, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra presents “Williams’ Wondrous World: The Magic of John Williams,” 8 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Florence Baptist Church at Mt. Zion, 642 Mt. Zion. $19-$35. 859-431-6216; www.kyso.org. FILE On Stage - Comedy Loni Love, 7:30 p.m. 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Steel Magnolias, 8 p.m., Fort Thomas Woman’s Club, $15. 859-392-0500; www.villageplayers.biz. Fort Thomas. 9 to 5: The Musical, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Boone County Community Activities Fair, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Community organizations on hand to tell what they have to offer. Music, games, balloon animals, bounce houses, golf-swing training, health screenings, vision screenings, child ID kits, police cruisers, K-9 unit, free popcorn and drinks and more. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Tours Newport Gangster Tour, 5 p.m.-7 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Tour of historic sites. See buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. Explore Newport’s connections to some of most well-known crime figures. Discover how little town gave birth to modern day gaming industry. $20. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859491-8900; www.americanlegacytours.com. Newport.

SUNDAY, MAY 11 Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. 4 p.m.-5 p.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Festivals Spring Fest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Kinman Farms, Free. 859-6892682; www.kinmanfarms.com. Boone County.

Holiday - Mother’s Day Mother’s Day Celebration, noon-6 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Mom gets complimentary flower/plant, lunch and dinner specials all day, music 3-6 p.m. and Mom gets free entry to petting zoo. Free. 859-384-6617; www.janessaddlebag.com. Union.

Karaoke and Open Mic

The Mane Event is 6-9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at 12372 Riggs Road in Independence. The Milestones Equestrian Achievement Program includes student-riding demonstrations, dinner by-the-bite, silent auction, raffles and music by Top of the World Productions. Benefits Milestones Equestrian Achievement Program. $20. 859-694-7669; www.milestonesinc.org. FILE

Karaoke, 9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., With DJ Will Corson. $10 buckets and $4 grape and cherry bombs. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington. DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-4313455; www.facebook.com/ millers.fillin. Bellevue.

Literary - Libraries Experience Folk Music, 2 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899

6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to kynews@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

U.S. 42, Original songs and classic tunes by Jamon Zeiler. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

Music - Big Band Jammin’ at Jane’s, 3 p.m.-6 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Free. 859-384-6617; www.janessaddlebag.com. Union.

Music - Concerts Cincinnati May Festival, 8 p.m. This year these ensembles will perform works by American composers including Copland, Dawson, Dett, Hogan, Moore, Jake Runestad, Thomson and Eric Whitacre., Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption, 1140 Madison Ave., $35. Reservations required. Presented by Cincinnati May Festival. 513381-3300; www.mayfestival.com. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Loni Love, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $17-$20. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater 9 to 5: The Musical, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Bingo, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., Southgate VFW, 6 Electric Ave., Early games start at 6 p.m., regular games at 7 p.m. Free. Presented by VFW Post 3186. Through July 20. 859-441-9857. Southgate.

MONDAY, MAY 12 Art Exhibits Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Carnegie, 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Civic Tea Party Meeting, 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. Through Dec. 29. 859-5869207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

Dance Classes Square Dance Lessons, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Casual dress and smooth-soled shoes. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 859-441-9155; www.sonksdf.com. Covington. Cardio Dance Party Dance Fitness Class, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., The Ritz Ballroom Dance Studio, 8150 Mall Road, Variety of dance styles, including jazz, hip-hop, Latin, jive and more danced to popular music. Ages 18 and up. $7-$12. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-6179498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Florence.

Education

Little Learners, 10 a.m.-noon, The Lively Learning Lab, $10. Registration required. 859-3715227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8:15 a.m.-9:15 a.m. 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. 4:45 p.m.-5:45 p.m. 6 p.m.-7 p.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood. Lean and Mean Circuit Class, 5:30 a.m.-6:30 a.m. 7 a.m.-8 a.m., Yolo Fitness, $15. 859-4292225. Park Hills. Zumba, 6 p.m., Walton Branch Library, 21 S. Main St., Latininspired, calorie-burning workout. $5. 513-505-8263. Walton.

Literary - Libraries Pajama Party, 6:30 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Florence. Microsoft Word II, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn to create a resume, flyer and more. Must have previously taken Microsoft Word I. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yoga, 6:15 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Class suitable for all levels. 859-342-2665. Union. Gentle Yoga, 6 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Learn basic postures and flows. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Yoga, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Hatha Yoga postures. $25. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. Zumba, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Latininspired dance-fitness program. $25 per month. 859-3342117. Union. Teen Gaming (middle & high school), 3:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Gaming and snacks. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Hebron. Spotlight on Genealogy: Exploring DNA Basics, 7 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Explore cost breakdowns, sample results and brief history of genetic genealogy. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington. College Scholarships: Show Me the Money, 7 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, College expert Dan Bisig shares strategies to help get your student in best position to get scholarship dollars. Free. 859-342-2665. Union.

TUESDAY, MAY 13 Art Exhibits Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Carnegie, 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Cooking Classes CWELL: Cook, Walk, Eat, Learn, Laugh, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m., Boone County Extension Environmental and Nature Center, 9101 Camp Ernst Road, Practice outdoor cooking, then enjoy walk and what you prepared. Dress for walking and weather. Ages 21 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. Through May 20. 859-586-6101. Union.

Dining Events Family Night, 6 p.m.-9 p.m., Hofbrauhaus, 200 E. Third St., Ages 12 and under eat free when adult entree is purchased. Face painting, balloon animals, contests and more. 859-491-7200; www.hofbrauhausnewport.com. Newport.

Education Sign Language, 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m., The Lively Learning Lab, 7500 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 10, Learn conversational sign language. $10. 859-371-5227. Florence.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. 4:45 p.m.-5:45 p.m. 6 p.m.-7 p.m., Edgewood Jazzercise Center, $38 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Edgewood. Lean and Mean Circuit Class, 7 a.m.-8 a.m., Yolo Fitness, $15. 859-429-2225. Park Hills.

Exhibits Vietnam: Our Story, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Free for veterans from all eras and all current military personnel, $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Literary - Libraries Bridge, 12:30 p.m.-3 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Union. Chapter and Verse, 7 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, 859-342-2665. Union. Blast Off, 6:30 p.m., Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Make balloon rockets and hovercrafts. Free. Registration recommended. 859342-2665. Hebron.

Music - Acoustic Roger Drawdy, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Irish music. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Music - Blues Open Jam, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-4313455; www.facebook.com/ Millersfillinn. Bellevue.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14

Music - Bluegrass

Art Exhibits

Bluegrass Jam Session, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., All bluegrass pickers invited to participate. Free. 859-491-

Recognized: Contemporary Portraiture, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Carnegie, 859-491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.


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LIFE

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MAY 8, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B3

Offer mom Rita’s treats for Mother’s Day My Mom, Mary Nader, really did follow the beat of a different drummer. Mom was traditional in many ways except when it came to clothes. She was the first on our block to wear petal pushers (we call them Capris now). Not so much because they were fashionable, but because they were comfortable. I’m a little bit like my Mom in that respect. I like being fashionable, but comfort trumps fashion every time. Luckily, with the assortment of clothing today, I can be both. When it came to food, Mom was “out there”, as well. We ate squid when it was just called squid, not Calamari and we ate whatever was in season. Her meager budget demanded it. She had the Mediterranean diet down pat, and as a mother myself, I appreciate more and more all the wisdom she imparted. I’ve learned that one can be a Mom without ever bearing children. My sister, Judy, is a good example of this. She has been like a Mom to our nieces and nephews. So

Rita Heikenfeld

for all the Moms out there, biological or otherwise, the happiest of Mother’s Day to you!

RITA’S KITCHEN

Pastry shop Pavlova/Meringues

Now this would be an elegant, yet fairly easy, dessert for Mom. 8 extra large egg whites, room temperature 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 cups granulated sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla Preheat oven to 175200. Line baking sheets with parchment. Beat egg whites, using low speed until whites are loose and foamy. Add cream of tartar and salt and increase speed to medium. Beat until whites stand in soft but frothy peaks. Turn to high and add sugar, about 2 tablespoons at a time, beating for 5 seconds

after each addition. This assures sugars dissolves and meringues come out crispy, not too chewy. The meringue will be shiny and will fall into firm peaks when beater is lifted. Place meringue into a pastry bag with star or plain tip and draw a circle, starting from middle out. This will be your base. You can make the circle as big as you like. Then build up sides, about 3 layers. Or just plop a large dollop of meringue onto parchment and then take a spoon to hollow out center, making sure you still have a nice coating of meringue on the bottom in center. Bake 2 hours, or until meringues are dry and crisp throughout. Pull from parchment paper and store up to two weeks in airtight containers. Fill with whipped cream and fresh fruit. You can also fill with lemon curd, pudding, whatever. Makes two large Pavlovas or 2-3 dozen small ones.

Rita Heikenfeld’s pavlova/meringue shells filled can be a treat for Mother’s Day. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Jack’s chocolate covered strawberries for Mom

Good for you:

My grandson, Jack, invited me to read to his second grade class at Guardian Angels’ school. “If you like, bring in a treat”, his mom, Jessie, said. The only thing I had on hand was strawberries and chocolate, so I made chocolate dipped strawberries. Talk about a hit. The kids wanted to know how to make them. I told them I’d publish the recipe for them to make, and here it is. Easy enough for Jack and other little hands to make for Mom. 1 pound strawberries with stems 12 oz. favorite chocolate morsels Rinse, but do not hull berries. Drain and pat completely dry. Melt chocolate and remove from heat while you still see some lumps. Stir until smooth. Holding berries by stem, dip 3/4 way up. Set on sprayed pan or parchment paper. Put in frig, uncovered, to set. Store, covered, in frig for a day.

Make these with dark chocolate for anti-oxidant qualities. Strawberries are good bone builders and good for immune systems, plus they contain lots of fiber. Readers want to know: Cutlery - stamped vs. forged. I will be devoting a column on this subject, but in the meantime, check out my UTube video on cutlery at Abouteating.com. Really good information there.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at columns @communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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Does Your Heart Have Rhythm? Learn about the latest treatment options for heart rhythm disorders. Join us for an informative free seminar on arrhythmia. Experts from St. Elizabeth and Mayo Clinic will tell you about the important correlation between arrhythmia and stroke and how it can impact you. 7 p.m. - Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Northern Kentucky University METS Center 3681 Olympic Blvd., Erlanger, KY 41018 Light refreshments will be served. The seminar is free, but space is limited. Call 859-301-WELL (9355) or visit stelizabeth.com/arrhythmia to register by May 9th.

Thomas P. Carrigan, MD Cardiac Electrophysiologist St. Elizabeth Heart & Vascular Institute

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LIFE

B4 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

Howard Ain warns about fake IRS calls Although they don’t sound very professional, callers from overseas are upsetting a lot of area people by claiming they are with the Internal Revenue Service and threatening them with jail time for unpaid taxes. The IRS says this crime is continuing nationwide even though the tax deadline has passed. A woman in Bethel wrote me saying she’s been “receiving several

BAPTIST

HEBRON BAPTIST CHURCH

3435 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048 (corner of Cougar Path & North Bend Rd.)

9:30 AM Morning Worship & Adult Sunday School 11:00 AM Morning Worship & Sunday School 6:00 PM Evening Worship 6:45 PM Wednesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study Youth & Children’s Activities

859-689-7282

http://www.hebronbaptist.org

LUTHERAN Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS) 9066 Gunpowder Rd. Florence, KY

(Between US 42 & Mt Zion Rd., Florence)

746-9066 Pastor Rich Tursic Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00 Sunday School - All ages 9:45 AM www.goodshepherdlutheranky.org

phone calls a day from someone wanting to speak to my husband. The one time that I anHoward swered a Ain foreign HEY HOWARD! sounding man asked if I was Tom. When I said no he said he had the wrong number and hung up. Since then I have ignored the calls and today he left three messages on our voicemail saying he was with the IRS and threatening us if we did not respond.” I listened to one of those voicemails and the caller said, “I am informing you that we’re starting a tax fraud case against you.” Clearly, it is enough to scare anyone

Vacation Bible School 9 - noon June 7

Register at: Mainstreetbaptist churchvbs@gmail.com or call 859-620-6221 Church located across from the Florence Post Office on Main Street. CE-0000593728

but the woman said, “I know I am smart enough to not get upset or believe this stuff but I see too many times on the news senior citizens falling for this stuff.” In leaving the voicemail message the caller also left a phone number to call back. I checked that number on the internet and found lots of other people have received these same calls from a man threatening them with arrest for tax fraud. I too received one of these calls from a foreign sounding man who claimed an arrest warrant had been issued for my wife for unpaid taxes. I said, “Fine, I’m turning on my recorder so I am sure to get everything correctly.” He very quickly hung up. The IRS says its received reports of these callers being particularly aggressive in the past few months. It says, “Immigrants are frequently targeted. Potential victims are threatened with deportation, arrest, having their utilities shut off, or having their driver’s licenses revoked. Callers are frequently insulting or hostile – apparently to scare their potential victims.” After threatening victims sometimes the scammers hang up and then have others call back

pretending to be from the local police or Department of Motor Vehicles. They can even spoof the caller ID on your phone to make it appear they’re calling from the IRS, the police or the BMV. The IRS says if you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, and you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think you owe taxes, then report the call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 800-366-4484. If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe taxes, call the IRS directly at 800-829-1040. The IRS employees at that line can help with a payment issue – if there really is such an issue. Incidentally, the IRS says it never initiates contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. It never sends text messages or uses social media channels. It will never ask for PINs, passwords or similar confidential access information for credit card, bank or other financial accounts. Howard Ain's column appears biweekly in the Community Press newspapers. He appears regularly as the Troubleshooter on WKRC-TV Local 12 News. Email him at heyhoward@local12.com.

The Porters, Littrells, Lambers and Hendrix families traveled to Mexico with their Boone County Recorder. THANKS TO ERIC HENDRIX

Readers on vacation return from Mexico Boone County Recorder accompanies traveling families Community Recorder

The Porters, Littrells, Lambers and Hendrix families traveled to Mexico with their Boone County Recorder. The Hebron residents, mostly from North Pointe subdivision, just returned from a Norwegian cruise to the western Caribbean. They visited Cozumel, Belize and Costa Maya, Mexico. Are you going on vacation? Pack your Community Press & Recorder paper along with your snorkel and suntan lotion. Then include the newspaper in a travel photo – along with your family – on your next trip. Send your digital “Readers on Vacation” photo to Nancy Daly at ndaly@communitypress. com. Make sure to include everybody’s name, a little bit about what’s happening in the photo and – of course – where you’re on vacation. While we prefer digital photos, you can also mail print photos to Readers on Vacation, care of Nancy Daly, Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Carnegie celebrates Carmon DeLeone’s musical influences

Are you a contractor? Please submit your bids!

Looking for HVAC, Plumbing, Weatherization, Roofing, and Others! Call Us Immediately! The NKCAC Weatherization program is seeking Weatherization Private Contractors for Heat Systems and Hot Water repairs or replacements and Energy Conservation installation. Applicants must have proficient carpentry and energy conservation material skills, and/or HVAC and Plumbing Licensure as well as communication skills with clients. Applicants must comply with current codebooks and State Weatherization manuals.. Must be willing to travel and work throughout an 8 county designated service area in Northern Kentucky. Certificates of Insurance for General Liability and Comprehensive Coverage should meet minimum $800,000. Master HVAC minimum Certificates of Insurance required in amount of $500,000 for general liability and $300,000 for property damage. An orientation meeting is mandatory and can be scheduled upon receipt of application.

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Application packets can be obtained on our website or by calling (859)-795-2353 www.nkcac.org

Immaculate Heart of Mary School Openings in grades 1-8

IHM SAIN S

Call for a tour 859-689-4303

BE A SAINT!!!

CE-0000594442

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The Carnegie in Concert season continues with the celebration of Carmon DeLeone’s half century of musical influence and achievement. Celebrate a semicentennial of concerts under the baton of DeLeone as he and his Middletown Symphony Orchestra bring to life an evening of music theater at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 22, at the Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Featured performances include “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Funny Girl” and “Man of La Mancha.” Joining DeLeone will be Tony Award nominee, decorated Broadway veteran and Covington native Lee Roy Reams. DeLeone is best known for his role as music director for the Cincinnati Ballet, Middletown Symphony and conductor laureate of the Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra. His talents as composer, conductor and director are benefactors of his wide range of musical interests. He is experienced in both the classics and jazz. Tickets for “Birdie to Brice: 50 Years of Carmon DeLeone” are $25; $22 for Carnegie members, WVXU Perks and Enjoy the Arts members and students. Tickets can be purchased through The Carnegie Box Office, open Tuesday through Friday noon-5 p.m., in person or by phone at 859-957-1940. Tickets are also available online at www.thecarn egie.com.


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LIFE

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MAY 8, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B5

Extension service Cavalcade offers show on the go marks 100th with an activities fair Community Recorder

The newly organized Walton Lions Club meets monthly. Its next meeting will be May 13 at Denny’s. President Dr. Tyler Hudson and the club are working on some fundraising projects. The Lions are recognized as community oriented with their service. If you would like to learn more about the organization, you might want to visit their meeting or call Dr. Hudson or Sarah at 859485-3937. The Walton Ruth Verona Meadows AgriculWALTON NEWS ture Department and the FFA are holding their annual Spring Greenhouse Plant Sale. They are open 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. They have some nice plants at good prices. Boone County Cooperative Extension will celebrate its 100th anniversary on May 10 at the Boone County Community Activities Fair. This will take place at the Boone County Farmers Market and will feature not only the celebration booth but displays and information from other groups and organizations in the county. The celebration will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ryan McGee of Alta Vista was a victim of the fierce winds we experienced this past week. A tree in his front yard was blown down and damaged the front of his home. Ryan was trying to work on the situation and was hit by a limb.

He had a head wound that required several stitches, but is doing OK. WaNa Club met at my home on Thursday night. Our program was a book review by Joella Flynn. Joella presented a very interesting history account of the early 1900s of Boone County through the memoirs of her aunt, Betty Jo Weaver. Aunt Betty was the author of “White Kittens and Four Leaf Clovers.” This writing included so many customs and ways of living different from our present. Joella had brought along pictures of her family, cherished gifts she received and paintings of Aunt Betty. Four guests, Bev Rouse, Wyona Whaley, Janice Whaley and Peggy Peebles, along with our members enjoyed a most enjoyable evening. Lee Ann Gibson and Peggy Peebles had lunch at Florence Cheddar’s, the occasion being Lee Ann’s birthday. Don’t forget to mark your calendars for the Walton-Verona High School Banquet for June 7. For info and reservations, call Joella Flynn 859-485-7271. The Crittenden Alumni Banquet is May 17 starting at 4 p.m. with a social hour and banquet at 5 p.m. For info and reservations you may call Julian Wills at 859-824-5772 or Ruth Meadows at 859485-7271. All former students and friends are welcome. Belated happy birthday to Helen Rich on May 1. Happy anniversary to Ray and Deloris Cheesman on May 11.

Ruth Meadows writes a column about Walton. Feel free to call her at 859-391-7282 with Walton neighborhood news items.

The Cavalcade of Homes has created a new digital experience to help visitors and onlookers experience all the event has to offer. The Cavalcade of Homes runs the first three weekends of May from noon until 5 p.m. The free event features 13 homes in Northern Kentucky and is the region’s largest scattered site new home show. What the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky bills as the “show-on-the-go” provides details of the Cavalcade of Homes, home listings and descriptions driving directions “We are excited for our association to provide Cavalcade of Homes enthusiasts a leap into the 21st century,” said Brian Miller, executive vice president of the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky. “With the tap of a finger you can call the builders, or send them a message. With the ‘my tour’ feature you can add the homes you wish to visit and easily navigate between them as you attend the event. As photos continue to pour in we are adding them to photo galleries which can be seen on our website and the mobile experience,” Miller said. The HBA has included a searchable directory of all member professionals.

This four-bedroom home on Griststone Circle in Independence is one of 13 homes in Cavalcade of Homes, the region’s largest scattered site new home show. Home info: Single family home 3572 sq. ft. 4 bedrooms 31⁄2 baths $389,900 This Arlinghaus home is at 10958 Griststone Circle, Independence, KY 41051 PROVIDED

“This helps the public to find the professional that is right for their job if that is a new home, a remodel, or any thing else homes, garden or business related. It’s a mobile one-stop shop and is a great way to reach out to whatever your home or business needs,” Miller said. “In our technologically mobile world we wanted to be ahead of the curve and deliver an outstanding tool for our community and we believe we have done just that.” Cavalcade of Homes is sponsored by Cullen Brothers, Adam Miller Homes, LLC and Toebben Builders.

Relaxation with IV sedation If fear is keeping you from normal, routine dental visits sedation dentistry may be what you need. Dr. Tara Dallmann, DDS is a sedation expert with the training and skill to put even the most anxious patient at ease. Come back to the dentist - your smile will love you for it!

“I am so happy that I found your office in the telephone book. I have a very big fear of the dentist office. I gag easily and I don’t have any tolerance to pain. I would not get my teeth cleaned or have any other dental work without sedation. I didn’t even know that it existed until April of last year. I needed a filling replaced and I needed my teeth cleaned and I had put it off for many years because of my fear and my gag reflex. I would not be able to go back to the dentist without sedation.”

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Building Bridges to Better Futures

Help CHNK raise up to

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LIFE

B6 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

Jaycees dance at Redwood

The Boone County Jaycees hosted one of its annual Redwood Dances on March 14. The chapter hosts three dances a year for Redwood clients, caregivers and parents: a St. Patrick’s Dance in the spring, a Cowboy Dance in the summer and a Prom Dance in the fall. The Jaycees provided snacks, beverages, the DJ and the big event of the evening is the crowing of the royal court. The chairperson for this year’s dances is Molly Williamson. She has been running the dance for the past few years. The Boone County Jaycees are rich in tradition, holding on to key projects every year, while adding new projects to fill the needs of the community and members too. The chapter has

POLICE REPORTS Boone County Jaycees at the Redwood Dance included, from left, Lois Evans, Erica Monk Pavese, Alexys Pavese, Chris Pavese, Caitlin Miller, Molly Williamson, Gina Garcia and Robert Kleier. PROVIDED

been hosting dances at Redwood for over 25 years. The chapter does a variety of events all year including: Redwood Dances, high school scholarships, essay contests, needy family

Christmas, sporting events, speaker programs, prayer breakfast to honor local clergy, reverse quarter auctions, trick or treat at the Nursing Homes, Kentucky Speedway races, membership socials.

You Served Us, Let Us Serve You VA MOBILE HEALTH UNIT will be here

Sunday, May 11, 2014

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. AND EVERY FIRST AND THIRD TUESDAY STARTING IN JUNE FROM 7AM TO 12 NOON

Richwood Flea Market 10195 Dixie Hwy., Florence, KY

Ther no chae is r for thi ge s servic e.

The Jaycees are currently running a membership drive in Boone County. The organization is looking for individuals between the age of 18-41 who like to volunteer, who like to make a difference in their community, and who would like to meet like minded people. Contact 2014 President Caitlin Miller at 484-6452697 or visit a meeting at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month on the lower level of the Florence Government Center.

BOONE COUNTY Arrests/Citations Amanda L. Staley, 25, firstdegree possession of a controlled substance (cocaine), possession of drug paraphernalia, March 29. Michael L. Perry, 29, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 6. Alfredo C. Ayala, 57, DUI, April 6. Abdoulrahamane Sacko, 21, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 10. Jan T. Schuck, 55, DUI, reckless driving, April 11. Tera L. Stotts, 34, alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of drug paraphernalia, April 11. Tommy D. Silvers, 50, driving a motor vehicle on a DUI suspended license, April 11. James H. Bailey, 24, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 6. Brian R. Borne, 42, alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle, April 6. Joel G. Reams, 32, alcohol intoxication in a public place, possession of open alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle, April 6. Shirley M. Boles, 39, DUI, reckless driving, April 6. Jason J. Hyde, 36, DUI, reckless driving, April 6. Preston L. Adams, 23, seconddegree disorderly conduct, possession of marijuana, alcohol intoxication in a public

The Cincinnati VAMC’s Mobile Health Unit is designed to help eligible Veterans access the VA Healthcare programs/services they deserve! Staff will be on hand to determine eligibility and provide information.

Incidents/Investigations

Cincinnati Va Medical Staff Will Be On Hand To Answer Any Of Your Questions About Benefits For You And Your Dependents:

• HOW TO ACCESS VA HEALTH CARE • F.A.Q.’S • PENSION

• COMPENSATION • BURIAL BENEFITS • BRING A COPY OF YOUR DD214

We aare here to serve those who have served.

place, April 6. Carie L. Gadd, 33, alcohol intoxication in a public place, April 6. Paul D. Centers, 60, alcohol intoxication in a public place, April 7. William J. Walker, 33, shoplifting, April 7. Scot E. Parlier, 42, seconddegree disorderly conduct, alcohol intoxication in a public place, April 7. Vincent D. Hamilton, 24, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, April 7. Sanjuanita Y. Orzo, 45, DUI, careless driving, April 8. Erich C. Black, 34, DUI, April 18. Akeisha D. Spencer, 35, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 18. Jamar C. Higgs, 26,DUI, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 18. Jenna A. Smith, 24, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 18. Darryl W. Tolle, 48, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, April 18. Teasha M. Harbin, 38, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, April 18. David A. Garnett, 48, alcohol intoxication in a public place, April 18. Chasity S. Dorsey, 21, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, April 18. Chase M. Deck, 28, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (drug unspecified), first-degree possession of a controlled substance (PCP), possession of drug paraphernalia, April 18. Melanielynn N. Merida, 25, DUI, reckless driving, April 19.

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Assault Reported at 3400 block of Queensway Dr., April 18 Burglary Reported at 6400 block of Rosetta Dr., April 6. Reported at 400 block of Filly Ct., April 7. Reported at 10000 block of Cedarwood Dr., April 17. Criminal mischief Reported at Main St., April 7. Reported at 1200 block of Napa Ridge Ct., April 7. Escape from jail Reported at 3000 block of Conrad Ln., April 4. Fire Reported at 900 block of Donaldson Hwy., April 16. Fraud Reported at 11200 block of Frontage Rd., April 6. Fraudulent use of a credit card Reported at 8100 block of Mall Rd., April 9. Narcotics Reported at 900 block of Banklick St., March 29. Recovery of stolen property Reported at 9500 block of Sapphire Ln., April 7. Shoplifting Reported at 600 block of Chestnut Dr., March 29. Theft by unlawful taking more than $500 Reported at 11600 block of Gum Branch Rd., April 12. Reported at 8500 block of Dixie Hwy., April 6. Reported at 10800 block of St. Andrews Dr., April 7.

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MAY 8, 2014 • BCR RECORDER • B7

The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center has planted 1,957 pinwheels outside its Houston Road facility to remind neighbors and the community that everyone can “Be the End” of child abuse. PROVIDED

1,957 pinwheels represent cases of N. Ky. child abuse Community Recorder

The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center has planted 1,957 pinwheels outside its Houston Road facility to remind neighbors and the community that everyone can “Be the End” of child abuse. April was National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and each pinwheel planted outside the center represented a case of reported child abuse in Northern Kentucky during 2013. This year there is a new partnership between the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center and the Children’s Advocacy Center of the Bluegrass in Lexington. By jointly introducing a new campaign, “Be the End,” the mission of keeping children safe from abuse across the commonwealth is shared with goals to raise awareness and education about the identification and prevention of child abuse. “Be the End” encourages all adults to be a voice for any child suffering from abuse, and emphasizes the importance of learning signs of abuse to keep children safe. “Children may think they cannot tell or may not know how to express what is happening to them,” said Vickie Henderson, Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center executive director. “This is why it is an adult responsibility to learn possible signs of abuse and recognize if a child is being harmed. “It is possible to prevent abuse from occurring when adults are being proactive for children. ‘Be the End’ is the ethical responsibility we all have to speak up for children.” By joining forces, both

children’s advocacy centers hope the “Be the End” campaign will reach a larger area of Kentucky with the unified message of prevention. Supporters can contribute gifts via text and support their local center’s work by texting GIVECAC to 501501 to donate a $10 gift. Children’s advocacy centers provide a multidisciplinary team approach to reports of child abuse. Routinely at the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center, law enforcement officers, social service workers and prosecutors work together to focus on the details of the abuse and investigation. The center provides coordinated services for child abuse victims, including medical examinations, forensic interviews, family advocacy programs and therapy. Such an approach enables teams to work together and prevent further trauma in children after abuse has occurred, and begin a coordinated investigation immediately. Young victims, their siblings, and non-offending caregivers can also receive comprehensive and on-site services to offer aid and support. “Our goal is to move children to a place of healing quickly,” said Henderson. The Northern Kentucky center has planted pinwheels annually since 2007 to raise awareness of child abuse in the community. The Center is recognized as a resource in Northern Kentucky, not only for intervention and advocacy, but for its work to prevent child abuse. Supporting the center with similar pinwheel gardens are Immanuel Methodist Church in Lakeside Park, St. Timothy Parish in Union, and Hebron Baptist Church.

Chuy’s restaurant in Florence is provided pinwheel-themed coloring sheets for children who dined at the restaurant in April, sold pinwheels to benefit the the center, and donated a lunch honoring investigators who work with the center. Famous Dave’s BBQ in Florence sponsored a “dine to donate” event at its Houston Road. “I believe that crimes against children are the most under-reported,” Henderson said. “Community awareness and education are critical in protecting the children in our community. Our goal is for every adult in Northern Kentucky to know the signs of child abuse, how to report and prevent child abuse,” she said.

and May 24 from10 a.m. to noon and June 4, June 6 and June 10 from 4-6 p.m. at the shelter. A parent must attend orientation with each student. Participants 13-15 must have a parent with them at all times while volunteering at the shelter. Questions or registration may be directed to the coordinator at jpea1215@aol.com.

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May is Stroke Awareness Month Stroke prevention and recovery come into focus throughout May as we promote healthier bodies for life. Join us to learn smart tips for stroke prevention. And find out how our stroke rehabilitation program has earned our hospital The Joint Commission Disease-Specific p Care Certification in Stroke Rehabilitation. You can n also ttake akee ad ak adva advantage advantag van n agee of informative inf nfor orma mati tive ve sscreenings. cree cr eeni ee eni n ng ngs. s. Stroke Screenings Friday, May 19, 2014 • 9 a.m.-1:00 p.m. m. St. Elizabeth Healthcare Heart and Vascular Van On Campus HealthSouth Northern Kentucky Rehabilitation Hospital 201 Medical Village Drive ( ( ( (

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ar Receive the complete cardiovascular screening package for $100.00 nings gs s (4-hour fast required) or the screenings of your choice for $25.00 each. Registration required at 859 301-WELL (9355)

Shelter offers Junior Volunteer program Boone County Animal Shelter is offering training for its popular summer Junior Volunteer program. Paw Pals assist shelter staff with activities designed to help keep adoptable animals safe, clean, healthy and happy. This program is open to students age 13-17 and registration for a twohour orientation is required. Orientation sessions are offered May 17

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LIFE

B8 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

DEATHS Vivian Ashcraft

Martha Daugherty

Vivian J. Merrell Ashcraft, 63, of Hebron, died April 29 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was an employee of the Kroger Co. in Florence, and member of Cornerstone Baptist Church. Her parents, Luther “Doc” and Ruby E. Qualls Merrell, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Gary L. Ashcraft; son, Clayton L. Ashcraft of Hebron; daughter, Jeanetta L. Middleton Ramsey of Falmouth; sisters, Sheila Bernice Setters of Burlington, and Nancy Darlene Irvin of Dry Ridge; one grandchild and one greatgrandchild. Interment was at Sand Run Cemetery in Hebron.

Martha Jane Martin Daugherty, 85, of Florence, died April 26. She was a member of Florence United Methodist Church, an art teacher with the Boone County School System, and member of Florence Elks, Eastern Star, Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority, Mensa, Florence Women’s Club, Florence Garden Club, League of Women Voters, Kentucky Art Education Association and Church Women United. Her brother, Edward Charles Martin, died previously. Survivors include her children, Joseph Franklin Daugherty III, Mary Katherine Daugherty, James M. Daugherty and Sara Ferguson; five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

of Covington; and four grandchildren.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 859-283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at cincinnati.com/northernkentucky. Burial was at Corinth IOOF Cemetery. Memorials: the charity of donor’s choice.

Brian Eversole Brian Louis Eversole, 48, of Taylor Mill, died April 27 at his residence. He worked as a painter.

Survivors include his son, Jagger Eversole; daughter, Tasha Casey; brothers, Blaine Eversole of Irvine, Ky., and Baxter Eversole of Lexington; sisters, Betty Niemeyer of Latonia, Beverly Eversole of Ludlow, Brenda Allen of Hebron, Barveda Baughn of Piner, Bobbie Stidams of Dry Ridge, and Bernide Miller

Karla Fields Karla E. Fields, 74, of Florence, died March 21. She was a retired business secretary, and member of Florence Christian Church. Her husband, Pail Fields; son, James Alex “Jay” Fields; stepdaughter, Charlotte Fields; four brothers and three sisters, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, L. Evonne “Sissy” Thoma; sons, Paul T. Fields, David P. Fields and Raymond M. Fields; sister, Clara “Earlene” Niemeyer; brother, Terry Stith; 15 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Burial was at Independence Cemetery. Memorials: Florence Christian Church, 300 Main St., Florence, KY 41042; or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Angie Jones Angie Jean Graham Jones, 71, of Union, died April 15. Survivors include her husband, John Jones; children, Richard Graham III, Belinda Deaver, Irene Budde, Roy Graham and Rita Faris; and 10 grandchildren.

Rita Kerns

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Rita Mae Kerns, 78, of Florence, formerly of Covington, died April 29. She was a homemaker. Her brother, William Kerns; and sisters, Helen Toll and Virginia Stuart, died previously. Survivors include her brother, Jack Kerns of Park Hills; numerous nieces and nephews. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery in Fort Wright.

Samantha Ramsey Samantha Jo “Sambo” Ramsey, 19, of Covington, died April 26 at St. Elizabeth Florence. She was a preschool teacher for Children’s Inc., and a 2013 graduate of Holmes High School. Her father, Robert Lewis Ramsey, and grandfather, Robert L. Ramsey, died previously. Survivors include her mother, Brandi Jo Stewart of Covington; brothers, Michael A. Baxley of Ludlow, and Christopher R. Baxley of Florence; sister, Amanda M. Ramsey of Verona; grandmother, JoAnn Gross of Covington; grandmother, Margaret Janell Ramsey of Covington; and grandparents, Dr. Edward P. and Gail Brandenburg of Bristow, Okla.. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Samantha Ramsey Memorial Fund, care of any Fifth Third Bank or MiddendorfBullock Funeral Home, 917 Main St., Covington, KY 41011.

Erik Recker Erik Christian Recker, 19, of Independence, died April 27 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He graduated from Simon Kenton High School in 2012, and was an avid baseball player and fan. Survivors include his grandfather, David Recker of Independence, and brother, Darren Fetick of Florence. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill.

Benjamin Reeves

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Benjamin F. Reeves, 90, of Glencoe, died April 25. He was a retired machinist with the U.S. Playing Card Co., a farmer, and Army veteran of World War II. His son, Ben A. Reeves, and sister, Madge Dolwick, died

previously. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Frances Smith Reeves; daughters, Deborah Hempel and Darlene Schmidt; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Burial was at Napoleon Cemetery in Gallatin County. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017; or Providence Health Care of Gallatin County, 499 Center St., Warsaw, KY 41095.

Mary Reimer Mary Jo Reimer, 78, of Florence, died April 24 at Florence Park Care Center. She worked as an accountant until deciding to attend nursing school in her mid-50s. After receiving her nursing degree, she worked as a hospice nurse in California and Northern Kentucky, was a nursing supervisor at St. Charles Care Center, and was a member of the Peace Corps who worked with AIDS patients in South Africa. Her son, Tony Sweet; and brothers, Ray and John Grote, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Katie Bennett of Bend, Ore.; sons, Jamie Sweet of Canoga Park, Calif., Fritz Reimer of Los Angeles, and Hans Reimer of Las Vegas; brother, Jim Grote of Los Angeles; sisters, Betty Engelman of Taylor Mill, Jane May of Florence, Nancy Mann of Florence, and Margie Jonavic of Las Vegas; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Memorials: the charity of donor’s choice.

Karl Tillman Karl Martin Tillman, 57, formerly of Buffalo, died April 26. He worked at RR Donnelley in Florence, was a Marine Corps veteran, avid bodybuilder, guitarist and aspiring writer. Survivors include his daughter, Krista; parents, Hollace and Anna; brother, Dieter; sisters, Regina and Angelika; and two grandchildren.

Lola Weaver Lola Clark Weaver, 68, of Florence, formerly of Dover, Ky., died April 24 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a former nurse's aide for several nursing homes. Her son, Lucas Weaver, and brother, Junior Clark, died previously. Survivors include her husband, John Weaver Sr., of Florence; daughter, Annette Hazel Weaver of Covington; sons, John Weaver Jr. of Covington, Matthew Weaver of Florence and William Weaver of Gallatin Co.; sisters, Bertha Carroll of Erlanger and Linda Vaughn of Stearns; brother, Dean Clark of Stearns; nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Carl Willoughby Carl Ray Willoughby, 76, of Burlington, died April 25 at his residence. He was a retired Teamster, Navy veteran, loved woodworking and was an avid gardener. Survivors include his wife, Mary; sons, Carl Jr., Dennis, Michael and Daniel; daughters, Denise, Joyce and Amy; brother, Burt Willoughby; sisters, Vera, Janet, Brenda Joyce, Cindy and Linda; 16 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Interment was at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery, North. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Jennifer Silbert, 35, of Hebron and Jeffrey Ahrens, 43, of Hebron; issued April 16. Rachel Jensen, 19, of Burlington and Jeremy Cheek, 19, of Hebron; April 17. Karen Monarch, 33, of Florence and Brian Monarch, 35, of Florence; April 18. Kimberly Hamann, 25, of Florence and Joshua Horn, 25, of Florence; April 18. Kyla Frankenberry, 20, of Florence and Ethan Crouch, 20, of Middletown, Ind.; April 21. Bridget Strickland, 27, of Florence and Russell Hatton, 30, of Florence; April 21. Cortney Becker, 25, of Cincinnati and Daniel Knapp, 27, of

Florence; April 21. Ashley Tekuelve, 27, of Georgetown, Ohio, and Justin Combs, 29, of Burlington; April 21. Majorell Kowolnek, 46, of Florence and Jose Vazquez, 55, of Florence; April 21. Hue Nguyen, 47, of Florence and Dung Phan, 48, of Florence; April 21. Brittany Barnes, 24, of Florence and Aaron Hedlund, 24, of Burlington; April 21. Kara Bodkin, 25, of Verona and Colt Parker, 29, of Walton; April 21. Connie Woodall, 49, of Florence and Craig Williams, 52, of Florence; April 23.


User: nruter

Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

LIFE

Is it an ant or a termite? Question: I think I found some termites in a pile of old firewood. They look like big ants with wings. Do ants ever have wings? Answer: Yes they do. Warmer weather and springtime showers signal termites to Mike emerge Klahr and fly into HORTICULTURE the air to CONCERNS find mates and start new colonies. That is why it is common to see large numbers of winged termites throughout the month of May. At first glance, it may be difficult to distinguish between swarming termites and winged ants. A termite has straight antennae, a uniform, nonconstricted “waist” and four wings of equal shape and length. Conversely, a winged ant has elbowed antennae (with a sharp bend), and three distinct body sections, with a narrow, constricted “waist” and “neck”, and two front wings that are longer and wider than the two back wings. Swarming termites emerging from wood piles, tree stumps and other outdoor locations don’t necessarily indicate a home or building infestation. However, winged termites found indoors usually are a sign of an infestation that needs treatment. Although termites swarming indoors die without causing

COMING UP » Keeping Trees and Shrubs Healthy, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 15, Boone Co. Extension Office. Learn about proper planting, mulching, watering, fertilizing and pest control methods for landscape trees and shrubs. Free, but call 859-586-6101 to register, or enroll online at boone.ca.uky.edu. » Terrific Trees for N. Ky. Landscapes, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 20, Boone Co. Extension Office. Learn about the overall best deciduous, evergreen, shade and ornamental trees for all sizes of landscapes in this area. Free, but call 859586-6101 to register, or enroll online at boone.ca.uky.edu. » Spring Arboretum Plant Sale, 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 17, Boone Co. Arboretum, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Shelter No. 1. Come out for some real bargains on trees, shrubs, flowers, vegetable plants, hardy fig trees, etc. Call 859586-6101.

damage, seeing thousands of them emerge inside can be an emotionally trying experience. Winged termites emerging from the base of a foundation wall or adjoining porches also usually indicate that the house is infested and requires treatment. Other indications of termite infestations are pencil-thin mud tubes extending over inside

and outside surfaces of foundation walls, piers, sills, floor joists and the like. Also watch for damaged wood hollowed out along the grain with dried bits of mud or soil lining the feeding galleries. Often there is no sign of the worker termites that cause damage – small, creamy-white insects with an ant-like appearance. Infestations can remain undetected for years. Damage to exposed wood isn’t noticeable because the outer surface usually is left intact. It takes the keen eye of an experienced professional to detect termite damage and treat this problem. Since eliminating termites requires special skills and equipment, it is best to contact a pest control company rather than try to treat for them yourself. The company should be licensed by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Membership in a state or national pest control or management association indicates an established firm. Ask for references. For more information about pests, plant identification and care, plus updates on upcoming Extension classes, and to win free vegetable seeds for your garden, go to www.facebook.com/BooneHortNews or contact your local County Cooperative Extension Service. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

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Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

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LIFE

B10 • BCR RECORDER • MAY 8, 2014

Doctor’s first book looks into the human psyche through science and spirituality. His website, www.un boundintelligence. com, describes the book as being able to help the reader understand what he or she really wants in life and how to get it. Kurapati says that his experiences as a doctor helped him to develop his thoughts while writing. “As a doctor, I get the unique opportunity to be around people in their most vulnerable moments. It is in these moments that I see the most organic side of people – their true selves,” Kurapati said. “I’ve come to realize that every person, at their deepest core, is but a force of which we all share. A force that powers us all – our most instinctual, human selves. We are all driven by the same desires – the desire to live, thrive and leave a lasting legacy. I call this force the unbound intelligence.” Kurapati said he began to write while in his early 30s after what he describes as an “epiphany” that helped him understand the “true essence of life.” “I wanted to share with others the contentment I was experiencing from this new enlightened outlook, and so the book was born,” he said. Kurapati said he applies much of what he discusses in his book to his medical practice.

By Amanda Hopkins Contributor

Amber Hunt, The Enquirer’s consumer watchdog reporter, and The Enquirer Call For Action team of trained volunteers are available to work for you. Specializing in mediation services, we’ll help you resolve consumer issues and get you resources that will help in the future.

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ENQUIRER CALL FOR ACTION IS HERE FOR YOU. Find this along with more watchdog coverage at Cincinnati.com/YourWatchdog. Activate the digital portion of your Enquirer subscription today at Cincinnati.com/Activate to stay connected to all of The Enquirer’s watchdog coverage and to enjoy the full value of your subscription.

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Dr. Rajeev Kurapati works with many different people on a daily basis as a board certified doctor in family medicine at St. Elizabeth’s Heathcare in Florence and Fort Thomas. Dr. Rajeev He tires to Kurapati work toward simple solutions to a patient’s health through science. In his first book, “Unbound Intelligence: Discover the God Within,” Kurapati, 37, digs a little deeper into the human psyche in order to understand how people act and understanding why humans do the things they do. “Since childhood, I’ve been curious about why people believe in the things they do, especially the belief in this transcendent ideal we call God,” Kurapati said. “I spent countless hours trying to understand the various philosophical, historical and spiritual traditions in an attempt to find the answers to the transcendent nature of life.” His book was released in January; it explores the topics of unconditional love and the universe and connects these topics

Writing the book has helped him create better connections with his patients. “Knowing that at our deepest core we are the same helps me to treat each person with the utmost respect and attention,” he said. He hopes that readers can connect to the book and help them in their own lives. “If we can understand the most basic reason behind various ways of life, including our own, we can accept differences, and perhaps more importantly, understand ourselves,” he said. Outside of his medical practice and his daily writing, Kurapati also enjoys exercise and spending time with his family. He says he hopes to write more books and to engage more people through speaking engagements and book signings. Kurapati lives in Mason with his wife and young son. He works at a hospital-based practice with St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Northern Kentucky. His book, “Unbound Intelligence: Discover the God Within” is available on Amazon.com in paperback and e-book Kindle versions. To learn more about Dr. Rajeev Kurapati and read more of his writings, visit unbound intelligence.com.

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User: nruter

Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

Zone: BRK

Edition: 1 Page: S-Cov Color: C K Y M

cubcadet.com

UNMATCHED SELECTION AND EXPERTISE.

cubcadet.com

S1

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042

859-384-3263

www.pvopower.com

COMMERCIAL MMER MERCIA CIAL L ZERO-TURN RIDERS RO-T O TURN N RI RIDER DERS S

UTILITY VEHICLES

SERIES 1000

LAWN AND GARDEN TRACTORS

CUB CU C UB B CA C CADET ADE D DET RZT RZ R ZT T® S 42/4 42 2/4 /46/ 46/5 /5 50 0/54 0/5 0/ 4 42/46/50/54

RZT ® S SERIES R

FOUR-WHEEL STEER F ZERO-TURN RIDERS Z

100

$

VOLUNTEER™ 4x4 SERIES

TANK™ LZ SERIES

Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-2 Sun 10-2

MARCH 15 – JUNE 15

TOWARD PURCHASE PRICE OF

LTX KW LAWN TRACTORS

1

SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE. 1

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS.

RZT S SERIES

FOUR-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS • Only Cub Cadet delivers true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for superior handling on varied terrain, including hills

CU CUB C UB BC CA CADET AD ADE DET RZT RZ R ZT T® S 42/46/50/54 42/4 42 2/4 /46 46 6 //5 /50 50/ 0/54

• 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

SERIES 1000

STARTING AT:

2,69999*

$

ONLY AT YOUR CUB CADET DEALER

LTX KW LAWN TRACTORS

SERIES 1000

LTX KW LAWN TRACTORS • Premium features only available at your dealer including: 18 HP† – 23 HP† professional-grade Kawasaki® engines, durable front bumper and comfortable, high-back seat • Enjoy the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut from 42" – 50" heavy duty mowing decks • Ultra-tight 12" turning radius for superior maneuverability around obstacles STARTING AT:

1,699

$

ONLY AT YOUR

99*

CUB CADET DEALER

• Premium features only available at your dealer including: 18 HP† – 23 HP† professional-grade Kawasaki engines; durable front bumper; comfortable, high-back seat • Enjoy the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ from 42" – 50" heavy duty mowing decks • Ultra-tight 12" turning radius for superior maneuverability around obstacles ®

STARTING AT: $

1,69999*

*Price shown for LTX KW reflects $100 Offer.

SIGNATURE CUT SERIES™

WALK-BEHIND MOWERS

• Mow at your own speed with new MySpeed™ variable drive system (excluding SC 100)

SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE. 2

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS FOR QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS.

• Front caster wheels allow zero-turn maneuverability and have exclusive locking ability for straight-line mowing (select models) • Beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut • SureStart Guarantee® ensures your mower will start in 1 - 2 pulls

STARTING AT:

36999*

$

SC 100 — SALE PRICE $24999*

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED.

THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

SALE PRICE:

1,69999*

$

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042

SALE PRICE:

1,89999*

$

859-384-3263

www.pvopower.com (1) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. The Best Buy Seal and other licensed materials are registered certification marks and trademarks of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. For award information, visit ConsumersDigest.com. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014 _FULL_LINE_F_REV CE-0000589209

SALE PRICE:

2,09999*

$

(1) Cub Cadet Days $100 Toward Purchase Price of LTX KW Lawn Tractors is $100 toward the regular purchase price of the LTX 1042 KW, LTX 1046 KW, and LTX 1050 KW Lawn Tractors. Offer valid between 3/15/2014 – 6/15/2014. (2) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014_CCDays_$100_OFFER_S1000_2x7

cubcadet.com


User: nruter

Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

Zone: BRK

Edition: 1 Page: S-A

Color: C K Y M

cubcadet.com

S2

UNHEARD-OF PERFORMANCE. INTRODUCING THE LATEST IN A LINE OF AWARD-WINNING ZERO-TURN RIDING MOWERS FROM CUB CADET.

RZT S ZERO

RZT ZT S SERIES ®

ELECTRIC ZERO-TURN RIDER WITH STEERING WHEEL CONTROL AND FOUR-WHEEL STEERING

FOUR-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS • Only Cub Cadet delivers true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for superior handling on varied terrain, including hills • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

0% INTEREST FINANCING 24 MOS1

$

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

113/MONTH

NEW FOR 2014

• With zero engine noise, zero belts and zero filters, it’s what you don’t get that’s most valuable • 42" deck delivers the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Incredible maneuverability and stability on hills — and anywhere else

0% INTEREST FINANCING 36 MOS1

1

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$

112/MONTH

1

0% INTEREST FINANCING FOR UP TO 54 MONTHS WITH EQUAL PAYMENTS. 1

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS. NEW FOR 2014

RZT L SERIES

TANK SZ SERIES ERIES

TANK™ L SERIES

ZERO-TURN RIDERS

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDERS

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDERS

• Most legroom in its class and adjustable lap bars with full-length comfort grips deliver an exceptionally comfortable experience • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful results of the Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Available 54" fabricated deck features exclusive tunnel design for the best-in-class cut and durability

• Commercial-grade Kohler® Command ® or Kawasaki® FX Series engines • 48", 54" or 60" heavy-duty, fabricated mowing decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Electronically applied dual-layer corrosion coating provides twice the protection against unforgiving environmental conditions • Industry-leading, heavy-duty commercial-grade steel frame absorbs the stress of hours of operation over rough terrain

• Only Cub Cadet has zero-turn maneuverability with revolutionary power steering, steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for unrivaled stability and precision control on difficult terrain • Kawasaki FX Series commercial-grade engine delivers higher horsepower and maximum torque for enhanced performance • 54" or 60" fabricated sloped-nose mowing decks are built with superior commercial-grade components to deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut

0% INTEREST FINANCING 36 MOS1

$

89/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: $2,49999*

0% INTEREST FINANCING 48 MONTHS1

$

136/MONTH

0% INTEREST FINANCING 54 MONTHS1

1

STARTING AT: $6,49999*

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER with steering wheel

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER

COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER 0% INTEREST FINANCING

• 48” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose fabricated deck *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 charged transmission MONTH1 STARTING AT: $4,99999* • Twin 2.8 gallon fuel tanks (5.6 gallon total)

$105/

1

STARTING AT: $10,49999*

Z-FORCE® SZ 60

Z-FORCE® LZ 60

Z-FORCE® LZ 48

195/MONTH

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

*WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$

• 60” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose, fabricated deck • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 transmission • Twin 2.8 gallon fuel tanks (5.6 gallon total)

0% INTEREST FINANCING *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$125/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: $5,99999*

• 60” heavy-duty, triple-blade, sloped-nose, fabricated deck • Steering wheel control and four-wheel steering • Hydro-Gear charged ZT-3100 transmission

0% INTEREST FINANCING *WITH EQUAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF

$136/MONTH

1

STARTING AT: $6,49999*

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED.

THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) 0% Interest for up to 54 months with equal payments: a minimum purchase amount is required as follows: $1,500 on the 24 month promotion; $3,000 on the 36 month promotion; $3,500 on the 48 month promotion available on garden tractors, all residential z-force l/lz and z-force sz residential models, commercial zero-turn riders and utility vehicles; $5,500 on the 54 month promotion available on commercial tank lz/sz series. During the 24, 36, 48 or 54 month promotional period a minimum monthly payment is required that is calculated by dividing the purchase amount by the length of the promotional period. The promotional period will start on the date of purchase. Interest will not accrue during the promotional period. If the purchase amount, plus any applicable fees or charges is not paid in full by the end of the promotional period, interest will be charged at the apr for purchases on any remaining balances until paid in full. The current apr for purchases is variable 27.99%. If any required minimum payment is 60 days past due, the penalty apr, currently variable 29.99% Will apply to remaining balances. Minimum interest charge $2.00. A promotional fee will apply to the purchases as follows: for the 24 month promotion - $39 on purchases less than $2,500 and $125 for purchases $2,500 and greater; for the 36 month promotion - $125; for the 48 month promotion - $125; for the 54 month promotion - $125. Offer subject to credit approval on your cub cadet credit card account. Offer valid only during promotional period from 1/1/14 through 7/31/2014. This offer may not be available through all cub cadet dealers. Other financing options are available. See a participating cub cadet dealer for details. (2) A minimum purchase amount of $3,500 is required. During the 48 month promotional period a minimum monthly payment is required that is calculated by dividing the purchase amount by the length of the promotional period. The promotional period will start on the date of purchase. Interest will not accrue during the promotional period. If the purchase amount, plus any applicable fees or charges is not paid in full by the end of the promotional period, interest will be charged at the apr for purchases on any remaining balances until paid in full. The current apr for purchases is variable 27.99%. If any required minimum payment is 60 days past due, the penalty apr, currently variable 29.99% Will apply to remaining balances. Minimum Interest charge $2.00. A one-time promotional fee of $125 will be applied to the account for this transaction. Offer subject to credit approval on a cub cadet credit card account. Offer valid on garden tractors, commercial zero turns, z-force and utility vehicles over $3,500. * Product price — actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. Cub cadet commercial products are intended for professional use. Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. Estimated monthly payment is calculated by dividing the assumed total purchase amount by the length of the promotional term and rounding up to the next dollar amount. Calculation assumes the purchase amount is paid in full within the promotional period. Actual payment may differ from estimated monthly payment. Sales tax and other fees are not included in the purchase price and may affect monthly payment amount. © 2014 Cub cadet 2014_zero_f


User: nruter

Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

Zone: BRK

Edition: 1 Page: T-Cov Color: C K Y M

ONLY AT YOUR

T1 T3

CUB CADET DEALER

SERIES 2000

GTX GARDEN TRACTORS

ONE TEST DRIVE IS ALL IT TAKES.

• Fingertip control with Electronic Power Steering provides maneuverability and a more enjoyable ride (GTX 2000 and GTX 2154 only) • Legendary Cub Cadet shaft drive means no Deck sold separately — Starting at $500* belts to the drive system to slip, stretch or break, for maximum power and STARTING AT: performance $ 3,99999* • Variety of mowing decks from 42” to 54,” stamped and fabricated, deliver the Cub GTX 2154 SHOWN 99 STARTING AT $5,499 * Cadet Signature Cut

SERIES 1000

LGTX LAWN AND GARDEN TRACTORS

SERIES 1000 • Test drives on incredible zero-turn riders and lawn tractors

ELECTRONIC • Electronic Power Steering and ultra-tight WITH POWER STEERING turning radius make mowing a breeze • 50" or 54" heavy-duty mowing decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut • Fully welded steel frame backed by a STARTING AT: five-year** warranty means peace of mind $ 2,69999* while you’re enjoying a little mow therapy

• Expert service and advice

RZT ® S SERIES

• Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity!

RZT S SERIES FOUR-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS

FREE GIFT

*

Bring this ticket to the Cub Cadet Test Drive Experience for a free giveaway just for joining the fun.

*One per person, while supplies last. Must present ad to receive offer. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice. Participating locations only. See dealer for complete details and restrictions.

• Only Cub Cadet has Synchro Steer® technology — true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control and four-wheel steering for superior handling on varied terrain, including hills • 42", 46", 50" heavy-duty stamped decks deliver the beautiful Cub Cadet Signature Cut STARTING AT: • Available 54" fabricated deck has exclusive $ tunnel design for the best-in-class cut 2,69999* and durability

SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE. 1

AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS.

STOP IN TO TAKE A TEST DRIVE AND PROVE TO YOURSELF WHY CUB CADET IS THE SMARTEST CHOICE.

GET THE SIGNATURE CUT THAT’S BACKED BY SIGNATURE SERVICE.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. ** See your local dealer for limited warranty details and information. Certain restrictions apply. † As rated by Kawasaki, horsepower tested in accordance with SAE J1995 and rated in accordance with SAE J2723 and certified by SAE International. Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 2014_TDE_EVENT_COUPON_H

cubcadet.com


User: nruter

Time: 05-08-2014 15:03

Product: CINBer

PubDate: 05-08-2014

Zone: BRK

Edition: 1 Page: T-A

Color: C K Y M

T4 T2

Stop In And Se eO

u

Reduced Pricer s On Our 2013 Models

RT 65

SC 500 hw

SC 100

• 13" dual-direction rotating tines • 18" tilling width • 16" pneumatic, ag tread wheels

• SureStart Guarantee® ensures easy starting in 1-2 pulls • 21" Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ deck • Dual-lever, 6-position deck height adjustment

• SureStart Guarantee® ensures easy starting in 1-2 pulls • 21" Cub Cadet Signature Cut™ • Dual-lever, 6-position deck height adjustment

SELF-PROPELLED WALK-BEHIND MOWER

REAR-TINE TILLER

STARTING AT:

79999*

STARTING AT:

STARTING AT:

$

$

36999*

$

TACKLE ANY CHALLENGE.

PUSH WALK-BEHIND MOWER

EFFORTLESS ZERO-TURN CONTROL GIVES YOU UNMATCHED MANEUVERABILITY TO TAKE ON ANY YARD.

24999*

THE VERSATILITY TO DO IT ALL. THE RELIABILITY OF A DEALER YOU TRUST.

YOUR INDEPENDENT DEALER—EXPERT SERVICE. LOCALLY OWNED. THE ADVICE, SELECTION AND SUPPORT YOU NEED TO FIND THE RIGHT FIT IS AT YOUR LOCAL CUB CADET DEALER.

Pleasant Valley Outdoor Power 8625 Haines Drive • Florence, KY 41042 859-384-3263 • www.pvopower.com

(1) FINANCING AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL BUYERS QUALIFY. MINIMUM PURCHASE PRICE REQUIREMENT APPLIES. SEE STORE OR CUBCADET.COM FOR IMPORTANT DETAILS. MINIMUM MONTHLY PAYMENTS REQUIRED. TRANSACTION FINANCE CHARGES MAY APPLY. SEE YOUR CUB CADET RETAILER FOR DETAILS OR GO TO CUBCADET.COM FOR FULL DISCLOSURE. FINANCING SUBJECT TO TD BANK, N.A. APPROVAL. PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. * Product Price — Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. **See your local dealer for limited warranty details and information. Certain restrictions apply. † as rated by engine manufacturer Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. © 2014 Cub Cadet 3PV_F

CE-0000589211


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