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BETHEL JOURNAL

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS ❚ PART OF THE USA TODAY NETWORK

Sheriff: Man arrested after showing up with ‘explosive mixture’ Sheila Vilvens Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Participants arrive by water and air to celebrate RiverDays in New Richmond Aug. 17-19, 2018. Mac’s Seaplane Service offered biplane rides. PHOTOS BY SHARON BRUMAGEM/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Rolling on the river in New Richmond Sharon Brumagem

Special to Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Things were rolling on the river Aug. 17-19 in New Richmond in Clermont County. Thousands of people traveled by various modes of transportation to the river town for its annual RiverDays event celebrating its rich Ohio River heritage. The event featured a cardboard boat regatta, live entertainment, dozens of craft/special interest/ food/game booths, rides (including a sea plane) and fireworks.

This “ship of the Nile” rides a wave of air during RiverDays in New Richmond.

It wasn’t just another day at the office for Clermont County Sheriff Robert Leahy. “Good God.” That was reportedly Leahy’s response after learning about a Tate Township man who transported an “explosive mixture” to the sheriff ’s Batavia office. Police say Glenn S. Kassen, 53, of Tate Township, wanted to show the sheriff the “power” of an explosive mixture of his own creation. The Hamilton County Sheriff ’s Office Bomb Squad was called in after Kassen described to detectives the contents of Glenn S. his brew, according to Kassen police. No details of the concoction’s contents were available. Samples were taken before the bomb squad detonated the mixture. A search of Kassen’s home resulted in the recovery of additional materials which were also detonated, according to police. Kassen has a list of prior arrests and convictions in Clermont County, including aggravated menacing and disorderly conduct. This investigation is ongoing and will be reviewed with the Clermont County Prosecutor’s Office for consideration of charges to be presented to a grand jury. Kassen was arraigned in Clermont County Municipal Court after being charged Aug. 24 with illegal assembly or possession of chemicals, or substances, for manufacturing of an explosive device. He’s being held in the Clermont County Jail on a $500,000 bond. His court date was set for Tuesday, Sept. 4.

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For the Postmaster: Published weekly every Thursday. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, OH 45202 and at additional mailing offices. ISSN 1066-7458 ❚ USPS 053-040 Postmaster: Send address change to The Bethel Journal, 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 Annual subscription: Weekly Journal In-County $18.00; All other in-state and out-of-state $20.00.

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Open Your Heart, Share Your Home and Earn Money Supporting a Child in Need. Envision serves people with developmental disabilities and is seeking caring individuals in Greater Cincinnati to serve as therapeutic foster parents who can provide a child with a family environment of trust and support. Phone: (513) 619-2901 | E-mail: referrals@envisionohio.org | Website: www.envisionohio.org

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2A ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

‘Fur’ever homes needed for abandoned cats Sheila Vilvens Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Sure, it’s a challenge. The task can be thankless. Nevertheless, volunteers from various rescues are uniting in an effort to find homes for upward of two dozen cats. A few are kittens. Most are young adult felines between 1 and 3 years old, according to Evelyn Black, a Mason resident and member of Tri-State CART, a nonprofit disaster relief agency for animals. The felines were abandoned when a New Richmond area rescue unexpectedly closed, she said. It’s not always easy to place an adult cat, Black said. Especially in kitten season. This knowledge isn’t deterring Black, Brittney May with Crazy Cats Rescue, Liz Johnson with OAR Spay Neuter Clinic, and others from trying. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that 3.2 million cats enter U.S. shelters each year. Of these cats, nearly 30 percent are euthanized. Nearly half are adopted. The numbers are not in their favor, Black acknowledged. Still, they need to try.The CART group has access to a storage shed full of cages and other equipment used for emergencies. “While we are not officially activated, we’re using our equipment and some of

COMMUNITY PRESS & RECORDER NEWSPAPERS ❚ 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 ❚ 2116 Chamber Center Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 NEWS TIPS ........................................513-248-8600 HOME DELIVERY .............................513-576-8240 ADVERTISING...................................513-768-8404 CLASSIFIEDS ....................................513-242-4000

A barn in the New Richmond area is filled with cats in need of a forever home. PROVIDED

our trained staff members,” Black said. A total of 60 cats were rescued, according to May. “We worked with other local rescue organizations to intake approximately 40 of the cats leaving us approximately 20 that we are still caring for and trying to get adopted,” she said. Several cats were pregnant or had

To place an obituary in the Community Press/Recorder newspapers Funeral homes or private parties need to call 1-877-513-7355 (option #2) for a paid obituary. Be sure to include the Community Press/Recorder community. Email the text to obits@enquirer.com. Proof of death required.

kittens. All will be spayed/neutered, tested for feline leukemia, vaccinated, flea treated and dewormed. Many need extensive medical care which Crazy Cats Animal Rescue is providing. Costs for this rescue, however, are exceeding expectations, May said. About $2,000 has already been invested in the health of the cats, with an addi-

tional $2,000 likely, she said. If anyone would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to the effort, they can visit www.crazycatsanimalrescue.com. To spread the word about the need, a New Richmond Rescue Cats Facebook page was created. Information about adopting the cats and the rescue effort is available there.

New Millcroft Inn owner to preserve site Jeanne Houck Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A developer has bought the historic Millcroft Inn in Milford for $550,000 and intends to preserve and restore the main house and stable. Contingent Holdings, LLC, said it also intends to modernize the infrastructure to support mixed commercial uses at the site at 203 Mill St., where a restaurant operated for nearly 70 years. The sprawling, nearly 14,000square-foot Millcroft Inn was built in 1812. It sits on just under a half acre in the heart of Milford’s downtown historic district. “It is imperative to restore and preserve these structures for future generations which is exactly what we intend to do,” said Mark Stuhlreyer, president of Contingent Holdings. The Sycamore Township developer is asking the community to help restore the buildings by sending historical photos and documents to “Save the Millcroft” at 7885 East Kemper Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45249. Electronic scans can be sent to mark@contingentholdings.com. Negotiations are underway with a prospective tenant for the portion of the inn site anchored by the old stable. An announcement should be forthcoming in the next few weeks, according to Con-

The developer that bought the historic Millcroft Inn in Milford wants to preserve and restore the main house and stable. THE ENQUIRER/JEANNE HOUCK

tingent Holdings. The developer is searching for a tenant for the larger portion of the site anchored by the main house, with its anticipated use as a large, 100-plus-seat restaurant, commissary, meeting/event center and professional offices. Contingent Holdings’ purchase of the Millcroft Inn is good news for the Greater Milford Area Historical Society, which successfully lobbied against plans by a previous owner to build townhouses and flats on the site. “This site has tremendous historical value and if properly and thoughtfully developed can once again be a source of great community pride in Milford and surrounding neighborhoods,” said Donna Amann, administrator of the historical society.

Anderson Pieology closes after 2 years Sheila Vilvens Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Pizza lovers in Anderson Township have one less place to dine. Pieology Pizzeria in Anderson Towne Center is closed. The pizza restaurant announced its closure in an Aug. 27 email to subscribers. No reason was given. The message simply read “Sorry, Pieology Anderson Towne Center is now closed. Thank you for visiting.” It referenced the Pieology U Square on West McMillian Street as an alternative dining option. Anderson Township Trustee Andrew Pappas said he’s saddened anytime a

business closes. “These are people’s jobs we are talking about,” he said. “However, that’s always the challenge in a capitalist system. I hope the employees find new jobs and the space is reutilized to a profitable venture.” Pieology opened in Anderson Township in the spring of 2016 shortly after the opening of Top This Donut Bar & Ice Cream, which is also closed. The latest restaurant closure comes on the heels of the opening of other new dining places in Anderson Township. Chipotle recently opened in the new Shoppes of Anderson Towne Center development. Earlier this year McAlister’s Deli opened for business in the same plaza.


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4A ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

Kroger to ban plastic checkout bags by 2025 Alexander CoolidgeCincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

HELLO Kroger said it will ban all plastic checkout bags by 2025. America's largest supermarket chain said it will transition from single-use to reusable bags and ultimately eliminate 123 million pounds of garbage annually sent to landfills. That would quadruple the amount of plastic the retailer currently recycles. Kroger currently sells reusable bags starting at $1 each. Kroger will ramp up the availability of those bags. Shoppers for the foreseeable future will still have the option of asking for paper bags. Kroger said it is also looking to cut back or phase out plastic bags for produce and meat, but it's focusing on eliminating checkout bags for now. The ban will directly affect a wide swath of consumers: Kroger serves 9 million customers every day at its nearly 2,800 stores in 35 states and the District of Columbia. Kroger's Seattle-based QFC subsidiary, with 63 stores in the Pacific Northwest, will be the first division to eliminate the bags by 2019. Besides hundreds of its namesake stores in the Midwest and the South, Kroger operates hundreds more under the Harris Teeter, Ralphs, Fred Meyer, Fry's and other nameplates. Kroger officials said they are responding to growing environmental concerns raised by shoppers, employees, communities and nonprofits. "The plastic shopping bag’s days are numbered," Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen wrote in an editorial submitted to The Enquirer and USAToday. "Our customers have told us it makes no sense to have so much plastic only to be used once before being discarded – And they’re exactly right." Kroger's decision will pressure other major competitors to follow suit. With nearly $123 billion in annual sales, Kroger is the second-largest grocer (behind Walmart, which is a mass discount retailer that gets half its $500 billion in sales from food). "We're the first major retailer in the U.S. to do this," said Jessica Adelman, Kroger's vice president of corporate affairs, which oversees company environmental and sustainability efforts. Kroger uses 6 billion such bags annually, while the industry discards an estimated 100 billion bags each year.

Kroger uses 6 billion plastic bags annually. The industry discards an estimated 100 billion a year. ALBERT CESARE/THE ENQUIRER

Only 5 percent of supermarket bags are recycled by consumers. Last year, Kroger collected almost 38 million pounds of plastic for recycling in those in-store bins at the front of stores. Additionally, Kroger recycled another 28 million pounds of plastic from other operations for a total of 66 million pounds. The ban comes as individual cities concerned about environmental impact have moved to outlaw such waste. Kroger officials said they decided to implement the transition at QFC because of the division's small size and half its stores already are under a ban enacted by Seattle in 2012. The debate over plastic shopping bags has spread across the nation. Last year, a statewide referendum on California's 2016 ban of plastic bags fell short of repealing the law, so it remains in effect. Kroger's Los Angeles-based subsidiary Ralphs operates under the California law. The legislation banned plastic single-use bags, but authorized a heavier plas-

tic bag (different than standard reusable bags) designed for multiple uses that shoppers can buy for 10 cents apiece. Hawaii (where Kroger has no stores) has a de facto statewide as its largest counties have outlawed them. Other cities that have enacted bans on plastic shopping bags are Austin, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Other cities and counties that are beginning to crack down with fees are: Boulder, Colorado; Brownsville, Texas; Montgomery County, Maryland; New York City; Portland, Maine; and Washington, D.C. Meanwhile, several states in the Midwest, South and the West have passed laws preventing local governments from enacting their own bans: Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri and Wisconsin. "Though the majority of bills propose a ban or fee on bags, or improve recycling programs, most enacted legislation in recent years deals with preemption of local government action," said the National Conference of State Legislators in May.

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EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ 5A

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6A ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

Try jalapenos a new way: candied Rita’s Kitchen

Candied jalapeno peppers/cowboy candy

Rita Heikenfeld

Makes about 9 half pints. These are addictive! Awesome gift, as well.

Picking hot peppers is like picking cucumbers – the more peppers we pick, the more peppers we have. Maybe you’re in the same situation, whether it’s peppers from your garden or the market. So try the candied jalapeno peppers. I’ve had numerous requests again for them. Trendy restaurants are serving their own version of this alongside sandwiches and stirred into condiments. You can make them at home, like my daughter-in-law Jess and I are doing this weekend. That’s what she requested for her birthday. And if you’re in the mood for a quick and yummy fish dish, try the roasted salmon with sweet & spicy glaze. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at rita@com munitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line.

Ingredients 3 pounds jalapenos (throw in a few Serranos if you have them) 2 cups cider vinegar 5 percent acid 6 cups sugar (it’s a lot but remember, you’re candying the peppers) 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2-3/4 teaspoon celery seed 3 teaspoons granulated dry garlic 1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper Instructions Wearing gloves, remove stems from peppers. Slice into 1/8-1/4 inch rounds. Set aside.

Salmon with sweet and spicy glaze No real recipe but a kind of go to taste on ingredients deal. Here’s the improv version: Ingredients Salmon filets with skin Dark or light brown sugar and Dijon or spicy country mustard Salt and pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 400-425. Mix sugar and mustard. Start adding sugar to mustard until glaze is sweet with a bit of a kick. Season fish, place skin side down on sprayed baking sheet. Coat thickly with glaze and roast until fish flakes with fork, about 10-15 minutes, depending upon size. Don’t overbake.

Bring everything else to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Add pepper slices and simmer 4 minutes. They will shrivel a little. No worries. Use a slotted spoon to put peppers into hot canning jars to within 1/4 inch of the upper rim of the jar. Turn heat up under the syrup and bring to a full boil. Boil for 6 minutes. Pour boiling syrup into the jars over jalapeno slices. Insert a knife or skewer into the bottom of the jar and turn it two

Candied jalapenos can be brushed onto meat on the grill or added to potato salad or mayo for sandwiches. RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

or three times to release any trapped pockets of air. Adjust level of syrup if necessary. Wipe top and sides of rims with clean, wet cloth. Why? Even a teeny particle of food that clings to rim prevents a good seal.

Remove jars. Leave them to cool, undisturbed, for 24 hours. Allow to mellow two weeks. Or don’t! Store in pantry up to a year. Don’t want to can peppers?

Screw on 2 piece caps and lids. (Flat cap has to be new; screw on lid does not).

Just store in refrigerator for several months. Or freeze up to 6 months.

Place jars in canner, cover with water by 2 inches. Bring to a full boil. Boil for 10 minutes for 4 oz. and 8 oz. jars, or 15 minutes for pints.

Leftover syrup Delish brushed on meat on the grill or added to potato salad or mayo for sandwiches.

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8A ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

Viewpoints Probation substations help probationers succeed Steven Martin Guest Columnist Community Press

Since the late 1990’s The Hamilton County Common Pleas Court, on which I have served on since 1996, has maintained probation substations in certain communities. Currently there are substations in Madisonville, Price Hill, Clifton/Avondale, and Over the Rhine. The idea came from Mike Snowden who is a former Cincinnati Chief of Police and later was our Chief Probation Officer. The thought behind utilizing these substations was to give people on probation more supervision than was possible with only a downtown location. I was able to get this plan adopted despite misgivings of several judges and Probation Officers. Periodically, I review the performance of these substations. Within the last few months I have gone to the Community Councils of East Price Hill, West Price Hill and Madisonville. The residents in those communities believe, without exception, that those substations are working well. By law, there are some defendants that are required to be placed on probation. I want every one of my probationers

to succeed and by that, I mean to follow the law, get a job, complete their education and be out of the criminal justice system. By being in the community, these officers provide more effective supervision. Probation officers work closely with the community and law enforcement. It is a vital part of the work of our Court. Probation Officers being in the neighborhoods help the probationers succeed. Small problems are solved before they become big problems. Job referrals can be made promptly. If someone needs drug treatment, these officers can arrange that treatment quickly often without violating probation. Simply put, these substations are an effective use of the taxpayer’s dollars. In each of the communities served by these probation officers, there are community groups doing great things. As a Judge, I am proud that these probation officers participate in the community often on their own time. They are a vital link to the citizens our Court serves. I have long felt our Court needs to expand the use of substations. Helping probationers turn their lives around should always be a goal of The Hamilton County Common Pleas Court. Steven Martin has served as a Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge since 1996.

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Choose your moving company carefully Sandra Guile Guest Columnist Community Press

Moving back to campus or moving to a new home takes a lot of organizing, planning, and patience. Choosing someone to pick up all your belongings and take them to another location is a scary prospect, and sometimes the details involved with moving aren’t exactly clear before the first box is packed. Know this: you have rights and responsibilities that protect both you and the moving company that begins when you decide to move until the time the items are dropped at the new door. ❚ Everything starts with the estimate - have the company tell you exactly how much the move will cost in writing and read the fine print. ❚ Know what estimate you received there are three types. 1. Nonbinding - the final cost may be different than what you were quoted originally. 2. Binding - the final cost is the amount you were told during the estimate. 3. Guaranteed to not exceed - the final cost must be at or lower than the number contained in the quoted price. ❚ Insurance is important - the moving company is liable for the value of your items, but there are different levels of liability that may impact the

amount of reimbursement you receive if an item is lost or damaged. ❚ Verify licensing - interstate movers must be licensed and insured by the federal government. Trucks are assigned a motor carrier number, one which you can confirm with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration ❚ Check out who you choose - hiring a moving broker is different than hiring a moving company; they act as middlemen between you and a mover, so make sure you know who you’re working with. Unfortunately, scams are also something to be aware of when getting ready to move. One common scam is when a moving company lures a customer into a deal with low rates and then holds their items hostage in exchange for a ransom that’s two to three times higher than the original estimate. Another is when a deposit is put down on a truck and a moving date is agreed upon, but the moving company never shows up. There are a few red flags that can help you spot a shady moving company, so be wary if they refuse to do onsite inspections; if they demand a large deposit in cash; or if they only have a P.O. Box and have no listing of a brick and mortar location. Should you suspect something doesn’t seem quite right, report it to scamtracker.org. Find additional tips on bbb.org Sandra Guile is the Community Outreach Specialist for BBB.

Teach a person to think and learn forever Chuck Keller Guest Columnist Community Press

I asked this question at the beginning of class: Should the Food and Drug Administration declare chocolate pudding a vegetable? After some giggling, I argued that after all chocolate was made from a bean and pudding was found on salad bars all over therefore it must be a vegetable. Sure, it’s flawed argumentation, but it got the discussion going. Students had to think about their responses, question the premise of the argument, search for support for their claim, and articulate an argument. They had to think. Rote responses were useless. As humorous as this seems, it underscores my premise that we must teach students how to think. In fact, I argue that skills are more important than content in the long arc of life learning. If we know how to ask questions, where to look for answers, and how to evaluate those answers then we as teachers have succeeded. This is my definition of thinking. There is, no doubt, a value to memorizing facts like names, dates, events, definitions, formulae, etc. But there is even more value in asking questions like “Why was George Washington the first American President?” Or “What is our relationship to the environment?” Or “Would the Vietnam War have ended when it did if people did not protest?” Or “Is Romeo and Juliet a love story or a cautionary tale in how not to love?” Students at any age can do this. For 10 of my 34 teaching years, I team-taught the English portion of American Studies, a combination of American History and American Literature. My partner was an amazing talent. Not only did he have a deep knowledge but he was a gifted instructor and

he was academically adventurous. He was willing to take a chance. So we took lots of chances and we failed as well as succeeded along the way, but we learned from our mistakes. It was a joy to see our students become curious lifelong learners and to see their standardized test scores improve. But always we debated content versus skill. Since our discussions made us think more deeply about what, why, and how we were doing, we decided to teach students that same process. Ultimately, it is important for students to become their own teachers. We must teach the how and the why. We must teach them how to think. We must teach how to be constructively critical. If we do not, then we fail the student and the community. And I cannot accept that kind of failure. Teaching to the test may get a student into a good college, but it will not help that student develop in college where she must be an independent learner. And it won’t help students solve problems in the workforce, either. To discuss this will reveal biases in curriculum and teaching styles and may conflict with administration edicts, but it’s worth the discussion. I recently held an online discussion on this topic. One former student told me, “If you are able to critically think and deduct using logic and research, you can become proficient in any content.” The future belongs to those who can think critically, communicate, and solve problems. Teach a student how to think and you have created a learner for life. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going back to the salad bar for some chocolate pudding. Chuck Keller, a retired educator from Fort Thomas, is a member of the Enquirer's Education and Family Life Roundtable. Email: cmkeller@live.com.


Eastside Community Press

❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ 1B

Sports HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL PREVIEW

Mason senior Maggie King finished second last season in the Greater Miami Conference to teammate Anna Brinkmann in total kills. ALEX VEHR/FOR THE ENQUIRER

How will Mercy McAuley affect VB scene? Mark Schmetzer

Special to Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Perhaps the most intriguing question regarding not just volleyball but all Greater Cincinnati high school girls sports this year is what kind of impact will be felt from the new Mercy McAuley. The school formed by the merger of Mercy and McAuley will sponsor teams of athletes from former programs that traditionally enjoyed levels of success in most – if not all – all sports. “We have a unique opportunity establishing the identity of our new program,” Wolves coach Greg Samuels said. “This will lead to one of the deepest rosters that I’ve been a part of with 13 returning players having extensive varsity experience, and with this depth will come lofty team goals.” Mercy won a district championship last season led by outside hitter Shelby Dennis, who ranked second in the Girls Greater Catholic League in kills per set each of the last two seasons, and defender Alyssa Overbeck, who ranked among the GGCL’s top four in digs per set each of the last two seasons. From McAuley comes 5-foot-11 middle hitter Madison Merz, who finished ninth in the GGCL in blocks last season as a freshman. The Wolves still will have to get past defending Division I state-champion Ursuline and regional runnerup Mount Notre Dame in the GGCL. Coach Jeni Case lost seven players to graduation from the state champions, but she welcomes back first-team junior setter Logan Case and second-team allstate libero Maggie Huber. “It’s nice to have two key positions back,” Jeni Case said. “This will be their third year in those

positions.” Coach Chris Lovett’s MND Cougars welcome back significant experience, led by three seniors – outside hitter Samantha Wolf, middle blocker Madison Kern and defender Emily Ernst. “I think that we are going to have a strong defensive team while also matched with a powerful offense,” said Lovett, who’s in his first season as coach after nine as an assistant. Loveland seems poised to make some noise behind senior middle hitter/ setter Marie Plitt and senior libero Corrine Wilson. “Loveland is eyeing the (Eastern Cincinnati Conference) title again this year,” fourth-year Loveland coach Julie Plitt said. Among lower division schools, Division II Bishop Fenwick has just two seniors, but the Falcons return five starters, led by junior setter Grace Maziar. Division III Madeira coach Jennifer Bracken expects the Amazons to be strong in the middle, offensively and defensively, while Dan Coyne is taking over at Williamsburg for long-time coach Ed Stewart, who is recovering from knee replacement surgery. Coyne has five starters back from last season’s 24-2 team.

Players to watch Logan Case, Ursuline, junior setter – First-team all-state last season. Shelby Dennis, Mercy McAuley, senior outside hitter – Second in the Girls Greater Catholic League the past two seasons in kills per set. Maggie Huber, Ursuline, senior libero – Second-team all-state last season. Maggie King, Mason senior outside hitter – The 6-foot Comet finished secSee VOLLEYBALL, Page 2B

Senior Shelby Dennis was second in the Girls Greater Catholic League the past two seasons in kills per set. MICHAEL NOYE/ FOR THE ENQUIRER


2B ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

Turpin’s Bush beating path to state XC title Scott Springer Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

MASON - After the Lakota East Invitational at Voice of America Park in Mason, Turpin High School senior Samantha (Sam) Bush is 2-0 and looking like one of the runners to beat again this fall. She's been so good for so long that one fan was overheard saying, "I thought she graduated!" No such luck for the competition. Sam Bush is back in her familiar frontrunning position. "Sam Bush is the only Sam Bush," Turpin coach Melissa Siemers said. "She has the Turpin cross country as well as the two-mile and mile record in track. She has been the fastest to come through in what she does." Bush has a favorable start, having already won the OHSAA Preview Race at National Trail Raceway in Hebron, Ohio in 18:45. The raceway is normally for motorcycles and dragsters, but harriers like Bush give it a trot to start the season and, if they're lucky, to end the season. Turpin won as a team among smaller Division I schools the opening week and was second to Lakota East Aug. 25. Bush again won that race comfortably in 18:55.8. "The focus was running the two-mile really hard," Bush said. "The first mile I stayed back and stayed with my teammates in the pack. The second mile my focus was to get at it and get to the front." She reached the front and finished with a 19-second cushion over secondplace finisher Carly Spletzer of Lakota East. Bush was 10th at the state meet last year and has some improving to do to better that time of 18:13.2. As a sophomore, she was fifth in 17:55.5. Her freshman year she was 17th in 18:36. Her cross country career started at Nagel Middle School in Anderson Township when she went out and won her first race as a seventh-grader. In spring track and field, Bush is always a distance threat around the oval. She's been an Eastern Cincinnati Conference Runner of the Year three consecutive seasons. Last spring she was tops in the ECC in the 1,600 meters at 4:53.31 and 3,200 at 10:38.37. Bush is also a state meet veteran at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in Columbus having qualified in both longdistance events each season. As a freshman, she was fifth in the 3,200. Her sophomore year saw her take fifth in the 1,600 and fourth in the 3,200, while last year she was third in the 1,600 meters. In both seasons, she's often battled

Turpin’s Sam Bush cruises across the finish line GEOFF BLANKENSHIP/FOR THE ENQUIRER

with Maddie Walker, who ran two years at Amelia and then became part of Bush's ECC competition with West Clermont. Walker will run for the University of Cincinnati. "You're definitely going to see her and Maddie battle. It's a friendly rivalry," Siemers said. "Horter (Danielle) from Lakota East is starting to shine now and you may see freshman Emmy Sager from Milford make improvements. Kings is always going to be strong as they have been the last few years." In addition, Siemers is taking Bush and Turpin to Columbus and Centerville to catch other top competition she may see again in October.

Ursuline junior Logan Case returns after being named First Team All-State last season. ALEX VEHR/FOR THE ENQUIRER

Volleyball Continued from Page 1B

ond last season in the Greater Miami Conference to teammate Anna Brinkmann in total kills.

Emme Madden, West Clermont, sophomore setter – Already committed to the University of Cincinnati. Grace Maziar, Bishop Fenwick, junior setter – Closing in on 2,000 career assists, 500 career digs and 100 career aces for the Falcons. Marie Plitt, Loveland, senior mid-

"It's better to run with people because I obviously get better times," Bush said. "It's nice to have them push you and make you run better." She also doesn't mind getting a little verbal push from coach Siemers at various points of the course. Track meets allow her to feed off the crowd, but cross country features smaller pockets of people along the way. "When I'm by myself, it's definitely a help when I'm slowing down," Bush said. Like West Clermont's Walker, she will also continue her running career in college. She has a pretty prestigious list of six currently in the running for her ser-

vices. "Last week I visited six schools in six days," Bush said. "I visited Penn State, North Carolina State, Virginia Tech, West Virginia, Georgia, and Tennessee." One of those schools will get one of the more consistent runners the area's seen over the last four seasons. With the opening win at National Trail, Bush thinks she knows that course better having led most of the way. Either way, opponents in autumn know to look for the blonde pony-tail in the maroon and gold. "She's definitely a known name," Siemers said. "It always takes her a little bit by surprise that that's the case."

Loveland's Marie Plitt was last season’s Eastern Cincinnati Conference Player of the Year. SCOTT SPRINGER/THE ENQUIRER

dle hitter/setter – Last season’s Eastern Cincinnati Conference Player of the Year. Corinne Wilson, Loveland, senior libero – Led the ECC in digs last season. Chloe Wolf, Kings, sophomore middle hitter – First-team all-ECC as a freshman last season. Samantha Wolf, Mount Notre

Dame, senior outside hitter – Finished fourth in the GGCL last season with an average of 3.54 kills per game. Lexi Wallace, Western Brown She's the sole returning player from the league-champion team that went 15-8 overall and undefeated in the SBAAC.


EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ 3B

Rankings can change from year to year. And while ours climbed to #2, our mission always stays the same. We believe that expert care for our kids creates a better future for all. Until every child, parent and caregiver has a reason to stay hopeful, we’ll never stop. #2forkids


4B ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

The critters are trying to destroy my garden and fruit trees Ole Fisherman George Rooks Guest columnist

Howdy folks. I got the cataracts off both eyes now and by golly everything looks bright. Dr. Bell did this for me. I didn’t realize how bad my eyes were. Now everything is clear and the colors are bright. The farm market at Bethel is doing good. There were several folks selling garden items, one feller selling honey, one selling baked items – the lady that bakes is doing a fine job. Lots of folks sure like what she bakes. Paula and I went down to Mount Moriah for a steak and chicken supper with the VanScyoc’s last Friday. The Bethel Woods had a picnic last Friday and the folks sure enjoyed all the food. It won’t be long till I speak to the folks at Bethel Woods. I will be speaking to the seniors at the lodge above Batavia at the Senior Services Tuesday. I enjoy doing this and they are such a good group. Some remark that I have brought memories of when they were kids back to mind and that is good. Talked to Mike at the bait shop in Afton. He said he is looking for a super fall for fishing. They have caught more blue catfish this year than other years. The crappie are starting to be more aggressive and the channel cat fish are biting real good. He said they’re catching some stripers and musky. The bass

fishing has been slow. Talked to Ken and he said it took 14 pounds of bass to win at Grant Lake. That lake has been very good this year. Talked to Cedar Lake and they had a contest Aug. 28 to Sept. 1. The garden is getting about done. The tomatoes are still getting ripe. The bell peppers are getting bigger and the cucumbers are good. I have one vine that has crawled up the side of the fence and has some nice cucumbers. I set some blueberries out in the spring and got a handful of blueberries. The birds got the rest. Next year I will need to put a cover on the plants and hope that keeps the birds out. I have a groundhog or whistle pig – this is a nickname for the critter that is digging under one of my buildings. Now the raccoons have company. The squirrels and crows have eaten all the apples and pears off my trees. It seems if you don’t fence or do something, the critters will destroy a garden and fruit trees. Mr. Chester, my cat, is doing fine. He only likes one kind of cat food and if I get the wrong kind he just sits and looks at me. Start your week by going to the house of worship of your choice and praising the good Lord. God bless all . . . More later . . . George Rooks is a retired park ranger, Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park.

Classes for older adults coming to Clermont County PROVIDED

Classes for older adults coming to Clermont County Are you 50 or older and ready to learn new things? This fall the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Cincinnati (OLLI), will offer classes at UC Clermont College. The non-credit, daytime classes well be held during an eight-week, fall session at the Batavia campus. Winter and Spring sessions in 2019 are also part of the pilot program. OLLI offers affordable classes in a friendly, casual environment –no tests, no grades, and no pressure. The only prerequisite is an interest in stretching your mind and meeting interesting people. OLLI offers hundreds of classes each year on a wide variety of subjects and topics. The multi-week courses, onetime programs and field trips are held at several locations in Greater Cincinnati in addition to the Batavia campus. OLLI will hold four, multi-week seminars on Tuesdays this fall at UC Clermont College and eight, one-time programs. Two multi-week seminars - “A

DIRECTORY

EMAIL: servicedirectory@gannett.com or CALL: 877-513-7355, option 7

Forestville Baptist Church 1311 Nagel Rd

ECKANKAR – the Path of Spiritual Freedom You are invited to the ECK Light and Sound Service

513-474-3884 www.forestvillebaptist.com Sunday Services: Discovery Groups ~ 10am Morning Service ~ 11am Evening Service ~ 6pm Youth Group ~ 6pm

10:00 am - 11:00 am Second Sunday of Each Month Anderson Center 7850 Five Mile Road, Cincinnati, OH 45230 (800) 891-7713 EckankarOhio.org Worldwide 1-800 LOVE GOD ECKANKAR.org

Wednesday Bible Study & Kids Program ~ 7pm Nursery provided for all Services CE-0000692527

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST 937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

513-722-2541

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. GUM Youth - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Every Sunday: 6 - 12th grades JR. GUMY - 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 2nd Sunday of month: 3rd - 5th grades Email: goshenumc@fuse.net Follow us on

Handicapped Accessible Scott Wade, Senior Pastor Amber Blake, Children’s Pastor Kenny McQuitty,Youth Director Lana Wade, Worship Director SUNDAY: Sunday School (all ages) Worship Service Children’s Worship (Age 4 - 5th Grade) Evening Activities for Children, Youth, & Adults

7341 Beechmont Avenue (Near Five Mile Road) Email: csandersontownship@gmail.com

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

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CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP Sunday 9:30 & 11 am

231-1020 christiansciencecincinnati.com

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • AndersonHills.org

9:30 am 10:30 am

6:00 pm

MONDAY: Ladies’ Bible Study/Prayer Group

10:00 am

WEDNESDAY: Choir Youth Group (Grades 6-12) Children (Age 4 - 5th Gr.)

6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm

THURSDAY: Celebrate Recovery 6:30pm New Hope Campus, 243 S. Fifth St., Williamsburg S. Charity & E. Water Streets Bethel, Ohio 45106 - 513-734-4204 Office: M-F 10:00 am - 2:00 pm E-mail: bethelnazarenechurch@gmail.com www.facebook.com/BNC4me

CE-0000692243

TRADITIONAL WORSHIP Sunday 8:30 & 11 am

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Anderson Township

Saint Mary Church, Bethel 3398 Ohio SR 125

CE-0000692524

Sunday Service & Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Testimonial Meeting 7:30 p.m. In Church Reading Rm/Bookstore Open after all services. Downtown Reading Rm/Bookstore 412 Vine Street, Cincinnati Open Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

6710 Goshen Rd., Goshen (Across from Goshen High School)

CE-0000692537

(Across from Anderson Post Office)

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Phone 734-4041

Everyone is welcome! Weekend Worship Saturday: 5 p.m. Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m.

Nursery, Children’s & Youth available 6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 513.677.9866 • www.epiphanyumc.org

Rev. James Reutter Saturday Mass – 4:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM ccc.city

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am AWANA Ministry Wednesday 6:45 - 8:15pm Bible Study 7:00 - 8:00pm Youth grades 6-12 7:00 - 8:00pm Nursery provided for all services

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

Come, connect, grow & serve

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301 Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

TO PLACE AN AD: 513.768.8400

Childrens Ministry & Nursery PASTOR PAULA STEWART

www.cloughchurch.org

Short History of Terrorism” and “Clermont County, Its History and People” will run simultaneously from 11 a.m 12:30 p.m. Two other classes - “Getting Older Ain’t for Sissies” and “Stately Homes of England” – will run simultaneously from 2-3:30 p.m. “Brown Bag Lunch” programs will be held on Tuesdays from 12:40-1:50 p.m. OLLI members are encouraged to bring their lunches to these one-time programs on a different topic each week. Subjects of these programs include “Tales from Spring Grove Cemetery,” “Decision Making,” and “Route 66 and the Food along the Way.” A full description of OLLI’s UC Clermont College classes is found on pages 39 and 40 of the OLLI Fall, 2018 catalog. Classes begin Sept. 17 at OLLI’s multiple locations in Greater Cincinnati. For more information and to request a catalog visit OLLI’s website at www.uc.edu/ ce/olli or call 513-556-9186. Carol Heideman, OLLI at UC

TO PLACE AN AD: 513.768.8400

Ruff’N Stuff 4-Hers weeding/mulching church grounds. PROVIDED

Ruff ’N Stuff 4-H Club’s yearly community service for Christ Presbyterian Church By Noah Munz, Ruff’N Stuff Reporter The Ruff ’N Stuff 4-H Club does a yearly community service project to pay back the community. The Ruff ’N Stuff 4-H Club has operated out of the Christ Presbyterian Church for many years. To repay the church for letting the club operate in their building, Ruff ’N Stuff decided to pay back the church by doing our yearly community service at the church. The Ruff ’N Stuff 4-H Club, advised by Brenda Bayne, has done volunteer work for the church to repay this debt before in 2012. To continue to repay the

debt, we decided to volunteer again this year. The volunteer work that the group has done both times is landscaping the area around the church. The group planted flowers, spread mulch and weeded the church grounds. The head of landscaping was at the event and was very thankful that we helped landscape and beautify the church. The project was a success and the club was happy that they could help the community and pay back the kindness that the church had offered them. Brenda Bayne, Ruff ‘N Stuff 4Hers


EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ 5B

Felicity-Franklin FFA at the Clermont County Fair Throughout the week of July 22, many Felicity-Franklin FFA members attended the fair to show several species of animals, compete in the Skillathon, run for fair royalty, and work in Felicity FFA’s first-ever T-shirt booth at the Clermont County Fair. 2018 graduate and former FFA reporter Kolbie Brandenburg was named Sheep Representative in the royalty contest. Fellow graduate and 2017-18 FFA president Erin Jennings also succeeded in the run for royalty when she became the 2018 Fair Queen. Several FFA members from eighth through 12th grades showed cattle at this year’s Clermont County Fair. Many of these members exhibited class winners, including graduate Erin Jennings, junior Mallory Taulbee, and freshmen Garrett Taulbee, Luke Jennings, Emma Laubach, and Wyatt McElfresh. Luke Jennings showed the Grand Champion Breeding Heifer, Reserve Champion County Born & Raised Breeding Heifer, fourth Overall County Born & Raised Feeder Steer, fifth Overall Feeder Steer, and 5th Overall Market Steer, and was named Grand Champion Beef Showman. Mallory Taulbee won Grand Champion Feeder Steer and

Grand Champion County Born & Raised Steer. Garrett Taulbee showed the Reserve Champion Feeder Heifer and 3rd Overall County Born & Raised Feeder Heifer. Emma Laubach had the Reserve Champion Feeder Steer and third Overall County Born & Raised Feeder Steer. Finally, Wyatt McElfresh showed the Reserve Champion Market Steer and third Overall County Born & Raised Market Steer. Other cattle exhibitors included Chase Jarman, Clayton Lindsey, Maggie Mahaffey, Connor Ninichuck, Mikie O’Dell, Alex Simmermon and Ethan Simmermon. Goats were another common species to show among Felicity FFA members, where many were class winners and showmanship class winners. Alisha Boone showed the 3rd Overall Market Wether and Reserve Champion County Born & Raised Market Wether, won her showmanship class, and was Champion Skillathon Participant and Champion Outstanding Exhibitor. Olivia Taylor showed the fifth Overall County Born & Raised Doe. Clayton Lindsey showed the Champion Rate of Gain animal and third Overall County Born & Raised Wether, which was raised by fellow FFA member Steven Jones.

Goshen Local Schools receives grant from the Ohio Department of Education. PROVIDED/MARK EDWARDS, GOSHEN LOCAL SCHOOLS

Goshen Local Schools receives grant from the Ohio Department of Education Goshen Local Schools has recently been awarded a nearly half million dollars grant to increase both college readiness opportunities as well as industry credentialing opportunities. Only 17 school districts in the state of Ohio were awarded the grant from the Ohio Department of Education. The grant was established as part of Ohio’s strategic plan for education known as “Each Child, Our Future.” The purpose of the grant is designed to expand access to and increase enrollment in advanced coursework for students including lowincome students through the development of career pathways, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate opportunities. The grant awarded to Goshen Local Schools is for $425,000 over the course of three years. The grant fits well with Goshen Local Schools future and current college and career readiness initiatives. At Goshen the grant will fund strategies aimed at: Developing more advanced placement and college course opportunities, Developing new industry credentialing pathways, Increase career exploration and college readiness ef-

forts in elementary and middle school. “A commitment to access and equity is deeply embedded in our history and mission at Goshen.” said Superintendent Darrell Edwards. “We believe in every student’s talent and potential to make important contributions to our world. This grant will deepen our capacity and speed our progress toward making good on our district mission for all students to perform at increasingly higher levels.” The money specifically will be used for initiatives such as to help further develop the college Information Technology program that was created through the partnership between the University of Cincinnati and Goshen Local Schools. A portion will be used to bring in state of the art

equipment for Goshen students to not only take college level computer courses, but also help those students gain industry credentials that usually are earned by post-secondary students. In addition, tools that help monitor students’ progress towards post High School goals will be added to help engage parents with the college and career planning process. One of the Board of Education’s Target Areas is “Career and College Readiness”. The grant means that more opportunities will come to Goshen students and families. These opportunities will help lead the way for a bright future for all students in the Goshen Local School District. Mark Edwards, Goshen Local Schools

Harlie Brandenburg was the third Overall Goat Showman, showed a class winner, and won her showmanship class. Kolbie Brandenburg had the Grand Champion Market Wether, Reserve Champion Market Wether, Grand Champion Junior Doe, won her showmanship class, and was the Reserve Champion Goat Showman. Kolbie also won Champion Sheep Showman and her showmanship class with a class winner. Other goat showmen included Clayton Falgner, Emilee Falgner, Whitney Hauserman, Katie Janson, Steven Jones, Makayla Lindsey, and Maggie Mahaffey. In the swine show, Luke Jennings was named Champion Outstanding Exhibitor and Champion Skillathon Participant and showed the 5th Overall Market Barrow. Steven Jones had the Champion Barrow Rate of Gain. Mallory Taulbee was the Champion Swine Showman, won her showmanship class, and exhibited the 3rd Overall Market Barrow. In addition, Chloe Taulbee and Erin Jennings won their respective showmanship classes. Swine exhibitors also included Alisha Boone, Luke Dunaway, Emma Laubach, Garrett Taulbee, and Olivia Taylor. Poultry exhibitors included Madison Baird, Colton Stamper, and Madison Winter. Baird was named the Champion Intermediate Poultry Outstanding Exhibitor and had a class winner. Winter showed the Champion Goose and Overall Champion Waterfowl. She also succeeded in the rabbit barn with the Reserve Champion Californian and was Champion Rabbit Showman. In the Showman of Showmen contest, three Felicity-Franklin FFA members competed among three species. Luke Jennings won second place as representative for beef, Mallory Taulbee

Felicity-Franklin FFA at the Clermont County Fair. From left: Showman of showmen competitors Harlie Brandenburg (fourth place), Luke Jennings (second place), and Mallory Taulbee pose with their ribbons. PROVIDED/KYRA DAVIDSON, FELICITY-FRANKLIN FFA

was third place as representative from swine, and Harlie Brandenburg placed fourth as a representative for goats. General project displays by FFA members included Agriscience Fair posters by Kyra Davidson, Alisha Boone & Trinity Evans, Seth Roehm & Braden Blackburn, Joseph Glassmeyer & Jared Hamilton, Landen Tull, Macey Donovan, Kiersten Chandler & Sara Doane, and Madison Baird & Reagan Lowe. Taylor McElfresh displayed her woodworking project and vegetable projects included Wyatt Crozier, Carson Crozier and Logan Moore. Each FFA member who showed this year proved Felicity FFA to be the home of many extraordinary showmen. Kyra Davidson, Felicity-Franklin FFA, Reporter

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6B ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

ANDERSON TOWNSHIP 1037 Alnetta Drive: Armstrong John E to Aretz Lori S; $174,000. 5607 Brookstone Drive: Heimkreiter John T & Klarissa J to Kohlhepp Scott & Jenni; $827,500. 2730 Caledon Lane: Hoekzema Leslie M Tr to Foley Todd J & Katharine M Durso; $324,000. 1729 Citadel Place: Low-Tabscott Amy M to Casagrande-Pike Emily & Dustin Pike; $220,000. 8594 Coran Drive: Alidelbi Mhd Basel & Rihab Idelbi to Pastura Anthony; $175,000. 2336 Donnington Lane: Faulisi Marco Charles & Sara to Mcnutt Bradley T & Lauren J; $412,000. 400 Fourth Ave.: Cunningham William P & Shirley to Tilley Mary L; $35,000. 2115 Hunterspoint Lane: Thurston Hale W & Yngrid C to Yates Gabrielle & Michael; $308,000. 1101 Immaculate Lane: Seybold Scott M & Natalie to Schultian Bernard L & Tara

A Dunaway; $215,000. 823 Indian Trace Court: Witte Amy to Shah Parth N & Julia A; $370,000. 8545 Ivy Trails Drive: Hart Robert S III & Victoria L to Farmer Daron & Brooke; $875,000. 932 Phillips Road: Wical Johner A Jr & Ashley N to Wolfer Vanessa; $109,900. 1310 Schirmer Ave.: Bausch Matthew & Erin to Forsha Richard II; $130,000. Stoney Bridge Drive: Hart Robert S III & Victoria L to Farmer Daron & Brooke; $875,000. 794 Strathcoma Drive: Bonow Brooke E to Mccarroll Keith M & Mindy; $267,000. 8295 Tidewater Court: Custom Corporate Logistics LLC to Huffman Carmen A; $195,000. 2333 Wolfangel Road: Faske Robert D & Kathleen R to Four50 Llc; $133,001. 7337 Woodcroft Drive: Sledge Brandi L to Mederer Michelle A; $275,000. 7113 Woodridge Drive: Boenning Richard A to Casari Michael S; $130,000. 1716 Yellowglen Drive: Ramer David L & Robinette L to Amato Carol A;

$256,220.

MOUNT WASHINGTON 1416 Antoinette Ave.: Holtzleiter Adam J to U S Bank National Association; $79,800. 6355 Corbly Road: Davis J Richard to Quarra Properties Ltd; $55,300. 6355 Corbly Road: Rouse Eileen Tr to Bentz Ellen S; $110,500. 1959 Honeysuckle Lane: Duncan-Wilson Jason J & Michelle L to Bayer John & Gretchen; $259,000. 2464 Kewanee Lane: Ratz Heather L Charles E to Griffith Caitlin N & David D; $200,000. 1914 Mears Ave.: Higgs Mary Esther Tr to Cincy Construction Llc; $82,500. 1914 Mears Ave.: Cincy Construction LLC to Edgar Construction LLC Tr Of Trust 212; $89,900. 1276 Moonkist Court: Beck Robert R & Pamela M to Hutton Kathleen R; $160,000. 5624 Sunvalley Lane: Austin Mackenzie

Editor’s Note About Calendar The Community Press and Recorder Calendar sections will return soon, after modifications are made to the processing system. We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

R & Robert R Hesler to Lipscomb Karen R & Richard; $209,900. 1726 Sutton Ave.: Longbow Properties LLC to Lopez-Freeman Roberto Antonio; $238,000.

Milford’s 13th Annual Art Affaire Sept. 22 The Greater Milford Area Historical Society (GMAHS), in association with Lykins Energy Solutions, will present the 13th Annual Art Affaire - Milford’s premier art and fine craft show - on Saturday, Sept. 22, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event is free and open to the public and will be held, rain or shine, on a closed three-block section of Main Street (U.S. Route 50) in historic Milford. “Art Affaire is a primary fundraiser for GMAHS,” comments Donna Amann, administrator, GMAHS. “We are extremely pleased that the show continues to grow, our sponsors stay committed, and the community embraces this magnificent display of local and regional art. The Main Street venue in historic Milford is also very special, as it allows us to showcase artists as well as feature the quaint shops and cafes on the street.” The 2018 Art Affaire call to artists generated several applications. “We received our largest-ever number of applications with nearly 40 percent of those from artists new to Art Affaire,” says Mary Ward, artist coordinator, Art Affaire. “We are definitely pleased with the quality and diversity of this year’s participating artists.” The 13th Annual Art Affaire will feature: ❚ A record-breaking 120 juried local and regional artists exhibiting and selling original works in clay,

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Lapis and silver cuff bracelet by 2017 Art Affaire Best of Show Winners - father/daughter jewelry artists team, Aaron Rubinstein and Haguit Towler-Rubinstein PROVIDED

digital art, drawing, fiber art, glass, jewelry, leather, metalwork, mixed media, painting, paper and print

making, photography, sculpture, wearable art and wood. ❚ Several demonstrating artists, including the Ohio Valley Woodturners Guild; Wade McCarren and O’Neal Johnston, wood carving; June Ludwick, pine needle baskets; John Middick, drawing; and more. ❚ A variety of strolling musical entertainment including Civil War guitarist, Steve Ball; Bear Foot with Russ and Barb Childers featuring Appalachian music and storytelling; Kevin Moran, Americana music; Lars Noble, country music; Roaring 20’s Barbershop Quartet; and Wild Carrot with American roots music. ❚ Food by 20 Brix, Harvest Market, Lehr’s Prime Market, Padrino Italian and Tickled Sweet; and wine and beer from Lehr’s Prime Market. The event will feature two hospitality tents where visitors can relax and enjoy refreshments. ❚ A Community Cultural Tent featuring local and regional arts-related organizations including Artsy Fartsy, Cincinnati Art Museum, Clermont Chorale, Clermont County Public Library, Historic Milford Association (HMA), Milford History Library, Milford Theatre Guilde and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)/UC Clermont. For more information, visit MilfordHistory.net Mary Ward, Mary Ward & Associates

Soiree for Success set for Sept. 29 Soiree for Success, the Forest Hills Foundation for Education’s (FHFE) annual gala fundraiser, will be held on Saturday, Sept. 29 at the Anderson Center on Five Mile Road in Anderson Township. In its fifth year, the Soiree for Success includes dinner by the bite, cocktails, a live and silent auction, and live music. The public is invited; online registration is open at FHFE.org. All proceeds from the Soiree go to fund FHFE programming at Forest Hills schools, including Destination Imagination, Teacher Grants, Robotics, After-school Tutoring and activities at Nagel, and College and Career readiness opportunities for high school stu-

Tina Howard BETHEL - Tina Kaye Howard, 52, of Bethel, passed away Tuesday,

August 28, 2018 at Anderson Mercy Hospital. She was born November 4, 1965 in Bucyrus, OH, daughter of Frank and Sandra K. Shivener Howard of Amelia, OH. She was preceded in death by her sister, Lisa Dawn Howard; maternal grandparents, Billie and Patsy Shivener; paternal grandparents, Leslie and Myrtle Howard; maternal great-grandparents, Hank and Blanche Shivener and paternal great-grandparents, Earl and Annie Spires. Tina taught at William Bick Elementary Primary in Bethel for 31 years. She was an active member and the Grant Memorial Methodist Church in Pt. Pleasant where she was the Secretary of the Board and chairperson of Hannah’s Circle. She also taught Sunday school at church. Tina loved every child that she taught and every child and parent loved her. In addition to her parents, Tina is survived by a host of aunts, uncles and cousins. Family and friends may visit from 5:00 – 8:00 PM, Thursday, August 30, 2018 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home, 177 W. Main St. (SR 125), Amelia, OH. Funeral service will be held at 10:00 AM, Friday at the funeral home with Gordy Ginn officiating. Burial will follow at East Liberty Cemetery, Lynx, OH. Please sign her online tribute wall at www.ecnurre.com.

Forest Hills Foundation for Education board members and Soiree for Success planning committee members and hostesses recently met to discuss the Sept. 29 event From left: Beth Davis, Maggie Hummel, Jenny Gavin, Dee Stone, Julie Bissinger, Joyce Gundling, Catherine Moulas, Gina Crowley, Angi Zoglio, Robin Rothfuss, Tracy Huebner, and Marta Meeker. PROVIDED/DEE STONE, FHFE

dents, For more information, contact FHFE executive director Dee

Robert Oetzel NEW RICHMOND - Robert R. Oetzel, husband of 62 years to Sally E. (nee Randolph) Oetzel. Father of Garrett (Sonja) Oetzel, Richard Oetzel, and Sarah (Douglas) DeAtley. Grandfather of Amy, Jody, Amber, Daniel, Marissa, and Savannah. Robert’s passions in life were his family and farming. He passed away at his home in Monroe Township, on Monday August 27, 2018 at the age of 84. Visitation will be held at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home (Amelia) on Tuesday September 4, 2018 from 1:00 PM until time of services at 3:00 PM. Interment at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

Stone at dstone@fhfe.org. Dee Stone, FHFE

Parkside Christian Church hosts free Medicaid presentation Attorney Dennison Keller, will discuss Medicaid at Parkside Christian Church at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 8. This free presentation is open to the community and will cover the criteria for Medicaid eligibility, allowable assets, what to do and what not to do in the process. RSVP by emailing Dennison pcc@parksidechrisKeller tian.com. Beth Warren, Parkside Christian Church


EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ 7B

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8B ❚ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 ❚ EASTSIDE COMMUNITY PRESS

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 0902 GOING HEAD TO HEAD BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

50 Bit of P.R. 1 Group of trees 53 Like baseball’s Durham Bulls 6 Potential queens 54 Speaker of Welsh or 11 Word that looks like Breton its meaning when written in lowercase 56 Actor Elba 14 Harmless weapons 58 One of the o’s in “o/o” maker 59 Rank above maj. 18 Strong suit? 61 Showdown in cinema 19 “Continue” 65 Mork’s planet 20 “Foucault’s 66 Brightly colored Pendulum” author, blazer 1988 67 Obie-winning 21 Like the Gregorian playwright Will calendar 68 “What is it?” 22 Showdown in Greek 69 Showdown in the mythology funnies 25 A couple of times 74 Not use cursive 26 Word of confirmation 77 University in Des on a messaging app Moines 27 Couple 78 Greenish-brown hue 28 Showdown in classic 79 Neighbor of China video games 81 What’s used to row, 30 Quickened paces row, row your boat 32 Wasn’t struck down 83 Leave fulfilled 33 Realm 85 Less than perfect 34 Tours can be seen 88 Geometric prefix on it 89 Italian “il” or French 35 Triumph “le” 37 Not in any way 90 Prattle 39 Showdown in 92 Showdown in American history the Bible 43 Hot ____ 95 Protein shell of 44 One of four in a grand a virus slam 98 Like sauvignon blanc 47 Univs., e.g. 99 Traditional Christmas 48 Bent over backward, decoration in a way 100 Jump to conclusions Online subscriptions: Today’s 103 Some petting-zoo puzzle and more animals than 4,000 past puzzles, 106 Word with wonder nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). or world AC R O S S

107 Showdown in comic books 109 Lead-in to boy or girl 111 Simple plant 114 Ostentation 115 Showdown in literature 118 Businesswoman Lauder 119 Apt name for a Braille instructor 120 TD Garden athlete 121 Knock over 122 Cowardly Lion portrayer 123 ____ bit 124 Overjoy 125 Bone: Prefix

RELEASE DATE: 9/9/2018

15 Stefanik who is the youngest woman ever elected to Congress 16 Fast one 17 “____ Jacques” 21 Conductors’ announcements 23 “____ where it hurts!” 24 Uncle, in Argentina 29 Under half of 45? 31 Brother of Dori and Nori in “The Hobbit” 32 Surprising lack of Oscar recognition 34 Suitable for a dieter, informally 35 Body of water connected by canal to the Baltic DOWN 36 Watson’s company 1 What “Talk to the 38 Defeat hand!” is an 39 Govt. org. based in Ft. example of Meade, Md. 2 Unswerving 40 Word before right 3 “I couldn’t agree or rise more!” 41 Move turbulently 4 They’re found under a 42 Increasingly ripe, say bridge 45 Wedding need … or 5 Beats by ____ booking (headphones brand) 46 Stereotypical 6 Short strokes therapist’s response 7 “Alas!” 49 Pipe cleaner 8 Sudden impulse 51 Enthusiasts 9 Sister 52 Go wrong 10 “Try me” 54 Part of the eye 11 Be relevant to 55 Wapitis 12 Country named for its 57 British Bulldog : latitude Churchill :: ____ : 13 College student’s Thatcher assignment 60 Undistinguished, as 14 Words after an many a subdivision interruption house

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GIVE TO NEEDIEST KIDS OF ALL Yes, I would like to contribute to NKOA. Enclosed is $___________________. Name______________________________________________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________________________ Apt. No. ___________ City_______________________________________________________ State_________________ Zip___________ Please send this coupon and your check or money order, payable to: NEEDIEST KIDS OF ALL, P.O. Box 636666, Cincinnati, OH 45263-6666

Make a credit card contribution online at Neediestkidsofall.com.

Neediest Kids of All is a non-profit corporation now in its 64th year. Its principal place of business is Cincinnati, and it is registered with the Ohio Attorney General as a charitable trust. Contributions are deductible in accordance with applicable tax laws.


Classifieds

SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

Homes for Sale-Ohio

JOBS

Automotive

WANTED! TOYS & PROTOTYPES

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

We are collectors seeking toys, prototypes & tools relating to toy development and production! If you were a vendor for any of the major toy companies including Kenner, Mattel, Hasbro, or LJN throughout the 70’s, 80’s, or 90’s please contact us!! ∂ STAR WARS ∂ REAL GHOSTBUSTERS ∂ SUPERPOWERS ∂ M.A.S.K. ∂ MILLION DOLLAR MAN ∂ BATMAN ∂ ALIEN ∂ CARE BEARS

Kenner & Hasbro CALL OR TEXT 937-361-8763

∂ PROTOTYPES ∂ PACKAGINIG SAMPLES ∂ TOY BLUEPRINTS ∂ EMPLOYEE PAPERWORK

Real Estate

Rentals great places to live...

Milford SEM Villa

Rent subsidized Voted Best of the East Senior apartments 62 + older Immediate Occupancy Newly renovated apts Secure building Service coordinator Visiting physicians 513-831-3262 TTY 1-800-750-0750

(1) Acre ready to build Lot, Top Gated Resort, Somerset, KY area. Paid $33,000. will take $10,000 for Quick Sale. See www. lakecumberlandresort.com ∂ On site Boat Ramp ∂ 3 Pools ∂ Tennis court ∂ Boat ∂ Storage ∂ Fuel ∂ Country Store. Build anytime make trip to see, Rent a cabin on the property overnight and I’ll reimburse the rental fee if you buy my lot! Owner Tony: 606-219-9283

Homes for Sale-Ohio Amelia: Lg 2 bdrm apartment , heat water & waste paid, Quiet area, near shopping, $650 513-207-8246 Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. 1-3BR. 513-929-2402 Equal Opportunity Housing

FELICITY Garrison Place Senior Apts. 62 and over, Rent Subsidized Free Utilities, Secure Building On-site laundry Pets Allowed 513-876-3590 TTY 800-750-0750 FT. THOMAS. 1 & 2 BDRM APTS & 1 BDRM TOWNHOMES 859-441-3158

Lincoln HTS- A great place to live & great loc. in a historic village! Oak Park Apts is now accepting applications for 1, 2, 3 & 4BR apts. A/C, fully equp kit, lndry fac., off-st prkg. Prof. managed. 513-563-7740 MT. AUBURN- Walk to Christ Hosp., 1 BR, great architecture, W/D on site, $550 + utils. 513-289-5697 MT. LOOKOUT 1 & 2 BDRM Grandin Bridge Apartments 513-871-6419

Pre-Leasing Brand New Mixed Income Apts Mins To Downtown! Residencesatavondale.com Residences at Avondale Town Center, (513) 898-2467 | TTY: 711, 3635 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH

Small 2 BR, 1 BA, gar., big yard, Owensville out, $89,500 513-724-6150

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Salesforce Software Project

Analyst: Manage Salesforce-based CRM (Customer Relationship Management) software projects. Support Apttus-based CLM (Contract Lifecycle Management) implementations. Manage end-to-end design, development, testing model and implementation, over JIRA using an Agile methodology. Write Apex classes, Arrange CRUD settings, setup OAuth. Create VisualForce pages. Req. MBA degree. Job location: Cincinnati, Ohio. Resume: Cyangate, Fax: 413 235 0242

Delhi Lawn Service Inc Turf Applicator FT/PT Apply fertilizers & weed controls. Must have a valid driver’s license. Willing to train. $13/hr while training & $15/hr upon completion. 513-451-2129

Office Coordinator Tri-County consulting firm looking for a strong analytical minded college grad seeking a career opportunity to grow with the company. Strong people skills & a multi tasker are essential to succeed. Great Benefits. Email: ksetna@crs401k.com

Condominium for rent: Impeccable 2BR 2.5 BA, finished basement, new carpet & appls. No pets. $1250/mo Loveland Area. Call Vivian 513-258-8484

Loveland 9993 Union Cemetery Rd on 2.5 acres. 3 BDR, 2 BA, LR, DR, kitchen, full basement, & deck. New carpet & paint. $1,150/month + $1,150 sec dep. 513-683-6812

HAND OUT THE CIGARS! Celebrate with a announcement. VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things... Annual Spring DOLL Show & SALE . Sat, April 14th, EnterTrainment Junction Expo Room, 7379 Squire Court, West Chester/Cincinnati, Ohio 45069. (I-75 Exit 22/ Tylersville Rd) 10am-3pm. $5 adult adm. FREE "Let’s Play" exhibit. 513-207-8409 or askmargie@aol.com

BURLINGTON ANTIQUE SHOW Boone County Fairgrounds Burlington, KY Sunday, SEPT. 16 -----------8am-3pm $4.00/Adult Early Buying 6am-8am $6/Adult Rain or Shine 513-922-6847 burlingtonantiqueshow.com

Sony Camera Equipment, Sony A900 ( 24.6MP ) Full Frame Body. Sony A77 ( 24.3MP ) Body with Zeiss 16-80 zoom Lens, $Sony A900 $700.00, Sony A77+ lens $900.00. (513)3783159 rlsigrist@me.com

Hopewell CemeteryMontgomery OH two gravesites, excellent location. Half Priced! 513-659-6116

SEASONED Firewood, Split, Stacked & Delivered. 1/2 cord $125. 859-760-2929

Rides best deal for you... Buying All Vehicles Not Just Junk up $3000 Fair cash price, quick pickup. 513-662-4955 We buy junk cars and trucks cash on the spot û†û 513-720-7982 û†û

BMW 2004 X3, SUV, 156,300 mi., 4 dr., Automatic, Good cond., Red ext., Beige int., VIN#WBXPA73444WC35979, 06 Cylinders, AWD, Very Clean. New tires, $3,200. Lorin Wolfe (513)708-6844

FORD 2015 Escape SE. Excellent cond., 91,000 mi, 4WD, black. Private owner. $11,900. 513-266-4568

∂ PLAYSETS/VEHICLES ∂ PHOTOGRAPHY ∂ CONCEPT DRAWINGS ∂ TOY PATTERNS

We Buy STAMP Collections! Old Letters U.S. & World 40 years in business 513-624-6800

randyschollstampcompany.com

3 Cemetary Lots in Forest Lawn Memorial Park. Section 486, Block B. Side by Side. $2000 ea. 228-875-4648

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

HOMES

Adopt Me

Pets

1 BUYER of OLD CARS CLASSIC, ANTIQUE ’30-40-50-60-70s, Running or not. 513-403-7386 Chevrolet 1965 Corvette, Convertible, 2 dr., Manual, Excellent Restoration cond., Red ext., Black int., 08 Cylinders, 2WD, Alloy Wheels, Bucket Seats, Cassette Radio, Leather Interior, New frame up restoration, Proven Car Show Winner. Not a Trailer Queen., $51,000. (513)8740847

Toyota Venza LTD 2014 SUV, black, loaded, new condition, 32k mi, 1 owner $17,900 513-863-6165

CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

find a new friend... ADOPT- Animal Rescue Fund. Open Mon-Sat 11-5; Closed Sun & Holidays 513-753-9252 www.petfinder.com

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

WE SERVICE ALL APPLIANCES Also Selling Washers & Dryers w/ 1 year warranty. 513429-1091

HANDYMAN No job too big or small incl. electrical. Call Bob & compare. 513-248-2130

Hendel’s Affordable Û Tree Service Û

WE SERVICE ALL APPLIANCES Also Selling Washers & Dryers w/ 1 year warranty. 513429-1091

HANDYMAN No job too big or small incl. electrical. Call Bob & compare. 513-248-2130

∞513-738-9913 ∞ ∞513-266-4052 ∞

Bernedoodle Puppy, Standard Female, 12wks, vet checked, UTD shots $700 937-417-324 German Shepherds pups, BLACK-RED only 3 super boys left 2year Health @ Hip guarantee see pics and reviews of past and present pups @Ken dall Haus Shepherds (513)8464742 knifeone@hotmail.com

BUYING ALL TYPES OF KENNER TOYS & HISTORICAL MEMORABILIA. Help add to the largest private STAR WARS collection in Ohio! Did you or a family member used to work for Kenner? We are LOCAL paying CASH for prototypes, packaging samples, displays, artwork, paperwork, and toys in all conditions. Heck, we will even buy your KENNER business card! Looking specifically for STAR WARS, M.A.S.K., Jurassic Park, GI Joe, Alien, Stretch Armstrong, The Real Ghostbusters, and most character lines. 1980’s and older only please. Help keep Kenner history here in Cincinnati! Call or text 513.500.4209 - Please leave a voicemail if we don’t answer, or email us at CincyStarWarsCollector@gmail.com . Save this ad- we buy all year !

Shih-Tzu, AKC, Vet Checked, First shot/wormed, champion breed, 1 chocolate imperial female, ready to go! $800, 812-637-2494

Call today for Autumn & Discount Pricing!

GOT EXTRA STUFF? Put it up for sale. VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys BUYING CHINA, Crystal, Silverware,DownsizingMoving Estate 513-793-3339 BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985 Freon R12 Wanted: R12 collecting dust? Certified professional pays CA$H for R12. (312)291-9169 RefrigerantFinders.com I BUY STEREO SPEAKERS, PRE AMP, AMP, REEL TO REEL TURNTABLE, ETC. RECORDS, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (513) 473-5518

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347

Garage Sales neighborly deals...

ESTATE SALE HYDE PARK 3523 St. Charles Place 45208 Fri. 9/7 & Sat. 9/8 10:00-4:00 NUMBERS AVAILABLE AT 8:00 FRIDAY. THIS IS A RELOGISTICS SALE. Unique offerings in one of Cincinnati’s favorite ommunities. Full of elegantly classic and timelessly vintage items. Fabulous furniture, antique china, Waterford crystal, original art work, books, kitchen accessories and SO MUCH MORE! Go to relogisticsestateservices.com/estate_sales

for more information. DON’T MISS THIS ONE! Credit cards accepted. (We use the number system.)

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

WANTED ARTISTS & CRAFTERS Sharonville Kiwanis Arts & Craft Show. Sharonville Community Center. Sun Sept 30. 513-563-1738 email: patchancetaylor@gmail.com

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

1202 Immaculate Lane, Sat. 8am-3pm. Lots and Lots and Lots of stuff, great for Ebay resale!

Friendship Flea Market, Freindship, IN Sept. 8 - Sept. 16, Open Daily 9am Southeastern IN, 45 mi. west of Cincinnati, on State Road 62. 859-341-9188 www.friendshipfleamarket.com Bring this ad for $1 off parking Monday - Thursday.

Amelia, Yard , 228 Deer Creek Dr, Fri: 8-4, Sat: 8-4, Cleaning out after 18+ yrs. 8 man tent $150, Coleman cot $50, various computer/electronic acces, Racing collectibles, office supplies, kitchen items, deco items, crafting, books, gardening, flower pots, bathroom, linens, cleaning, pressure washer (needs work), baby/kid toys, baby (including bassinet, swing, car seat), dog supplies, Christmas. So much more. , Dir: 125 to Huntsman Trace to right on Deer Creek Dr. BeechmontVineyard Green Condo Community Wide Garage Sale 3810 VINEYARD GREEN DR, Saturday , Sept. 8, 8a-3pm Estate Sale, Indian Hill, 7514 Muchmore Close, Fri. - Sun., 9a-4p, Pristine items, antique cherry corner cab., step cab., DR set, walnut server, pie safe, wicker BR, Pottery Barn, Frontgate, Pier1, Chico, Sharper Image, tons of Xmas, toys, tools, patio & more

Liberty Twp: Hawthorne Hills Community Garage Sale off Milliken, between Yankee Rd & Maud Huges; entries off Milliken at Hawthorne Reserve Drive & off Maud Huges at Woodgate Way. Saturday, Sept. 8th 9am-3pm Rain DateSunday, Sept. 9th Participant maps downloadable @ hawthornehillsliberty township.org after Wedneday Sept. 5 Montgomery, 10240 Kerrianna Dr, Sat: 9-1, ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT AMERICAN LEGION POST 630. Furniture, tools, childrens, household, jewelry, electronics, sports, holiday items. We will also collect worn flags for proper & respectful disposal, Dir: Kenwood Rd -Zig Zag- Kerrianna


2C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

PRESENTS

ONE DAY UNIVERSITY

LIVE TALKS ONE DAY UNIVERSITY at

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 | 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM Memorial Hall - Anderson Theater | 1225 Elm St | Cincinnati Do you love to learn? Not to pass a test or start a career or fulfill job requirements, simply for the pure fun of it? Well, so do we! That’s why One Day University creates fascinating days of learning designed to invigorate your mind. We work with over two hundred award-winning professors from the country’s top colleges - from tenured chairs of academic departments to rising stars on campus - to create events that are always educational, entertaining and unforgettable.

HISTORY

No matter what your passion, you’ll find that every One Day U event is filled with thoughtprovoking talks that will challenge you as if you were a freshman in college once again! And just like your college days, you’re sure to meet new friends who share the belief that learning is a rewarding lifelong process. At One Day U, there’s no homework and no grades. Just learning for the sake of learning!

The Civil War and Abraham Lincoln: What’s Fact and What’s Fiction?

9:30 AM 10:35 AM

Louis Masur / Rutgers University Clive Prize for Teaching Excellence

PSYCHOLOGY 10:50 AM 11:55 AM

FILM 12:10 PM 1:15 PM

Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College Princeton Review’s Best 300 Professors

Three Films That Changed America Marc Lapadula / Yale University Award for Outstanding Teaching

LIVE EVENT Full Price: $159

$109

Only next 90 registrants Use code CinCom109

Register Today To Lock In Your Discount For This Remarkable LIVE Event

Visit OneDayU.com or Call 800-300-3438


SEPTEMBER 5, 2018 Âľ EAST - COMMUNITY Âľ 3C

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

PUBLIC NOTICE In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at the Life Storage location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s) to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, September 24, 2018, at 10:00 AM 1105 Old State Rt 74 Batavia, OH 45103 513-752-8110

Legal Notice Public Hearing—Milford Planning Commission Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. Place: Council Chambers, 745 Center Street, Milford, Ohio.

Craig Massey 42 Deer Creek Amelia, Oh 45102 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment Tosha Richards 4007 Brandy Chase way #262 Cincinnati, Oh 45245 Household Goods/Furniture Kylie Campbell 4495 Eastwood Dr apt 15306 Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture Brenda Horner 420 E. Main St Gallatin, Tn 37066 Household Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances, Office Furn/Machines/Equip, Landscaping/Construction Equip, Acct. Records/Sales Samples Christopher Bentley 4232 Seclusion Ct Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment Courtney Durbin 1074 Shayler Rd Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture Stacy Mckeel 1156 Creekstone Dr Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture Michael Grooms 4479 Eastwood dr Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture CJC,Sept.5,12,’18#3100011

Legal Notice Village of Newtown Planning Commission The Village of Newtown Planning Commission will be conducting a Public Hearing at 6:00 pm, on Thursday, September 27, 2018, at the Newtown Municipal Center, located at 3537 Church Street Newtown, Ohio 45244. The purpose of the Public Hearing is to consider a zone change request for 7202 Main Street from Office Research Park to General Business. PUB:FHJ,Sept5,12’18 #3129961

Site 18-12 High Street Residential Planned Development Zoning Map Amendment. The City will hold a Public Hearing to consider a zoning map amendment request. The applicant and property owners, Phil & Suzanne Ditchen, are requesting to add a Planned Development Overlay to the following parcels: 210731B046B, 210731B043B and 210731B540. The properties are located on the east side of High Street. The applicant is proposing to construct four single family homes on the subject site. The property is zoned R-3 single Family Residential District. This request is being considered pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 1133 of the Milford Zoning Ordinance. A copy of the proposed plans may be viewed at City Hall, 745 Center Street, Milford, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. If you have any questions regarding the Public Hearing, please call Pam Holbrook, Assistant City Manager, at (513) 248-5093. MMA,Sept5’18#3129701

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION Unit # 321 George Wolpert 2191 St. Rt. 125 Lot 44 Amelia, OH 45102 Unit # 156 Tonia Anderson 4146 St. Rt. 276 Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 143 Heather Saylor 281 Sherwood Ct. Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 280 Tresa Kirby 356 Seneca Dr. Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 148 Samantha Fink 339 Brown St. Bethel, OH 45106 Unit # 108 Charles Fribourg 306 Sweetbriar Dr. Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 150 Sean Empen 318 Shannon Circle Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 336 Lisa Bowling 4013 Alexander Ln. Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 118 Sam Humphries 5335 Mississippi Dr. Fairfield, OH 45014 Unit # 110/211/212 John Jones 215 Park Meadow Dr. Batavia, OH 45103 Unit # 177 Misty Hollifield 154 S. Front St. Williamsburg, OH 45176 Your Personal Property Stored at: Discount Storage Plus 2636 Old St. Rt. 32 Batavia, OH 45103 513-732-9888 Will be sold for payment due Cin,Sept5,12,’18# 3122228

  

                 

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.

Terri Harvey 700 University Ln #204 Batavia, Oh 45103 Household Goods/Furniture

The Milford Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing to consider the following case:


4C µ EAST - COMMUNITY µ SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

FROM

“NO FOOD ALLOWED.” TO

“HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?”

You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.

Bethel Journal 09/05/18  
Bethel Journal 09/05/18