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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1 Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u l y 2 3 , 2 0 0 9

Steven Watters of River City Barber

Vol. 110 No. 28 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Meeting police and firefighters Bethel takes part in National Night Out activities Aug. 4 By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

$1,500 cash giveaway

JOURNAL

Bethel’s residents will have the chance to get to know the village’s police and firefighters during National Night Out at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4, at Burke Park. National Night Out is a crime and drug prevention event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch designed to strengthen the relationship between local law enforcement and citizens. The Bethel Police Department,

the Bethel-Tate Fire Department, the Clermont County Sheriff’s Office, the Ohio State Highway Patrol and the U.S. Army will be in Bethel that night. “I believe that it is a night where all of the residents can come out and enjoy a free event and talk to our officers, firemen, troopers and deputies,” said Bethel Police Chief Mark Planck. There will be activities for children as well as free hot dogs and drinks donated by several Bethel businesses and the Wal-Mart in Amelia, Planck said. The Army

also will be making free dog tags for children. Bethel-Tate Fire Chief Rick Stowell said his department will have a fire engine, aerial tower and extended ladder at the event. “We’ll also have pamphlets and smoke detectors to give away to people who need theirs replaced or don’t have them at all,” he said. Firefighters and police officers are looking forward to the chance to meet residents in a non-emergency setting, Planck and Stowell said. “They love to interact with the

public and we’re usually stuck in the building so people don’t get a chance to talk to firefighters unless they have a reason to do so,” Stowell said. “The more we can get out in the public and talk fire prevention and safety and just about the operation of the department in general, the better.” Planck said the event allows his officers to better understand who the residents are. “The village has many wonderful people to socialize with,” he said.

Explore local ‘ocean’

Whether you’re looking for an outdoorsy stay-cation or just a day trip for the kids, the Cincinnati Nature Center has you covered. The nature center, on Tealtown Road, Union Township, is hosting it’s first of four seasonal exhibits called Discover Our Hidden Ocean. “We wanted to tell our members and the community about what we have here as a natural resource. We have people coming from all over the world to see our fossils from the Ordovician era,” said Kristi Masterson, the center’s community relations manager. This ongoing exhibit is different from the nature center’s usual programs, which are typically one-day events. FULL STORY, B1

Kings Island bound

Readers who won tickets to Kings Island as part of our Readers Choice survey are: • Michael Brunner of Cincinnati • Tara Reese of Hamersville • Darla Hartmann of Cleves • Mark Class of Alexandria, Ky. Watch the newspaper for more Readers Choice announcements in coming weeks. For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Bethel, OH 45106 ISSN 1066-7458 * USPS 053-040 Postmaster: Send address change to The Bethel Journal 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170 Loveland, Ohio 45140 Annual Subscription: Weekly Journal & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.00; Weekly Jounral only all other in-state $20.00; Out-of - state $20.00

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

A last farewell

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Church displays crosses

Recently, volunteers from St. Mary’s Church in Bethel parish put up 4,000 crosses representing the 4,000 babies aborted each day in the U.S. As volunteers were placing the crosses, people from other churches stopped by to help.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

A hearse carries the body of Spec. Greg Missman into Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Withamsville for burial services July 17. The Pierce Township resident was killed in Afghanistan July 9. For more photos, see page A4.

Bethel approves $2,000 for laptop By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

Bethel Village Council voted Monday, July 13, to purchase a $2,068 HP laptop for Village Administrator Travis Dotson. Dotson has been using his personal computer for several weeks, after giving his office computer to a utilities clerk. “When they changed operating systems for the utilities billing department, one of the girls’ computers couldn’t handle the system so Travis gave her his,” said Donna Gunn, village council member and finance committee chair. The laptop will be purchased using water and electric enterprise funds instead the general fund, said Fiscal Officer Angel Burton. “As village administrator, he oversees the utilities department’s operating expenses, personnel

Navigate your way to the right car for you.

and supplies which are all covered within the enterprise funds,” she said. Gunn also said the village’s general fund, which is operating in the red, will not be impacted by the purchase. “We have money in general, but it’s not in the general fund,” she said. “It’s in water and electric funds, but we cannot transfer money out of those enterprise funds into the general fund. That’s an Ohio Revised Code stipulation.” Council member James Dick, who voted against the purchase, said he did not have enough background information on the laptop, but that does not mean he disagreed with the need. “I had no information prior other than what was mentioned before council so if it’s something that’s justified and needed, I don’t have an issue with it,” Dick said.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Carrie Fairchild, left, and Laura Rogers, both of Bethel, hold up an American flag at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home in Amelia for the arrival of Spec. Greg Missman, who was killed in Afghanistan.

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Bethel Journal

News

July 23, 2009

Clermont County Fair pays tribute to grassroots By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Whether you’re into funnel cakes and elephant ears or carnival rides and demolition derbies, the Clermont County Fair has something for everyone. But Bill Scharber, Cler-

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@c

unityp

mont County Agricultural Society president, said no matter what fair-goers come for, they should take a little time to check out the animal projects presented by the 4-H, Junior Fair and the Future Farmer’s of America. “That’s what the fair is all about, the grassroots,�

JOURNAL

Find news and information from your community on the Web Bethel – cincinnati.com/bethel Felicity – cincinnati.com/felicity Franklin Township – cincinnati.com/franklintownship Moscow – cincinnati.com/moscow Neville – cincinnati.com/neville Tate Township – cincinnati.com/tatetownship

Scharber said. “People should come out to see the showmanship and the projects, it’s about supporting our youth.� Pam Burns, co-coordinator of the Junior Fair and 4H Club adviser, said the Junior Fair programs in Clermont County, including 4H, FFA and Scouts, have about 1,000 members between the ages of five and 18. “It’s very popular,� she said. “(4-H and FFA) teaches the kids responsibility and how to take care of

their animals.� Each club will have a booth at the county fair explaining the projects club members are showing. Burns said the deadlines and project requirements also helps educate the kids. “Junior Fair has a positive impact on the kids and the community,� Burns said. Scharber said between 70,000 and 100,000 people typically come to the fair each year, but he’s always hoping for more. Profits from entry and

other fees go to the Clermont County Agricultural Society, which supports the 4-H, Junior Fair and FFA. The entry fee is $10 – parking, exhibits and grandstand shows are free. The 160th Clermont County fair is 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday, July 26, through Saturday, Aug. 1. The Clermont County Fairgrounds are at 1000 Locust St. in Owensville. Scharber said if people want to come to the fair, but can only come one day, they should come Monday,

Bethel wants to hire auxiliary police officers

News Theresa L. Herron | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7128 | therron@communitypress.com Mary Dannemiller | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 248-7684 | mdannemiller@communitypress.com Kelie Geist | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7681 | kgeist@communitypress.com John Seney | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7683 | jseney@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Anthony Amorini | Sports Reporter . . . . . 248-7570 | aamorini@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 248-7685 | mlamar@enquirer.com Angela Paolello Marcotte Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4715 | amarcotte@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Diana Bruzina | District manager . . . . . . . 248-7113 | dbruzina@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

The Bethel Police Department is looking for auxiliary officers to improve patrols in

the village. When a full-time officer was laid off earlier this year to ease the department’s burden on the village’s general fund, it created the need for more auxiliary officers. “Auxiliary officers work 24 hours a month free and then any hours after that they are paid $10 an hour,� said Police Chief Mark Planck. “The paid hours are on an as-needed basis� Currently, the department has one part-time officer, four full-time officers and five auxiliary officers. The department would like to add five more auxiliary officers, Planck said.

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“I would need those officers to work for full-time officers while they are on vacation or taking sick time,� he said. “I think it’s a win-win situation for them, as I am always in need of officers to work hours that they would be paid for.� Aside from covering fulltime officers’ shifts, the auxiliary officers help with events like Bethel’s Down Home Christmas and Homecoming parade, said Bethel village council member Donna Gunn. “They’re important because they help us reduce overtime,� she said. “They can fill slots when a full-time or part-time officers are not available and when we need more than just our regular crew. They add more bulk to our force during the times we need them.� Planck said he was looking for officers who are honest, punctual and possess strong moral character. “Any interested persons that have been to an Ohio Peace Officer Academy and hold a valid certification should request an application from me or any Bethel police officer during regular business hours Monday Through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,� Planck said. The department is at 120 W. Plane St. in Bethel.

Index

        

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the fair’s least crowded day. Highlights from Monday’s schedule includes the cutest baby contest, Rabbit Hash band, Comet Bluegrass Allstars and the Ohio State Tractor Pull Association’s tractor pull. “People should come check out the fair, rain or shine, it’s a lot of fun,� Scharber said. “There have been many years where it has rained, but we still have a good time.� “The Clermont County Fair is a tradition,� he said.

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July 23, 2009

Bethel Journal

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Bethel Journal

News

July 23, 2009

Missman’s life, service celebrated

By Kellie Geist and John Seney

Clermont@communitypress.com

Flags and yellow ribbons lined the thoroughfare as hundreds of people came to the Union Township Civic Center to pay their final respects to Army Spec. Greg Missman. Missman, of Pierce Township, died July 8 of wounds sustained while fighting in Afghanistan. Private and public visitations were held Thursday, July 16, at the civic center. While the family mourned Missman’s death, they also used the visitation as a way to celebrate his life and sacrifice. “We’re here to celebrate daddy’s life because daddy was a strong soldier who loved us and we loved him,� Missman’s 4-year-old son, Jack, said with some prompting by his mother Brooke Missman Elkin. Missman’s brother Michael said while Missman was a great soldier, he also was a wonderful brother and friend. “I can’t think of a better person. He’s always been there for me as a great role model ... He always knew how to put a smile on my face,� Michael said. Missman, 36, graduated from Amelia High School in 1992 and served a threeyear stint in the Army in the 1990s. After 11 years of civilian life, Missman reenlisted Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and was sent to Afghanistan earlier this

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Members of the Patriot Guard line the driveway of Mt. Moriah United Methodist Church in Withamsville for the funeral of Spec. Greg Missman, who was killed in Afghanistan.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Two Union Township fire trucks hold a flag above the hearse carrying the body of Spec. Greg Missman at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home in Amelia.

KELLIE GEIST/STAFF

Spec. Greg Missman

PROVIDED

summer. Missman was assigned to the 704th Brigade Support Battalion Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division in Fort Carson, Colo. He is the first Clermont County service-

Family, friends and community members made their way into the civic center’s gym to pay their respects to Spec. Greg Missman. man to die in Afghanistan. Missman and his father Jim were both members of the American Legion Post 72 in Mt. Carmel. Missman is the third member of that post to be killed in action

Missman’s body arrived in Dover Air Force Base, Del., July 9. After the visitation, Missman’s funeral was July 17. “It’s a terrible sacrifice – it’s so painful and such a

loss,� said Missman’s mother Donna Missman Turner. “We’re all real proud of Greg ... He will always be my hero.� Funeral services were at Mt. Moriah United Methodist Church in Withamsville, followed by burial at Mt. Moriah Cemetery. A military honor guard marched in front of the hearse carrying Missman from the church to the cemetery. Members of veterans groups and others pay-

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ing their respects lined the way holding American flags. Katrina Howe of Withamsville and her two daughters held flags as the hearse passed through the cemetery. She said she didn’t know Missman, but his aunt lived in her neighborhood. She came because “he’s a solder.� Johnny Robinson of Chillicothe, Ohio, traveled 100 miles to attend the funeral, “to do what’s right.�

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SCHOOLS

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

| NEWS | Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128 ACHIEVEMENTS

ACTIVITIES

| HONORS communitypress.com

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@communitypress.com

A5

JOURNAL

Allen wins national skills competition By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Hillary Allen knows what it takes to be in the health care industry and she’s not even in college yet. Allen, of Williamsburg who attended Bethel-Tate High School and the Grant Career Center, won second place in Basic Health Care Skills at the SkillsUSA national competition. Allen and Lauren Meadors, of Williamsburg High School and the Grant Career Center, competed at the 45th Annual National Leadership and Skills Conference and SkillsUSA Championships in June. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to encourage students to excel in trade, technical and skilled service industries, according to the organization’s Web site. Allen and Meadors went to the national competition last year as part of a community service team. After taking 8th place out of 44 teams, they wanted national medals their senior year. “We wanted to go back and try to medal. Having been there before gave us the motivation to do that,” Allen said. “If you’ve never been, you don’t know what it’s like.” Allen spent the year studying everything from health care terminology to nutrition to prepare for the competition. “At the competition, they can really throw anything at you,” Allen said. “We learned most of the skills in class, but you never really know what they are going to ask.” Allen claimed the silver in Basic Health Care Skills. She is planning to continue using the skills she’s learned from Grant’s Allied Health Science program

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club members Shelby Church, left, and Chelsey Abbit paint the inside of the Junior Fair Board office July 14 at the Clermont County Fairgrounds. The members’ goal was to make the fairgrounds look nicer for the fair.

PROVIDED

Grant Career Center SkillsUSA National Champions Lauren Meadors, left, and Hillary Allen. when she attends the Ohio State University for athletic training. Meadors took first place in Medical Math. This was the first year for the Medical Math competition at the national level. Meadors, who recently graduated from the Allied Health Science program, is planning to study nursing at Christ College of Nursing. Pam McKinney, public relations director at Grant Career Center, said Allen and Meadors earned two of 15 medals instructor Myrna Little’s allied health students have won in the last 10 years. “They come from a long line ... It’s this little pocket of greatness not many people know about,” McKinney said. “It’s rare for a school to have one student win, but to send two to nationals and have them both win is pretty amazing.”

Felicity-Franklin uses grant money to buy kitchen equipment By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Felicity-Franklin High School’s cafeteria is getting a shiny upgrade for the new school year. The district received an American Recovery and Investment Act grant through the Ohio Department of Education Office of Safety, Health and Nutrition. The $20,833 grant will be used to purchase a Combi oven. “The Combi oven is actually an oven that can cook and steam food. Most of the schools have them, but it’s an expensive piece of equipment we’ve just never been able to afford,” said Michelle Utter, food service supervisor. Utter requested the Combi oven in anticipation of not being able to use the deep fryers because of the National School Lunch Programs efforts to offer healthier food choices.

“I think eventually we’ll have to stop using the deep fryers because of health (reasons), but we didn’t want to have to cut out things like French fries,” Utter said. “This will help us be able to offer different and healthier food choices.” Felicity-Franklin was one of two districts in Southwest Ohio to receive funds to purchase kitchen equipment. “Michelle worked many hours making sure she had exactly what was required to get this grant,” former Superintendent Bill Shepherd said. “Michelle and her staff do a wonderful job preparing and serving quality lunches to the students of the district.” Felicity-Franklin also applied for stimulus money for technology upgrades in the district and Shepherd said they are hoping to hear on those grants in the near future.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

The Bethel and New Richmond 4-H members paint a barn at the Clermont County Fairgrounds July 14.

Community service

Tuesday, July 14, members from the Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club, along with members from the New Richmond 4-H’ers, worked on painting and cleaning up barns and the Junior Fair Board office at the Clermont County Fairgrounds. The members’ goal was to make the fairgrounds look nicer for the fair.

COLLEGE CORNER Graduates

Jared A. Butts and Joel D. Weaver, both of Bethel, recently graduated from Wilmington College. Butts received a B.S. in sport management and Weaver received a B.A. in sport management.

Dean’s list

Margaret Van Over has been named to the 2009 spring semester dean’s list at Southern State Community College. She is from Bethel.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

From left, Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club members Scott Wagner and Austin Church move the ladders to scrape paint off a building at the Clermont County Fairgrounds July 14 as part of a community service project.


SPORTS A6

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

| YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7118 HIGH

SCHOOL

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

communitypress.com

Rugby growing in the Tristate By Mark Chalifoux

The Ohio Rugby Union is part of USA Rugby and oversees rugby in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Chase Deck makes contact with the ball against the Warriors.

The Bethel Tigers advanced to the county tournament final four before falling to the Milford Warriors July 16. Bethel pitcher Allen King was strong through the early innings against the Warriors, though the Warriors won 10-5

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel catcher Blace Haviland catches a high pitch against Milford.

Bethel run ends

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Dillon Utter slides in for a run against Milford. The Tigers put up five runs in the loss.

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s T.J. Boyd slides across the plate for a Tigers run while the Bethel fans celebrate.

BRIEFLY Wrestling with commitment

Bethel-Tate High School student Cory Disbennett recently committed to wrestle for the College of Mount St. Joseph. Disbennett is a 2009 Ohio state qualifier.

McNicholas High School wrestler Justin Meineke also committed to wrestle with the College of Mount St. Joseph.

Tweet, tweet

Follow the Community Press sports staff on Twitter at twitter.com/cpohiosports.

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Zack Puckett smacks a line drive against Milford.

SIDELINES Become a soccer official

The Southern Ohio Soccer Officials Association will offer an instructional class for new soccer officials beginning July 28 at Roades Crossing, 453 W. Main St., Mt. Orab. Class will meet three times a week at 7 p.m. and will last about two hours each evening. The final test will be given Aug. 22. Students will meet all the require-

ments (25 hours classroom and onfield instruction) to become a licensed Ohio High School Athletic Association official after passing the test. The class costs $100, which includes books, materials and OHSAA registration. Prospective students should contact Randy Hiler at 937-444-4194 or Edward Huffman at 625-8318 to enroll.

The thing that separates rugby from other sports is the camaraderie the sport fosters. A rugby player in a new city isn’t alone for very long. “I’ve lived in several different places and when I get to a new city, one of the first things I do is look for a local rugby club because it’s an instant peer group,� said Charles Dainoff, vice president of the Ohio Rugby Union. “You immediately have a group of friends that can ease your transition into a new community. It’s a great sport and a great way to meet people.� Rugby is a sport that’s on the rise in the Tristate as new players are joining the existing clubs and starting their own. The Ohio Rugby Union is part of USA Rugby and oversees rugby in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. There are 11 rugby clubs in Cincinnati and one in Northern Kentucky. That includes all age groups, from men’s clubs to collegiate teams at Xavier and Cincinnati and several area high school clubs. “Generally speaking, it’s all one big community,� Dainoff said. “We’re already starting to see kids transition from high school rugby to college rugby and it’s a sport you can play for 20 or 30 years if you’re committed to it.� Dainoff plays for the Cincinnati Wolfhounds, based in Fairfield, and occasionally plays for Wolfhounds 35 and older team, the Greyhounds. Clubs in the city often have different divisions for players depending on experience level. “There’s plenty of room for people to compete at whatever level they are comfortable with,� Dainoff said. “It’s a lot easier to get involved than you think. All

             

you have to do is find out where a team is practicing and show up and introduce yourself.� The list of rugby clubs is on the ohiorugbyunion.org Web site. While the sport may look confusing at first, Dainoff insisted it’s not as chaotic as it seems and compared it to soccer and football. “Two teams are trying to advance the ball from one side of the field to the other to score,� he said. And almost as important as how the game is played is the social aspect of rugby. It’s a long-standing tradition in rugby for the home team to throw a party for the visiting team to thank them for coming to play. “You leave the rivalry on the field and that’s part of building this network of friends,� Dainoff said. When he moved to San Francisco, Dainoff was reunited with a former opposing player he’d been involved in a scuffle with while both played for different teams. “That was in the past and we were great teammates on this new team a few thousand miles across the country,� Dainoff said. “That’s sort of rugby in a nutshell.� The game is growing at the youth level too, according to the ORU’s youth director Chris Hopps. High school teams have been created at Moeller, Walnut Hills, Northbend (St. Xavier and Elder), and Indian Springs. Hopps said he hopes to have a parochial league in Cincinnati in the near future and that his goal is to spread rugby to anyone in high school or younger. The most prevalent way to generate interest, which can eventually build to the formation of teams, is through camps and clinics to teach the game to new players. “We make it so anyone can walk through it,� Hopps said. “They are learning rugby without knowing it.�

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JOURNAL

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VIEWPOINTS

July 23, 2009

EDITORIALS

LETTERS

standing them on the rock pillars at North Carolina’s Dry Falls, snapping their pictures with the falls as the backdrop. I have pictures of my daughters, Debbi and Shari, posed at the same posts when they were children. But the Brumagems can’t travel long distances anymore. It took a comment from co-worker Jeanne Siegel, the program manager for Clermont Senior Services, to help me “rethink” family traditions. I was telling Jeanne how much fun it was having Gia and Gabe camp with me at the Grassy Run Rendezvous this spring. I explained how the grandkids watched the tipis and traders’ tents go up, that Gabe loved the music, Gia enjoyed “shopping” traders row with her Grassy Run BFFs Ella and Coral, and how Gabe went in the dance ring by himself for a men’s dance during the Native American dance presentation. “I’m glad they can camp with me, because I know I probably won’t be able to take them on family trips like the ones I went on with my grandparents,” I said. Jeanne replied, “Sharon, Grassy Run is part of you. Just think of the experience Gia and Gabe are getting. As kids, most of

Sharon Brumagem Town Crier

us dreamed about being princesses and cowboys. Your grandkids are living their fantasies with you. What a wonderful gift you are giving them!” Jeanne’s words opened my eyes. Sometimes what become family traditions are so obvious, we overlook them and their importance in our lives. Having the grandkids at Grassy Run the past two years has had an impression on them. During the Fourth of July weekend when Gabe heard fireworks, he yelled, “More powder!” Also, I wouldn’t be getting ready to go “camping” with them this weekend in the heart of Covington where their back yard is no bigger than their tent, and where we’ll be making pancakes over a wood fire in the brazier both remember from Grassy Run. So next year (hopefully), when Gia and Gabe are sitting in the “Tecumseh” audience with me during the Battle of Tippecanoe scene, and Gabe shouts, “More powder!” I can smile and think, “A tradition lives on!” Sharon Brumagem is co-founder of Grassy Run Historical Arts Committee and is the volunteer/communications coordinator for Clermont Senior Services.

tralia whom I have known since I was 2. We discussed the moon landing just the other day as we were together when it happened. I have lived in Theresa L. the USA for 27 having Herron years, come here first in Editor’s 1976 and returnNotebook ing a few years later. I have lived in Cincinnati for the last 22 years. However, I was born and raised in Australia and even though it is multiple time zones away I remember where I was when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. It was actually a chain of circumstances that allowed me to watch the first moon walk. Because of the time differential (16 hours when we are on DST) it was after 2 p.m. the next day. I was 25 at the time and naturally was at work during the day. However, a childhood friend who lived in New Guinea at the time was back in Sydney for a conference; he lived about three miles from where I worked. At the time I was the office manager of a bakery and when the production was finished for the day (about 10 a.m.) I pretty much could come and go as I pleased. The moon landing, even in Australia, was seen as a momentous achievement. Australians felt some

pride in the whole space program, as a lot of the tracking was done from space telescopes and radio units in Central Australia (truly the Outback!), so there was a vested interest in its success. My friend and I sat in the living room of his mother’s house and watched the first steps on an old black and white TV. After a quick beer for lunch it was back to work, but it certainly stuck in our minds. As he is here in the USA to help me celebrate my 65th birthday, the landing was one of the things that we were reminiscing about just this week. To be together on the 40th anniversary, I feel, is a really interesting piece of trivia. Randy Kleine of Milford wrote: Like many young fellows who grew up during the space race of the 1960s, I was glued to the progress of the moon shot. Therefore, even though my family was engaged in camping activities at Lake Cumberland, Kentucky, I sat in my Mom’s station wagon (remember those?) listening to the car radio. Surrounded by woods, I now joined the astronauts, Neil and Buzz, in experiencing a new wilderness. Thanks for sharing. I hope you all got to see some TV coverage of the anniversary. Theresa L. Herron is the editor of The Community Journal, Community Journal North, Milford-Miami Advertiser and The Bethel Journal. She can be reached at 248-7128 or therron@communitypress.com.

OFFICIALS DIRECTORY Ohio House of Representatives

Ohio Rep. Danny Bubp (R-88th District) may be reached for questions or concerns at his Columbus office at 614-466-8134 or via e-mail at district866@ohr.state.oh.us.

at 614-466-8082, e-mail tniehaus@mailr.sen.state.oh.us, or write Ohio Senate, Room 38, Statehouse, Columbus, Ohio 43215. Include your home telephone number and address.

Ohio Senate

U.S. House of Representatives

Ohio Sen. Tom Niehaus may be reached

COLUMNS

U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt (R- 2nd District

|

CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

238 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 1-800-784-6366 • Cincinnati office: 8044 Montgomery Road, Room 540, Cincinnati, Ohio 45236. Phone: 513-791-0381 or 1-800-784-6366 • Batavia office, 175 E. Main St., Batavia, Ohio 45103. Phone: 513-732-2948.

Rep. Jean Schmidt recently introduced legislation to increase the federal weight limit on tractortrailer trucks to 97,000 pounds from the current 80,000-pound limit and to increase the use of double trailers on our nations highways. I have serious concerns with Ms. Schmidt’s proposal. First and foremost, bigger trucks will result in more rollover accidents making our highways less safe for everyone. Ohio’s decision this past spring to raise the speed limit for heavy trucks to 65 mph combined with Schmidt’s proposal is a recipe for a public safety disaster. A basic physics equation holds that momentum equals mass times velocity. When you have significantly larger and heavier trucks traveling at higher speeds, the damage caused by accidents will be exponential, resulting in greater loss of life and limb. Indeed Gerald Donaldson, senior research director for the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, said of Schmidt’s proposal: “More lives would be lost in large truck crashes” and “More bridges would be placed at an increased risk for catastrophic failure.” The danger is so great that truck drivers themselves are upset at the prospect of having to deal with much larger vehicles. The Teamsters union opposes Schmidt’s legislation, as do the families of truck accident victims. My second major concern is that our nation’s roads and bridges are already in bad shape and increasing the weight load and use of double trailers will result in even more degradation of our infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Highway Cost Allocation Study reports that large trucks

E-mail: clermont@c

unityp

JOURNAL

JOURNAL

already pay just half of the cost of the damage they cause to our highways. Taxpayers pay the difference. Schmidt’s bill therefore amounts to an David unfunded federal Krikorian mandate that will put even more Community stress on our fedPress guest eral, state and columnist municipal budgets. Schmidt’s proposed legislation is good for profits at large trucking businesses and companies like International Paper that are lobbying hard for Schmidt’s legislation. As a business owner myself, I am in favor of pro-business legislation, but not at the expense of the safety of our citizens and our country’s national interest. Rail transportation has been proven to be significantly cheaper over long hauls consuming far less energy. In terms of cost, safety and environmental impact, investment in our railway system to transport larger loads, faster is the best alternative. Schmidt’s legislation would undermine our railway system and indeed many rail groups oppose it. The federal government’s job is to promote the national interest and in this case we should be focusing efforts on modernizing our railway infrastructure. Schmidt would have us looking backwards. I think you agree that it’s time to look ahead. Above all public safety must not be compromised. David Krikorian is a Democratic candidate for Congress from Ohio’s Second District. He lives in Madeira.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Do you think the economic stimulus plan is working, or should the federal government implement another round of stimulus packages? “This answer depends on if you are promoting freedom, independence and smaller federal government, or power in the Democrat Party. “Much of the funding does not occur until the elections of 2010 and 2012, which is designed to guarantee continuation of the corrupt election process of complete Democrat control. “I would urge no more funding We really do not have the money and this process will eventually destroy our financial system leaving our grandchildren deep in un payable debt. “Please urge your congressmen to vote no on government health care, carbon caps. my generation fought WW2 for freedom not socialism.” F.J.B. “The stimulus package is not working, and there is no way I think another round will help the small businesses, regular people like me. I think that the stimulus package is just helping the rich, big corp. CEOs keep their private jets, vacation homes, etc. There needs to be away for the average Joe to get some relief.” C.M.

A publication of

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

A7

Trucking bill will hurt country’s economy

Readers remember first moon landing I wanted to thank everyone who commented on my column about the first moon landing and walk by the U.S. astronauts. One person told me I have an incredible memory. I thought about that, but it’s not that I have an incredible memory. It’s the event. It was huge and it stuck with me just like it stuck with many of you. Here are some comments from a couple of readers. Terri Clifton of Milford wrote: You asked for memories of the first moon landing. My mother, sister and I were sitting on the floor of our living room in Miamiville. The landing was exciting, but the memory of my mother is what really stands out for me. She was so excited she could barely sit still. Having been born in 1927 she remembered days of ice being sold on the streets for your ice box and coal stoves. She told us when she was in school there was talk that someday we would put a man on the moon. Considering at this time her family didn’t even own a car, she wasn’t sure it was going to ever happen, much less in her lifetime. She was overjoyed and while the moon landing was memorable enough, her joy and enthusiasm that we were witnessing history made it even more so. Stan Shadwell of Pierce Township wrote: Funny that you should write an article on where you were when the “Eagle Landed.” I have a friend over from Aus-

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Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128

Town Crier rethinks family traditions

I sit at the edge of my seat as the music begins. The Shawnee brave on his horse begins to swim the pond at the edge of the Sugarloaf Mountain stage. Watching, I reflect on how many times I’ve seen the outdoor drama “Tecumseh” since 1982. I look at my companions: Historian Rick Crawford and his sister, Kathleen, and her husband, Bill, of Union Township along with my friend, fellow history buff and Meals-on-Wheels volunteer, Shirley Shipley of Owensville. I remember how Rick and I joked used to say we probably would be going to outdoor dramas and looking for historical markers along the road when we were 60. The big 6-0 is just around the corner, and our historical treks aren’t quite as long as they used to be, but they are traditions that not only Rick and I share, but also our families. However, my perception of family traditions and making memories has changed. Getting older and the side effects of Bob’s serious illness three years ago have rerouted my thinking. When my grandchildren, Gia and Gabe, were born, I eagerly planned family trips to places I went to with my grandparents. I envisioned

|

Bethel Journal

Bethel Journal Editor . . . . .Theresa L. Herron therron@communitypress.com . . . . . . .248-7128

This week’s question Are you worried about a possible worsening of the swine flu pandemic this fall and winter? Why or why not? Every week The Bethel Journal asks readers a questions that they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to clermont@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. “The ‘stimulus package’ is worthless. Additional spending would be a waste. The ‘stimulus package’ will have no impact on our economy. It would be like me dropping a rock, then taking credit for gravity. “The economy is going to correct itself as it always does, with or without the interference of the federal government. K.O. “Neither. It isn’t working, hasn’t worked and another one won’t work. “Our unemployment rate is even higher than what the Obama administration predicted if we didn’t do the stimulus. Most of the money still hasn’t been distributed. “This is a huge waste that will burden my children/future grandchildren for no good reason.” N.H. “No more bailouts.”

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail clermont@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com

J.D.P.


Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT B1 Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u l y 2 3 , 2 0 0 9

Steven Watters of River City Barber

Vol. 110 No. 28 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Through July 24, you can win daily cash prizes and get entered for a $500 jackpot from CincyMomsLikeMe.com. Go to MomsLikeMe.com/ cincycontests for all the info.

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B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Meeting police and firefighters Bethel takes part in National Night Out activities Aug. 4

By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

$1,500 cash giveaway

JOURNAL

Bethel’s residents will have the chance to get to know the village’s police and firefighters during National Night Out at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4, at Burke Park. National Night Out is a crime and drug prevention event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch designed to strengthen the relationship between local law enforcement and citizens. The Bethel Police Department,

the Bethel-Tate Fire Department, the Clermont County Sheriff’s Office, the Ohio State Highway Patrol and the U.S. Army will be in Bethel that night. “I believe that it is a night where all of the residents can come out and enjoy a free event and talk to our officers, firemen, troopers and deputies,” said Bethel Police Chief Mark Planck. There will be activities for children as well as free hot dogs and drinks donated by several Bethel businesses and the Wal-Mart in Amelia, Planck said. The Army

also will be making free dog tags for children. Bethel-Tate Fire Chief Rick Stowell said his department will have a fire engine, aerial tower and extended ladder at the event. “We’ll also have pamphlets and smoke detectors to give away to people who need theirs replaced or don’t have them at all,” he said. Firefighters and police officers are looking forward to the chance to meet residents in a non-emergency setting, Planck and Stowell said. “They love to interact with the

public and we’re usually stuck in the building so people don’t get a chance to talk to firefighters unless they have a reason to do so,” Stowell said. “The more we can get out in the public and talk fire prevention and safety and just about the operation of the department in general, the better.” Planck said the event allows his officers to better understand who the residents are. “The village has many wonderful people to socialize with,” he said.

Explore local ‘ocean’

Whether you’re looking for an outdoorsy stay-cation or just a day trip for the kids, the Cincinnati Nature Center has you covered. The nature center, on Tealtown Road, Union Township, is hosting it’s first of four seasonal exhibits called Discover Our Hidden Ocean. “We wanted to tell our members and the community about what we have here as a natural resource. We have people coming from all over the world to see our fossils from the Ordovician era,” said Kristi Masterson, the center’s community relations manager. This ongoing exhibit is different from the nature center’s usual programs, which are typically one-day events. FULL STORY, B1

Kings Island bound

Readers who won tickets to Kings Island as part of our Readers Choice survey are: • Michael Brunner of Cincinnati • Tara Reese of Hamersville • Darla Hartmann of Cleves • Mark Class of Alexandria, Ky. Watch the newspaper for more Readers Choice announcements in coming weeks. For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Bethel, OH 45106 ISSN 1066-7458 * USPS 053-040 Postmaster: Send address change to The Bethel Journal 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170 Loveland, Ohio 45140 Annual Subscription: Weekly Journal & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.00; Weekly Jounral only all other in-state $20.00; Out-of - state $20.00

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

A last farewell

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Church displays crosses

Recently, volunteers from St. Mary’s Church in Bethel parish put up 4,000 crosses representing the 4,000 babies aborted each day in the U.S. As volunteers were placing the crosses, people from other churches stopped by to help.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

A hearse carries the body of Spec. Greg Missman into Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Withamsville for burial services July 17. The Pierce Township resident was killed in Afghanistan July 9. For more photos, see page A4.

Bethel approves $2,000 for laptop By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

Bethel Village Council voted Monday, July 13, to purchase a $2,068 HP laptop for Village Administrator Travis Dotson. Dotson has been using his personal computer for several weeks, after giving his office computer to a utilities clerk. “When they changed operating systems for the utilities billing department, one of the girls’ computers couldn’t handle the system so Travis gave her his,” said Donna Gunn, village council member and finance committee chair. The laptop will be purchased using water and electric enterprise funds instead the general fund, said Fiscal Officer Angel Burton. “As village administrator, he oversees the utilities department’s operating expenses, personnel

Navigate your way to the right car for you.

and supplies which are all covered within the enterprise funds,” she said. Gunn also said the village’s general fund, which is operating in the red, will not be impacted by the purchase. “We have money in general, but it’s not in the general fund,” she said. “It’s in water and electric funds, but we cannot transfer money out of those enterprise funds into the general fund. That’s an Ohio Revised Code stipulation.” Council member James Dick, who voted against the purchase, said he did not have enough background information on the laptop, but that does not mean he disagreed with the need. “I had no information prior other than what was mentioned before council so if it’s something that’s justified and needed, I don’t have an issue with it,” Dick said.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Carrie Fairchild, left, and Laura Rogers, both of Bethel, hold up an American flag at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home in Amelia for the arrival of Spec. Greg Missman, who was killed in Afghanistan.

Go to Cars.com and become a more confident car shopper. Find your way to the certified pre-owned vehicle for you. Use our research tools to compare vehicle safety ratings and resale values. Cars.com points you in the right direction. ©2009 Classified Ventures, LLC™. All rights reserved.


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Bethel Journal

News

July 23, 2009

Clermont County Fair pays tribute to grassroots By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Whether you’re into funnel cakes and elephant ears or carnival rides and demolition derbies, the Clermont County Fair has something for everyone. But Bill Scharber, Cler-

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@c

unityp

mont County Agricultural Society president, said no matter what fair-goers come for, they should take a little time to check out the animal projects presented by the 4-H, Junior Fair and the Future Farmer’s of America. “That’s what the fair is all about, the grassroots,�

JOURNAL

Find news and information from your community on the Web Bethel – cincinnati.com/bethel Felicity – cincinnati.com/felicity Franklin Township – cincinnati.com/franklintownship Moscow – cincinnati.com/moscow Neville – cincinnati.com/neville Tate Township – cincinnati.com/tatetownship

Scharber said. “People should come out to see the showmanship and the projects, it’s about supporting our youth.� Pam Burns, co-coordinator of the Junior Fair and 4H Club adviser, said the Junior Fair programs in Clermont County, including 4H, FFA and Scouts, have about 1,000 members between the ages of five and 18. “It’s very popular,� she said. “(4-H and FFA) teaches the kids responsibility and how to take care of

their animals.� Each club will have a booth at the county fair explaining the projects club members are showing. Burns said the deadlines and project requirements also helps educate the kids. “Junior Fair has a positive impact on the kids and the community,� Burns said. Scharber said between 70,000 and 100,000 people typically come to the fair each year, but he’s always hoping for more. Profits from entry and

other fees go to the Clermont County Agricultural Society, which supports the 4-H, Junior Fair and FFA. The entry fee is $10 – parking, exhibits and grandstand shows are free. The 160th Clermont County fair is 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday, July 26, through Saturday, Aug. 1. The Clermont County Fairgrounds are at 1000 Locust St. in Owensville. Scharber said if people want to come to the fair, but can only come one day, they should come Monday,

Bethel wants to hire auxiliary police officers

News Theresa L. Herron | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7128 | therron@communitypress.com Mary Dannemiller | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 248-7684 | mdannemiller@communitypress.com Kelie Geist | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7681 | kgeist@communitypress.com John Seney | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7683 | jseney@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Anthony Amorini | Sports Reporter . . . . . 248-7570 | aamorini@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 248-7685 | mlamar@enquirer.com Angela Paolello Marcotte Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 936-4715 | amarcotte@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Diana Bruzina | District manager . . . . . . . 248-7113 | dbruzina@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

By Mary Dannemiller mdannemiller@communitypress.com

The Bethel Police Department is looking for auxiliary officers to improve patrols in

the village. When a full-time officer was laid off earlier this year to ease the department’s burden on the village’s general fund, it created the need for more auxiliary officers. “Auxiliary officers work 24 hours a month free and then any hours after that they are paid $10 an hour,� said Police Chief Mark Planck. “The paid hours are on an as-needed basis� Currently, the department has one part-time officer, four full-time officers and five auxiliary officers. The department would like to add five more auxiliary officers, Planck said.

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“I would need those officers to work for full-time officers while they are on vacation or taking sick time,� he said. “I think it’s a win-win situation for them, as I am always in need of officers to work hours that they would be paid for.� Aside from covering fulltime officers’ shifts, the auxiliary officers help with events like Bethel’s Down Home Christmas and Homecoming parade, said Bethel village council member Donna Gunn. “They’re important because they help us reduce overtime,� she said. “They can fill slots when a full-time or part-time officers are not available and when we need more than just our regular crew. They add more bulk to our force during the times we need them.� Planck said he was looking for officers who are honest, punctual and possess strong moral character. “Any interested persons that have been to an Ohio Peace Officer Academy and hold a valid certification should request an application from me or any Bethel police officer during regular business hours Monday Through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,� Planck said. The department is at 120 W. Plane St. in Bethel.

Index

        

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the fair’s least crowded day. Highlights from Monday’s schedule includes the cutest baby contest, Rabbit Hash band, Comet Bluegrass Allstars and the Ohio State Tractor Pull Association’s tractor pull. “People should come check out the fair, rain or shine, it’s a lot of fun,� Scharber said. “There have been many years where it has rained, but we still have a good time.� “The Clermont County Fair is a tradition,� he said.

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Bethel Journal

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Bethel Journal

News

July 23, 2009

Missman’s life, service celebrated By Kellie Geist and John Seney

Clermont@communitypress.com

Flags and yellow ribbons lined the thoroughfare as hundreds of people came to the Union Township Civic Center to pay their final respects to Army Spec. Greg Missman. Missman, of Pierce Township, died July 8 of wounds sustained while fighting in Afghanistan. Private and public visitations were held Thursday, July 16, at the civic center. While the family mourned Missman’s death, they also used the visitation as a way to celebrate his life and sacrifice. “We’re here to celebrate daddy’s life because daddy was a strong soldier who loved us and we loved him,� Missman’s 4-year-old son, Jack, said with some prompting by his mother Brooke Missman Elkin. Missman’s brother Michael said while Missman was a great soldier, he also was a wonderful brother and friend. “I can’t think of a better person. He’s always been there for me as a great role model ... He always knew how to put a smile on my face,� Michael said. Missman, 36, graduated from Amelia High School in 1992 and served a threeyear stint in the Army in the 1990s. After 11 years of civilian life, Missman reenlisted Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and was sent to Afghanistan earlier this

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Members of the Patriot Guard line the driveway of Mt. Moriah United Methodist Church in Withamsville for the funeral of Spec. Greg Missman, who was killed in Afghanistan.

JOHN SENEY/STAFF

Two Union Township fire trucks hold a flag above the hearse carrying the body of Spec. Greg Missman at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home in Amelia.

KELLIE GEIST/STAFF

Spec. Greg Missman

PROVIDED

summer. Missman was assigned to the 704th Brigade Support Battalion Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division in Fort Carson, Colo. He is the first Clermont County service-

Family, friends and community members made their way into the civic center’s gym to pay their respects to Spec. Greg Missman. man to die in Afghanistan. Missman and his father Jim were both members of the American Legion Post 72 in Mt. Carmel. Missman is the third member of that post to be killed in action

Missman’s body arrived in Dover Air Force Base, Del., July 9. After the visitation, Missman’s funeral was July 17. “It’s a terrible sacrifice – it’s so painful and such a

loss,� said Missman’s mother Donna Missman Turner. “We’re all real proud of Greg ... He will always be my hero.� Funeral services were at Mt. Moriah United Methodist Church in Withamsville, followed by burial at Mt. Moriah Cemetery. A military honor guard marched in front of the hearse carrying Missman from the church to the cemetery. Members of veterans groups and others pay-

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ing their respects lined the way holding American flags. Katrina Howe of Withamsville and her two daughters held flags as the hearse passed through the cemetery. She said she didn’t know Missman, but his aunt lived in her neighborhood. She came because “he’s a solder.� Johnny Robinson of Chillicothe, Ohio, traveled 100 miles to attend the funeral, “to do what’s right.�

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SCHOOLS

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

| NEWS | Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128 ACHIEVEMENTS

ACTIVITIES

| HONORS communitypress.com

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township E-mail: clermont@communitypress.com

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JOURNAL

Allen wins national skills competition

By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Hillary Allen knows what it takes to be in the health care industry and she’s not even in college yet. Allen, of Williamsburg who attended Bethel-Tate High School and the Grant Career Center, won second place in Basic Health Care Skills at the SkillsUSA national competition. Allen and Lauren Meadors, of Williamsburg High School and the Grant Career Center, competed at the 45th Annual National Leadership and Skills Conference and SkillsUSA Championships in June. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to encourage students to excel in trade, technical and skilled service industries, according to the organization’s Web site. Allen and Meadors went to the national competition last year as part of a community service team. After taking 8th place out of 44 teams, they wanted national medals their senior year. “We wanted to go back and try to medal. Having been there before gave us the motivation to do that,” Allen said. “If you’ve never been, you don’t know what it’s like.” Allen spent the year studying everything from health care terminology to nutrition to prepare for the competition. “At the competition, they can really throw anything at you,” Allen said. “We learned most of the skills in class, but you never really know what they are going to ask.” Allen claimed the silver in Basic Health Care Skills. She is planning to continue using the skills she’s learned from Grant’s Allied Health Science program

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club members Shelby Church, left, and Chelsey Abbit paint the inside of the Junior Fair Board office July 14 at the Clermont County Fairgrounds. The members’ goal was to make the fairgrounds look nicer for the fair.

PROVIDED

Grant Career Center SkillsUSA National Champions Lauren Meadors, left, and Hillary Allen. when she attends the Ohio State University for athletic training. Meadors took first place in Medical Math. This was the first year for the Medical Math competition at the national level. Meadors, who recently graduated from the Allied Health Science program, is planning to study nursing at Christ College of Nursing. Pam McKinney, public relations director at Grant Career Center, said Allen and Meadors earned two of 15 medals instructor Myrna Little’s allied health students have won in the last 10 years. “They come from a long line ... It’s this little pocket of greatness not many people know about,” McKinney said. “It’s rare for a school to have one student win, but to send two to nationals and have them both win is pretty amazing.”

Felicity-Franklin uses grant money to buy kitchen equipment By Kellie Geist kgeist@communitypress.com

Felicity-Franklin High School’s cafeteria is getting a shiny upgrade for the new school year. The district received an American Recovery and Investment Act grant through the Ohio Department of Education Office of Safety, Health and Nutrition. The $20,833 grant will be used to purchase a Combi oven. “The Combi oven is actually an oven that can cook and steam food. Most of the schools have them, but it’s an expensive piece of equipment we’ve just never been able to afford,” said Michelle Utter, food service supervisor. Utter requested the Combi oven in anticipation of not being able to use the deep fryers because of the National School Lunch Programs efforts to offer healthier food choices.

“I think eventually we’ll have to stop using the deep fryers because of health (reasons), but we didn’t want to have to cut out things like French fries,” Utter said. “This will help us be able to offer different and healthier food choices.” Felicity-Franklin was one of two districts in Southwest Ohio to receive funds to purchase kitchen equipment. “Michelle worked many hours making sure she had exactly what was required to get this grant,” former Superintendent Bill Shepherd said. “Michelle and her staff do a wonderful job preparing and serving quality lunches to the students of the district.” Felicity-Franklin also applied for stimulus money for technology upgrades in the district and Shepherd said they are hoping to hear on those grants in the near future.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

The Bethel and New Richmond 4-H members paint a barn at the Clermont County Fairgrounds July 14.

Community service

Tuesday, July 14, members from the Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club, along with members from the New Richmond 4-H’ers, worked on painting and cleaning up barns and the Junior Fair Board office at the Clermont County Fairgrounds. The members’ goal was to make the fairgrounds look nicer for the fair.

COLLEGE CORNER Graduates

Jared A. Butts and Joel D. Weaver, both of Bethel, recently graduated from Wilmington College. Butts received a B.S. in sport management and Weaver received a B.A. in sport management.

Dean’s list

Margaret Van Over has been named to the 2009 spring semester dean’s list at Southern State Community College. She is from Bethel.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM.

From left, Bethel Beefers & Sheepers 4-H Club members Scott Wagner and Austin Church move the ladders to scrape paint off a building at the Clermont County Fairgrounds July 14 as part of a community service project.


SPORTS

A6

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

| YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7118 HIGH

SCHOOL

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

communitypress.com

Rugby growing in the Tristate By Mark Chalifoux

The Ohio Rugby Union is part of USA Rugby and oversees rugby in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.

mchalifoux@communitypress.com

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Chase Deck makes contact with the ball against the Warriors.

The Bethel Tigers advanced to the county tournament final four before falling to the Milford Warriors July 16. Bethel pitcher Allen King was strong through the early innings against the Warriors, though the Warriors won 10-5

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel catcher Blace Haviland catches a high pitch against Milford.

Bethel run ends

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Dillon Utter slides in for a run against Milford. The Tigers put up five runs in the loss.

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s T.J. Boyd slides across the plate for a Tigers run while the Bethel fans celebrate.

BRIEFLY Wrestling with commitment

Bethel-Tate High School student Cory Disbennett recently committed to wrestle for the College of Mount St. Joseph. Disbennett is a 2009 Ohio state qualifier.

McNicholas High School wrestler Justin Meineke also committed to wrestle with the College of Mount St. Joseph.

Tweet, tweet

Follow the Community Press sports staff on Twitter at twitter.com/cpohiosports.

MARK CHALIFOUX/STAFF

Bethel’s Zack Puckett smacks a line drive against Milford.

SIDELINES Become a soccer official

The Southern Ohio Soccer Officials Association will offer an instructional class for new soccer officials beginning July 28 at Roades Crossing, 453 W. Main St., Mt. Orab. Class will meet three times a week at 7 p.m. and will last about two hours each evening. The final test will be given Aug. 22. Students will meet all the require-

ments (25 hours classroom and onfield instruction) to become a licensed Ohio High School Athletic Association official after passing the test. The class costs $100, which includes books, materials and OHSAA registration. Prospective students should contact Randy Hiler at 937-444-4194 or Edward Huffman at 625-8318 to enroll.

The thing that separates rugby from other sports is the camaraderie the sport fosters. A rugby player in a new city isn’t alone for very long. “I’ve lived in several different places and when I get to a new city, one of the first things I do is look for a local rugby club because it’s an instant peer group,� said Charles Dainoff, vice president of the Ohio Rugby Union. “You immediately have a group of friends that can ease your transition into a new community. It’s a great sport and a great way to meet people.� Rugby is a sport that’s on the rise in the Tristate as new players are joining the existing clubs and starting their own. The Ohio Rugby Union is part of USA Rugby and oversees rugby in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. There are 11 rugby clubs in Cincinnati and one in Northern Kentucky. That includes all age groups, from men’s clubs to collegiate teams at Xavier and Cincinnati and several area high school clubs. “Generally speaking, it’s all one big community,� Dainoff said. “We’re already starting to see kids transition from high school rugby to college rugby and it’s a sport you can play for 20 or 30 years if you’re committed to it.� Dainoff plays for the Cincinnati Wolfhounds, based in Fairfield, and occasionally plays for Wolfhounds 35 and older team, the Greyhounds. Clubs in the city often have different divisions for players depending on experience level. “There’s plenty of room for people to compete at whatever level they are comfortable with,� Dainoff said. “It’s a lot easier to get involved than you think. All

             

you have to do is find out where a team is practicing and show up and introduce yourself.� The list of rugby clubs is on the ohiorugbyunion.org Web site. While the sport may look confusing at first, Dainoff insisted it’s not as chaotic as it seems and compared it to soccer and football. “Two teams are trying to advance the ball from one side of the field to the other to score,� he said. And almost as important as how the game is played is the social aspect of rugby. It’s a long-standing tradition in rugby for the home team to throw a party for the visiting team to thank them for coming to play. “You leave the rivalry on the field and that’s part of building this network of friends,� Dainoff said. When he moved to San Francisco, Dainoff was reunited with a former opposing player he’d been involved in a scuffle with while both played for different teams. “That was in the past and we were great teammates on this new team a few thousand miles across the country,� Dainoff said. “That’s sort of rugby in a nutshell.� The game is growing at the youth level too, according to the ORU’s youth director Chris Hopps. High school teams have been created at Moeller, Walnut Hills, Northbend (St. Xavier and Elder), and Indian Springs. Hopps said he hopes to have a parochial league in Cincinnati in the near future and that his goal is to spread rugby to anyone in high school or younger. The most prevalent way to generate interest, which can eventually build to the formation of teams, is through camps and clinics to teach the game to new players. “We make it so anyone can walk through it,� Hopps said. “They are learning rugby without knowing it.�

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JOURNAL

Mt. Carmel Sports Page Cafe Tuesday 2-6 PM

Milford Garden Center Corner of Rt. 50 & 131 in Milford Shopping Center Wed. 2- PM Sat. 10 AM


VIEWPOINTS

July 23, 2009

EDITORIALS

LETTERS

standing them on the rock pillars at North Carolina’s Dry Falls, snapping their pictures with the falls as the backdrop. I have pictures of my daughters, Debbi and Shari, posed at the same posts when they were children. But the Brumagems can’t travel long distances anymore. It took a comment from co-worker Jeanne Siegel, the program manager for Clermont Senior Services, to help me “rethink” family traditions. I was telling Jeanne how much fun it was having Gia and Gabe camp with me at the Grassy Run Rendezvous this spring. I explained how the grandkids watched the tipis and traders’ tents go up, that Gabe loved the music, Gia enjoyed “shopping” traders row with her Grassy Run BFFs Ella and Coral, and how Gabe went in the dance ring by himself for a men’s dance during the Native American dance presentation. “I’m glad they can camp with me, because I know I probably won’t be able to take them on family trips like the ones I went on with my grandparents,” I said. Jeanne replied, “Sharon, Grassy Run is part of you. Just think of the experience Gia and Gabe are getting. As kids, most of

Sharon Brumagem Town Crier

us dreamed about being princesses and cowboys. Your grandkids are living their fantasies with you. What a wonderful gift you are giving them!” Jeanne’s words opened my eyes. Sometimes what become family traditions are so obvious, we overlook them and their importance in our lives. Having the grandkids at Grassy Run the past two years has had an impression on them. During the Fourth of July weekend when Gabe heard fireworks, he yelled, “More powder!” Also, I wouldn’t be getting ready to go “camping” with them this weekend in the heart of Covington where their back yard is no bigger than their tent, and where we’ll be making pancakes over a wood fire in the brazier both remember from Grassy Run. So next year (hopefully), when Gia and Gabe are sitting in the “Tecumseh” audience with me during the Battle of Tippecanoe scene, and Gabe shouts, “More powder!” I can smile and think, “A tradition lives on!” Sharon Brumagem is co-founder of Grassy Run Historical Arts Committee and is the volunteer/communications coordinator for Clermont Senior Services.

tralia whom I have known since I was 2. We discussed the moon landing just the other day as we were together when it happened. I have lived in Theresa L. the USA for 27 having Herron years, come here first in Editor’s 1976 and returnNotebook ing a few years later. I have lived in Cincinnati for the last 22 years. However, I was born and raised in Australia and even though it is multiple time zones away I remember where I was when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. It was actually a chain of circumstances that allowed me to watch the first moon walk. Because of the time differential (16 hours when we are on DST) it was after 2 p.m. the next day. I was 25 at the time and naturally was at work during the day. However, a childhood friend who lived in New Guinea at the time was back in Sydney for a conference; he lived about three miles from where I worked. At the time I was the office manager of a bakery and when the production was finished for the day (about 10 a.m.) I pretty much could come and go as I pleased. The moon landing, even in Australia, was seen as a momentous achievement. Australians felt some

pride in the whole space program, as a lot of the tracking was done from space telescopes and radio units in Central Australia (truly the Outback!), so there was a vested interest in its success. My friend and I sat in the living room of his mother’s house and watched the first steps on an old black and white TV. After a quick beer for lunch it was back to work, but it certainly stuck in our minds. As he is here in the USA to help me celebrate my 65th birthday, the landing was one of the things that we were reminiscing about just this week. To be together on the 40th anniversary, I feel, is a really interesting piece of trivia. Randy Kleine of Milford wrote: Like many young fellows who grew up during the space race of the 1960s, I was glued to the progress of the moon shot. Therefore, even though my family was engaged in camping activities at Lake Cumberland, Kentucky, I sat in my Mom’s station wagon (remember those?) listening to the car radio. Surrounded by woods, I now joined the astronauts, Neil and Buzz, in experiencing a new wilderness. Thanks for sharing. I hope you all got to see some TV coverage of the anniversary. Theresa L. Herron is the editor of The Community Journal, Community Journal North, Milford-Miami Advertiser and The Bethel Journal. She can be reached at 248-7128 or therron@communitypress.com.

OFFICIALS DIRECTORY Ohio House of Representatives

Ohio Rep. Danny Bubp (R-88th District) may be reached for questions or concerns at his Columbus office at 614-466-8134 or via e-mail at district866@ohr.state.oh.us.

at 614-466-8082, e-mail tniehaus@mailr.sen.state.oh.us, or write Ohio Senate, Room 38, Statehouse, Columbus, Ohio 43215. Include your home telephone number and address.

Ohio Senate

U.S. House of Representatives

Ohio Sen. Tom Niehaus may be reached

COLUMNS

U.S. Rep. Jean Schmidt (R- 2nd District

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CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

238 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 1-800-784-6366 • Cincinnati office: 8044 Montgomery Road, Room 540, Cincinnati, Ohio 45236. Phone: 513-791-0381 or 1-800-784-6366 • Batavia office, 175 E. Main St., Batavia, Ohio 45103. Phone: 513-732-2948.

Rep. Jean Schmidt recently introduced legislation to increase the federal weight limit on tractortrailer trucks to 97,000 pounds from the current 80,000-pound limit and to increase the use of double trailers on our nations highways. I have serious concerns with Ms. Schmidt’s proposal. First and foremost, bigger trucks will result in more rollover accidents making our highways less safe for everyone. Ohio’s decision this past spring to raise the speed limit for heavy trucks to 65 mph combined with Schmidt’s proposal is a recipe for a public safety disaster. A basic physics equation holds that momentum equals mass times velocity. When you have significantly larger and heavier trucks traveling at higher speeds, the damage caused by accidents will be exponential, resulting in greater loss of life and limb. Indeed Gerald Donaldson, senior research director for the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, said of Schmidt’s proposal: “More lives would be lost in large truck crashes” and “More bridges would be placed at an increased risk for catastrophic failure.” The danger is so great that truck drivers themselves are upset at the prospect of having to deal with much larger vehicles. The Teamsters union opposes Schmidt’s legislation, as do the families of truck accident victims. My second major concern is that our nation’s roads and bridges are already in bad shape and increasing the weight load and use of double trailers will result in even more degradation of our infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Highway Cost Allocation Study reports that large trucks

E-mail: clermont@c

unityp

JOURNAL

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already pay just half of the cost of the damage they cause to our highways. Taxpayers pay the difference. Schmidt’s bill therefore amounts to an David unfunded federal Krikorian mandate that will put even more Community stress on our fedPress guest eral, state and columnist municipal budgets. Schmidt’s proposed legislation is good for profits at large trucking businesses and companies like International Paper that are lobbying hard for Schmidt’s legislation. As a business owner myself, I am in favor of pro-business legislation, but not at the expense of the safety of our citizens and our country’s national interest. Rail transportation has been proven to be significantly cheaper over long hauls consuming far less energy. In terms of cost, safety and environmental impact, investment in our railway system to transport larger loads, faster is the best alternative. Schmidt’s legislation would undermine our railway system and indeed many rail groups oppose it. The federal government’s job is to promote the national interest and in this case we should be focusing efforts on modernizing our railway infrastructure. Schmidt would have us looking backwards. I think you agree that it’s time to look ahead. Above all public safety must not be compromised. David Krikorian is a Democratic candidate for Congress from Ohio’s Second District. He lives in Madeira.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Do you think the economic stimulus plan is working, or should the federal government implement another round of stimulus packages? “This answer depends on if you are promoting freedom, independence and smaller federal government, or power in the Democrat Party. “Much of the funding does not occur until the elections of 2010 and 2012, which is designed to guarantee continuation of the corrupt election process of complete Democrat control. “I would urge no more funding We really do not have the money and this process will eventually destroy our financial system leaving our grandchildren deep in un payable debt. “Please urge your congressmen to vote no on government health care, carbon caps. my generation fought WW2 for freedom not socialism.” F.J.B. “The stimulus package is not working, and there is no way I think another round will help the small businesses, regular people like me. I think that the stimulus package is just helping the rich, big corp. CEOs keep their private jets, vacation homes, etc. There needs to be away for the average Joe to get some relief.” C.M.

A publication of

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

A7

Trucking bill will hurt country’s economy

Readers remember first moon landing I wanted to thank everyone who commented on my column about the first moon landing and walk by the U.S. astronauts. One person told me I have an incredible memory. I thought about that, but it’s not that I have an incredible memory. It’s the event. It was huge and it stuck with me just like it stuck with many of you. Here are some comments from a couple of readers. Terri Clifton of Milford wrote: You asked for memories of the first moon landing. My mother, sister and I were sitting on the floor of our living room in Miamiville. The landing was exciting, but the memory of my mother is what really stands out for me. She was so excited she could barely sit still. Having been born in 1927 she remembered days of ice being sold on the streets for your ice box and coal stoves. She told us when she was in school there was talk that someday we would put a man on the moon. Considering at this time her family didn’t even own a car, she wasn’t sure it was going to ever happen, much less in her lifetime. She was overjoyed and while the moon landing was memorable enough, her joy and enthusiasm that we were witnessing history made it even more so. Stan Shadwell of Pierce Township wrote: Funny that you should write an article on where you were when the “Eagle Landed.” I have a friend over from Aus-

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Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128

Town Crier rethinks family traditions I sit at the edge of my seat as the music begins. The Shawnee brave on his horse begins to swim the pond at the edge of the Sugarloaf Mountain stage. Watching, I reflect on how many times I’ve seen the outdoor drama “Tecumseh” since 1982. I look at my companions: Historian Rick Crawford and his sister, Kathleen, and her husband, Bill, of Union Township along with my friend, fellow history buff and Meals-on-Wheels volunteer, Shirley Shipley of Owensville. I remember how Rick and I joked used to say we probably would be going to outdoor dramas and looking for historical markers along the road when we were 60. The big 6-0 is just around the corner, and our historical treks aren’t quite as long as they used to be, but they are traditions that not only Rick and I share, but also our families. However, my perception of family traditions and making memories has changed. Getting older and the side effects of Bob’s serious illness three years ago have rerouted my thinking. When my grandchildren, Gia and Gabe, were born, I eagerly planned family trips to places I went to with my grandparents. I envisioned

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Bethel Journal

Bethel Journal Editor . . . . .Theresa L. Herron therron@communitypress.com . . . . . . .248-7128

This week’s question Are you worried about a possible worsening of the swine flu pandemic this fall and winter? Why or why not? Every week The Bethel Journal asks readers a questions that they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to clermont@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. “The ‘stimulus package’ is worthless. Additional spending would be a waste. The ‘stimulus package’ will have no impact on our economy. It would be like me dropping a rock, then taking credit for gravity. “The economy is going to correct itself as it always does, with or without the interference of the federal government. K.O. “Neither. It isn’t working, hasn’t worked and another one won’t work. “Our unemployment rate is even higher than what the Obama administration predicted if we didn’t do the stimulus. Most of the money still hasn’t been distributed. “This is a huge waste that will burden my children/future grandchildren for no good reason.” N.H. “No more bailouts.”

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail clermont@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com

J.D.P.


Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

Ohio’s livestock farmers work hard to provide us with the highest quality eggs, wholesome dairy foods and fresh meat and poultry. By following strict guidelines and putting to use the best farm practices, Ohio’s livestock farmers ensure the food they produce is safe and affordable for everyone.

Providing

safe and affordable food is a big responsibility.

For Ohio livestock farmers, providing safe, affordable food is not just a job…

it’s a way of life.

Learn more about safe, affordable food at www.ohiolivestock.org

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T h u r s d a y, J u l y 2 3 , 2 0 0 9

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PROVIDED

Steven Watters likes to walk across the street and paint when business is slow at the River City Barber in New Richmond.

Place to get your hair cut – or portrait painted By John Seney jseney@communitypress.com

Steven Watters likes to call himself “a jack of all trades.” His River City Barber shop on New Richmond’s riverfront is proof of that. In addition to the barber’s chair and haircutting tools you’ll find in most barber shops, you’ll also likely find paints, brushes, easels and canvas. Watters will cut your hair, and if you like, paint your portrait. “When I’m not cutting hair, I’m painting,” he said. He has done a number of portraits on commission since he opened the shop a year and a half ago. He usually works from photographs customers leave him. When business is slow, he’ll take his easel across the street and paint pictures of New Richmond’s waterfront. He has a lot of his art work on display, and calls his business “half art gallery and half barber shop.” Watters has been a barber for 42 years, previously operating shops in Williamsburg and Bethel. “I like it here, with the view of the river,” he said of the New Richmond location. “It’s very nice.” Watters went to an art school in the 1980s, but that didn’t work out as a career, he said. He got back into painting

River City Barber facts

Address: 124 Front St., New Richmond Telephone: 720-9693 Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Prices: $12 for adults; $10 for children; $11 for seniors; $10 with Golden Buckeye card Wednesdays. about three years ago and has been going strong ever since. His best work involves painting and drawing people, he said. “I’m a lover of Norman Rockwell and Michaelangelo,” Watters said. Watters also is a singer and musician and often performs at the Front Street Cafe next door to the shop on “Open Mic Night” Thursdays. He likes to sing Elvis songs. Bob Lees, owner of the Front Street Cafe and the building housing the barber shop, called Watters “A Renaissance man.” Lees said the location has housed a barber shop for more than 50 years. He remembers getting a haircut there while growing up in New Richmond. When Lees purchased the building to renovate, reopening the barber shop was a high priority. “It’s the heart and soul of our redevelopment district,” he said.

THINGS TO DO Be an explorer

The Clermont County Public Library is hosting the Explorer’s Club at 10 a.m. Monday, July 27, at the New Richmond Branch Library, 103 River Valley Blvd. The event features music, art, dance and drama, with snacks and crafts. It is for grades kindergarten to fourth. The event is free. Registration is required. Call 553-0570.

Concert

The village of New Richmond is hosting the New Richmond Concert Series at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 25, at The Bandstand, George and Susanna Way. Music is by Aja: The Steely Dan Tribute Band. Event is free. Call 553-4146.

See river critters

Clermont County Park District is hosting the nature pro-

gram “River Critters” at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 25, at Sycamore Park, 4200 Ohio 132, Batavia. Explore water with a naturalist to discover the many critters that call the river home. Call 876-9013.

On stage

The Clermont Inn Players are presenting “Three Courses of Comedy” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 24, at Clermont Inn, 180 E. Main St. in Batavia. It is three one-act comedies: “The Spot,” by Steven Dietz; “Wanda’s Visit,” by Christopher Durang; and “The Tarantino Variation,” by Seth Kramer. The event includes dinner. The cost is $30. Reservations are required. The play runs through July 25. Call 732-2174.

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PROVIDED

A group of kids enjoy a Saturday Stream Exploration with Cincinnati Nature Center naturalist Sheila Riley. From left: Katelyn Cheng, Sean Masterson, Riley, Alex Shiveley, Dylan Shiveley, Carter Cotton and Reed Cotton.

Cincy Nature Center explores ‘our ocean’ By Kellie Geist

kgeist@communitypress.com

Whether you’re looking for an outdoorsy stay-cation or just a day trip for the kids, the Cincinnati Nature Center has you covered. The nature center, on Tealtown Road, Union Township, is hosting it’s first of four seasonal exhibits called Discover Our Hidden Ocean. “We wanted to tell our members and the community about what we have here as a natural resource. We have people coming from all over the world to see our fossils from the Ordovician era,” said Kristi Masterson, the center’s community relations manager. This ongoing exhibit is different from the nature center’s usual programs, which are typically one-day events. The Ordovician period began about 490 million years ago. During that time, the worlds oceans were full of invertebrates such as trilobites, brachiopods and cephalopods. Connie O’Connor, the center’s education and visitors services director, said Cincinnati is one of only two places in the world where the Ordovician Period is exposed at the surface. This exhibit, which will be open all summer, is a combination of displays and activities at the visitor center and a cell phone tour of the geological trail called Nature Calls. Inside the visitor center, visitors can read about and handle Ohio fossils from the Ordovician period, make rubbings of those fossils in the

Daily Admission

Monday: Free Tuesday through Friday: $3 for adults, $1 for children Saturday and Sunday: $5 for adults, $1 for children

Membership Fees

KELLIE GEIST/STAFF

Cincinnati Nature Center Education and Visitors Service Director Connie O'Connor explains the changes Rowe Woods has gone through over the last 450 million years. child’s area and learn the history of Cincinnati’s hidden ocean. On the grounds, visitors can take the geological trail to look for fossils and formations made by the creatures that lived in the Tristate then. Rather than have signs explaining the different trails parts, the center is trying a cell phone tour. “I think people get tired of standing in one place and reading a sign. With the cell phone tour, they can dial the number and then continue to walk while they listen,” O’Connor said. “Also, not everybody likes to read. Sometimes it’s just more interesting and engaging to hear someone talk.” It does cost cell phone minutes to use Nature Calls. In addition to the selfguided exhibits and tours,

the center also is offering programs about the hidden ocean. Dry Dredgers, a non-profit group specializing in fossils, will be available from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 15, at the visitor center to help people identify fossils. Another program is the Saturday Stream Explorations. From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday through August, visitors can walk the stream to explore and look for fossils. “We normally don’t let people splash around in our stream because it’s not good for the habitat. We want to keep people on the trails most of the time, so this is a special treat to let people go off the trail and explore with the guidance of a naturalist,” O’Connor said. The visitor center is open

Individual: $35 Student: $25 Two people: $50 Family: $70 Other options also are available For more information about the Cincinnati Nature Center, exhibits or fees, visit www.cincynature.org, call 831-1711, or e-mail at cnc@cincynature.org from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and the grounds are open from dawn to dusk. Discover Our Hidden Ocean can be accessed anytime the visitors’ center and grounds are open. “In times of economic struggle, as most families I know are going through, we don’t need to go to Myrtle Beach or Florida. You can come to your local hidden beach here and enjoy your surroundings,” Masterson said. In addition to the Discover Our Hidden Ocean exhibits, the Cincinnati Nature Center and Rowe Woods consists of 1,025 acres of fields, forest, ponds and streams and 18 miles of hiking trails. The center also has a lodge, summer camps and a celebration garden to enjoy.


B2

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U L Y 2 4

CIVIC

Eastside Yardwaste Recycling Drop-Off Site, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Bzak Landscaping at Turpin Farm, 3295 Turpin Lane. Hamilton County residents only. Presented by Hamilton County Environmental Services. 946-7734. Newtown.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Summer Video Exercise Classes, 9:30 a.m. Anderson Senior Center, 7970 Beechmont Ave. Exercising with Angela Lansbury, Richard Simmons and more. Ages 18 and up. Free. 474-3100. Anderson Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Newtown Farm Market, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Newtown Farm Market, 3950 Round Bottom Road. Plants, deli department, frozen custard, gift boxes, fruit baskets, strawberries, corn and other vegetables. Presented by Village of Newtown. 561-2004. Newtown.

FOOD & DRINK

Friday Night Grillouts, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Music by Exit 12. Lake Isabella, 10174 LovelandMadeira Road. Outdoor covered patio or airconditioned dining area. Includes specialty, à la carte and children’s dinners. Music, fishing demonstrations and naturalist’s wildlife programs. $3.75-$8.85; parking permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 791-1663. Symmes Township. Summer Wine Sampling and Entertainment Series, 5 p.m. Harmony Hill Vineyards and Estate Winery, 2534 Swings Corner Point Isabel Road. 50 cents per sample. 734-3548. Bethel.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Shooters Sports Grill, 780 Loveland Miamiville Road. 7747007. Loveland. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-7 p.m. Latitudes, 7426 Beechmont Ave. Suite 201, Drink specials. 233-9888. Anderson Township.

Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 12025 Shore Road. Small-scale, authentic castle. Picnic area. Group tours and special events available $3. 683-4686. Symmes Township. Wetland Adventure Wet Playground, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Woodland Mound, 8250 Old Kellogg Road. Wet playground with 16-foot tree with two slides, great blue heron, frogs, turtles and flowers that spray water. $2 ages 2-12; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Anderson Township.

RECREATION

All-Night Fishing, 8 p.m. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Rent rowboat or bring your own. Four horsepower or less electric and gas motors permitted. Fishing ticket good for 12 hours. Light visible 360 degrees required on boats after dark. All ages. $9.50 for 12-hour permit, free ages 12 and under and ages 60 and up; rowboat rental $9.39 six hours, $11.27 12 hours; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 791-1663. Symmes Township. Shayne Graham Celebrity Race-off, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Motorsports Country Club of Cincinnati, 2848 US 50, Mini Sprint Qualifying Race. Includes silent auction, pizza and beverages. Benefits Shayne Graham Foundation. Bring canned good to benefit Mercy Social Ministries. $5,000 donaGraham tion for team of four per cart, free for spectators. Registration required. Presented by Shayne Graham Foundation. 604-4028. Batavia. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 2 5

CIVIC

Eastside Yardwaste Recycling Drop-Off Site, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Bzak Landscaping at Turpin Farm, 946-7734. Newtown.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screening, 9 a.m.-noon, Homan Chiropractic, 4380 Glen Este-Withamsville Road. Blood pressure, height, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Walk-ins welcome. Free. Appointment recommended. 753-6325. Eastgate.

MUSIC - BLUES

SummerTime Blues Tour, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Adis’ Place. 7925 Beechmont Ave. With Voodoo Puppet Blues Band and guests. Includes drink specials, contests and prizes. Ages 21 and up. $3. 233-7613. Anderson Township.

MUSIC - OLDIES

John Fox, 7 p.m.-11 p.m. G. Bailey’s, 9521 Fields Ertel Road. 1950s-1970s folk and rock. 683-2011. Symmes Township.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Three Courses of Comedy, 7:30 p.m. Clermont Inn, 180 E. Main St. Three one-act comedies: “The Spot,” by Steven Dietz; “Wanda’s Visit,” by Christopher Durang; and “The Tarantino Variation,” by Seth Kramer. Includes dinner. $30. Reservations required. Presented by The Clermont Inn Players. Through July 25. 732-2174. Batavia.

PUBLIC HOURS

Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-7 a.m. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Full-service boathouse with rowboat rentals. Open fishing year-round in 28-acre lake with outdoor fishing pier from dusk to dawn. $9.50 for 12-hour permit, free ages 12 and under and ages 60 and up; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275. Symmes Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Harmony Hill Vineyards ‘Market On The Hill’, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Harmony Hill Vineyards and Estate Winery, 2534 Swings Corner Point Isabel Road. Unique “All Ohio Proud” market. Local beef, lamb, vegetables, eggs, cheese, artisan breads and wine.734-3548. Bethel. Newtown Farm Market, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newtown Farm Market, 561-2004. Newtown. Wilfert Farms, 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Wilfert Farms, 3135 Lindale Mount Holly Road. Fresh-picked fruits and vegetables that are harvested several times each day and kept under refrigeration.797-8344. Amelia.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

NATURE

River Critters, 11 a.m. Sycamore Park, 4200 Ohio 132. Explore water with naturalist to discover many critters that call the river home. Free. Presented by Clermont County Park District. 876-9013. Batavia.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Three Courses of Comedy, 7:30 p.m. Clermont Inn, 732-2174. Batavia.

PUBLIC HOURS

Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 201 Riverside Drive. Bonaventure House with exhibits, gift shop and library, 1797 Rich Log Cabin and 1879 Bishop-Coleman Gazebo. $3. 683-5692. Loveland. Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-7 a.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Wetland Adventure Wet Playground, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Woodland Mound, 521-7275. Anderson Township.

RECREATION

All-Night Fishing, 8 p.m. Lake Isabella, 7911663. Symmes Township. Rumblin’ by the River Cruise-in, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. AJA, Steely Dan tribute band, 7:30 p.m. New Richmond Riverfront, Front Street and Susanna Way. Classic cars, trucks and show bikes gather on Front Street. Includes a band, DJ, door prizes, 50/50 and favorite trophy. Free. Presented by New Richmond Ohio Chamber of Commerce. 553-6485. New Richmond. Little Miami River Canoe Trip, 11 a.m. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Begins at Lake Isabella, continues 7.5 miles down river. All equipment provided. Bring lunch. Must complete Quick Start program prior to trip. $25, $20 ages 6-18. Registration required, available online. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-2345. Symmes Township.

RELIGIOUS - COMMUNITY Summer Fun, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial Park, Glen Este-Withamsville Road. Hamburgers and drinks. Gifts for children and adults. Two door prizes given at noon and 1 p.m. All ages. Presented by Eastgate Community Church. 943-3926. Union Township.

MUSIC - ROCK

Campus Mob, 10 p.m. O’Neal’s Tavern, 7466 Beechmont Ave. $3. 231-7241. Anderson Township.

SAT., JULY 25 & SUN., JULY 26 3:00 pm both days at Lakota West High School Varsity Baseball Field The Ohio Heat Baseball Organization is pleased to announce Dave Collins as the New 15 U Head Coach. Dave played 16 years in the Major Leagues including 7 years with the Reds.

Eastside Yardwaste Recycling Drop-Off Site, 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Bzak Landscaping at Turpin Farm, 946-7734. Newtown.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Henry Ford Squares, 5:30 p.m. Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road. Western style square dance club for experienced dancers with round dance and line dancing. $5. 929-2427. Union Township.

FARMERS MARKET

Newtown Farm Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Newtown Farm Market, 561-2004. Newtown. Batavia Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Batavia Township, Main and Depot streets. Vegetables, fruits and eggs. 876-2418. Batavia.

MUSIC - RELIGIOUS

The Meltons in Concert, 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Full concert. and 10:30 a.m. Glen Este Church of Christ, 937 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike. George Melton preaches and the Meltons present gospel music. 753-8223. Eastgate.

VOLUNTEER EVENTS

Grailville Garden Volunteer Day, 9 a.m.noon, Grailville Education and Retreat Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road. Work in organic garden and kitchen. Lunch and tour follows. Wear clothes and footwear that can get dirty. Bring gloves, water, sunscreen, hat and snacks. No experience required. Volunteers welcome other hours and days-call to schedule. Free; $15 tour and lunch. Reservation required for lunch. 683-2340. Loveland.

OHIO HEAT BASEBALL TRYOUTS Ohio Heat baseball is a non-profit highly competitive organization that competes at the highest level both in the Tri-State area and nationally. Ohio Heat has an indoor facility for off-season work as well as professional training available to team members. Ohio Heat has an exclusive contract with Wilson/Demarini. Visit www.ohioheatbaseball.org for further tryout details. Contact Mark Jones at

513-532-6298

for additional information

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

SPORTS-REGISTRATIONS

M.E. Lyons YMCA/Anderson Barracuda Swim Team, 4:30 p.m. M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike. Registration 4 p.m. For swimmers ages 6-18, all ability levels. Team has practice groups in both Anderson and Campbell County YMCA. Free. 474-1400. Anderson Township. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 8

CIVIC

Eastside Yardwaste Recycling Drop-Off Site, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Bzak Landscaping at Turpin Farm, 946-7734. Newtown.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 683-5692. Loveland.

Life Is Not A Spectator Sport, 6:30 p.m.8:30 p.m. Mercy HealthPlex Anderson, 7495 State Road. Spirit of Women interactive program includes information on bone and joint health, diet and exercise. Wear comfortable shoes. Free. Registration required. 9563729. Anderson Township.

M O N D A Y, J U L Y 2 7

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

PUBLIC HOURS

Zumba Fitness Class, 6:30 p.m. Clough United Methodist Church, 2010 Wolfangel Road. $5. 379-4900. Anderson Township. Summer Video Exercise Classes, 9:30 a.m. Anderson Senior Center, 474-3100. Anderson Township.

Spinebenders Book Club, 7 p.m. “The Soloist” by Steve Lopez. Guests from The Phoenix Place share personal insights of battling mental illness. New Richmond Branch Library, 103 River Valley Blvd. Adults. Free. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 7322736. New Richmond.

FARMERS MARKET

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

EXERCISE CLASSES

2010, 15U

Tryouts for Ohio Heat baseball teams will be

CIVIC

Eastside Yardwaste Recycling Drop-Off Site, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Bzak Landscaping at Turpin Farm, 946-7734. Newtown.

Summer Wine Sampling and Entertainment Series, 5 p.m. Harmony Hill Vineyards and Estate Winery, 734-3548. Bethel. New Richmond Concert Series, 7:30 p.m. Music by Aja: The Steely Dan Tribute Band. The Bandstand, George and Susanna Way. Free. Presented by Village of New Richmond. 553-4146. New Richmond.

S U N D A Y, J U L Y 2 6

CIVIC

FOOD & DRINK

MUSIC - CONCERTS

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: THERRON@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Clermont County Park District is hosting the nature program “River Critters” at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 25, at Sycamore Park, 4200 Ohio 132, Batavia. Explore water with a naturalist to discover many critters that call the river home. The event is free. Call 876-9013.

Newtown Farm Market, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Newtown Farm Market, 561-2004. Newtown.

FOOD & DRINK

Irresistible Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Graeter’s, 8533 Beechmont Ave. Discounts, smoothie tastings, giveaways, “Cone Hole,” “Pin the Cherry on the Sundae,” trivia and more. All ages. 721-3323. Cherry Grove.

Drop-In Story Time, 10 a.m. Williamsburg Branch Library, 594 Main St. Stories, games, songs and crafts. All ages. Free. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 7241070. Williamsburg.

Drop-In Babytime Story Time, 10 a.m. Union Township Branch Library, 4462 Mount Carmel-Tobasco Road. Listen to stories, learn new songs and bounces to do with baby. Ages birth to 18 months. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 528-1744. Union Township. All Age Story Time, 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Bethel Branch Library, 611 W. Plane St. Stories, dance and a craft. All ages. Registration required. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 734-2619. Bethel. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 9

FARMERS MARKET

Wilfert Farms, 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Wilfert Farms, 797-8344. Amelia.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Kroger Anderson Towne Center, 7580 Beechmont Ave. Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. Presented by Jewish Hospital. 686-3300. Anderson Township.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

40th Anniversary of the Lunar Landing, 6:30 p.m. Amelia Branch Library, 58 Maple St. Cincinnati Observatory speaker presents program about the moon phases. Includes stories, space food and lunar crafts. Registration required. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 752-5580. Amelia. Fancy Nancy, 7 p.m. Union Township Branch Library, 4462 Mount Carmel-Tobasco Road. Explore a fancy book character with fancy ideas and make a fancy craft. Grades K-5. Registration required. 528-1744. Union Township.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Shooters Sports Grill, 774-7007. Loveland.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Explorer’s Club, 10 a.m. New Richmond Branch Library, 103 River Valley Blvd. Music, art, dance and drama, with snacks and crafts. Grades K-4. Free. Registration required. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 553-0570. New Richmond.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Drop-In Toddler Time Story Time, 10 a.m. Union Township Branch Library, 4462 Mount Carmel-Tobasco Road. Ages 18 months to 3 years. Stories, songs and play. Presented by Clermont County Public Library. 528-1744. Union Township.

PUBLIC HOURS

Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Wetland Adventure Wet Playground, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Woodland Mound, 521-7275. Anderson Township.

PROVIDED

Jersey Productions returns to the Aronoff Center to perform “Oklahoma!” It is at 2 p.m. Thursday, July 23; and at 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, July 24-25. Tickets are $20-$25. Call 513-621-2787 or visit www.cincinnatiarts.org. Pictured are Case Dillard as Curly and Courtney Brown as Laurey.


Life

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Human relationships have become more transient and the development of genuine love more tenuous. Love is now sought in serial marriages or clandestine affairs. panionship. “There will be some,� he predicted, “who, through luck, interpersonal skill and high intelligence, will find it possible to make long-lasting monogamous marriages work. Some will succeed in marrying for life and finding durable love and affection. But the others will fail to make even sequential marriages endure for long.�

My dear brides and grooms, isn’t it remarkably sad that what was predicted 39 years ago has now become true? May your marriage be counter-culture, your commitment permanent, your love enduring. And may your children find in your relationship an inspiration for their own.

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Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@community press.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

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week’s brides and grooms were even born, Toffler predicted that success in marFather Lou the riage of Guntzelman the future Perspectives w o u l d come to be determined by the degree to which matched development actually occurs between spouses. Love would be determined by the degree of shared growth, not necessarily by the giving of self. Yet, he goes on to say, “The mathematical odds are heavily stacked against any couple achieving this ideal of parallel growth. The odds plummet when the rate of change in a society accelerates, as it is now doing. “In a fast-moving society in which ‌ the family is again and again torn loose from home and community, in which individuals move further from their parents, further from the religion of origin, and further from traditional values, it is almost miraculous if two people develop at anything like comparable rates.â€? Dire words! And now, almost 40 years later, our own observations bear him out. Human relationships have become more transient and the development of genuine love more tenuous. Love is now sought in serial marriages or clandestine affairs. In 1970 Toffler claimed that in the future those who marry will have an average of three marriages in their lifetime: the first for the expression of sexuality; the second for procreating children; and the third for com-

B3

FISH DAY!!!

Today’s marriages as predicted 40 years ago The wedding season is upon us. It runs from spring to late autumn. It’s anybody’s guess how many weddings occurred just this last weekend. Today’s weddings occur in a sociological atmosphere quite different from that of a couple’s parents and grandparents. The current atmosphere we’ve collectively spawned over the years is no friend of the newly married, or long-married for that matter. Didn’t we ever see where we were going? Someone did. In 1970 an interesting book, “Future Shock,â€? was written by Alvin Toffler. He was a sociology professor at Cornell University who conducted research into future value systems. From this research he predicted what our culture could expect in the fastarriving future and how it would affect our lives. He showed how we were fast forming a “throw-awayâ€? society. This, in turn, would lead us to adopt a concept of transience – a new “temporarinessâ€? in everyday life as well as a mood of impermanence. This Age of Transience would soon affect our relationship with people, but also our attitude toward things, places, ideas, as well as toward institutions and organizations. He wrote, “The people of the future will live in a condition of ‘high transience’ – a condition in which the duration of relationships is cut short ‌ things, places, people, ideas, and organizational structures will all get ‘used up’ more quickly.â€? Permanent commitment to anything would become passĂŠ. Before most of last

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

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B4

Bethel Journal

Life

July 23, 2009

Got garden vegetables? Make frittata, slaw When we plant our vegetable garden, it seems like forever before it starts bearing. Then all of a sudden, I’m inundated with cucumbers, zucchinis and tomatoes. Then the corn comes on and we’re eating corn every night. I’m not complaining; in fact, I feel more than blessed. But the thing is I need to clone myself just like I clone recipes for you. Anybody got ideas how to do that?

Oh, and by the way, if you do figure out a way to clone me, I’ve got a few changes I’d like to make.

Dale and Julie Alexander’s Fabulous Frittata

Frittatas are popular now: Mark Bittman of the New York Times has his version and Loveland readers Julie and Dale Alexander have theirs, too.

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⁄4 pound chorizo sausage (use the fresh, not smoked/cooked kind) 1 medium onion, diced 11⁄2 cups red and yellow pepper or green bell pepper, diced 4-6 green onions, chopped 9 extra large eggs 1 cup whipping cream 2 teaspoons Mexican seasoning (we use Penzey’s Southwest) 1 cup shredded Mexican style or cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon butter Sour cream Salsa Brown chorizo sausage in skillet, drain and crumble. In an oven-proof 10- or 11-inch skillet, melt butter and saute onions until translucent. Add 1 teaspoon of Mexican seasoning, stir in sausage, peppers and onions. Whisk eggs with

Pelican’s Reef’s coleslaw

For Shari Weber, Anderson Township, and several others. “Something’s different in there and it’s so good,” she told me about this Anderson Township eatery. Well, after Trew, kitchen manager/chef got the OK to share this, turns out the “secret” could either be the celery seed or the restaurant’s own from-scratch mayo. “We want to serve our customers the best homemade food,” John Broshar, co-owner told me. Worth a visit for this alone or their new Caribbean slaw. 2 pounds shredded green cabbage About 2 cups shredded carrots 1 medium onion, diced fine Diced bell peppers, red and green 2 tablespoons celery seed 4 cups real mayonaise 1 ⁄2 cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar Salt

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Frittata made by Rita with fresh herbs. For Rita’s recipe, be sure to check out her blog at www.Cincinnati.com. Mix veggies together. Overmixing makes for a Mix celery seed, mayo, dense, sometimes gooey, vinegar and sugar. Pour bread with “tunnels.” over veggies. Adjust seasonings.

Coming soon

Zucchini everything including Rita’s favorite chocolate zucchini cake Jimmy Gherardi’s healthy ranch dressing for kids

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

1. Zucchini: Leave peel on if you like (I like). When packing for freezer, put more shredded zucchini in the container than you think you’ll need. When thawing, push out excess liquid if using in baked goods. That way you’ll get enough. 2. Don’t overmix bread batter! That includes zucchini, banana or other quick bread batter! Remember, it’s a “quick bread” batter and that means to stir wet ingredients into dry very gently until moistened.

Delicious drinks that lower blood pressure

Water (you knew that, right?), hibiscus tea (most herb teas contain hibiscus), grape juice. Careful with energy drinks – check caffeine content, which can elevate blood pressure. Pucker up: A squeeze of lemon juice in your first glass of water helps form and repair collagen, is a gentle liver cleanser, and is great for your immune system and stress. Plus, the vitamin C helps your body absorb iron better. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Or call 513-2487130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

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cream. Whisk in 1 “After moving teaspoon Mexican to Loveland from spice. Illinois last year, Pour half egg we found we realmixture into skillet ly missed our with the other ingreSunday morning dients and stir. Add breakfast place, 1 Benedict’s in East ⁄2 cup of cheese. Add Dundee, Ill. One of remaining egg mixRita ture, stir slightly. our favorites was Heikenfeld Add remaining 1⁄2 the Frittata Olé. We adapted a fritcheese, stir Rita’s kitchen cup tata recipe from slightly. Ina Garten, Barefoot ContesBake at 350 degrees for sa, as a basis for our version 50 to 60 minutes until goldof Frittata Olé. This is great en brown and eggs set. Garfor Sunday brunch with a nish with sour cream and Bloody Mary!” salsa. Serves six to eight.

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Community

July 23, 2009

Bethel Journal

B5

Clermont County offers great public parks The O.V.A.M. grounds is in fine shape thanks to a lot of wonderful people. They have an old schoolhouse ready for folks to see and take a tour. There has been a tremendous amount of work that has gone into this project, taking it down brick by brick and moving it and putting it back up at the show grounds. When you see it, ask Earl Pringle to tell you the story about the school and where it came from and who donated it to the group. The feature tractor this year is the Massey HarrisMassey Ferguson tractor and garden tractor and the Fairbanks Morse gas engines. There will be live music, flea market, craft building, bingo and numerous other activities to see. Also there

who came out to eat. Sunday after church we went up to the Ohio Valley Antique Machinery Grounds, close to Georgetown for a picnic. The crowd was big with more than 100 folks there. The food was plentiful and as usual very good. The folks who make the ice cream were there with their hit-and-miss engine to run the ice cream mixer. These folks will be at the show, Aug. 13 -16, making their famous ice cream. Now you may wonder who these kids are, well, they will be the Grand Marshals. They are Harold and Betty Manning. When during the show you want some ice cream, get there early after each batch is done or you may need to wait for the next batch.

Don’t flush old medicine down the drain, toilet “Pouring your outdated medications down the sink or flushing them down the toilet can have a negative impact on our streams and ultimately our drinking water,” said Clermont Water Resources Department Program Manager John McManus. While pharmaceuticals have not been detected in local streams or drinking water, to date, they are starting to have an impact on waterways in other parts of the country. “We need to change our habits now to ensure our waterways remain healthy,” said McManus. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency studies identified more than 100 individual pharmaceuticals and personal care products in environmental samples and drinking water. Additionally, a study conducted by the Associated Press in 20072008 detected drugs in the drinking supplies of 24

major metropolitan areas. “While these levels were not found to be at levels that pose a human health risk, some studies have shown impacts on fish and other aquatic life,” said McManus. “As the use of prescription medications increase, there is a concern that medicine levels in treated drinking water will also rise.” Unless otherwise directed, it is best not to flush unused medications or pour them down the sink or drain. Throw them in the trash. To protect children and pets, place the unwanted medication in a sealable bag; adding kitty litter, coffee grounds or sawdust

Bethel 734-2278

SHOW TIMES FRI. JULY 24 THRU THURS. JULY 30

HARRY POTTER

The church is hosting Praise in the Park from 3 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, at Burke Park in Bethel. It is a free Christian concert featuring contemporary Christian music the band Alter East. The event also includes festivities including volleyball, cornhole, basketball and contests with prizes. It is a free family friendly event. Bring lunch and seating. The church is at 1005 Batavia Pike, Glen Este; 753-1993.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Robert Mast, 31, 806 Wright St., Newtonsville, security guard/firefighter, and Kathryn Fuchs 49, 806 Wright St., Newtonsville, deputy clerk/firefighter. Marcus Moore, 24, 1601 Fay Road, Goshen, marketer, and Whitney Brown, 23, 4754 Ohio 133, Williamsburg, teacher. Branden Beckett, 24, 5187 Smokey Road, Williamsburg, machinist, and Deborrah Clifton, 23, 5187 Smokey Road, Williamsburg, stay at home mom.

12:00 - 1:15 - 3:15 - 4:45 6:45 - 8:00 - 10:00 ICE AGE III 3D (PG) 12:30 - 2:45 - 5:00 - 7:15 - 9:30 TRANSFORMERS 2 (PG13) 1:00 - 4:00 - 7:00 - 10:00 I LOVE YOU BETH COOPER (PG13) 12:35 - 2:50 - 5:05 - 7:25 - 9:45 BRUNO (R) 1:05-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:20 PUBLIC ENEMIES (R) 12:55-3:45-7:05-9:55 PROPOSAL (PG13) 12:25-2:40-4:55-7:20-9:40 MY SISTER' S KEEPER (PG13) 7:40-9:55 UP (PG) 12:45-3:05-5:25 HANGOVER (R) 12:50-3:00-5:20-7:35-9:50 Free KidsFlick Wednesdays! KUNG FU PANDA (PG) 10:00am $2 Surcharge On 3D Tickets

Divorce/Dissolution Probate • Custody • Child Support • Visitation • Domestic Violence

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• Chef prepared meals Continental breakfast, lunch and dinner

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AMELIA FRIDAY NIGHT

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St. Bernadette Church 10 min. east of I-275, off Rt. 125 at Walgreen/CVS, turn south on Jenny Lind Rd.

Police security. Doors open at 6:00 pm; games begin at 7:30 pm. Loads of instants, lots of door prizes! Great food, friendly patrons and sellers!

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Call today for a complimentary lunch and tour.

Paper Entrance Packages $10.00 $3500 payout each night with 130 players or more. Computers Available

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• Beauty and barber shop

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TONS OF DOOR PRIZES!

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• All utilities included (except phone, cable TV & internet) If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood.

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makes it less appealing to children and pets. Before throwing the medication away, remove all identifying personal information from the containers. For more information on the proper disposal of prescription drugs, contact the Clermont County Storm Water Department at (513) 732-7880.

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from the Boar’s Head Bait shop at Afton. Thanks, Mike. The Clermont County Fair will be here before we know it. It will start July 26 and run till Aug. 1. Start your week by going to the church of your choice and praise the good Lord. God bless all. More later. George Rooks is a retired park ranger. Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park.

Movie Hotline 947-3333 - SENIOR WEDNESDAY $ 4.50 ALL DAY Seniors 65 & Over

721 W Plane St., Bethel Ohio • 513-734-7470

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Midway

Pierce Point

is camping there. Admission is $5 per day or you can buy a membership for $10 which admits you for every day. Now for the fishing report. The stripers are really on a feeding frenzy. The folks are catching lots of them, some between 3 and 5 pounds. The biggest we have heard of is 13 pounds. Now whoever caught this fish sure had a hard time landing it, because they sure put up a hard fight. I got this

1001479601-01

These folks are so proud of the different parks. T h e y include the one at Chilo 34, George Lock Pattison Rooks Park which Ole has a lodge, lake, picnic Fisherman ashelter and hiking trails, Sycamore Park, Kelley Nature Preserve, Crooked Run Nature Preserve at Chilo and Hartman Log Cabin. Last Friday evening the Grangers met at the Grange Hall in Nicholsville to clean and get ready for the homemade ice cream social Saturday evening and it was a wonderful success. Thanks to all the folks who helped and the ones

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Howdy folks, The good news is that Ruth Ann is doing great, we have an appointment at the clinic each Tuesday to check her blood level. Last Thursday evening Ruth Ann and I took folks from our church group down to the Chilo Park for a picnic and it was a great one. The park is in excellent condition, the launch ramp for boats is wonderful and very convenient for the public. The picnic shelter houses are good and a fine place to see the Ohio River and watch boats and barges on the river. The visitors center is a great place to visit, the folks there will give tours for groups. You can set one up by calling the Clermont County Park District at 732-2977.

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BINGO adcall 513.242.4000 or859.283.7290


B6

Bethel Journal

Community

July 23, 2009

Senior Citizens Day at the fair is July 29 It’s July again. That means it’s time for the Clermont County Fair. I have some important decisions to make before I go this year. Will I get the corn dog, funnel cake or those crispy little waffle-shaped cookies sprinkled with powdered sugar? Hmmmmm. I have to remember to wear something white that

day, too. Powdered sugar and black clothing don’t mix. Trust me on this. Since I work for Clermont Senior Services, I am always at the fair on their annual Senior Citizens Day. It’s always the Wednesday of the fair, which is July 29. Every year Clermont Senior Services collaborates with the fair board to pro-

vide a good time for seniors. Ginny Kaldmo will emcee the day’s events. You would remember Ginny if you ever met her. There is no one else like her. In the morning, CSS hosts a rousing bingo game. Dozens of prizes will be given out and there is no charge to play. Ginny will call bingo with her usual (or

I should say unusual) level of enthusiasm. A little before noon, guests will break for lunch on their own (don’t miss the corn dogs), and return at 1 p.m. for the afternoon program. Thanks to sponsorships from Eastgatespring Health Care & Rehabilitation Center, Clermont Senior Services, and the Clermont

County Senior Fair Board, we are able to provide afternoon entertainment that is top notch. All of these activities are included with the $3 senior gate admission, and are presented in the Multi-Purpose Fastiques building. Please stop by to see this special show, and visit our sponsors’ booths as well. Repre-

sentatives from CSS and Eastgatespring will be Linda on hand to Eppler answer questions. Community Linda Eppler is Press guest director of columnist communications for Clermont Senior Services.

DIRECTORY Jenny Eilermann

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD CHRISTIAN - CHURCH OF CHRIST

513.768.8614

EVANGELICAL FREE 5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

Real Life Assembly of God 2300 Old SR. 32, Batavia, OH 45103 513-735-4228 Sundays Adult Service 10:30am Super Church 10:30am Royal Rangers 6:00pm Wednesday Bible Study, Youth Group & Kids Club 7:00pm Tuesday & Thursday Joe’s Place Teen Center 1:00-4:00pm Real People, Real Issues, Real Life

www.faithchurch.net

Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

FRIENDSHIP Lutheran Church (ECLA)

Come Experience The Presence of the Lord In Our Services

Growing our Faith, Family & Friends Sunday Worship 10:00AM (Child Care Available) Sunday School (Ages 3-12) 9:30AM

SOUTHERN BAPTIST

1300 White Oak Road Amelia, Ohio 513-752-5265

Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am Wednesday Night Worship & Prayer Service 7:00pm Nursery provided for all services/ Youth & Children’s Programs

www.cloughpike.com

752-3521

CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH Bible Based Teaching Christ-Centered Worship Family Style Fellowship Sunday School 9:45 am Worship 11:00am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm 2249 Old State Road 32, Batavia

513-732-1971

CHURCH OF CHRIST Bethel Church of Christ

Traditional Worship 8:30am Contemporary Worship 11am Sunday School 9:45am 125 E Plane St Bethel OH 734.2232 www.bethelchurchofchrist.com

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST 937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm

Pastor: Tom Bevers www.Cornerstone.ohbaptist.org

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF MT REPOSE 6088 Branch Hill-Guinea Pike Ken Slaughter, Pastor Sunday School 9:45am - Worship 11am (nursery provided) Sunday Evening Service 6pm-Youth 6pm 513-575-1121 www.mtrepose.org

BAPTIST BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm; Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF GOSHEN 1828 Woodville Pike • 625-5512 Pastor Junior V. Pitman Sunday Morning Worship – 10:00am Prayer Time – 5:30pm Sunday Evening – 6:00pm WED. Prayer & Bible Study – 7:00pm Nursery provided for all services

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FELICITY

212 Prather Rd. Felicity, OH Pastor: Chad Blevins 876-2565 Sunday School 9:45am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Eve. Childrens Mission 6:00pm Sunday Eve. Adult Discipleship 6:00pm Sunday Eve. Worship 7:00pm Wed. Eve. Adult Bible Study 7:00pm

LINDALE BAPTIST CHURCH

3052 ST. RT. 132 AMELIA, OH 45102 Pastor John Davis 797-4189

Sunday School..........................9:30am Sunday Morning Worship........10:30am Sunday Evening Worship..........6:30pm Wednesday Prayer Service........7:00pm Wednesday Youth Group...........7:00pm

www.lindalebaptist.com

UNITED METHODIST

UNITED METHODIST

EMMANUEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School 9:00am Worship 10:30am

Trinity United Methodist

Children’s Worship and Childcare 10:30am Corner of Old SR 74 and Amelia-Olive Branch Rd 732-1400 http://www.emmanuel-umc.com

LUTHERAN

RIVER OF LIFE Assembly of God 1793 U.S. 52, Moscow, Ohio 45153 Pastor: Ralph Ollendick Sun. Contemporary Service SS -9:45am, Worship 11:00am Wed.- Informal Biblestudy 7-8pm

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH 1025 CLOUGH PIKE

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PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

UNITED METHODIST We’re trying a New Blend

OWENSVILLE CHURCH OF CHRIST

A fellowship where God changes people for life. Come visit us! 2545 Highway 50 Owensville, OH 45160 513-732-2324 Sunday School 9:00am Childrens Church 10:00am Worship 10:00am Contemporary and traditional with live music and multi-media.

CHURCH OF GOD GOSHEN CHURCH OF GOD

Real People...In a Real Church... Worshipping a Real God! 1675 Hillstation Road, Goshen, Ohio 45122 722-1699 www.goshenchurchofgod.org Pastor Tim McGlone Service Schedule Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday Youth Service 7:00pm Saturday Service 7:00pm

Amelia United Methodist Church “To Become and Make Disciples Of Christ”

Schedule of Services: Sunday School 9:00-9:45am; Sunday Morrning Celebration 10:00am - Nursery provided; Childrens Ministry 10:00; Sunday Evening Operation Great Commission 6:00pm; Wed - Bible Study 7:00pm; Wed. - Youth Group 7:00pm.

www.houseofrestoration.org

EPISCOPAL ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH & ST. THOMAS NURSERY SCHOOL

Faith United Methodist Church 180 North Fifth Street, Batavia, Ohio David W. Phaneuf - Minister 732-2027 Sunday School 9:15am; Worship 10:30am Nursery Provided United Methodist Youth, Men & Women Organizations Handicap Accessibility www.gbgm-umc.org//faith-batavia

FELICITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

176th Year in Felicity Walnut & West St. Felicity Rev. Jane Beattie, Pastor 876-2147 Contemporary Worship............9:00am Sunday School.......................10:00am Traditional Worship................10:45am Nursery provided for all Sunday morning services

“Room for the Whole Family” GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 6710 Goshen Rd, Goshen Across from Goshen High School 513-722-2541 www.goshenmethodist.org Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am Blended Worship Traditional and Contemporary Youth Fellowship 6:00pm Nursery Available

Located at 19 East Main Street (St. Rt. 125 & Church St.) Amelia, Ohio

513.753.6770

Sunday School Class 9:30 a.m.

Sunday Worship 10:45 a.m.

Children’s & Junior Church During Service Infant / Toddler Nursery Available

AUMY! Youth Group grades 6 to 12

Sunday evenings 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Come Join Us…. Marc Quinter, Pastor

Contemporary and Traditional live Worship Music and Multimedia

HOUSE OF RESTORATION WORSHIP CENTER 1487 SR 131, Milford, OH Rev. Jeff Wolf 575-2011

6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. (across from Oasis Golf Course) Ph. 513-677-9866 www.epiphanyumc.org Contemporary Services: Saturdays 5pm & Sundays 9:00am Traditional Service: Sunday - 10:30 am

B elfast U n ited M eth o d ist C h u rch 2297 St. Rt. 131 Goshen, Ohio Rev. Ronald Slater, Pastor 724-2715 Sunday W orship 9:15am Sunday School 10:30am Nursery, Junior Church

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 402 W. Plane St. Bethel, Ohio 513-734-7201 www.bumcinfo.org

100 Miami Ave, Terrace Park,OH 831-2052 www.stthomasepiscopal.org Saturday: 5:00pm Holy Eucharist Sunday 7:45am Holy Eucharist* 8:34am Summer Breakfast 10:00am Holy Eucharist* 11:00am Fellowship & Refreshments *Child care available

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45am Contemporary Worship 9:30am Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 & 10:45am Nursery Care for Age 3 & under Full Program for Children, Youth, Music, Small Groups & more Handicapped Accessible

THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN

PASTORS: Bill Bowdle -Sr. Pastor Steve Fultz - Assoc. Pastor; Dustin Nimmo - Youth Pastor Janet Bowdle - Children’s Pastor

MT MORIAH UNITED METHODIST 681 Mt. Moriah Dr, Withamsville

513-752-1333 Worship: 9:00am & 10:30am Sundays We Love Children:

Ark of Learning Preschool and Child Care, Youth G roup (7-12 grades)

St. Bernadette Church

Learn more on our Web Site

http://w w w.m tm oriahum c.org

Come visit us at the

Owensville United Methodist Church

Located at 2580 US Hwy 50 (next to the library) or (1mile east of Owensville on 50)

10:30am day Worship Service......8:30am, 10:30 Sunday Sunday School.......................9:30am w/nursery & children’s church A special prayer and healing service on the 1st Sunday evening of each month at 7:00pm

Pastor Mike Smith

513-732-2211

1479 Locust Lake Rd Amelia, Oh 45102 753-5566 Rev. Bill Stockelman, Pastor Weekly Masses, Saturday 5:00 PM Sunday 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM

www.stbernadetteamelia.org

Ask us for information about Angel Food Ministries

Place orders by August 9 Pick up Aug 15, 10am-noon

Morning Worship 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.m. High Voltage Youth 6 p.m.

513-735-2555

www.kingswayfellowship.com

4359 E. Bauman Lane | Batavia, OH 45103 Pastor, Troy P. Ervin

Welcomes You Y

Sunday Morning Schedule: 9AM - Worship: Traditional 10AM - Classes & Groups 11AM - Worship: Contemporary Nursery care provided

330 Gay Street, Williamsburg, OH 45176

One block north of Main Street at 3rd 513-724-6305 WburgUMC@aol.com www.williamsburgumc.com

Pastor: Rev. Duane A. Kemerley Youth Director- JD Young

NAZARENE

A New Life - A New Prospective A New Song

Pastor: Michael Fite info: 753-3159 Meeting at WT Elementary 1/2 mile east of I-275 on SR 125

Sunday Worship. 10:00am www.newsongohio.com

THE SALVATION ARMY Worship & Service Center 87 N. Market Street Batavia, OH 45103

Bethel

Church of the Nazarene Rev. Scott Wade, Senior Pastor Rev. Dale Noel, Chaplain & Care Pastor Mark Owen, Director of Music and Worship Mitch Scott, Director of Youth SUNDAY: Sunday School (All Ages)....................... 9:30am Celebration of Worship.........................10:30am Children’s Worship. (1st-6th Grades).................. ...........10:30am Bible Study............................................6:00pm Youth Worship........................................6:00pm Special Music each week Nursery Care Provided Handicapped Accessible MONDAY: Ladies’ Prayer Group.................10:30am WEDNESDAY: Adults Prayer Meeting............................7:00pm Youth Small Group - ages 12-18............7:00pm Small Groups meet in various locations and at different times throughout the week. S.Charity & E. Water Sts. Bethel, Ohio 45106 513-734-4204 Office: M-F 8:00am - 2:00pm E-mail: bethelnaz@fuse.net www.bethelnazarenechurch.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL FIRST CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 6208 Guinea Pike, Milford, OH 45150 Pastor Melvin Moore Church: 513-575-5450 A Loving Church in Jesus Name Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45am Thur. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00pm Nursery Provided for Sunday Morning Worship

513-732-6241 - www.salvos.com/Batavia Sunday School 10:00am- Worship 11:00am Captain Aaron A. Boone, Sr. Captain Amber S. Boone Commanding Officers/Ministers

Looking for a Church That Loves Kids? Looking for Acceptance & Mercy?

vineyard eastgate community church Located @ 1005 Old S.R. 74 (@ Tealtown Rd. in Eastgate)

Sunday Services 8:30, 10:00 & 11:30 AM

513.753.1993 vineyardeastgate.org

PRESBYTERIAN (USA) LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Worship Service........................10:00am Church School............................11:15am CONNECT Youth Service.............6-8pm Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities 360 Robin Ave. (off Oak St.), Loveland OH

683-2525

www.LPCUSA.org

Men and Women’s groups, Active Seniors “Vagabonds” that gather and travel Pastor: Randy Lowe

Sunday Morning 10:00AM

Contemporary Worship Practical Message Classes for Children & Teens Nursery Care Sunday 6:00PM Avalanche Youth Service Wednesday 7:00PM Bible Study (adults) / Avalanche Youth We have many other groups that meet on a regular basis 4050 Tollgate Rd, Williamsburg, OH 513-724-3341 www.cmcchurch.com Mark Otten, Pastor

LPCUSA@fuse.net

PRESBYTERIAN CALVIN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Amelia/Withamsville - 3mi. East of I-275 1177 West Ohio Pike (SR125)-Phone 752-2525 Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

Rev. James R. Steiner, Interim Pastor Nursery care provided www.calvinpresbyterianchurch.com

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 199 Gay Street Williamsburg, Ohio 45176 Phone: 513-724-7985 Sunday School: 9:30A.M. Worship:10:30A.M.(SupervisedNursery) PRESCHOOL: Tues, Weds, Thurs

WESLYAN

Sunday 10:30am ... Holy Eucharist Handicap Accessible 513-753-4115 www.GoodSamaritanEpiscopal.org

Williamsburg g

SUNDAY SERVICE TIMES

United Methodist Church

Where Faith and Life Bond for Blessing

25 Amelia Olive Branch Rd.

ROMAN CATHOLIC

“Encircling People with God’s Love” Traditional Worship.......8:15am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship..................9:30am Sunday School...............................9:30am Nursery Available 5767 Pleasant Hill Rd (next to Milford Jr. High) 513-831-0262 www.trinitymilford.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301 Sunday Worship: 10:30am with Childrens Church & Nursery Thursday “Unplugged” Service 7:00pm 6/11-8/20, with Nursery

www.cloughchurch.org

638 Batavia Pike Corner of Old St.Rt. 74 & Summerside Rd Phone: 513-528-3052 Pastor: Rev. Blossom Matthews Sunday Morning Worship: 8:30 & 10:40 Nursery Care Available Sunday School for all ages: 9:30 Web: www.Summerside-umc.org E-mail: Summerside_umc@yahoo.com

MULBERRY WESLEYAN CHURCH

949 SR Bus. 28, Milford 831-3218 Eric George, Pastor Rob Meyer, Youth Leader Kent Underwood, Minister of Worship & Music

Sunday School 9:30am Worship/Children’s Church 10:30am Sunday Equipping Hour 6:00pm Adult Bible Study/Youth/Kids Club 7:00pm WED ”A friendly Church for the Whole Family”


ON

THE BETHEL

RECORD

| DEATHS | Editor Theresa Herron | therron@communitypress.com | 248-7128 BIRTHS

Arrests/citations

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

communitypress.com E-mail: clermont@c

unityp

B7

JOURNAL

POLICE REPORTS

Incidents/investigations

Criminal damage Numbers and drawings were written on Smyth Automotive, 685 W. Plane St., July 3 Curfew/loitering/vagrancy Three juveniles were found out after curfew, Tower Alley, June 29. Disorderly conduct

Rodney Small, 44, 330 Brown St., Georgetown, Ohio, driving under OVI suspension, having physical control of vehicle while under the influence, June 10. Juvenile, 16, assault, July 8. Ethan A. Kestel, 29, 133 S. Ash St., possession of drugs/drug paraphernalia, July 3.

Bethel Journal

July 23, 2009

A man tried to enter a home after being told to leave, 14 Bethel Park, July 4.

Identity theft

322 S. Charity St., July 7.

Report taken

A man swallowed pills in an attempt to kill himself, 600 block of Easter Road, July 10. A food stamp card was lost, 221 S. Union St., July 7.

Theft

Cell phone taken from owner on West Plane Street, July 4. Handgun taken from 218 N. Ash St., July 4. Safe and other items taken from 529 Charity St., July 11. Camera from 636 Easter Road, July 7. Electricity at 82 Bethel Park Drive, July 7. Trailer from Wichards Oil & Auto using a credit

card reported stolen, 518 W. Plane St., July 7. Debit card from 228 W. Plane St., July 6.

CLERMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE No reports available

IN THE COURTS The following cases have been filed with Clermont County clerk of courts.

Filings

Total Quality Logistics vs. L and E Trucking of Naples Inc., professional tort Total Quality Logistics vs. J and J Logistics of South Florida Inc., professional tort Clarence Bingamon vs. Marsha P. Ryan and Ford Motor Company, worker’s compensation Ricky Broach vs. Marsha P. Ryan and Crown Services Inc., worker’s compensation Robert L. Elam vs. Marsha P. Ryan and Smyth Automotive Inc., worker’s compensation U.S. Bank NA vs. Rod Bullock, et al., foreclosure HSBC Mortgage Services Inc. vs. Mark A. Zenni, et al., foreclosure Bank of New York Mellon vs. Beverly J. Staten, et al., foreclosure Mortgage First LLC vs. Mary L. Werner, et al., foreclosure Wesbanco Bank Inc. vs. Robert L. Van Frank, et al., foreclosure Citimortgage Inc. vs. Sherry Lawson, foreclosure U.S. Bank NA vs. Peter T. Skinner, et al., foreclosure Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. James W. Huxtable, et al., foreclosure Bank of New York Mellon vs. Emmanuel A. Itapson, et al., foreclosure Bank of New York Mellon vs. Victoria

D. Gallenstein, et al., foreclosure Chase Home Finance LLC vs. Robin Roots, et al., foreclosure Everbank vs. Gary T. Lawson, et al., foreclosure HSBC Bank USA NA as trustee vs. William Maki and Deborah Maki, foreclosure Citimortgage Inc. successor by merger vs. Christopher J. Stover, et al., foreclosure Midfirst Bank vs. Mike Schirmer, et al., foreclosure Victory Community Bank vs. Rita J. McQuearry, et al., foreclosure GMAC Mortgage Inc. vs. Maurice R. Howard, et al., foreclosure Chase Home Finance LLC vs. Rob A. Morris, et al., foreclosure U.S. Bank NA vs. Floyd L. Maynard, et al., foreclosure Wells Fargo Bank NA vs. Matthew W. Leliaert, et al., foreclosure Mt. Pisgah United Methodist Church vs. John Oetzel, et al., other civil Willard Grubb and Julie Grubb vs. Robert Mosley and State Farm Insurance Companies, other civil National Bank and Trust Company vs. American Land Holdings LLC, et al., other civil FIA Card Services NA vs. Michael Garrett, other civil Concepts Inc. vs. Affordable Granite LLC and Fran C. Hardy, other civil Midland Funding LLC vs. Rod Howard, other civil Robyn Conner vs. Chrysler Group LLC, other civil Livingston Financial LLC vs. Bridget

L. Davis, et al., foreclosure National City Mortgage vs. Brian L. Hunt, foreclosure BAC Home Loans Servicing LP vs. Shane Snider, et al., foreclosure BAC Home Loans Servicing LP vs. Bryan McAbee and Janell L. McAbee, foreclosure National City Bank vs. Steven R. Leonard Jr. and Erin D. Leonard, foreclosure Wachovia Mortgage Corporation vs. Rhonda M. Godinho and State of Ohio Estate Tax Division, foreclosure BAC Home Loans Servicing LP vs. Michael D. Ooten and Michele M. Ooten, foreclosure Taylor Bean and Whitaker Mortgage Corp. vs. David W. Guy, et al., foreclosure Deutsche Bank National Trust Company vs. Vincent E. Mauch, et al., foreclosure Park National Bank vs. Dennis Heyne, et al., foreclosure Bank of New York Mellon vs. Cathy L. Lawson, et al., foreclosure Green Tree Servicing LLC vs. Timothy L. Shelton, et al., foreclosure Xceed Financial Credit Union vs. Eric W. Smith Voya, et al., foreclosure Huntington National Bank vs. John Praschak, et al., foreclosure BAC Home Loans Servicing LP vs. Terri A. Sprague and Clermont County Treasurers Office, foreclosure Household Realty Corporation vs. Beverly Kabler and Treasurer of Clermont County, foreclosure Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. Kevin

TENN

BED AND BREAKFAST

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E

Divorce

Mary L. Brabant vs. Donnie R. Brabant Rita M. Hill vs. Raply Wayne Hill Shannon Clemons vs. Merv Clemons Stephanie Boehm vs. Roger E. Boehm Carolyn Harrison vs. John M. Harrison Bethany A. Kissinger vs. Kevin J. Kissinger John Brady Grimm vs. Jayne Janell Grimm

Dissolution

Jessica Ann Kaldmo vs. James Kaldmo Dixie Harvey vs. Billy Harvey Julie Moore vs. Eric Simmerman Barbara K. Wilson vs. David R. Wilson Lori A. Rosenberger vs. Robert J. Rosenberger Jr. Adam Thomas Kearney vs. Lynda Gail Stamm

Indictments

The following people have been indicted by the Clermont County grand jury to the Court of Common Pleas. This means members of the grand jury decided enough evidence has been collected to warrant filing charges. Joshua L. Whitacre, 21, 3387 Ohio 125, Bethel, receiving stolen property, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Robert Benjamin Seaman, 39, 674 Elliott

BED AND BREAKFAST

513.768.8614

BED AND BREAKFAST

BeautifulBeach.com leads you to NW Florida’s Beach Vacation Rentals along the beaches of South Walton. Luxurious gulf-front homes, seaside condos and cottages. Dune Allen Realty, 50 yrs of excellent service and accommodations. 888-267-2121 or visit www.BeautifulBeach.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

FLORIDA

Feature of the Week

RAVENWOOD CASTLE: A MOST UNUSUAL GETAWAY Visit a “medieval castle” on a high hilltop on 115 secluded and forested acres of the most beautiful area of Southeast Ohiothe Hocking Hills! Owners Sue & Jim Maxwell are creating the most unusual guest experience of stepping back 800 years in a reconstruction of a “12th century Norman castle.” The Maxwells have traveled throughout England & Scotland & have always loved castles & the medieval era. Although the building is new, the couple has been collecting architectural antiques for several years. Each guest room or suite has a stained glass window, usually in the bedroom, a Victorian fireplace mantel with a gas log unit, antique light fixtures and some have beautiful old doors. The wood mouldings around the door & windows & the 5 stairways are inspired by centuries old motifs from Great Britain’s stately homes & castles. Most rooms also have a French door with a balcony, private deck overlooking the forest. There are also “medieval” themed cottages with fireplaces and whirlpools. Ravenwood has

CLEARWATER/ST. PETE Gulf front condos. Sandy beach. January ’10, 4 Week Discounts! Florida Lifestyles. 1-800-487-8953 www.ourcondo.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

DESTIN. Beautiful, luxury 2 BR, 2 BA Oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Covered prkng, sleeps 6. Local own er. www.us-foam.com/destin Ofc513-528-9800, eves 513-752-1735

DESTIN. New, nicely furnished 2 br, 2 ba condo. Gorgeous Gulf view. Pools, golf course. Discount Summer & Fall rates. Book now. 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us its own food service for guests, so they can spend their entire visit immersed in solitude if they wish, surrounded by tall trees, huge rocks, the castle‘s own hiking trails and plenty of peace and quiet. Or guests can drive the few miles to outside attractions & other dramatic scenery in the Hocking Hills. Ravenwood offers popular “murder mystery” weekends and also plans “medieval dinners”, getaway workshops, and other special events. Facilities are also perfect for small weddings and other festive occasions. The building has no steps into the 1st floor level - a “drawbridge” leads from the driveway to the massive front door and the first floor guest rms. Nearby are caves, waterfalls, lots of hiking trails, a scenic railway, arts & crafts studios & shop, antique malls and much more. There are often midweek discounts and a special “Royal Family” Adventure Package in the summer.

NEW YORK MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

Bed & Breakfast

FLORIDA Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo, 2 BR, 2 BA. Pool. Local owner 513-770-4243 www.bodincondo.com

367 H, Goshen, theft, Goshen Police. Jason L. Pack, 29, 2755 Ohio 132 #61, New Richmond, receiving stolen property, Union Township Police Department. Killian R. Griess, 19, 3969 Piccadilly Circle E, Cincinnati, breaking and entering, theft, burglary, Union Township Police Department. Tricia D. Latini, 28, 154 Marble Cliff Drive, Lakeside Park, Ky., breaking and entering, theft, Miami Township Police. Timothy W. Bartlett, 41, 552 Aspen Glen Drive Apt. 908, Cincinnati, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Dale Franklin Coffey, 45, at large, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Scott Lewis Herndon, 38, 53 Colvard Drive, Ohatchee, Ala., non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Tyrone Darnell Lowe, 31, 1838 Lawn Drive, Cincinnati, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Ronald Vernon Ramsey, 39, 312 Pershing Ave., Cincinnati, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Joshua L. Randall, 25, aggravated robbery, robbery, felonious assault, Union Township Police Department. Dustin David Keith Bailey, 21, breaking and entering, theft, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office.

travelads@enquirer.com

FLORIDA

Anna Maria Island. Save $$$ on a beach getaway. Only $499/wk + tax. All new inside, very comfy, just steps from the beach. 513-236-5091 www.beachesndreams.net

St., Cincinnati, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. Brian David Tharp, 34, 3924 May St., Cincinnati, non-support of dependents, Clermont County Department of Support Enforcement. John Michael Fisler, 26, 320 Front St., Williamsburg, theft, receiving stolen property, forgery, Union Township Police Department. Byron K. Betts, 51, 507 Piccadilly Square C, Cincinnati, trafficking in cocaine, trafficking in heroin, Union Township Police Department. Bo Travis Warren, 22, burglary, theft, Union Township Police Department. Arthur James Fritts, 33, 2479 Upper Five Mile West, Williamsburg, receiving stolen property, Clermont County Sheriff’s Office. Patrick C. Henry, 39, forgery, receiving stolen property, burglary, Union Township Police Department. Louis T. Cione, 48, 42 Hunters Court, Amelia, theft, tampering with records, The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. Trevor Aaron Taylor, 24, 533 Hamblin Court, Amelia, trafficking in heroin, corrupting another with drugs, possession heroin, tampering with evidence, engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, Narcotics Unit. Brad Lee Casey, 31, 1813 Mears Ave. #2, Cincinnati, failure to appear, Prosecutor’s Office. James E. Clark, 45, breaking and entering, vandalism, Pierce Township Police. Jill Y. Christman, 38, 1785 Ohio 28 Lot

Travel & Resort Directory Jenny Eilermann

THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast, just minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for Romantic Weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

M. Wolf, other civil Estate of Mary Brown vs. Kenneth Ray Brown, other civil Total Quality Logistics vs. Z&S Fresh Inc., et al., other civil FIA Card Services NA vs. Carolyn J. Sutto, other civil American Servicing Group vs. Kenneth Bradbury, other civil

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Dinsey. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com NAPLES - New all incl golf/tennis comm, beaut furn 2 BR/2 BA condo overlooking 27 hole champ GC, mo rentals at reasonable rates, not avail Jan-Mar 2010. 513-312-5799, Doug.

PANAMA CITY BEACH Family Atmosphere! Your Best Vacation Value! 800-354-1112 www.Summerhouse.com

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 800-245-7746 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or nr ocean. Great locations & rates. Golf pkgs, too. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828 Hilton Head Island, SC

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

For info call 800-477-1541 or visit www.ravenwoodcastle.com

FLORIDA DESTIN. Edgewater Beach Condos on the Gulf. 1-3 BR, beachfront, pvt balconies, FREE Wi-Fi, beach set-up (in season) & use of new fitness ctr. New massage/facial salon, 2 pools (1 heated), FREE $20 gift cert to pool grill (weekly rentals in season). Call or visit our website for lastminute specials. 800-822-4929 www.edgewaterbeach.com

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, beach view from balcony. Bright & airy, nicely appointed, all amenities. Cinci owner. 232-4854. The Best Crescent Beach Vacation!

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

LEELANAU VACATION RENTALS Over 120 condos, cottages and homes on Lake Michigan, Glen Lake and other inland lakes. Call 231-334-6100 or visit www.leelanau.com/vacation

MICHIGAN

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Log Cabin Resort w/heated indoor pool, minutes from Dollywood, Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mtns. Breathtaking mountain views, hot tubs, Jacuzzis, pool tables & pet friendly cabins are offered. Excellent rates, discounts available. Call 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366) hiddenspringsresort.com

TENNESSEE A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge.Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

Nr Powell NORRIS LAKE. Valley Marina. 2 BR/1BA, very nicely furnished home. Covered porch, deck. $95/nt. 423-562-8353 www.norrislakehse.com www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

www.NorrisLakeCedarCottage.com Great 2 BR, 1½ bath cottage on the water. Sleeps 7. Two fireplaces, pri vate boat dock. $650/wk, $220 wknd. 865-363-4330 865-966-1775

TIME SHARES WHOLESALE TIMESHARES 60-80% Off Retail! Qualified Buyers Only! Call for Free Info Pack! www.holidaygroup.com/cn 1-800-731-0307


B8

Bethel Journal

On the record

July 23, 2009

BRIEFLY Football reinstated

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE CLERMONT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY The following changes to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Clermont County Agricultural Society have been proposed to comply with state rules and regulations or for clarification purposes. New language is in bold print and old language is struck through. A majority of the membership of the Clermont County Agricultural Society must approve these changes in order for the changes to take effect. Voting will take place on Saturday, August 1, 2009 between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the Fair Board office. You must be a current member of the Clermont County Agricultural Society to vote. Memberships may be purchased at the Fair Board office until Wednesday noon of fair week for $35.00. You must be at least 18 years of age and reside in Clermont County qualify and you must purchase your own membership. Memberships can not be sold to second parties. ARTICLE I – TITLE—no change ARTICLE II – OBJECT—no change ARTICLE III – MEMBERSHIP—no change ARTICLE IV - BOARD OF DIRECTORS Section 1. The management of the Clermont County Agricultural Society shall consist of no more than 20 members, one elected or appointed from each of 15 townships in Clermont County plus up to 5 members at large. e. Each member at large must be nominated by an elected board member and voted upon within 90 days by the majority of the Board Members present. present. All 20 members will serve for a term of 3 years and the terms so arranged that the terms of one-third of the members expire annually. Section 2.—no change ARTICLE V – ELECTION—no change of existing language. Addition of the following: Section 6. No director or other officer of a society shall use society funds, facilities, or employees: 1. To promote the candidacy of any member who seeks election or re-election to the board of directors of the society; or 2. To influence the votes of members upon any amendment to the constitution or by-laws of a society which is submitted as provided by regulation 901-5-08 3. No person employed by a society shall engage in any of the activities specified in this rule. ARTICLE VI - ANNUAL MEETING Section 1. The annual meeting of the members of the Society shall be held in Clermont County (place and time to be selected by Directors) on the second Wednesday of December November of each year or date set by the Board of Directors. Section 2.—no change ARTICLE VII - ORGANIZATION & MEETINGS Section 1: The Board of Directors shall meet annually on the 2nd Wednesday of November each year, and elect a president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer. The president, vice president and treasurer Said officers may serve and the secretary not more than three two years as the board may determine and until their successors are elected and qualified. Section 2.—no change ARTICLE VIII – AMENDMENTS—no change ARTICLE IX – COMPENSATION—change in amendment 2 only AMENDMENT No. 2 The Board is to pay directors as authorized by the O.R.C. the monthly stipend of $15 per meeting for a maximum of 12 meetings per year and mileage from the director’s home to the meeting and return at a rate of 30¢ 40¢ per mile. ARTICLE X – BONDS—no change ARTICLE X – FAIR DATES—no change BY-LAWS ARTICLE I – QUORUM—no change Section 1. A majority of the members of the Board of Directors shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business of the Society. ARTICLE II – MEETINGS-- no change of existing language; addition of the following: Section 4. In the event that a special meeting is called, proper public notification will be made by posting notice on Fair Board office door. ARTICLE III - ORDER OF BUSINESS—no change ARTICLE IV - DUTIES OF OFFICERS—no change ARTICLE V - RULES—no change MEMBERSHIP The membership ticket may be purchased for the sum determined by the Board of Directors. Membership tickets will be on sale from the first day of January of the current year until Wednesday of fair week at 12:00 noon. No memberships for the current year will be sold after this date and time. To purchase a membership, phone the office at 513-732-0522. Memberships may be purchased at the fair board office. This ticket provides for three benefits. 1) Admits members only at the gate for all sessions of the Fair, including automobile. 2) Entitles member to place entry in any or all departments for exhibition. 3) A resident of Clermont County 18 years of age or older may purchase a membership in the Clermont Agricultural Society and have voting rights. RULES FOR EXHIBITORS—no change ENTRY FEES AND TERMS—no change JUDGES—no change PROTESTS—no change PROTECTIVE MEASURES—no changes except for the following: 23. No exhibitor will be allowed to give or to sell any article that will conflict with rights sold to privilege men persons. 26. Where general and special rules conflict, special takes precedence. Fair Board reserves the right to pay all premiums pro rate. Health requirements for all livestock to conform to the rules of the State. Entries for all livestock classes close at 5 p.m. Saturday, July 21 the Saturday before the first day of the fair, except for Jr. Fair exhibitors. Stalls, pens are available. Each exhibitor must furnish own straw. MISCELLANEOUS—no changes except for the following 34. The fair board office will be open daily Monday-Saturday at Fair Grounds beginning Saturday, June 28, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. the first Monday of July each year. The office will be closed July 4th. 35. Tags will not be mailed after Saturday, July 12, but can be picked up at the Fair Grounds. 36. 35. Collectors for both auto and pedestrian gates will be under supervision of the members in charge of the 36 department gates and admissions department. 37. 36. Every precaution will be taken to properly protect exhibits, and for this purpose night watchmen will be on duty 37 during the continuance of the fair. There will also be a daily police force. The Association, however, will not be responsible for any property or injury to any persons attending the fair at any time indoors or out. 38. 38 37.. The Association Society will not be responsible for theft of autos, accessories or contents. 39 39. 38. Ample space will be provided for systematic parking. Section 1711.07 (Board of Directors and Annual Election of County Society) The board of directors of a county or independent agricultural society shall consist of at least eight members. An employee of the Ohio State University extension service and the county school superintendent shall be members ex officio. Their terms of office shall be determined by the rules of the department of agriculture. Any vacancy of the board caused by death, resignation, refusal to qualify, removal from county, or other cause may be filled by the board until the society’s next annual election, when a director shall be elected for the unexpired term. There shall be an annual election of directors by ballot at a time and a place fixed by the board, but this election shall not be held later than the first Saturday in December, and not later than the fifteenth day of November each year thereafter. The secretary of the society shall give notice of such election, for three weeks prior to the holding thereof, in at least two newspapers of opposite politics and of general circulation in the county a newspaper of general circulation in the county, or by letter mailed to each member of the society. Only persons holding membership certificates at the close of the annual county fair, or at least fifteen calendar days before the date of the election, as may be fixed by the board, may vote, unless such election is held on the fairground during the fair, in which case all persons holding membership certificates on the date and hour of the election may vote. When the election is to be held during the fair, notice of such election must be prominently mentioned in the premium list, in addition to the notice required in newspapers. The term of office of the retiring directors shall expire, and those of the directors-elect shall begin, not later than the first Saturday, and not later than the thirtieth day of November each year thereafter. The secretary of such society shall send the name and address of each member of its board to the director of agriculture within ten days after the election. Section 1711.08 (Reorganization Meeting of Officers) The board of directors of a county or independent agricultural society shall annually meet not later than the first Saturday of January, and not later than the thirtieth day of November, and at such meeting shall elect a president, a vicepresident, a treasurer, a secretary, and such other officers as it may deem proper. The president, the vice-president, and the treasurer shall serve one year, and the secretary not more than three years as the board may determine, and until their successors are elected and qualified. The president and the vice-president shall be directors. The secretary and treasurer may or may not be directors. Before election of officers the newly elected directors shall qualify by taking oath or affirmation before a competent authority, and in electing officers the board shall conform to the rules of the department of agriculture. Section 1711.08(1) (Eligibility for Public Office) —no change Section 1711.12 (Forbidden Activities) —no change Section 1711.13 (Powers of County Society) —no change ELECTION OF FAIR BOARD DIRECTORS In addition, an election will be held to fill the Board of Director seats for the following townships: Goshen, Jackson, Miami, Monroe, and Stonelick. Each position is for a three year term commencing on December 1, 2009. In order to qualify, you must be a resident of Clermont County, be 18 years of age, be a member of the Clermont County Agricultural Society for the current year, and live in one of the above townships. A petition must be obtained prior to 4:00 p.m. on the Saturday before the opening of the fair, have ten (10) valid signatures, and returned to the Fair Board office by 5:00 p.m. on the Saturday before the opening of the fair. Those signing the petition must also be members of the Clermont County Agricultural Society for the current year. No one can sign another person’s name on the petition. Non-members will be declared invalid. The Fair Board Election will be held on the last day of the fair, Saturday, Aug. 1st between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. in the Fair Board office at the same time and place as the vote on the Constitution and By-Law changes. Submitted by Dan Hodges, Fair Board Secretary

1001484848-01

BETHEL – The Bethel-Tate Local School District has reinstated football for seventhand eighth-grade middle school students. Information regarding the team and the upcoming season is available at the district office, 675 W. Plane St., during business hours. During the summer, the district office is open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Hot dog in paradise

UNION TWP. – Clermont County businesses are invited to join Clermont Chamber members for the Annual Hot

Dog in Paradise held to coincide with Jimmy Buffet’s 2009 Summerzcool Tour Aug. 6. Hot Dog in Paradise is a part of the series of Chamber Tailgates. The tailgate, will be 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the grounds of the Eastgate Professional Office Park, 4355 Ferguson Drive. Tropical hot dogs will be grilled up by Tim Clepper of Ike’s Catering and Vending. Network in a festive island atmosphere with other area businesses. While there is no fee to attend the tailgate, reservations are requested. Call the Clermont Chamber of Commerce at 576-5000 or register online at www.clermontchamber.com.

History project

PUBLIC NOTICE RESOLUTION 877 APPROVING WAGES AND SALARIES OF EMPLOYEES OF THE VILLAGE OF BETHEL, adopted 07/13/2009 by the Bethel Village Council. Complete details of the legislation are available upon request at the Municipal Fiscal Office, 120 N. Main St., Bethel, Ohio 45106. Mayor John Swarthout Fiscal Officer Angel Burton 1001485210 PUBLIC NOTICE 1. ALLEN BARTON B14 1433 TONAPAH DRIVE CINCINNATI, OHIO 45255 2. MICHELLE BINNING J346 4 MONTGOM ERY WAY #6 AMELIA, OHIO 45102 3. ALBERTCLAYBURN,JR. I302 16221 SAMS COURT WILLIAMS BURG, OHIO 45176 4. CHRISTOPHER COLLIVER E131 3235 KENNEDY FORD ROAD BETHEL, OHIO 45106 5. MALENA COX H276 4358 BEECHMONT DRIVE CINCINNATI, OHIO 45244 6. CHAD DEAN E133 308 WALNUT STREET #1 NEW RICHMOND, OHIO 45157 7. AMY DEROSE I339 3119 MACEDONIA BETHEL, OHIO 45106 8. STEPHEN DUNN Q630/598 37 HONEYSUCKLE DRIVE AMELIA, OHIO 45102 9. JESSICA GODBY R654 & S 7 0 6 PO BOX 106 BETHEL, OHIO 45106 10. TINA LONG S708 22 CHURCH STREET #12 AMELIA, OHIO 45102 11. CARLA PUCKETT I323 140 N. UNION STREET BETHEL, OHIO 45106 12. RITA RIECK B11 1888 SR 133 BETHEL, OHIO 45106 13.TERESA TREMPER E151 2730 SR 222 # 35 BETHEL, OHIO 45106 125 STORAGE 1958 OHIO PIKE AMELIA, OH 45102 (513)797-8515 1001485335 PUBLIC NOTICE The Goshen Township Board of Zoning Appeals will hold the following public hearing on Monday, August 17, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. at the Goshen Township Government Center, 6757 Goshen Road, Goshen, Ohio: Case #298: Applicant David Scott has requested a variance for the change in setbacks to be able to build on his property located at State Route 132 and Parker Road . The public is invited. This application may be viewed ten (10) days prior to this public hearing at the Goshen Township Government Center, 6757 Goshen Road during normal business hours. 1001485789

BATAVIA – The Clermont County Collaborative of Historical Organizations and the Clermont County commissioners have a joint history project. The commissioners installed a display case in the lobby of the administration building, 101 E. Main St. in Batavia. Each month a different historical organization will have a display on local history. In July, the Goshen Township Historical Society will have a display. The display is open to the public free of charge during the regular hours of the administration building.

History display

UNION TWP. – In July, the Clermont County Historical Society has a display at the Union Township Library. This display highlights the 35 historical markers installed throughout Clermont County during the county’s bicentennial in 2000. The display is open to the public free of charge during the regular library hours.

Museum open house

WILLIAMSBURG – The Clermont County Historical Society and Harmony Hill Association (Williamsburg Historical Society) museums will be open to the public from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1. The museums are at Harmony Hill, 299 S. Third St. in Williamsburg. The Harmony Hill Association display features William Lytle, Father of Clermont County, and

Williamsburg’s history. The Clermont County Historical Society archives will be open for research of local history. Also at the site is the Lytle Diary House, the oldest building in Clermont County. There is no admission charge.

Museum days

CLERMONT COUNTY – The annual Clermont County Collaborative of Historical Societies Museum Days will be Saturday, Sept. 12, and Sunday, Sept. 13. Eleven museums will be open for two days this year instead of one.

MRDD to meet

CLERMONT COUNTY – The Clermont County Board of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities (MRDD) will hold its regular monthly meeting Thursday, July 23. A strategic planning session will begin at 4 p.m. with a short board meeting to follow. This takes place at the Thomas A. Wildey Center, 2040 U.S. 50, west of Owensville. Call 732-4921.

Virtual schools

UNION TWP. – While school is out of session for the summer, it’s a good time for parents to reflect on their child’s educational path and discuss whether or not the current schooling – whether the child is attending a private school, a traditional public school or a public virtual charter school – is the right fit. No two students are alike, so educational options should be customizable. Ohio Distance & Electronic Learning Academy (OHDELA) is holding meet-and-greet events through August to educate parents and children on the reasons students choose the virtual environment. Online schools are not for everyone, but students who may not thrive in a traditional brick-and-mortar school setting often excel in a more flexible educational environment. The next meeting is 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 22, at Chuck E Cheese, 4394 Eastgate Square Drive, Suite 900. Another meeting is 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5, at the Downtown Library, 800 Vine St. Contact: Monica Jones at 330-252-8755.

DEATHS Kenneth L. Brookbank

Kenneth L. “Kenny” Brookbank, 66, of Bethel died July 13. Survived by wife, Donna (nee Lane) Brookbank; son, Kendall Lee Brookbank of Bethel; daughters, Ginger Suttles of Bethel and Kimberly Jane Hatfield of Georgetown; brother, Jerry Smith of Hamersville; sisters, Kathie Planck of Cincinnati, Debbie Alexander of Seaman, Ohio, Patty Hamilton of Georgetown and Sandy Smith of Hamersville; 11 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by son, Robert K. Brookbank; brother,

Ronald Smith; one grandson and one great-great-grandchild. Services were July 16 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home, Bethel.

Paul F. Minzler

Paul F. Minzler, 74, of Bethel died July 10. Survived by wife, June Wickersham Minzler; daughter, Mary Minzler; sisters, Monica Reed and Mary E. Bueter; and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were July 13 at the Felicity Cemetery, Light Street, Felicity.

BUILDING PERMITS Residential

H & H Contractors Inc., Felicity, alter, 723 Ohio 133, Franklin Township. Patrick Doyle, Felicity, alter, 3453 Franklin Road, Franklin Township. Dennis Rogers, New Richmond, alter, 214 Osborne St., Tate Township. Bo McKay Inc., Amelia, alter, 2618 Ohio 125, Tate Township.

Commercial

Jerry Masari, Bethel, alter-Bethel Hometown Flea Market, 525 Plane St., Bethel Village. Franklin Township Trustees Zoning, alter, 653 Ohio 222, Franklin Township.

REAL ESTATE Clermont County real estate transfer information is provided as a public service by the office of Clermont County Auditor Linda L. Fraley.

Hiatt, 5.001 acre, $250,000. 3069 Sugartree Road, Melissa Latham to Anthony White & Amanda Howell, 1 acre, $130,000.

TATE TOWNSHIP

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP

2851 Davis Road, Bobby E. McFarland, et al. to Federal National Mortgage Assoc., 0.26 acre, $73,333.34. 2215 Donald Road, Anthony & Andrea Baldino to Christopher Jahn & Lindsey Behymer, 4.0000 acre, $137,500. 2651 Harry Hill Drive, William & Jean Lawrence to Michael & Vivian

2762 Bert Reed Memorial Road, Dianne Avery & Beni Levi to Prudential Relocation Inc., 3.291 acre, $120,000. 2762 Bert Reed Memorial Road, Prudential Relocation Inc. to Duane & Bethany Brown, 3.291 acre, $120,000.

bethel journal 072209  

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township Reade...

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