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BEST FRIENDS FOREVER B1

Jacob and Seth Ryan

Volume 5, Number 38 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving the communities of southern Campbell County E-mail:kynews@communitypress.com

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Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

T h u r s d a y, J u l y 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

Boone only smoke ban holdout

On the run

Bucket brigade DJ Rodgers, a firefighter for the Alexandria Fire District, rushes a pair of full water buckets toward a ladder where one of his teammates in the Northern Kentucky Firefighter’s Regional Firefighter Olympics awaits to hand them up to fill a 55-gallon barrel in the old fashioned bucket brigade event Saturday, July 10. For more photos see A3.

By Paul McKibben pmckibben@nky.com

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Making waves

Campbell County residents made their way to Vet’s Pool in Newport July 8 to escape the afternoon heat, which reached above 90 degrees in the afternoon. LIFE, B1

Taking shelter

The Campbell County Animal Shelter is planning a kennel expansion, and how much state grant money the county receives will determine how big the expansion is when paired with a private donations fund. Fiscal Court endorsed the shelter’s application for $250,000 in state grant money for the construction of a new kennel area at the July 7 meeting. NEWS, A4

Votes split over hiring process By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The often unanimous Fiscal Court votes to hire for county positions were instead split twice by no votes from Campbell County Commissioner Ken Rechtin at the July 7 meeting over his concerns the search process for applicants was inadequate. By a 2-1 vote in favor, Campbell County Fiscal Court rehired Pat Dressman, who retired as the fulltime human services director March 30 to run her unsuccessful

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Recorder carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Alexandria Recorder. This month we’re featuring Benjamin Holtz who attends Sts. Peter and Benjamin Paul and plays basketball, football and is on the honor roll. He likes playing video games, camping and sports. For more information about the carrier program contact Alison Hummel at 859-4423460.

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

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election campaign for a Kenton County commissioner spot. The county also voted to hire LaToya Malone as the full-time manager for the Lakeside Terrace senior apartments. Commissioner Dave Otto and Judge-executive Steve Pendery cast yes votes on both the hires. Commissioner Mark Hayden was absent from the meeting. Rechtin said his no votes were against the hiring process the county was using and were not meant to cast doubt on the qualifications of the people being hired. Rechtin said the county wasn’t

doing enough to advertise for and seek out the best applicants possible.“There is a 10 percent unemployment rate out there,” he said. “We should throw these out and see what’s available out there.” At the July 7 meeting Dressman’s new position, part-time human services manager at a maximum of 100 hours per month, was created. Dressman was hired without any solicitation by the county for other candidates for the new posi-

Hiring continued A2

Residents elect Wagner to fire board By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

In an election between five different candidates, property owners in the Alexandria Fire District sent E.J. Wagner of Gilbert Ridge Road to a spot on the district’s Board of Trustees. Wagner, a former volunteer firefighter for the district, was the winner of the election according to unofficial election results posted on the front door of the firehouse, said Sandy Decker, EMT and administrative assistant for the district. Wagner said he resigned from the department after serving about nine or 10 years as a volunteer because he wanted to build his family’s house. He ran for the fire board because he wanted to come back to help the fire district although he doesn’t have the time to be a full-time volunteer. Wagner said he was overwhelmed by the amount of support he received in his election to fire district trustee. “I always had a lot of respect for everybody up there,” he said. Wagner said how can anyone not respect a group of people dedicated to saving lives. “I really wanted to be there and help out in any way I can,” Wagner said. Other candidates seeking a four-year term on the board LIFE

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Fire board members

The Alexandria Fire District’s Board of Trustees has seven members and meets at the firehouse, 7951 Alexandria Pike, at 7:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday each month. Board positions include two representatives elected by fire department members to four year terms, two property owners in the district elected four year terms by other property owners, and three board members appointed to three year terms by the Campbell County Judge-executive. The following is a list of the board members and the year their term expires. • Steve Minshall, a fire department representative, with a term expiring in 2013. • Mike Berkemeyer, a fire department representative, with a term expiring in 2011. • Doug Neyman, a property owner representative, with a term expiring in 2012. • E.J. Wagner, elected according to uncertified results, as a property owner representative on a four-year term starting this year. • James Korpik, a Judge-executive appointment, with a term expiring in 2011. • Mic Cooney, a Judge-executive appointment, with a term expiring in 2012. • Doug Carmack, a Judge-executive appointment, was re-appointed this year and his term will expire in 2013. included incumbent Betty Rauch, and three other challengers: James F. Ciccarella, Robert Duke and Sam Trapp. The official vote results were scheduled to be certified and announced at the 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 13 meeting of the Board of Trustees, said Thomas A. Wietholter, attorney for the Alexandria Fire District. The elected board member representing property owners was also scheduled to be sworn in at the meeting and the chairman and other officer positions elected for the year, Wietholter said. The local election will have

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ramifications beyond the Alexandria Fire District because incumbent fire district board member Betty Rauch lost her bid for reelection. If the certified results show that Rauch lost the election, she will have to give up her position on the Kentucky Fire Commission, Wietholter said. According to the Kentucky Fire Commission’s website, the governor appoints members to the 19member commission. Rauch is a member of the state fire commission by virtue of being an elected member of a local fire district’s board, Wietholter said.

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Northern Kentucky appears to be closer to having a regional public smoking ban with only the Boone County Fiscal Court lacking the votes to pass an ordinance. That was the sentiment expressed at Tuesday’s State of Northern Kentucky Address program at Receptions in Erlanger where the judge-executives from Boone, Kenton, Campbell and Grant counties spoke about several issues. Boone County Judge-executive Gary Moore said he doesn’t believe at this point Boone County has the votes to pass an ordinance. “In talking with our commissioners and taking a look ... at the economic climate, I don’t think we’re there today,” he said. Kenton County Judge-executive Ralph Drees said there are three out of four Kenton County Fiscal Court members who will probably vote for a ban. Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery said three out of four Campbell County Fiscal Court members are in favor of a ban. Pendery said a number of states have enacted smoking regulations. “We’re not out there on the edge, the cutting edge here,” he said. “It’s more of a question of why haven’t you done this than it is what are you doing with this astonishing new approach to life.” Moore said a draft ordinance is “floating around.” After the program, he told reporters there is not a final ordinance to base a decision on yet. Moore said he can’t say who the holdout is in Boone County on the ordinance. He said all four Boone County Fiscal Court members have questions. He acknowledged that the other two counties appearing to have the votes adds pressure to Boone County to pass it. Moore said health departments in most other communities are the enforcing agency. He said that should be the case here if something passes. The Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department’s board does not have another meeting until September. The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce hosted the program with The Kentucky Enquirer and nky.com the title sponsor. Dennis Hetzel of The Enquirer and nky.com moderated.

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Alexandria Recorder

Hiring From A1 tion. Dressman will be paid the same $34.93 hourly salary she earned before retiring. “She did retire from us,” Rechtin said. Maybe there’s an opportunity to give the position to another person, he said. Pendery said he’s glad to have Dressman back. “As a long time employer, when you find a good employee you try to keep them,” Pendery said. At a meeting April 7, in response to Dressman’s retirement, the county created a part-time $15.72 an hour position to handle some of her duties including reviewing and paying

July 15, 2010

monthly claims from social service agencies in an attempt to save money. That person will remain in place and continue with those duties, Horine said. That position will remain, and Dressman will work less than 100 hours a month on an “as-needed” basis when the county requests her services and she is available, Horine said. The director’s position being vacant was meant as a short-term money savings solution and it’s been three months, Horine said. The county’s leaders have had no one they could turn to when it came to big decisions on how to manage the human services division that includes the county’s senior center and distributing funds to more than 40 social service agencies,

Index Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Food.............................................B4 Life...............................................B1

Police reports..............................B8 Schools........................................A5 Sports ..........................................A7 Viewpoints ..................................A9

News Managing Lakeside

Terrace The county had two qualified applicants for the manager position at Lakeside Terrace, which pays an hourly rate of $16.05, after advertising the position through the Internet, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. “This is a substantial position with substantial pay,” said Commissioner Ken Rechtin, who voted against hiring for the position. “To only have two applicants for this position is unacceptable. I think we should go out and look again.” The position was not advertised in newspapers because it was deemed the cost was too expensive, Horine said. LaToya Malone, the person hired, has already worked at Lakeside Terrace for 22 months as a worker from a temporary agency, he said. Even if more people were interviewed it’s doubtful a more qualified person could be found, Horine said. Otto said in his business experience a person who has already shown has a good work ethic and is reliable is a better guarantee than hiring someone who might just “look good on paper.” Besides being well liked by the residents, Malone can handle light maintenance needs at Lakeside Terrace including HVAC problems and buffing of the floors, Otto said. Horine said. Otto said Dressman’s institutional knowledge was missed and sets her apart from any other potential job candidates because it would take money spent on job training to bring someone else up to speed. “We could get six applicants in, and they would be equal except for the knowl-

edge,” Otto said. Pendery said he didn’t know if there was anyone as well qualified as Dressman to make decisions on how and where to expend the county’s senior and mental health tax funds. “I guess we won’t ever know either,” Rechtin said in response to Pendery’s statement.

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County plans change for senior housing By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County will continue operation of its Lakeside Terrace seniors home in Highland Heights, but is preparing changes that will make it easier for some residents to move if they wish. The future of Lakeside Terrace has been the subject of rumors ever since a neighboring nursing home not owned by the county was sold and converted into dorms for college students in 2008, said Campbell County Administrator Robert Horine. “The county does not have any plans at this time with Lakeside Terrace to do anything except what we’ve been doing,” Horine said. In 2009 the county paid off the 40-year mortgage on the 95-housing unit building, and a transition is being planned for the government housing voucher program used by residents that was tied to the mortgage, he said. The county has notified the residents of the center in recent months that in June 2011 the Fiscal Court may not renew a special Section 8 low-income housing voucher contract that some residents use, and they will receive a different type of voucher. “They will be given a housing choice voucher that is no longer site-based and can move someplace else of their choosing,” Horine said. Currently, 37 of the 60 residents of Lakeside Terrace have Section 8 vouchers that can only be used to pay rent at the county-run home in Highland Heights, he said. To move to another seniors home, even in Newport, those 37 residents have to apply for a different type of section 8 voucher. “They have to get on a waiting list and wait to see if they can get a housing voucher,” Horine said. The county will monitor occupancy rates to watch if they decline because people receive new vouchers and move out of Lakeside Terrace, he said. “If folks have that voucher in their hands and those folks chose to go elsewhere that would certainly send a strong message to the owner/operator of the facility that something is going on here, and you

need to address it,” Horine said. When Lakeside Terrace was opened by the county in 1970 it was the only group home for seniors in the county and now they have other choices, he said. Since the closing of the adjacent Lakeside Heights Nursing Home to make way for college dorms, occupancy at Lakeside Terrace has dropped to 60 units out of 95, Horine said. There was a symbiotic relationship with Lakeside Heights because often a husband or wife would take up residence in Lakeside Terrace to live nearby their spouse who was in the nursing home, Horine said. Rumors about the fate of the building, which needs extensive rehab work in areas including plumbing, haven’t helped occupancy rates either, he said. The county offers reasonable rates that include utilities if anyone age 62 or older is interested moving in, Horine said. In addition to meeting with residents of Lakeside Terrace to explain the upcoming changes, the county has offered to change its contract with tenants requiring the county to give at least 120 days notice and not 30 day before a resident’s lease can be terminated, he said. “These are elderly people, and as you might expect they’re very concerned about ‘Where am I going to live today, and where am I going to live tomorrow,’” Horine said. Commissioner Dave Otto used the situation at Lakeside Terrace to help justify the hiring of LaToya Malone as the full-time manager at the July 7 Campbell County Fiscal Court meeting. Malone has been working at Lakeside Terrace as a temporary worker for the past 22 months. In Malone’s new job, she’ll also take over many of the routine duties formerly handled by a maintenance director who retired in recent months. Based on a survey of the residents, hiring Malone was the right decision to make because the residents already were comfortable with her, Otto said. “Unfortunately, there are questions in the minds of residents of ‘Is the county going to continue on running this facility,’” Otto said.

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Alexandria – nky.com/alexandria Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter. . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Alison Hummel | District Manager. . . . . . . . 442-3460 | anhummel@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


News

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July 15, 2010

Alexandria Recorder

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jacob Biery, left, 15, a member of the Alexandria Fire Explorers, holds tight to a rope bracing a ladder Hunter Melville, 14, is climbing in the “three-man ladder drill” portion of the Northern Kentucky Firefighter’s Regional Firefighter Olympics Saturday, July 10 in Alexandria.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Danny Hildebrand, Colton Sharp, DJ Rodgers, Travis Rauch and Sean Bartlett, firefighters for the Alexandria Fire District, are off to the races in a timed old fashioned bucket brigade water filling event during the Northern Kentucky Firefighter’s Regional Firefighter Olympics in Alexandria Saturday, July 10.

Scouts plant rain garden By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

PROVIDED

From left, Emily Guevara, Anna Hopkins, Haley Canup, Danielle Heiert, and Sarah Begley, all members of Alexandria Girl Scouts Troop 281, shop for flowers with Elizabeth Clay, at far right in the background, before planting a rain garden at the Campbell County Environmental Education Center at A.J. Jolly Park July 1 where Clay is an environmental education assistant.

FESTIVAL

The Campbell County Police Department used an underage informant July 5 to test three businesses that sell alcohol. The underage informant was able to purchase a six pack of alcoholic beverages from Brinkman Carry-Out in Alexandria, said Keith Hill, Chief of Police for Campbell County. The cashier at Brinkman was cited for selling alcoholic beverage to a minor. The other two shops tested did not sell alcohol to the underage informant working with the police.

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rain garden was fun, she said. “I think it was cool because we got to help out and even if people don’t go on the trails they can still see some of the work we did, and I think that’s really cool,” Danielle said.

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In a story about the death of local solider Russell Madden in the July 8 issue of the Campbell County Recorder, some surviving family members were left out and listed incorrectly. Madden is survived by his mother Peggy Davitt and step-father Mike Davitt of Newport, and father Martin Madden and step-mother Pamela Madden of Bellevue.

from Clay when picking out plants that some were better than others because animals might eat certain non-native plants that are poisonous to them. Many of the taller plants can give shelter to the animals and some are edible, Danielle said. Planting the

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girls about local plant species, Heiert said. “I think it has been a great help to the girls, and we learned a lot when we were over there about the different plants that are good for the area,” Heiert said. Heiert’s daughter, Danielle, 11, said she learned

When deciding on a community service project, Heiert said they thought of asking Clay if there was any way they could help the environmental education center because they had gone on field trips there. The rain garden project has taught the

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and a building filled with interactive exhibits about the environment that Clay staffs. Later this fall, the troop will design and put up an informational sign about the rain garden, Clay said. Jennifer Heiert and Wendy Guevara, both of Alexandria, are the parent leaders of troop 281. The girls in the troop are very interested in the environment and although the rain garden project is about performing community service and not necessarily for work on attaining a specific award, Heiert said.

PROVIDED

Girl Scouts Troop 281 members from left, Sarah Begley, Danielle Heiert, and Maclaine Borne, all of Alexandria, plant a rain garden at the Campbell County Environmental Education Center at A.J. Jolly Park July 1-2. Wendy Guevara, parent co-leader of the troop, is in the background.

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Members of Girl Scouts of America Troop 281 in Alexandria have been preparing the Campbell County Environmental Education Center for a rainy day. The girls in the troop, all entering sixth grade in the fall, spent July 1-2 planting a rain garden at the center near A.J. Jolly Park south of Alexandria as part of a $500 community service project grant funded by Wal-Mart and Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky. Elizabeth Clay, environmental education assistant at the center, helped the girls in the troop create the plan for the garden including talking to them about what kind of plants would work best. The rain garden contains plants native plants like black-eyed susans and cone flowers that help absorb rainwater and prevent runoff, Clay said. Flooding has been an issue at the environmental education center for two reasons: beavers the live in the area, and the topography of the area, she said. The center, located at 1261 Race Track Road, features a series of walking trails

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Alexandria Recorder

News

July 15, 2010

Animal shelter plans kennel expansion By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The Campbell County Animal Shelter is planning a kennel expansion, and how much state grant money the county receives will determine how big the expansion is when paired with a private donations fund. Fiscal Court endorsed the shelter’s application for $250,000 in state grant money for the construction of a new kennel area at the July 7 meeting. The shelter was established in 1986 and accepted almost 2,900 animals in the 2008-09’ fiscal year. “The county is required by state law to have a shelter and care for animals,” said Campbell County Commissioner Ken Rechtin. About $50,000 in donations from private individuals and groups will pay for the 20 percent required match for the grant, said Lisa Bowman, director of the shelter.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

The Campbell County Animal Shelter in Camp Springs is planning to renovate the existing kennel area after adding a planned second kennel area to quarantine sick and potentially vicious and aggressive animals. There is a pool of about $3 million in state grants that all county shelter’s are eligible to apply for, Bowman said. “I hope we get it, keep your fingers crossed,” she said. “I hope we get some of it at least.” The shelter plans to

move forward with an expansion in the next year either way, she said. How big the addition is will depend on how much grant money the county receives, she said. If the shelter receives the full $250,000 grant the addition will include 20 new

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bathing room for the animals, she said. State law requires a separate kennel area for sick and potentially vicious animals from the other animals that the shelter currently does not have, Bowman said. Diseases can spread eas-

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kennels including a separated 10 kennel area for aggressive and sick animals. The plan includes an eventual renovation of the existing 30-kennel area that is deteriorating, she said. And there will also be a separate grooming and

ily between the animals, she said. “It’s for the safety of the public and for us,” she said. More kennel space will also help the county reduce the number of animals that end up being euthanized, Bowman said. For example, in February, the shelter took in nine dogs, four cats and a ferret that were confiscated in an animal cruelty case, she said. “They all had to be held until the court case was settled,” Bowman said. “That leaves less room to hold other animals coming in and we have to euthanize more.” Animal rescues and direct adoptions have helped the shelter reduce the rates of euthanized animals in recent years to about 20 percent, she said. “Our euthanasia rate would have been so much higher if it wouldn’t have been for the rescue groups,” she said.

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FIND news about where you live at nky.com/community

Results of the 2010 Point-in-Time Count of the Homeless were released June 30. The annual count, conducted Jan. 28 by the Kentucky Interagency Council on Homelessness, shows Kenton County had the most homeless people in the Northern Kentucky region, with little evidence of homelessness in the more rural counties of Grant and Gallatin. Kenton County had 406 individuals defined as homeless. Boone County had 116, Campbell County had 122, Grant County had one and Gallatin County had zero. Pendleton County did not participate. The count defined the homeless in various categories, including those in emergency shelters and motels, transitional housing and unsheltered. Kenton County had 187 in the emergency category, 124 in transitional and 95 unsheltered. Boone County had four emergency, 101 transitional and 11 unsheltered. Campbell County had 44 emergency, 43 transitional and 35 unsheltered. There were 6,623 home-

less people identified throughout the state. The 2009 count found 5,999 homeless individuals, but organizers believe a winter storm at the time of that count altered the results. Jefferson and Fayette counties, homes of Louisville and Lexington, respectively, were the top two counties in homeless totals. Jefferson had 1,626 homeless, while Fayette had 1,551. Statewide results also showed: • 1,460 homeless respondents were severely mentally ill. • 2,032 homeless respondents were chronic substance abusers. • 1,071 homeless respondents were victims of domestic violence. • 564 homeless respondents were veterans. • 15 percent of homeless individuals were completely without shelter across the state on the day of the count. The count is a coordinated effort of Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC), the Kentucky Interagency Council on Homelessness, the Coalition for the Homeless in Louisville, and Central Kentucky Homeless and Hous-

ing Coalition in Lexington. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development requires a count every other year. Kentucky, one of the few states to coordinate a statewide count, conducts a count every year on the last Thursday in January in an effort to achieve more current accuracy. “The count is a massive effort that asks local and state agencies, service providers, and volunteers to come together in the middle of winter to interview individuals, not just in a shelter or inside the office of a service agency, but outside in the elements,” said KHC CEO Richard L. McQuady in a press release. “We appreciate the time and efforts of everyone who came out to participate in this very important event. These results are an important piece of planning the state’s efforts to assist homeless individuals and families.” The 2010 Point-In-Time Count Report is available at www.kyhomeless.org and www.kyhousing.org, under Specialized Housing, PointIn-Time Count. Kentucky News Service

St. Elizabeth opening diabetes center The St. Elizabeth Regional Diabetes Center will open July 22. St. Elizabeth Healthcare says it will be the region’s largest and most comprehensive diabetes treatment center and the only one of its kind in the Greater Cincinnati region. There are 23.6 million children and adults in the U.S. who have diabetes, nearly 8 percent of the population, according to the American Diabetes Association. The center, part of St. Elizabeth Healthcare’s $29.2 million Covington building that opened last summer, will employ six board-certified endocrinologists, along with 14 diabetes educators and healthcare professionals skilled in diabetes care. “It’s not only the largest such practice here in Greater Cincinnati, but it’s one of

the largest east of the Mississippi,” said Dr. Linda Hermiller, endocrinologist and medical director of the new center. “This allows our patients to receive appointments quickly and then to get comprehensive and complete care from their very first visit on through all their follow-ups.” The new center will use about 18,000 square feet of the 118,000-square-foot building. It will feature exam and treatment rooms, state-of-the-art equipment, a health-care library and conference rooms for education classes. Patients referred to the center can also take advantage of other services in the building, including lab and diagnostic imaging, physical therapy, the Women’s Wellness Center and the Wound Care Center. The diabetes center’s

endocrinologists will be able to offer support for a range of endocrine and metabolic disorders, including: abnormal weight-gain evaluation and therapy; adrenal disease; hypogonadism; lipid metabolism; osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease and calcium disorders; pituitary disease; polycystic ovarian syndrome; and thyroid disease, including ultrasoundguided biopsies and thyroid cancer. Diabetes patients are currently treated in a building on Thomas More Parkway, but oftentimes have to go to other buildings for extensive care. “Now all of those folks will be able to go to one site,” said Guy Karrick, public relations manager for St. Elizabeth. Information: www.stelizabeth.com/diabetes. The phone number will be 859655-8910.


SCHOOLS

July 15, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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Alexandria Recorder

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving the communities of southern Campbell County

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RECORDER

Musical a twist on classic fairy tales By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The Fort Thomas Community Children’s Theatre is taking a unique look at some well-known fairy tales in their upcoming production of the musical “Into the Woods.” Inspired by the 1976 book “The Uses of Enchantment,” the show intertwines the plot of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales like “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Jack and the Beanstalk” and “Cinderella” to shows what happens after the happily ever after ending. “I like to choose shows that the

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Bethany Metzner, who plays the witch, sings a song during rehearsals.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Emily Hicks (left), who plays the baker’s wife, rehearses a scene with Joey Collopy, who plays the baker in the Fort Thomas’s Children’s Theatre production of “Into the Woods.”

kids will learn something from, but that are also fun,” said Director Caroline Stine. “This show has some really hard music, which is a challenge for me and the kids.” Stine said while she had to cut out some of the show’s really dark material, it still shows the fairy tales more like the original Grimms versions instead of the Disney versions. “This is really going to be a great show,” said stage manager Rachael Hawkins. “We have some really talented kids that are doing a great job.” Hawkins and Stine, along with many of the children in the production, have been working together since the mid-90s through the theatrical group, The Cliffview Players. Two of the shows lead roles, the baker’s wife and the witch, are

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Ben Justice, who plays Jack from Jack and the Beanstalk and Teresa Metzner, who plays Little Red Riding Hood, rehearse a scene from “Into the Woods.” being played by teens from Cliffview, Emily Hicks and Bethany Metzner. Hicks, who is a senior at Highlands High School, said she decided to try out for the musical because of the work she’s done with the group in the past. “Being part of these productions every summer is like a tradition,” Hicks said. “A lot of know each other and are friends.” Metzner, a recent Highlands graduate, said even though the first couple weeks of rehearsal are always rough, she thinks it is going to be a good show. The show opens at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 5 at the Performing Arts Center. Other showings are at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 6; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Matt Krieg, who plays Cinderella’s prince, and Michaela Bucher, who plays Sleeping Beauty, act out a scene from the musical. Saturday, Aug. 7; and 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 8. Tickets, which are $9 for adults

and $7 for students, are available at the door or in advance at www.showtix4u.com.

Summer science is no sweat in Bellevue By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

A Bellevue Independent School summer camp helped students see the fun in learning science. Through a partnership with the Boys and Girls Club, the district offered the week-long camp Monday, July 5 through Friday, July 9 for students in kindergarten to 12th grade. “We touched on all kinds of

science topics throughout the week,” said science teacher Hallie Booth. “My goal is to get the students interested in science and help them realize that it can really be fun.” With the help of “Dr. Discovery” Debbie Williams from Mad Science, Booth covered topics ranging from compounds and mixtures and energy to polymers and air pressure. Booth said the students spent

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Debbie Williams, known as Dr. Discovery, talks to kids about air pressure during Bellevue Independent Schools’ science camp Thursday, July 8.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Fifth-grader Emily Seward tries out an experiment to see what happens to marshmallows in high air pressure.

the week seeing demonstrations and participating in hands-on activities. “Kids love the ‘ew factor’ so the more gross something is, the more they like doing it,” Booth said. Booth said while the camp had a good turnout, she hopes more students will come in the future. “It’s amazing to see these students coming in during their summer break to learn science,” Booth said. “To me, that’s exciting.” Rob Sanders, director of the district’s Family Resource Center, said the science camp, along with other camps throughout the summer, are offered to the students for free thanks to grant money and help from the Boys and Girls Club. For more information about the summer programs offered in Bellevue contact Rob Sanders at rob.sander@bellevue.kyschools.us or call 261-2108.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Brothers Christian and Jeffrey Brinker help Dr. Discovery Debbie Williams demonstrate air pressure.


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Alexandria Recorder

Schools

July 15, 2010

Study: Education ranking improves CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Marching on

Drummers of the Campbell County Band of Pride practice getting in step and staying on beat on the playground of Campbell County High School Monday, July 12. At far left in the back row on first bass drum is Aaron Carroll, 13, of Alexandria. Wearing a hat and playing tenors in the second row at far left is Rodney Dykes, 17, of Cold Spring, and Rachel Britton, is to the right of Dykes and playing tenors. In front from left on snare drums are Brian Goins, 15, of Melbourne; Rachael Schabell, 17, of Grant’s Lick; and Derick Pollitt, 16, of Melbourne.

The academic performance of Kentucky students has improved the state’s national educational ranking, reflecting the strong returns the state receives from its investments in education, according to two recent reports from the Kentucky Long-Term Policy Research Center. “This is most important and encouraging news on Kentucky’s education results that we’ve seen in a long time. It’s solid proof that our investments in reforms are paying off,” noted Robert F. Sexton, executive director of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. The committee wanted to showcase the reports because of the message they hold for both policymakers and taxpayers, Sexton added. Following are highlights from the two reports. “The Increasing Returns on Kentucky’s Educational Investments,” available online at http://kltprc.net, concludes that Kentucky performs much better than expected in the face of such barriers to cost-effective

education spending as family poverty, parental education, students’ health status, disability rates and missed school days. Kentucky students’ scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) give the state a second place national ranking in what the center calls NAEP Proficiency Purchasing Power. The state ranks fourth in the nation on the center’s Index of Obstacles that make it hard for students to do well in school. Kentucky students’ scores have improved steadily since 1998 on NAEP, which is sometimes called the nation’s report card. “Not surprisingly, states with fewer obstacles tend to have higher NAEP Proficiency Purchasing Power,” the report stated. “Moderating the harmful effects of poverty on learning, as well as cultivating better health habits among children, will help reduce these obstacles and facilitate even higher returns from future educational spending.” In the second study,

available at http://kltprc.net, the research center reported that Kentucky ranks 32nd nationally on its Education Index of several indicators – a marked improvement from its 43rd-place ranking in 1992. The indicators included in the index measure educational attainment and achievement, dropout rates and ACT and NAEP scores. “The index shows that Kentucky has made educational improvements over the years and gained ground on other states,” the study noted. “Only two states that were in the bottom ten in 1992 had managed to climb out of that group by 2009 – Kentucky and North Carolina.” “We should be proud to have pulled our schools up from the bottom – and to be comparable to North Carolina, a state highly praised for its reforms.” Sexton said. “Compared to the nation, we’ve moved into the middle group, similar to states like Michigan and Oregon. Now we want Kentucky to push for the Top 20 – we believe Kentucky students can do it.”

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

From left, Aaron Weiner, 12, of Cold Spring; Courtney Combs, 17; Megan Maschinot, 13; and Nathan Cann, 14, all of Alexandria, practice playing the marimba during practice of the “front ensemble” of the percussion section of the Campbell County Band of Pride inside Campbell County High School Monday, July 12.

Raven McNeese, 13, of Highland Heights, plays the vibraphone during practice inside Campbell County High School Monday, July 12 of the Campbell County Band of Pride.

Kindergarten offered at Goddard School 1p6The Goddard School, located at 1501 Cavalry Drive in Florence, is offering a private kindergarten program. The private kindergarten program has a very small ratio of child to teacher. The program offers a very systematic way of teaching phonics and reading using a method based on Orton Gillingham. Students learn math and

science skills as well as other resources available in the Goddard program. “Our credentialed teachers deliver a curriculum which combines the goals and methodology of the Boone County school district with developmentally appropriate practices required by The Goddard School. The size of our kindergarten provides individualized attention for our

children,” said Melissa Owens, owner of The Goddard School in Florence. The Goddard School offers a program, for children ages six weeks to school age, focusing on building a strong and balanced foundation of emotional, social, cognitive and physical skills for each child. To arrange for a tour, call Owens 859-525-0555.

CLASS REUNIONS S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7 Campbell County High School graduates of 1990 are holding their 20th year class

reunion, Saturday, July 17, 2010, at the Syndicate in Newport. The cost is $50 per person for appetizers, drinks and music. For more information, call 859-512-6213 or visit Facebook “CCHS Class of 1990 Reunion.”

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The Syndicate is located at 18 East 5th Street. S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 2 8 Ryle High School graduates of 2000 are holding their 10th year class reunion, Saturday, Aug. 28, 2010, at BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon. For more information, call 614580-3712 or e-mail ryleclassof2000@gmail.com. The BlackFinn Restaurant and Saloon is located at 19 East 7th Street in Cincinnati.

Book drive

PROVIDED

Madisyn Becker delivered more than 500 books and nine cases of toothpaste to Paces Creek Elementary School in Clay County June 3. Clay county is one of the poorest counties in our nation. Madisyn collected books in a book drive as part of a service project in order to earn the Work Ethic Diplomma as a fifth-grader at Reiley Elementary.

S A T U R D A Y, S E P T . 1 1 Walton Verona High School graduates of 1985 are holding their 25th year class reunion, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010. For more information, contact Kevin Flynn at 859-4856128 or e-mail kbflynn@insightbb.com.

Have a class reunion? Please send your information to akiefaber@nky.com.

COLLEGE CORNER Brescia University dean’s list

The following student from Brescia University in Owensboro, Ky. was named to the Spring 2010 Dean’s List for completing at least 12 credit hours with a 3.5 GPA. • Katie Marie Duff of Alexandria, Sophomore, Pyschology

Madisyn with Darlene Swafford, the Paces Creek librarian, and media specialist.

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SPORTS

Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

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Shooting team snares state medals By James Weber jweber@nky.com

The Northern Kentucky Scholastic Trap Shooting Program had several firstplace winners recently at the annual state shoot in Berea, Ky. Thirty-five local competitors participated in the tourney, which is part of the National Scholastic Trap Shooting Program for college students and younger. The team, which practices at outdoor clubs in Alexandria and Kenton, has students from all over Northern Kentucky. “A lot of the kids have no interest in other sports, so it is a good outlet for them to compete in a team type sport,” said head coach Dennis Menning of Alexandria.

PROVIDED

Nicholas Sinclair shoots his last target in winning the Jerry Racke Memorial shoot-off at the state shoot in Berea, Ky. In trap shooting, competitors use shotguns to break a four-inch clay target going 45 miles per hour from the trap house. In competition the shooters try to break all 100 targets, alternating between

PROVIDED

Northern Kentucky’s third-place junior team at the state shoot, from left: Tyler Schnitzler, Quentin Penrod, Zachary Meiman, Shawn Butcher, Andrew Elmore.

five different stations. The pre-sub team representing Northern Kentucky was the overall team winner with a score of 316 out of 500. They were Jacob Bechtold, Mac Krallman, Tanner Hamilton, Jacob Graydon, and Marshall Krallman. Junior level shooters Andrew Elmore and Alec Wolfort tied for first place in individual honors, both hitting 98 out of 100 targets. Tanner Hamilton was third place in the pre-sub division with 89. Nicholas Sinclair won the Jerry Racke Memorial shootout, a 15-person individual competition. In the state shoot, students are in five-person teams, competing in different age levels. Menning said the team has been practicing for three

FILE PHOTO

Bobby Moore lines up a practice shot in 2008. months. Several of the youths will go to the national tournament in Sparta, Ill. Aug. 7-8. Many kids join the program as soon they’re big enough to handle the guns. “You must have good hand-eye coordination to become a good shot. It becomes a very mental game when you begin breaking a good score. If you miss a target you cannot dwell on it, you must get your head back in the game and prepare for the next shot.” The seven N.Ky. teams at the state shoot:

Collegiate: Second place with a score of 463 out of 500 - James Hellmann, Alexander Smith, Christopher Hellmann, Jeremy Norris, Michael Buemi. Junior teams: Third place with a score of 467 out of 500 - Andrew Elmore, Quentin Penrod, Tyler Schnitzler, Zachary Meiman, Shawn Butcher. Fourth place with a score of 462 out of 500 - Michael Strange, Taylor Bisig, Alex Wolfort, Sean Hamons, David Able. Fifth place with a score of 427 out of 500 - Taylor Straman, Michael Krallman,

Tanner Crowder, Daniel Giancola, Ken Padgett II. Seventh place with a score of 409 out of 500 Spencer Stephenson, Ethan Emmerich, Shelby Felty, Dakota Mockbee, James Popp. Sub-Junior: Fourth place winner with a score of 421 out of 500 - Bobby Moore, Charles Allen, Nicholas Staggs, Tim Jones III, Nicholas Sinclair. Pre-subs: First place with a score of 316 out of 500 Jacob Bechtold, Mac Krallman, Tanner Hamilton, Jacob Graydon, Marshall Krallman.

NKADA hall of fame announced The NKADA Hall Of Fame Selection Committee met and selected the following deserving individuals to be inducted in the NKADA Hall Of Fame in October. The luncheon will be on Saturday, Oct. 2 at Receptions. Ticket price will be $40 per person. This will be the first time the induction ceremony will be held as a luncheon on a Saturday. “The committee wanted to try doing this on a Saturday with two things in mind,” said NKAC President Mel Webster of Bishop Brossart. “One we think it will be easier for inductees that are now living out of town to attend, and second to try an accommodate so many that are involved with evening sports activities during this busy time of the year.” Jason West, Bellevue High School (1988-1992): One of the finest basketball and track performers to ever play at Bellevue High School. Also starred in cross country. Earned 10 varsity letters. The Marty Kehoe Award winner as a senior scored 1,052 career points. Voted all-state in track also as a senior leading Bellevue to state titles in 1991 and 1992. Janie Borcherding Shaffer, Beechwood High School (1986-

1990): She was a standout at Beechwood in volleyball and tennis. She was Female “Student Athlete of The year” in Kentucky in 1990. She earned nine varsity tennis letters. In volleyball she was a four-time team Most Valuable Player and three-time Outstanding Class A Player of the Year. She was also the school’s Valedictorian. Eric Vanlaningham, Boone County High School (19881992): Prolific cross country performer at Boone, he was state cross country champion in 1990 and runner-up in 1991. He set a region record in the 3,200 in track both in 1991 and 1992 which still stands. He won the state title in the 3,200 in 1991-92. He was regional champion in the 3,200 (three years), 1,600 (two years) and 800 (two years). Jeff Knauf, Scott High School (1979-1983): Premier basketball and soccer player at Scott High School. Started all four years on the varsity soccer team and was first team all-region as a junior and senior. In basketball, he was a three-year starter and was the team’s Most Valuable Player as both junior and senior. He was honorable mention all-state twice. Ron Parry, Newport High School (1962-1966): Ron Parry

was a standout at Newport High School in the 1960’s. Ronwas one of the Wildcats’ top football, basketball and baseball performers. He lettered five times in baseball, three in football and two in basketball. He was team MVP his senior football season and AllState, and started five years in baseball. Ron Madrick, Holmes High School (1993-Present): Highly respected Athletic Director at Holmes High School during some of the school’s most successful athletic accomplishments. Has served as President of the NKAC and NKADA and has been a driving force in the success of the Athletic Director’s Hall of Fame, Was a highly successful football coach. Karen Bresser Jones, Notre Dame Academy (1987-1991): Karen was a four-time letterwinner from 1988-91 in swimming at NDA. She won five state championships and led her team to a KHSAA state championship in both 1989 and 1991 and regional titles in 1988 and 1990. As a senior she won state titles in the 100 backstroke, 200 medley relay, and 400 freestyle relay. She won the 100 backstroke three straight years. Jared Lorenzen, Highlands

High School (1995-1999): Standout quarterback for the Bluebirds leading them to a 41-2 record as quarterback including state championships in 1996 and 1998. Kentucky’s “Mr. Football” his senior year. He also led his basketball team to the “Sweet 16” 1997 state runnerup spot. Becky Tenkman Mirick, Notre Dame Academy (1991-1995): One of the best volleyball players ever for the Pandas. She also played basketball. She was KHSAA state tournament Most Valuable Player in 1994 and Mizuno first team All-State in leading Notre Dame to the 1994 State Championship. Kellie Harrison Foote, Dixie Heights High School (19821986): She was a 13 time letterwinner at Dixie as a standout in volleyball, basketball and track. She was a two-time all-region performer in volleyball and basketball and three-time all-region in track. She once had 17 blocks in a basketball game. Jack Aynes, Ludlow High School (1947-1951):Jack Aynes earned an incredible 15 varsity letters during a stellar career at Ludlow High School from 194751. In football the co-captain was nominated to the East/West AllStar game. In basketball, he led

his team to the 1950 district championship and in baseball lettered five years as a pitcher/catcher. He tossed two no-hitters, struck out 17 of 21 batters versus Beechwood, and led Ludlow to its’ first ever NKAC team championship. Justin Seiter, Bishop Brossart High School (1997-2000): Justin Seiter will forever be known for “The Shot,” a last second goal that beat Mason County and sent Bishop Brossart to the 2000 Kentucky Sweet 16. He recorded 1,124 career points, was team MVP and is in the 10th region Hall Of Fame. He was a standout basketball and baseball player. He went 12-1 as a senior pitcher, had 179 strikeouts in 147 innings during his career. He holds school record for average .444, home runs (24) and RBI (117). Tom Potter Distinguished Service Award: Carl Heck, Newport Central Catholic High School. Carl has been a long time contributor to Newport Central Catholic High School in many capacities including official scorer for the girl’s basketball program. Joe “Bones” Egan, Bellevue High School. He has been a long time contributor and volunteer at Bellevue High School for most of the Athletic teams.

SIDELINES Memorial run and walk

The 16th annual Brian Rohne Memorial 5K Run and Walk will be 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 14, on the campus of Northern Kentucky University. The Brian Rohne Memorial 5K is conducted in honor of former NKU cross country runner Brian Rohne, who was killed by an automobile in January of 1993 while on a training run on the AA Highway in Cold Spring, Ky. During the 1992 fall season, Rohne had earned most valuable run-

ner honors for NKU after being named All-Great Lakes Valley Conference. The cost is $18 if registration is postmarked by Aug. 7 (includes a Tshirt). The cost is $15 for Runners Club of Greater Cincinnati members and $20 for registration on the day of the event (near the Albright Health Center after 5:30 p.m.). On-line registration is available at www.rcgc.net. The top 250 finishers will receive a 16th annual commemorative award, and the winners of the various divi-

sions for runners and walkers will also receive awards. The course is 3.1 miles and held entirely on closed roads around NKU’s campus. Results of the race will be posted on the Runners Club of Greater Cincinnati Web site within 24 hours of the finish.

Fast Start volleyball

The Northern Kentucky Youth Volleyball Club is offering a new program called Fast Start for athletes who did not make their school program for

athletes who attend schools that do not have a volleyball program available and for athletes who want to learn the game right the first time. Athletes will practice two hours, two days a week for six week, at Town and Country Sports Complex, 1018 Town Drive, Wilder. The program begins Thursday, Aug. 12, and will conclude Sunday, Sept. 26. No session is planned Labor Day weekend. Program fee is $150. Unless a reserved spot can be filled, there will be no refunds.

Registration is available online at nkyvc.com. E-mail nkyvc@fuse.net.

Swim team try-outs

The M.E. Lyons/Anderson Barracudas Swim Team has two try-out dates set for swimmers who are interested in becoming a member of one of the premier YMCA/USA Swim Teams in the country. The M.E. Lyons YMCA/Anderson Barracudas Swim Team has consistently produced some of the top

swimmers in the area and provides an atmosphere of fun and camaraderie for swimmers aged 6 to 18 of all ability levels. The team has practice groups in both Anderson as well as at the Campbell County YMCA. The try-out dates are Monday, July 12, or Monday, July 26, at the M.E. Lyons YMCA, 8108 Clough Pike. Registration is at 4 p.m. and the try-out begins at 4:30 p.m. Try-outs are free. Call Jeremy Bannon or Cathi Sander at 474-1400.


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Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

Sports & recreation

Freedom all-stars ready for second half By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Tim Grogan would love nothing more than to end his baseball playing career with a championship. While his Florence Freedom professional team faces an uphill climb in the second half of the 2010 season, he is hopeful the team can turn it around. “We have to figure out how to win the close games, but we’re right in there,” he said. Grogan was one of three Freedom players selected to play in the Frontier League All-Star Game July 14 in Marion, Ill. Shortstop Stephen Shults and relief pitcher Liam Ohlmann also were set to go. Grogan, a Florence native and Covington Catholic graduate, is second on the team in home runs and RBI, and leads in runs scored. “I’m looking forward to it,” he said. “It should be

DARREN WEIGL/STAFF

Freedom shortstop Stephen Shults fires to first on a double play June 21.

fun there because they always draw well there. They should do it right up there.” Grogan is a veteran of the Freedom, who enter the

halfway point with a 19-29 record. They are 20 games behind West Division leader Southern Illinois, who have a sizzling 39-9 record despite losing its last three games. Florence is eight games behind second-place River City (27-21) for the division’s wild-card berth into the playoffs. Grogan, 26, is preparing to end his playing career after this season and join the Freedom front office as director of amateur baseball. “I haven’t been healthy for four years,” he said. “Hopefully I can make it through 96 games and we can make a run at this.” Shults, a 23-year old from Lawrenceburg, Tenn., is leading the entire league in home runs (13) and batting average (.371) at the halfway point. He leads the Freedom in RBI with 37. Shults came to the team in a June 7 trade less than two weeks into the season. He was college teammates with Freedom players Justin

Pickett and Michael Wheeler at the University of the Cumberlands. He had spent three years in the Atlanta Braves organization battling injuries. His 13 homers this year is one less than he had in three years there. “I love the team,” he said. “We’ve got great team chemistry. It’s a great group of guys. We’re having trouble pulling out the close games right now. We have a good team, we just have to get everything clicking.” Ohlmann, a 23-year old from Wallingford, Conn., has been unhittable in relief, giving up just nine hits in 25 innings. He has a 2.13 ERA. When they return to regular play, the Freedom will have six games on the road before returning home Thursday, July 22, against Evansville. They need a quick start to get back into playoff contention. Grogan, a member of Cov Cath’s 2002 state title

FREEDOM TRAIL Stat leaders

Home runs: Stephen Shults 13, Tim Grogan 8, Johnny Welch 8, Billy Mottram 5, Michael Campbell 5. RBI: Shults 37, Campbell 25, Grogan 25, Justin Pickett 24, Welch 24. Runs scored: Grogan 38, Shults 34, Mottram 30, Welch 26, Justin Jacobs 20. Stolen bases: Mottram 11, Beau Manning 7, Campbell 6, Jimmy Baker 5, Welch 4. Batting average: Shults .371, Welch .325, Campbell .293, Grogan .287, Mottram .275. Wins: Andy Clark 4, Bryan Banes 3, Ben Shivers 3. Innings pitched: Tim Holmes 52.1, Banes 50, Clark 44.2. ERA: Liam Ohlmann 2.13, Jacinto Gonell 2.53, Shivers 2.94.

Upcoming schedule

July 16-18: at Evansville. July 19-21: at Southern Illinois. July 22-24: at home vs. Evansville. July 25-27: at River City. July 28-30: at home vs. Normal. All games are broadcast on WKNR 106.7 FM and over the Internet at www.florencefreedom.com. For ticket and promotion information, visit the Freedom website or call 594-4487 (HITS).

team, would welcome it. “That would mean the world,” he said. “I’ve won a championship in high

Hitting it sweet

Brossart senior second baseman Steve Popovich has accepted an offer to play college baseball at Spalding University. Spalding is a NCAA Division III Catholic university in downtown Louisville. Even though there was much interest and several offers from other colleges, he believed Spalding was the best fit. He cited strong academics, successful coach, approachable and friendly staff, small school advantages just blocks away from University of Louisville, only being 1 1 ⁄2 hours from home and a private dorm room to be some of his considerations.

PROVIDED

Northern Ky Hitmen 16U won the 2010 Battle of the Borders Tournament. Players on the team are from Boone, Kenton and Cambell counties. On knees: Ricky Pangallo, Jeffrey Guidugli, Vinnie Pangallo and Jimmy Tomlin Standing: Coach Rick Pangallo, Brady Hightchew, Evan Winchester, Zach Wynn, Blake Maines, Kyle Fuller, Spencer Brown, Kyle Jefferds, Charlie Reekers and Coach Joe Zimmerman Not Pictured: Justin Kohake, Alec Smith and Jesse Orth. Not pictured is Coaches Jim Smith and Dave Kohake.

BRIEFLY NKU adds runners

Northern Kentucky University cross country head coach Steve Kruse has added three more recruits to his 2010 women’s roster. Kelly Johnson and Kelsey Gaffney are a pair of freshmen

runners who are joining the Norse, while Michelle Skjoldal has transferred to NKU and will also be a member of the team this fall. Johnson is a graduate of Milford High School, and she ran a personal best of 20:23 last season in the five-kilome-

ter. Johnson also lettered in volleyball and track for Milford. Gaffney, a graduate of Goshen High School, posted a time of 21:43 two years ago in a five-kilometer race for her personal best. Gaffney also earned letters in soccer, bas-

ketball and track while an athlete at Goshen. Skjoldal is a native of Lovell, Wyoming, who is transferring from Black Hills (S.D.) State University. While at Black Hills State, Skjoldal competed at the 2008 NAIA nationals at Kenosha, Wis., and placed 39th in that event with a time of 18:10. Skjoldal earned all-conference honors three times at Black Hills State and helped the team placed third at the 2006 NAIA nationals.

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July 15, 2010

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Motorists asked to ‘share the road’ with motorcycles

Motorists asked to ‘share the road’ with motorcycles The Kentucky Office of Highway (KOHS) joined other federal, state and local highway safety, law enforcement and motorcycle organizations to proclaim May “Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.” Motorcycle fatalities nationwide have increased during the past decade. Motorcycle fatalities rose 2.2 percent nationwide in 2008 to 5,290, up from 5,174 in 2007. Officials hope the added safety emphasis in May helps remind motorists to share the road with motorcycles. Motorcyclists are reminded to make themselves visible to other motorists. “As the weather improves, more and more motorcyclists are hitting the roads,” said KOHS Executive Director Chuck Geveden. “And with that in mind, pedestrians, bicyclists and drivers of all vehicles, including SUVs, passenger cars or trucks, need to be extra attentive and make sure you ‘share the road.’ A motorcycle is one of the smallest vehicles on our roads, often hidden in a vehicle’s blind spot. Everyone needs to aggressively look for them.” Motorists and bicyclists should always make visual checks for motorcycles by checking mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic and at intersections. Pedestrians should also scan for motorcyclists who might be hidden by other traffic. “Motorcyclists have responsibilities, too,” said KOHS Director of Highway Safety Programs Boyd Sigler. “They should follow the rules of the road, be alert to other drivers, never ride while impaired or distracted, and always wear a Department of Transportationcompliant helmet and other protective gear.” Sigler said motorcyclists are much more vulnerable in crashes than passenger vehicle occupants. According to research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, per vehicle mile traveled, motorcyclists are about 37 times more likely to be killed in traffic crashes.

Geveden offered several tips for drivers: • Allow motorcycles a full lane. Motorcycles have all of the rights and privileges of any motor vehicle on the road. • Visually check for motorcycles in mirrors and blind spots before entering or leaving a lane of traffic and at intersections. • Signal when turning, merging or changing lanes. • Be cautious of motorcycle turn signals – they can be misleading. Motorcycle signals are often not self-canceling and riders sometimes forget to turn them off. Wait to be sure the motorcycle is going to turn before you proceed. • Leave plenty of space when following motorcycles to give them enough time to maneuver or stop in an emer-gency. In dry conditions, motorcycles can stop more quickly than cars. Motorcyclists should consider these safety tips: • Avoid riding in poor weather conditions. • Wear brightly colored protective gear and a DOT-compliant helmet. • Use reflective tape and stickers to increase visibility. • Use turn signals for every turn or lane change, even if it appears no one else is around. • Combine hand signals and turn signals to draw more attention. • Keep a visible position in the lane of travel. • Never drive impaired. “Our message to all drivers and motorcyclists is simple. Share the responsibility and do your part in decreasing fatalities by safely sharing the road,” Sigler said. For more information visit http://highwaysafety.ky.gov and www.nhtsa.dot.gov.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Moving to the music

Teacher Cynthia Lawrence leads a group of children during the Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ Summer Enrichment Program Music for Movers camp Wednesday, July 7.

About letters & columns

All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@ communitypress.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Kayleigh Nicholaus (left) and Cici Murphy dance during the camp.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question:

Do you think weather warning sirens are effective? Why or why not? What changes would you make to the warning system? “I live in an area that has an effective system, for which I am extremely grateful. When I hear the siren I turn on the TV for updates and plan accordingly. “Some people complain that they hear sirens too frequently for storms that are not life-threatening. I prefer to err on safety’s side. S.J.P. “I do not believe they are very effective. I live relatively close to the siren near Wilson School and can hear it clearly when I am outdoors. Inside is a different story. I am consistently surprised at how well my house dampens the sound. The same is true in a car. Even if I hear the siren, it does not tell me anything about the threat or where it is located. “I usually respond to the signs of threatening weather by checking my TV or the Internet. “I think the system of sirens is outmoded and a waste of money. In this day and age, you could send a text message to all the cell

phone towers in the threat area and reach a lot more people with more accurate information. The siren system is a truly blunt instrument.” F.S.D. “The systems are pretty good, but they need a dose of human common sense also. “The warning for the wind storm of 2008 was pretty poor. Damage was occurring south and west of us in Louisville and Lexington, yet, even though this storm was heading our way we got little warning of its severity. “It seems pretty obvious to me that simple weather observation should have alerted NOAA and private forecasters of the danger. Granted, to have near hurricaneforce winds in this area is very unusual, but it seems to me that many folks were ‘asleep at the switch.’ I know of a young boy who was severely injured by a falling tree. He still suffers from his injuries. It did not have to happen.” T.H. “Are weather warning sirens effective? Probably yes. “They certainly give more people a better chance of getting to

Next question

shelter than they would have without them (as do the warnings on radio and TV). However, they don’t do much to minimize the property damage that results from the severe weather. “Life is a crap shoot in some respects; we’ll never be totally safe, and even if we could be we would still have to be prepared to check out of this life at some point. (Insurance ads used to try to avoid using the term ‘death,’ and instead used quotation marks around some euphemism. So my wife and I use the term “quote quote” when we discuss this subject, to add a little humor.)” Bill B. “Weather sirens have a limited effect. I often strain to hear them. Not very loud in a lot of places. “How to improve would be more such sirens. Used only when there is imminent danger. “More use of TV broadcasting with louder noises coming from the sets. Mandated that every broadcaster use that method including FM and AM radio. Interrupt the program and cease the broadcast of the program.” J.S.D.

“Yes I do. The sirens are supposed to warn you in the event of a probable tornado, and they do sound when there is a tornado watch along with a severe thunderstorm warning. But many say this is ‘cry wolf.’ “Tornados happen very quickly if the conditions are right so when the sirens sound I often look at the sky and turn on the weather service to see the latest.” O.H.R. “NO! We need to go back to the good ol'days when you heard a siren it meant run to the basement. Now days I tend to ignore them because I do not know what they mean. Do we really need a siren for a severe thunderstorm? Or the constant interruption of our TV shows to pinpoint what street it is on. Come on really…it’s just a thunderstorm. I know they can do damage too but I have managed to survive without the warnings for 30 something years! Please weather people, just warn me when I am in imminent danger. Thank you and great question!” K.S.D. “Yes, I think they can be effective in saving lives. However, I

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving the communities of southern Campbell County

RECORDER

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Noah Phillips sings along with a song during the camp.

Alexandria Recorder Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

The Post Office has announced plans to raise its price for a first class stamp from 44 cents to 46 cents, effective in January. Do you think this increase is reasonable? Why or why not? Send answers to mshaw@nky.com with Chatroom in the subject line. think there needs to be consistency across the board as to when they will be blown and what the warning means. Then, and only then, will we all be on the same page as to what precautions to take.” B.N. “I can look outside and see bad weather, as well as hear storms/rain/hail. Warning sirens would be more effective if they sounded when a funnel cloud had been spotted in an area. People are in the, ‘Boy who cried wolf’ syndrome right now, and that is dangerous.” C.A.S. “You should only have sirens for tornados, because most people can’t remember the different signals for tornados and thunder storms.” N.P.

s WORLD OF

OICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.nky.com


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Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

*Must have Medco. Mean average annual savings calculated from a study through July 2009 of over 14 million lowest on-line savings opportunities on long-term prescriptions excluding Medicare and other non-qualifying participants. Your actual savings may not reach the projected average and may vary. For further details see medcopharmacy.com **Medco Pharmacy standard shipping on prescription items only. Medco Pharmacy, Making Medicine Smarter, Dr. Obvious, Ph.D. and the Obvious Choice are trademarks of Medco Health Solutions, Inc. Š2010 Medco Health Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

CE-0000401897


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving the communities of southern Campbell County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, J u l y 1 5 , 2 0 1 0

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

Summer splash

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Brothers Jacob and Seth Ryan of Fort Thomas pose for a picture at the Fort Thomas Swim Club.

Fort Thomas brothers are more like best friends When neighbors see 9year-old Jacob Ryan playing near his Wilbers Lane home, they can expect that his little brother Seth, 5, isn’t far behind. The Fort Thomas brothers, who spend a lot of time on hot days at the Fort Thomas Swim Club, said they play together a lot. “Seth is not like other kids that completely terrorize their brothers,” said Jacob. “We get along and like to play games together.” From swimming to playing in their yard, the boys are often found playing out-

side together, Jacob said. “I like my brother because he plays basketball and stuff with me,” Seth said. One of the brothers’ favorite memories together is a recent trip to Cumberland Lake, where they got to ride on a pontoon boat. Once summer break is finished, Seth will be starting kindergarten at Moyer Elementary, where Jacob attends. The boys said they’ll most likely stay close growing up. “Hopefully we’ll be friends forever,” Jacob said.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Lena Watkins of Newport encourages her niece Cloee Watkins, left; nephew Donavin Watkins, 4, center; and daughter Kaylin Jones, 3, to jump into the waters of Vet’s Pool in Newport and escape the above 90 degree afternoon heat Thursday, July 8. Located at 26 Caroline Drive, Newport, Vet’s Pool is the only publicly operated pool in Campbell County. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and noon to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is $3 for children ages 5-12 or seniors 65 and older, and $5 for age 13 and up. Admission is $2 after 3 p.m., and is always free for children ages 4 and younger. For information about pool passes and parties visit the Parks & Recreation home page under the government tab of www.newportky.gov.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Swimming through the waters of Vet’s Pool, Jesse Byrne Jr., 8, hangs onto his dad, Jesse, with a smile.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Breanna Chandler, 4, of Newport, and her aunt Merrie Chandler, splash and swim across Vet’s Pool in Newport .

THINGS TO DO Market in MainStrasse

The Covington Farmers Market will be stationed in the MainStrasse Village in Covington Saturday, July 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The market will feature mushrooms, onions, apples, baked goods, pumpkins, cut flowers and more. For more information, call 859-292-2163 or visit www.mainstrasse.org.

Antiques in Burlington

Strike a deal at the Burlington Antique Show Sunday, July 18, at the Boone County Fairgrounds from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The antique show is expected to feature more than 200 vendors. Early buying will be available from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. Cost to enter the antique show early is $5. The cost to enter after 8 a.m. is $3. The show is free for ages 12 and under. The Boone County Fairgrounds are located at 5819 Idlewild Road. For details, call 513-9226847 or visit www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Gangsters in Newport

Learn about Newport’s connection to well-known crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night during the Newport Gangster Walking Tours Saturday, July 17, at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. The tour, which lasts 90 minutes, will include buildings that housed casinos, brothels and speakeasies. The tour begins at the Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, located at 18 E. 5th St., which is next to the Newport Syndicate. Tickets are $15. For more information, call 859-491-8000 or visit www.newportgangsters.com.

Matthew Russell, 32, of Newport, leaps into Vet's Pool from a diving board.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Jake Lusk, left, 8, of Newport, winces as his friend Sylvan Frazier, 8, of Newport, shakes his head after a dip underwater.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Alexandria Recorder.

CE-0000409497

DON’T MISS ty n u o C The Campbell

Cousins Samuel Russell, left, 9, and Paul Morris, 10, both of Newport, at Vet's Pool in Newport Thursday, July 8.

ds Farm Tour a o r k c a B !

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Robert Engram, 17, of Newport, dives into Vet’s Pool.

Sat. July 17th 9am-5pm Rain or Shine! FREE ADMISSION and FAMILY FRIENDLY! Miles of Smiles and Call us at 859 635-9587 or visit us for information and to download Memories Await! your map at http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd.


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Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U L Y 1 6

COOKING CLASSES

Walk and Wok at the Boone County Farmers Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Group walks at least a mile, visits farmers market to pick up produce, then cooks and eats lunch. Simple, healthy recipes shared. Ages 18 and up. $10. Registration required. 586-6101. Burlington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, From apples to zucchini, and everything in between. With perennial plants, there are annuals and hanging baskets for all occasions. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 586-6101. Burlington. Campbell County Farmers’ MarketAlexandria, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Southern Lanes Sports Center, 7634 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Includes produce, plants, flowers, jams, jellies, honey and arts and crafts. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/FarmersMarket. Alexandria.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Outdoors. Children can touch and feed the animals. Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Metrio, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Rooftop Club. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. Featuring Mickey Foellger, Eddie Wilbers and Tom Kohlhepp. 491-8027; http://www.cheznora.com/. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Whiskey Creek, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - POP

Velvet Soul, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Free. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

MUSIC - R&B

II Juicy, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Riverside Marina Bar and Grill, 145 Mary Ingles Highway (Ky. 8), Presented by Riverside Marina. 442-8111. Dayton, Ky.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, 101 Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, Musical comedy. Chaos and calamity ensue when the Umatilla Second Christian Church Women’s Auxiliary League gets ready for its annual Mother’s Day Pageant. Dinner served in the Corbett Theatre Lobby one and a half hours prior to performance. $55 two shows, $30; show only $15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Sketch comedy shorts and music by BillWho?. $30, $20 seniors and students. Through Sept. 4. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Interactive murder mystery. Family friendly. $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. Through July 31. 655-9140. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country National Touring Exhibit, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, National traveling exhibit tells the story of the explorers’ historic 1804-1806 expedition from a different point of view-that of the Indians who lived along their route. Lewis & Clark crossed the traditional homelands of more than 50 Native American tribes. The exhibit examines this monumental encounter of cultures and examines its past and present effects on the lives of the tribes which still live in the region. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. Through Aug. 13. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Freedom Dancers, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Florence Christian Church, 300 Main St. Family-friendly group that square dances and line dances. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Florence.

FARMERS MARKET

Covington Farmers Market, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Promenade. Mushrooms, onions, apples, baked goods, pumpkins, cut flowers and more. Presented by Covington Farmers Market. 292-2163. Covington. Simon Kenton High School Farmer’s Market, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Independence Courthouse, 5272 Madison Pike, Includes local vendors’ produce and products and organic produce grown by Simon Kenton’s Future Farmers of America.803-9483. Independence.

HISTORIC SITES

Railway Museum of Greater Cincinnati, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Railway Museum of Greater Cincinnati, 315 W. Southern Ave. Climb aboard a caboose or a diesel switch engine. Collection of engines, cars and cabooses. $4, $2 ages 10 and under. 513-574-7672; www.cincirailmuseum.org. Covington. Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, 5656 Burlington Pike, 1842 farmhouse and furnishings of the Dinsmore family. Tours begin on the hour; the last tour begins at 4 p.m. $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, 9:30 a.m.6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-582-4253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Centennials: The City of Fort Mitchell, Boy Scouts of America and Devou Park, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, $7; $6 ages 60 and up; $4 ages 3-17; free to members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - BLUES

Sonny’s Solo Blues, 9 p.m.-midnight, Claddagh Irish Pub Newport, One Levee Way, 581-8888; www.claddaghirishpubs.com. Newport. Ricky Nye and the Red Hots Reunion Show, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Sidebar, 322 Greenup St. Free. 431-3456. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Whiskey Creek, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Best of Shadowbox, 7:30 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $30, $20 seniors and students. 957-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. 655-9140. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Lewis & Clark and the Indian Country National Touring Exhibit, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Boone County Main Library, Free. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

TOURS

Campbell County Backroads Farm Tour, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Campbell County Conservation District, 8351 E. Main St. Suite 104, Self-guided auto tour may begin from any one of 16 farms in county. Includes wineries, animal and produce farms, a log cabin museum, an equestrian center, honey bee farm, horse farm and farmer’s markets. Free. 635-9587; http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd. Alexandria. Newport Gangster Walking Tour, 1 p.m. 5 p.m. Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. 5th St. Explore Newport’s connection to wellknown crime figures, including gangsters, gamblers and ladies of the night. $15. 4918000. Newport. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 8

ANTIQUES SHOWS

Burlington Antique Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, More than 200 vendors with antiques and vintage collectibles. Early buying, 6-8 a.m. with $5 admission. $3, free ages 12 and under. Presented by Burlington Antique Show. 513-922-6847; www.burlingtonantiqueshow.com. Burlington.

ATTRACTIONS

Bizarre and Beautiful Gallery, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Newport Aquarium, Included with admission: $22, $15 ages 2-12. 261-7444; http://www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Yoga, 6:30 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Bring mat. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Burlington.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Writer’s Group, 7 p.m. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Share work, get feedback, encouragement and inspiration to write your masterpiece. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665. Burlington.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 0

COMMUNITY DANCE Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. 727-0904. Fort Wright. FARMERS MARKET

Campbell County Farmers’ Market-Highland Heights, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Vegetables. Campbell County Senior Center, 3504 Alexandria Pike, Parking lot. Presented by Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service. 572-2600; http://ces.ca.uky.edu/campbell/. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

MUSEUMS

Creation Museum’s Petting Zoo, noon-6 p.m. Creation Museum, Included with admission: $21.95 ages 13-59, $16.95 ages 60 and up, $11.95 ages 5-12; $7 planetarium. 888-5824253; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Church Girls, 6:30 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 572-5464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

A Little Night Murder, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $14, $12 seniors, student and ages 12 and under. Call box office. 655-9140. Newport.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 1

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Artworks Mural Presentation, 10 a.m. Artisans Enterprise Center, 25 W. Seventh St. Interactive presentation with youth artists, the mayor and more. Screening of film about Covington by two youth artists, Amanda and Jacob. Presented by City of Covington. 2922322; www.covingtonky.com. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Earth Mother Market, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Stables Building, 1038 S. Fort Thomas Ave. “Certified Organic” or “Certified Naturally Grown” growers. 572-1225; www.localharvest.org/farmers-markets/M30992. Fort Thomas.

LITERARY LIBRARIES

Chess Club, 7 p.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Chess players of all ages and levels are invited to play. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 2

EDUCATION E-mail Basics, 10 a.m. Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn to set up free account, how to prevent viruses and etiquette tips. Free. Registration required. 3422665. Florence. (Almost) Every Other Thursday Science, 10 a.m. Launch into Space with COSI On Wheels. Pioneer Park, 3950 Madison Pike, Shelterhouse 1. All ages. Free. Presented by Kenton County Parks and Recreation. 5257529. Covington. FARMERS MARKET

Dixie Farmers Market, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 Commonwealth Ave. Fresh produce, fruits, baked goods and flowers. 727-2525. Erlanger.

FESTIVALS

Carmel Manor Festival, 1 p.m.8 p.m. Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Dinner, flea market, games for all ages. 781-5111. Fort Thomas.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Evansville Otters. WEBN “Thirsty Thursday” featuring Miller Lite draft beers or Pepsi fountain drinks for $1. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. Lawn available on game day only. Fans must show a lawn chair or blanket at time of purchase. $10-$12 VIP, $9, $7 lawn. Through Aug. 29. 594-4487; www.florencefreedom.com. Florence.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m.With The Phil DeGreg Trio. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

Dinsmore Homestead, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Dinsmore Homestead, $5, $3 ages 60 and up, $2 ages 7-17, members and ages 6 and under free. 586-6117; www.dinsmorefarm.org. Burlington.

Pictured is Rebecca Denison, founder of WORLD (Women Organized to Respond to Life-threatening Disease). The print is part of the Cincinnati Museum Center exhibit, “The Art of Caring: A Look at Life Through Photography,” on display through Sept. 19. It features more than 200 works portraying human emotion and the cycle of life. It is included with admission, $8.50; $7.50, 60 and up; $6.50 ages 3-12. Call 513-287-7000 or visit www.cincymuseum.org.

M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 9

LEAP for Health, 10 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, Story time for preschoolers ages 4-6. Hear book, taste food sample from farmers market and participate in physical activity. Free. 586-6101. Burlington. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. 572-5035. Newport.

HISTORIC SITES

PROVIDED © ANNIE LEIBOVITZ COURTESY LEIBOVITZ STUDIO

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

A horse meanders in a pasture in the morning light at Howard and Terry Kleier’s Lazy K Ranch on Siry Road in California June 25. The ranch is a tour stop on the 2010 Campbell County Backroads Farm Tour. The self-guided tour, which will take place July 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., includes 16 Campbell County farms. Those farms include wineries, animal and produce farms, a log cabin museum, an equestrian center, a honey bee farm, horse farm and farmers’ markets. For more information, call 635-9587 or visit http://home.fuse.net/campbellcd.

Church Girls, 8 p.m. Stauss Theatre, $55 two shows, $30; show only $15 available beginning April 15. Registration required. 5725464; www.nku.edu/~theatre. Highland Heights.

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Cornhole Tournament, 7 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, $5. 356-1440. Independence.

PROVIDED

An Evening with Sting is at 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 20, at Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave. The concer features the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra with Steven Mercurio, conductor. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com.


Life

Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

B3

Some factors involved in becoming mature

Consider, “If you find that your challenges balloon out when you think they should be diminishing; if you feel too tired to get up again but realize that life never lets you down very long; if life is even less fair than they warned you it would be; well, you are probably quite healthy and normal.” So writes psychologist Dr. Eugene Kennedy. What he’s expressing are some of the elements involved in becoming mature. When we’re young we think that becoming mature means that troubles level off and we’re more in control of life. The truth is that the difference between an adolescent and a mature adult is not that the adult has fewer problems. Rather, it’s because the

adult – if he or she is actually becoming m o r e mature – becomes m o r e ccomFather Lou aplished in Guntzelman coping. Coping Perspectives means figuring out healthy ways of dealing with the problems of life rather than seeking escapes from them. Mature adults come to realize, at least in some subtle way, that how we handle our problems and pressures is what brings about maturation. It may sound paradoxical, but Carl Jung said, “Man needs difficulties; they are necessary for health.”

The Aztecs had a saying: “A boy remains a boy until there is need of a man.” The same for all of us. The vexation and pain of our own problems powerfully show us the need for a mature man or woman to be standing in our shoes. If we’re courageous, we rise to the occasion. If we’re wimpy we opt out with some excuse, get high, or get lost in the world of technology. The contradictions, pressures and inconsistencies of life are the midwives that give birth to many precious human qualities. Jung also noted, “The serious problems of life are never solved, and if they seem to have been solved, something humanly important has been lost.” Another important factor in becoming mature is

learning how to balance. To be mature is not a matter of getting 100 on some kind of Life Test. It is rather a balancing of the demands of life so that A equals B equals C. These alphabet letters, of course, represent various ingredients of a healthy life which have to be integrated in a reasonably harmonious balance. What are the ingredients that need balancing? Aspects such as self and others, gratification and discipline, bodily needs and spiritual needs, intellect and emotions, action and reflection, self-assertion and respect for others and the demands of relationships.

premium Gold Circle seating in the infield in front of the stage for $50. There are also Infield Floor seating for $39.50 and stadium reserved seating (sections 103-113) for $28.50.

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Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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pose of a martyr. We shirk our responsibilities, claim we haven’t had the right breaks, and say that our problems are always someone else’s fault. We need to roll up our sleeves and struggle with the inconsistencies of life, and listen to the advice of coach philosopher Lou Holtz: “Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it.”

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Styx concert coming to Champion Window Field The Florence Freedom have announced their first concert in their 2010 Miller Lite Summer Concert Series. Legendary classic rock band Styx will perform Saturday, Sept. 4. Prior to the Styx performance, ticket holders can attend “Freedom Fest” featuring local bands playing on the stadium concourse beginning at 6 p.m.. The Rusty Griswolds will play for 75 minutes to cap off Freedom Fest. The Styx concert will begin from the field level stage shortly thereafter. Gates open for the event at 5:30 p.m. Seating options include

The over-riding goal is to become more human. Do the young have a more rugged road? Is it more difficult for most people to mature today? Author Joseph Gallagher thinks so. He writes; “The pressure problem of many people today is the problem of toomuch-ness… Too much noise, too much news, too many distractions, too many meetings, too many memos, too many social obligations, too many expectations, etc.” These make it more difficult to cope in a healthy way. Some of us opt out of maturing by adopting the

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B4

Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

Life

Zucchini: The other green summertime vegetable Last week it was all about pickling cucumbers. This week the requests are pouring in for zucchini bread recipes. T h e ones I’m sharing today are in my “Recipe Hall of Fame.� These are Rita the most Heikenfeld requested, especially Rita’s kitchen this time of year. The zucchini, like everything else in my garden, is a couple weeks early and I’m already picking every day. With county fairs coming up, I’ve had lots of requests for zucchini bread recipes that, as one reader said, “will win me that elusive ribbon.� One of the recipes I’m sharing today did just that: It won a blue ribbon for Susan Zugohoer, a Northern Kentucky reader. She shared her recipe several years ago and it’s a popular one. How’s that for a testimonial?

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Check after 20 minutes.

Susan’s blue ribbon zucchini bread

3 cups finely grated zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 3 cups sugar 11â „2 cups vegetable oil 4 eggs 3 cups flour 11â „2 teaspoons cinnamon 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 â „2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped nuts Grease and flour 9-by-13 pan or 3 loaf pans. Mix zucchini, sugar, oil and eggs. Beat two minutes. Combine dry ingredients. Add to mixture and blend well. Add nuts. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to one hour or until done. If desired, frost with cream cheese icing.

Chocolate zucchini bread/cake

It’s a cross between a bread and a cake, so either name is appropriate. This has become a favorite of everyone who has made it.

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Butterscotch zucchini bread

LISA J. MAUCH/STAFF

My editor Lisa Mauch’s version of the recipe for chocolate zucchini bread/cake. 11⠄2 cups shredded zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 1 cup flour 1 ⠄2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⠄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 ⠄4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ⠄4 teaspoon allspice 1 ⠄2 cup canola oil 1 ⠄2 cup sugar 1 ⠄2 cup light brown sugar 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 ⠄4 to 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (mini chips are nice)

Preheat oven to 350. Spray 9-by-5 loaf pan. Set aside shredded zucchini. Whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and allspice. Set aside. Beat oil, sugars, eggs, and vanilla until well blended, and fold in zucchini. Add flour mixture, mixing just until combined. Fold in chips. Bake until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 55 to 65 minutes. Place on wire rack to cool 10 minutes, then remove and finish cooling. Variation: These also are good made as muffins/cupcakes.

Don’t take it out of the oven too soon. I baked one pan for 50 minutes – it looked great coming out of the oven, but it sunk in the middle when it cooled, a sure indication of underbaking. 3 eggs 1 cup oil 2 teaspoons vanilla (I used 1 tablespoon) 2 cups sugar 2 cups grated zucchini (squeeze moisture out before measuring) 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⠄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 or 2 teaspoons cinnamon (I used 2) 1 ⠄2 teaspoon ginger 1 ⠄2 teaspoon nutmeg 1 ⠄2 cup rolled oats 1 package (3.4-ounce size) instant butterscotch

pudding mix 1 cup nuts, raisins or other dried fruit Beat eggs, oil, vanilla and sugar together well. Add zucchini. Then mix the flour and the rest of the dry ingredients together and then add to the egg mixture, blending well. Pour into two greased, floured, wax paper lined pans. Bake one hour at 350 degrees or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Lemon frosting

Mix and spread on bread after it cools. 2 cups confectioner’s sugar, sifted 2 tablespoons lemon juice 4 tablespoons butter, softened Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen� in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

TANK to run shuttle for KSO summer concerts TANK will provide a free shuttle for the 2010 Kentucky Symphony Orchestra Summer concert series. The shuttle will operate for each concert from Covington Catholic High School to the amphitheater at Devou Park.

The shuttle is being provided free as a community service partnership between TANK and the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. “The KSO concert series provides a great way for families to gather and enjoy time together,� said Andrew Aiello, TANK General Manager. “We are happy to do our part by providing the shuttle transportation to help with parking difficulties in Devou Park. TANK buses are a lower-cost alternative for

commuting and events like these provide a great way for people that have never used TANK to try us.â€? The free concert shuttles will operate from 6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. before the concert and return trips will begin immediately after the concert is finished. Upcoming shows in the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra Summer concert series: • Saturday Aug. 7, join the KSO for “Fun, Fun, Funâ€? as the KSO takes on the

1960’s minus the whining. • Saturday, Sept. 4, the KSO breaks out the hi-wire hijinks for the “Cirque a Devou.â€? All concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Devou Park Amphitheater, suggested donation: $5. Attendees can call 859-431-6216 or visit www.kyso.org for additional information on the concert series. Detailed shuttle information can be obtained by calling 859-331-TANK or visiting www.tankbus.org.

It’s about comfort‌. it’s about caring‌it’s about support for the patient and family.   c ^^^Z[LSPaHIL[OJVTOVZWPJL We can’t control the amount of time someone has left, but we can add to the quality of that time. At St. Elizabeth Hospice, we help families say “let’s make the most of the time we have left together.â€? Hospice treats the person, not the disease. Our emphasis is on comfort, enabling patients to spend their last days with peace and dignity. We can help you and the ones you love.

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Community

Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

B5

Mow, water your way to a happier summer lawn The summer season can be a very trying time for homeowners and their lawns. So, here are a few general tips to help keep your lawn looking its best this summer. 1) Keep mowing on a regular basis. Never remove more than 1/3 of the height of the grass blades each time you mow. 2) Mow at a higher mowing height. Keep your mowing height at least 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches. Longer grass blades mean less

stress on the turf, the crowns are shaded and protected from the heat of the grass Ron Wilson sun, roots should In the grow deeper, garden and your turf will do much nicer during the summer than the lawns mowed close and stressed. 3) Change your mowing pattern each time you mow.

Mow east to west one week, then north to south the next. Then take it diagonally. Just like the golf course pros do! This encourages your grass to grow upright, rather than laying down (being mowed one direction all the time) and definitely creates a happier lawn! 4) Throw those clippings back into the turf. Returning those clippings is like one additional fertilizing each year. Grass clippings are 75 to 85 percent water, decompose quickly, and do not

create thatch problems. 5) Have those mowers blades sharpened on a regular basis, which means at least three to four times throughout the mowing season. Dull blades shred rather than cut, which will give your lawn a yellowed look, and will make the grass more susceptible to disease. 6) Be sure to clean out under the mower deck when you’re finished mowing. It’s important to remove that grass build up, espe-

cially if you have an under the deck exhaust. It also helps the mower deck to operate properly. So keep under the deck cleaned. 7) If your lawn doesn’t get enough rainfall, water as needed. Remember the golden rule of 1 inch of rainfall every 10 days or so for optimum growing. If we don’t get it naturally, you have to supplement. And when you do supplement, do it all at one time; a deep, thorough watering. Deep watering

creates a deeper rooted lawn, which makes it much sturdier during possible drought situations, as well as being a much healthier lawn. Please, don’t be a water tease. One thorough watering is much better for the lawn and all plants, than frequent water “teasing.� Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Inc. Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. Reach him at columns@communitypress.com

Salvation Army staff moves to local community centers

JOSEPH FUQUA II/STAFF

Rally ride

Becky Ritter of Alexandra poses for a picture on her motorcycle during the annual Charity Ride & Motorcycle Rally at Newport on the Levee Saturday, July 3, in Newport.

The Salvation Army announced that it has decentralized its local social services staff to get social workers closer to those seeking help. With this change, effective July 6, The Salvation Army now offers social services support at each of its six area community centers. Social Services workers are instrumental in the process of providing emergency assistance and counseling to those in need. “We’re pleased to make this change to better meet the needs of our clients,� said Capt. Faith Miller, Divisional Program Secretary at The Salvation Army with oversight responsibility for social services. “Our clients, particularly in Cincinnati, have generally commuted to our downtown Cincinnati Family Service Bureau for

assistance. Now, those in outlying neighborhoods can seek assistance closer to home.� With this change, social workers are now available daily at each of the six area Salvation Army Community Centers, including the Family Service Bureau downtown. At the facilities downtown, as well as those in Price Hill, Finneytown, Covington and Newport, social workers are available to meet with clients daily, Monday-Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. At the Batavia facility, a social worker is available daily, Monday-Friday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit the website at www.salvationarmycincinnati.org, and click on the “Locations� tab to find a local community center.

Aquarium launches Fish-Facebook Contest Something fishy is going on at the Newport Aquarium Facebook page. Throughout the month of July, visitors to the page are encouraged to make a funny fish face photo and post it on Newport Aquarium’s Facebook wall. Everyone who posts a photo will be entered to win a Family Four-Pack of Aquarium tickets and Penguin Encounters. Two lucky winners will

be selected at random: one adult and one child (12 and under). Need inspiration? The Newport Aquarium staff posted a video on the site explaining the contest and demonstrating the best ways to make funny fish faces. Visit www.facebook. com/newportaquarium to post a photo, to watch the video or to read the official sweepstakes rules.

All photos must be posted by 11:59 p.m. Saturday, July 31 to be eligible. No purchase is necessary to enter or win. Newport Aquarium is open to the public 365 days a year. Extended summer hours last until Sept. 4, during which the aquarium is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Summer Family hours are from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday through Friday. Two kids get in for free with each

adult paying full price. For more information on Newport Aquarium or for tickets and directions, visit www.newportaquarium.com.

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The 30th National Veterans Wheelchair Games, is taking place through July 9 in Denver, Colo. Together, the Department of Veterans Affairs and Paralyzed Veterans of America are presenting the largest annual wheelchair sports event in the world for military Veterans. Veterans participating in the Games have served during a number of different periods since World War II. This year, Army veteran

Library hosts art show July 30

Enjoy an exhibition of art, music and food at Art After Hours, the Adult Summer Reading Finale of the Campbell County Public Library. This year’s art extravaganza will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, July 30, at the Carrico/Fort Thomas branch, located at 1000 Highland Ave. In its third year, Art After Hours showcases the work of 15 local artists in painting, sculpting, photography and printmaking. Cincinnati’s own Lou Lauche Jazz Quartet will provide live music for the evening. There will be hors d’oeuvres donated from Lother’s CafÊ, desserts from Fantasy in Frosting, and $1 wine samples from Stone-

Brook Winery with all proceeds donated to the library. For additional information, call the Carrico/Fort Thomas branch of the Campbell County Public Library at 859572-5033.

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Partial funding has been provided by the Kentucky Arts Council, a state agency in the Commerce Cabinet, with support Coun from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Cherry Hill Swim Club is having a free competitive swim clinic from 9:30-11 a.m., Friday, July 23, at Cherry Hill Swim Club, 705 Peach Tree Lane, Erlanger. Swimmers can brush up on their racing skills before the All-Stars and NKSL Champ Meet. Contact Jerri Freimuth, Cincinnati Marlins South, at jfreimuth@cincy-marlins.com, or call 761-3320.

Lisa Wilson,46, of Cold Spring is registered to compete in the games. For more information about the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, visit www.wheelchairgames.va.go v.

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B6

Alexandria Recorder

Community

July 15, 2010

IN THE SERVICE Huff completes training

Navy Seaman Recruit Cody L. Huff recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Jenkins completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and

shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations.” This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. “Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical

application of basic Navy skills and the core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Its distinctly “Navy” flavor was designed to take into account what it means to be a Sailor. Huff is the son of Marcy L. and David J. Huff of Alexandria. Huff is a 2008 graduate of Campbell County High School.

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Chad Ochocinco is pictured with Jewell and Hayley Gearding, Amanda, Abby, and Andrew Graus and Emily Matcia and Reese Roberts at Greater Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport on way to Miami. The children are residents of Alexandria and Florence.

Celebrity duck auction kicks off Rubber Duck Regatta fundraiser

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The fifth annual Celebrity Duck Auction to benefit the Freestore Foodbank, sponsored by Midwest Financial will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, July 29, at Jefferson Hall at Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, in Newport. The event will feature the auction of nearly 60 giant rubber ducks that have been signed by both local and national celebrities and decorated in their like-

ness by local artists. Local 12 Sports Director and voice of the Cincinnati Bengals Brad Johansen will host the event that features ducks signed by; Justin Bieber, Carrie Underwood, Brooks & Dunn, Metallica, Guy Fieri, Tim Gunn, Shepard Fairy, Johnny Bench, Pete Rose, Johnny Gomes, Dusty Baker, Chad Ochocinco, Dhani Jones, Rey Maualuga, Marvin Lewis and President Barrack

Obama, among others. Sponsored by Midwest Financial, the Celebrity Duck Auction will serve as the official kick-off of the Freestore Foodbank’s largest fundraising event of the year, the 16th annual Rubber Duck Regatta. A $5 donation is suggested (in the form of a duck sponsorship). For more information call 513-482-7534 or visit www. rubberduckregatta.org.

Durr Foundation aids housing group In full swing of its 35th anniversary year, People Working Cooperatively announced it has secured more than $100,000 in grant funds to carry out its mission to repair the community one home at a time, specifically in Northern Kentucky. PWC received three separate grants: two from The Greater Cincinnati Foundation (GCF) and one from The R.C. Durr Foundation Inc. to provide its services in Northern Kentucky. PWC received a grant of $50,000 from the Weathering the Economic Storm Fund, a partnership of funders, managed by The Greater Cincinnati Foundation. In addition, PWC received a grant of $60,000 from the Northern Kentucky Family of Funds at The Greater Cincinnati Foundation and $15,000 from The R.C. Durr Foundation Inc. “We’ve seen a great increase in the need for our services, especially in the Northern Kentucky region” said Jock Pitts, president of PWC. “By receiving grants like this, foundations are acknowledging the need exists and PWC is the organization to provide the services. We are extremely pleased to be selected to address this need.” The grant from the Northern Kentucky Family of Funds at The Greater Cincinnati

Foundation will allow PWC to provide home repairs and modifications in Northern Kentucky while the grant from the Weathering the Economic Storm Fund will be used to provide assistance with emergency home repairs and energy conservation for low income homes in both Northern Kentucky and Ohio. The grant was awarded as part of the “Weathering the Economic Storm” initiative created by GCF, a community-wide response to help individuals, families and nonprofit organizations move toward economic stability. In addition to the GCF grants, People Working Cooperatively was awarded $15,000 for home modifications in Northern Kentucky by The R.C. Durr Foundation, Inc. The foundation is dedicated to celebrating the life and legacy of its benefactor, R.C. Durr of Boone County, by providing philanthropic support to improve the quality of life of the larger Northern Kentucky region. “We are extremely proud to receive the grants,” said Chris Owens, director of development at PWC. “It’s validating that the community recognizes the good work that PWC has been committed to for the past 35 years, and we’re eager to continue that work.”

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Community

July 15, 2010

Alexandria Recorder

B7

NKY SUMMER CAMPS F R I D A Y, J U L Y 1 6

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. Advanced Circus Camp, 7 p.m. Public Camp Show. Includes T-shirt. Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Intermediate and advanced circus students. Ages 7 and up. $360, $270 siblings. Registration required. Presented by My Nose Turns Red Theatre Company. 581-7100; www.mynoseturnsred.org. Fort Mitchell. S A T U R D A Y, J U L Y 1 7

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, J U L Y 1 8

SUMMER CAMP RELIGIOUS/VBS

Vacation Bible School, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Daily through July 23. Grant’s Lick Baptist Church, 941 Clay Ridge Road, All children through high school learn about Jesus’ love, create crafts, sing songs and play games with visit to Saddle Ridge Ranch. Free. 6352444; www.grantslickbc.com. Alexandria.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. Lake Champlain Bike Extreme Challenge. Biking, tubing and hiking. $1,090; coed teens entering grades 9-11. Eight days and seven nights. Daily through July 25. Camp Ernst, 7615 Camp Ernst Road, Exploring Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail. Swimming, canoeing and camping. Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. M O N D A Y, J U L Y 1 9

SUMMER CAMP - ACADEMIC Sr. Curator Archaeology Camp, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Ages 11-17 work like an archaeologist, learning the tools of the trade and experiencing the past. $175, $150 members. Reservations required. 491-4003. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES

Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Daily through July 23. Little Britain Stables, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Fort Wright Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Fort Wright. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. Ockerman Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE

Finstitute Summer Camp, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Frogs. Daily through July 23. Newport Aquarium, $190, $150 passholders; $170, $130 passholders advance by May 5. Registration required. 815-1442. Newport. Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 9:30 a.m.2:30 p.m. Daily through July 23. Sunrock Farm, $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Shiver Me Timbers. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Pee Wee Swim. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Operation Y Spy. Daily through July 23. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 7811814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Operation Y Spy. Daily through July 23. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through July 23. Campbell County YMCA, 1437 S. Fort Thomas Ave. Scholarships and financial assistance available. Ages 3-5. $85, $65 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. Camp-

bell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through July 23. 4:15 p.m.-6 p.m. Post-camp care. Daily through July 23. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Archery Camp. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 0

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. Mom! I Need Money! Money Management Class, noon-4 p.m. Concludes noon-4 p.m. July 22. Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, learn why kids can’t always have what they want, how ads and TV influence spending, how to earn their own money, concept of spend/save/give, budgeting basics, how to use money wisely and financial responsibility. Grades 4-6. $60. Registration required. Presented by Life Skills Education Fund and Enriching Kidz. 513336-9993; www.enrichingkidz.com. Lakeside Park.

SUMMER CAMP - VBS

High Seas Vacation Bible School, 9 a.m.11:30 a.m. Daily through July 23. Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, for preschoolers. Free. 371-7961; www.florenceumc.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Pee Wee Swim. Daily through July 23. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 1

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 2

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. M O N D A Y, J U L Y 2 6

Farm, $195 per week. Registration required. 781-5502. Wilder.

SUMMER CAMP - SPORTS Soccer Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Daily through July 30. Central Park, 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Boys and girls ages 5-17. $89. Registration required. Presented by Ohio South Youth Soccer Association. 513-576-9555; www.osysa.com. Union.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Splish Splash. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Jungle Jamboree. Daily through July 30. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jungle Jamboree. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Volleyball Camp and Jedi Camp. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 30. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington. T U E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 8

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Splish Splash. Daily through July 30. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 7811814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Splish Splash. Daily through July 30. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through July 30. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through July 30. 4:15 p.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 30. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 7811814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 9

SUMMER CAMP - HORSES SUMMER CAMP Little Britain Stables Horse Camp, 8 a.m.-3 MISCELLANEOUS p.m. Daily through July 30. Little Britain Stables, $300. Registration required. 586-7990; ww.LittleBritainStable.com. Burlington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Circus Camp, 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Daily through July 29. 12:30 p.m.-3 p.m. Daily through July 29. Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St. Introduction to circus including stilt walking, rolling globe, creative dramatics, free T-shirt and more. Ages 4-7. $110; $90 siblings. Registration required. Presented by My Nose Turns Red Theatre Company. 581-7100; www.mynoseturnsred.org. Covington. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 30. Fort Wright Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Fort Wright. SummerCare: Adventures in Wonderland, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through July 30. Ockerman Elementary School, $128 week; $29 per day. Registration required online. 4312075; www.childreninc.org. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - NATURE Finstitute Summer Camp, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Creepy Crawly Slippery Slimy. Daily through July 30. Newport Aquarium, $190, $150 passholders; $170, $130 passholders advance by May 5. Registration required. 815-1442. Newport. Sunrock Farm Nature Camp, 9:30 a.m.2:30 p.m. Daily through July 30. Sunrock

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. Utah’s Uinta Wilderness Backpacker. $995, plus roundtrip airfare to Salt Lake City. Coed entering grades 9-11. Nine days and eight nights. Daily through Aug. 7. Camp Ernst, Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. F R I D A Y, J U L Y 3 0

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

a.m.-6 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $125-$175 per week. Registration required. 534-5700; www.myy.org. Burlington.

Hear, learn and move to different culture’s music each day and create own instrument to take home. Ages 6-10. $95 future members, $75 members. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

T U E S D A Y, A U G . 3

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

W E D N E S D A Y, A U G . 4

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. YMCA’s Got Talent. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Hollywood. Daily through Aug. 6. 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. Hollywood. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Teen Adventure Trips, 8 a.m. Little Miami Mountain Bike/Canoe/Bike. $570; coed entering grades 7-8. Five days and four nights. Daily through Aug. 6. Camp Ernst, Registration required. 586-6181; www.myycamp.org. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Treasure Island. Daily through Aug. 6. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 7811814. Independence. Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Treasure Island. Daily through Aug. 6. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Preschool Camp, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. Campbell County YMCA, $85, $65 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA A.C.E.S. Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Pre and post Camp, 6:30 a.m.-8:45 a.m. Pre-camp care. Daily through Aug. 6. 4:15 p.m.-6 p.m. Postcamp care. Daily through Aug. 6. Campbell County YMCA, Pre: $35, $25 members; post: $30, $20 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camp Leadership in Training Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $60, $30 members. Registration required. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Sports and Specialty Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dodge Ball Camp and Dance Camp. Daily through Aug. 6. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. 5345700; www.myy.org. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Day Camp, 6:30

SUMMER CAMP MISCELLANEOUS

Alumni Farm Camp, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Sunrock Farm, 103 Gibson Lane, Day of farming and exploring for past Sunrock Farm campers. Ages 16 and up. $50. Registration required. 781-5502; www.sunrockfarm.org. Wilder. Skidaddles Summer Camp, 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Skidaddles Inc. $170 for five days, $140 for four days, $115 for three days. Registration required. 647-7529; www.skidaddles.com. Florence.

Davis - Smithson

M O N D A Y, A U G . 9

SUMMER CAMP - YMCA

R.C. Durr YMCA Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wacky Water. Daily through Aug. 13. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Preschool Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-noon Part-day. End of Summer Carnival. Daily through Aug. 13. R.C. Durr YMCA, $170, $125 members; part-day: $105, $75 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. R.C. Durr YMCA Teen Summer Camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 13. R.C. Durr YMCA, $175, $130 members. Registration required. 534-5700. Burlington. Kenton County YMCA Traditional Day Camp, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. It’s a Jungle Out There. Daily through Aug. 13. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 781-1814. Independence.

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

LUTHERAN

Sunday Worship: Traditional 8:00 & 11:00am Contemporary 9:00am Sunday School 9:50am Contemplative 5:30pm

St. Luke Lutheran Church ELCA 4800 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY 859-441-2848 M Worship Sun 8:30 &10:30am Sunday School 9:30am All Are Welcome www.stlukecoldspring.org

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Davis of Cheviot, Ohio are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Darlene Davis to Charles William Smithson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smithson, of Ft. Thomas, Ky. Miss Davis is a 2004 graduate of Mother of Mercy High School and a 2007 graduate of Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science. Mr. Smithson is a 2004 graduate of Highland High School. He attended the Gateway Technical Community College. Mary is employed at Frederick Funeral Home and Charles is employed at Fidelity Investments. They will reside in Colerain Township. An August 14, 2010 wedding is planned at St. Martin of Tours Church.

Conner High

School Class of 1985 25 year reunion. Little Britain Carriage House 5307 Idlewild Rd. Burlington, KY 41005 Contact: Keith Kinser Keith.Kinser@motoristsgro up.com

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NON-DENOMINATIONAL LOVE & FAITH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

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• Receive up to $1200 in Manufacturers Rebates! • Receive up to a $1500 Federal Tax Credit! • Receive up to $250 Kentucky Tax Credit!

M O N D A Y, A U G . 2

SUMMER CAMP - ARTS Camp Carnegie Art and Drama Workshops, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Production: The Villain Trials. Workshop 5. Snack provided. Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Aug. 3, 4, 9, 10 and 11. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free; $10 registration deposit. Registration required. 491-2030; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Passport to the World Music Camp, 9 a.m.-noon Daily through Aug. 6. BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road,

Advanced Camping Experience Camp, 8:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 13. Kenton County YMCA, $120, $100 members; registration fee: $40 family, $25 child. Registration required. 356-3178. Independence. Traditional Day Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. It’s a Jungle out There. Daily through Aug. 13. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 781-1814; www.myy.org. Fort Thomas. Campbell County YMCA Adventure Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 13. Campbell County YMCA, $140, $110 members. Registration required. 572-3063. Fort Thomas.

CLASS of 1979 is having a 30+1 reunion on July 24th at Sweetwine Lodge on Nordyke Rd.Visit www,Turpin1979.com to view missing list, get reunion details & tickets

Crafters’ Day Out

Hebron Baptist MOPS Crafters’ Day Out: Sat, 7/24/10, 9am-9pm, Hebron Baptist Church. Bring scrapbooking, couponing, or other projects to work on without interruptions. $45 per table. Breakfast, lunch & dinner provided. Doorprizes. Call Eryn Creusere 859-409-0827 today to reserve your s p o t . Hebronbaptistmops.web.c om for more info.

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Alexandria Recorder

THE

Kelly Bailer

Kelly Ray Bailer, 49, Alexandria, died July 2, 2010, at his home. He was a disabled construction worker. Survivors include his wife, Robin Bailer of Alexandria; mother, Iva Shelton of Covington; mother-in-law, Maggie Caudle of Alexandria; son, Clarence Bailer of Cold Springs; daughters, Michelle Caudle Phelps of Alexandria, Tracy Bailer, both of New Orleans, La.; brothers, Darrell Shelton, Mike Bailer, BJ Bailer, all of Covington; sisters, Teresa Morgan of Butler, Tina Tables of Ludlow, Robin Meade of Covington, Teresa Monroe of Kings Mill, Kate Moore of Covington, Vicki Dryer of Chester, Va.; and four grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Cemetery in Taylor Mill.

Melissa Baldridge

Melissa Lyn Baldridge, 43, Southgate, died July 6, 2010, at her home. She was an accounting technician for the IRS in Covington. Her husband, Robert A. Baldridge, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Jessica Baldridge of Southgate; sister, Beth Murphy of Las Vegas, Nev.; and brother, Jeff Vallandingham of Goodyear, Ariz. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Asperger’s Society at Visions Research, P.O. Box 1257, Solana Beach, CA 92075.

July 15, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Lucille Barbiea

Lucille Margaret Barbiea, 87, of Florence, formerly of Fort Thomas, died July 3, 2010, at the Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. She was a homemaker, member of St. Thomas Church in Fort Thomas; Club 55 and Fort Thomas Seniors Citizens. Her husband, Melvin J. Barbiea, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Deborah McCulloch of Florence; sons, Ken Barbiea of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Dennis Barbiea of Florence and Bret Barbiea of Springboro, Ohio; brother, Alvin Zimmerman of Independence; sister, Myrt McCann of Cold Spring; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of St. Eliza-

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving the communities of southern Campbell County

N K Y. c o m

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DEATHS beth Healthcare, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Tom Bauer

Tom Bauer, 81, Fort Thomas, died July 6, 2010, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. He was a brewer with Wiedemann Brewery, Newport, member of St. Therese Parish in Southgate, coached semi-pro baseball and women’s slow pitch softball including the Dairy Cottage Team that won the first Women’s Slow Pitch Championship in Cincinnati, the Girl’s ASA World Champs in 1961. He was a Korean War Army veteran. His wife, Melba L. Andriot Bauer, died April 19. Survivors include his sons, Frank Winburn of Fort Thomas, Lonnie Winburn of Southgate, and Tom Winburn of Margate, Fla.; daughter, Cindy Winburn of Wilder; sisters, Edie Case of Silver Grove and Joan Bauer of Fort Thomas; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203; or St. Philip’s Church, 1404 Mary Ingles Highway, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Lloyd Bockerstette

Lloyd Harry Bockerstette, 85, Butler, died July 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a trucker who hauled cattle to market, member of the

THIS SUNDAY

Second Twelve Mile Church, and treasurer for Pleasant Hill (Fryer) Cemetery in Pendleton County. Survivors include his wife, Geneva Fern Bockerstette; sons, Dale Bockerstette of Campbell County and Rick Bockerstette of Pendleton County; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Memorials: Pleasant Hill (Fryer) Cemetery, 197 Norris Road, Butler, KY 41006.

Bruce Collins

Bruce M. Collins, 66, of Cold Spring, formerly of Fort Thomas, died July 2, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, Edgewood. He was a Lieutenant with the Campbell County Police Department and Campbell County Attorney’s Office, a member of the Fraternal Order of Police and The Blue Knights International, and a United States Air Force veteran. Survivors include his wife, Mary Collins of Cold Spring; son, Robert Collins of Louisville; daughter Kim Sweeney of Aurora, Ind.; and three grandsons. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 S. Loop Road Edgewood, KY 41017; Baptist Convalescent Center, 120 Main St., Newport, KY 41071.

William Corbin

William R. Corbin, 74, California, died July 3, 2010, at his home. He was the retired Associate Superintendent of the Campbell County Board of Education and a member of the First Christian Church in Fort Thomas, the Northern Kentucky Education Association, and the Campbell County Retired Teachers Association. Survivors included his wife, Jane Rouse Corbin of California, Ky. Burial was in Grandview Cemetery in Mentor. Memorials: First Christian Church

of Fort Thomas Building Fund, 1031 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Harrison Deaton, 78, Alexandria, died July 4, 2010, at his home. He was a member of the Bakers union. Survivors include his wife, Mary Lou Deaton of Alexandria; daughters, Diana Jones of Alexandria, Kimberly Barrett of Florence; sisters, Linda Baker, Janice Turner; brother, Marvin Deaton; four grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Corporation, a member of St. Paul United Church of Christ in Fort Thomas, and Southgate Super Seniors. Her husband, Byron G. Fehler, Sr., and son, Byron G. Fehler, Jr., both died previously. Survivors include her sons, Donald Fehler of Highland Heights, Daniel Fehler of Fort Thomas; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Dobbling Funeral Home in Fort Thomas handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Paul United Church of Christ, 1 Churchill Dr., Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

David Durso

Edith Feiler

Harrison Deaton

David John Durso, 62, Bellevue, died July 7, 2010, at Hospice of Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was a personal trainer for Urban Active in Florence and Erlanger, an Army veteran and licensed with the national Federation of Professional Trainers. Survivors include his mother, Betty Durso of Bellevue; brothers, Dennis Durso of Louisville, Douglas Durso of Frankfort, Dale Durso of Fort Thomas and Duncan Durso of Cincinnati; sisters, Donna Sayers of Bellevue, Debbie Botts of Hebron, Denise Durso of Fort Thomas, Deana Durso of Bellevue, and companion, Beverly Hamel of Burlington. Linnemann Family Funeral Home and Cremation Center, Erlanger, handled the arrangements. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Rosemary Fehler

Rosemary Catherine Pirman Fehler, 93, Southgate, died June 25, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, a bookkeeper for the Vista Development

Edith Feiler, 75, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and member of The Bridge Community Church in Wilder. Her son, Glenn T. Feiler, died previously. Survivors include her husband, David Feiler; sons, David J. Feiler of Berry and Michael B. Feiler of Silver Grove; sister, Alice Perry of Bellevue; six grandchildren; and 11 greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

John Fleming

John S. Fleming, 87, Dayton, died June 29, 2010, at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was a World War II Army Air Corps veteran and a member of Highlands Country Club in Fort Thomas. Survivors include his wife, Pat Fleming; and daughter, Cindy Fleming. Inurnment was in Woodland Mausoleum in Dayton, Ky.

Deaths | Continued B9

POLICE REPORTS FORT THOMAS

Ave., June 27.

Third degree criminal mischief

Arrest

THE

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Brian McCoy, 39, 22 St. Nicholas Place, DUI at 700 block of Highland, June 24. Robert Beagle, 42, 126 South Fort Thomas Ave. No. 2, second degree burglary at 128 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 24. Joshua James Horvath, 18, 1321 Alexandria Pike No. 3F, possession of marijuana, unlawful transaction with a minor at 840 Alexandria Pike, June 29. Anthony Dugan, 32, 48 Hollywood C, warrant at 48 Hollywood C, June 29. Barbara Creech, 32, 327 Elm St., warrant at 1100 Highland Ave., June 29. Frances Rackley, 27, 1731 Esmonde St., warrant at I-471 north, June 30. William McCoon, 41, 1335 Mussell Shoals Road, first degree possession of a controlled substance, warrant at I-471 south, July 7. Eric Gabbard, 32, 929 Rutledge Ave. Apt. 2, DUI at Highland Avenue at Deshler, July 8. Travis Sentel Smith, 29, 3080 McHenry Apt. 1, possession of marijuana at 40 Hollywoods Apt. 1, July 2. Karyn Stubbs-Tippenhauer, 40, 336 River Road, warrant at 36 Grant St., July 1. Shelton King, 22, 420 Fourth Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, theft by unlawful taking at Rossford Ave., June 30. Joseph Born, 27, 160 Pickets Charge No. 155, alcohol intoxication in a public place, carrying a concealed deadly weapon at 1972 Alexandria Pike, July 3. Clint Turner Jr., 38, 1601 Trankler Road, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 143 North Fort Thomas Ave., July 5. Jeremy Frances Horvath, 18, 1321 Alexandria Pike 3F, warrant at Tower Park, July 2. Benjamin Hartzel, 21, 112 Grant St., warrant at 1227 South Fort Thomas Ave., July 3.

Incidents/reports Second degree burglary

Reported at 128 South Fort Thomas Ave., June 24. Reported at 2 Walker Road, July 2. Reported at 100 Rosemont Ave., July 2. Reported at 255 Clover Ridge Ave., July 2. Reported at 120 Pickets Charge, July 2.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 38 Rossford Lane, June 24. Reported at 1015 North Fort Thomas Ave., July 5.

Third degree burglary

Reported at 1041 South Fort Thomas

Pick up The Enquirer at your local retailer or subscribe today. To subscribe, visit Cincinnati.Com/subscribe or call 1.800.876.4500. CE-0000408473

Reported at 1538 Alexandria Pike, June 24. Reported at 917 Highland Ave., July 1.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS/ SOUTHGATE Arrest

Michael Daniels, 25, 2653 Cardinal , DUI at 1972 Alexandria Pike, July 3. Irvin Bacon, 68, 10061 Persimmon Grove, warrant at Alexandria Pike and Johns Hill Road, June 30. Paige Ellis, 18, 1911 Glenway Ave., third degree trafficking a controlled substance at 40 Hidden Valley Drive, June 21. Armando Morales, 24, 26 East Robbins 2, DUI at I-471 north, June 20. Kimberly McGuire, 29, 113 Carlisle Ave., warrant at 525 Alexandria Pike, June 27. Richard Brock, 39, 128 Marshall Drive, fourth degree assault at 128 Marshall Drive, June 27. John Polick, 34, 1157 Park Ave., DUI at Industrial and Orchard, June 26.

Incidents/reports Second degree burglary

Reported at 7 Renshaw Road, June 29. Reported at 71 Elblaine Drive, June 21.

Second degree criminal mischief Reported at 1972 Alexandria Pike, July 1.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 2 Tesseneer Drive, July 2. Reported at 215 Meadow Trail Drive, July 3. Reported at 2526 Alexandria Pike, June 29. Reported at Center and Maple, June 22. Reported at 2335 Alexandria Pike, June 22.

Theft by deception

Reported at 2301 Alexandria Pike, July 1.

Third degree criminal mischief

Reported at I-471 south, June 22. Reported at 310 West Walnut St., June 25. Reported at 222 Renshaw Road, June 25.

NEWPORT

Arrest

Ladanvya Kyatte, 35, 200 Bluegrass 92C, fourth degree assault at 200 Bluegrass 92 C, July 8. Charles Ewing, 42, 608 Monmouth St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana at 628 Monmouth St., July 9. Mitchell Fair, 19, 307 Beechwood Ave., possession of marijuana,

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. tampering with physical evidence at 800 block of Dayton, July 8. Antonio Ramires, 37, 815 Roberts St., fourth degree assault at Eighth and Roberts, July 7. Louis Vaccariello, 52, 5549 Old Blue Rock Road, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, tampering with physical evidence at 628 Monmouth St., July 6. Thomas Meyer, 42, 10026 Glenkroll Court, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana at 628 Monmouth St., July 6. William Fisk, 39, 202 West 11th St. No. 4, possession of marijuana, receiving stolen property at 12th and Patterson, July 7. Hershel Roach, 47, 1727 Highwater Road, criminal possession of a forged prescription at 1301 Monmouth St., July 4. John Phillips, 32, 625 Monroe St., warrant, second degree possession of a controlled substance at 625 Monroe St., July 2. Donald Buck, 49, 1710 Eastern Ave. No. 5, theft by unlawful taking at 1 Pavillion Way, June 29.

Incidents/reports Fourth degree assault

Reported at 1301 Monmouth St., July 1. Reported at 400 Sweetbriar, July 1.

Second degree burglary

Reported at 302 Elm St., June 29.

Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 101 Riverboat Row, July 7. Reported at 210 East Ninth St., July 7. Reported at 715 Overton, July 6. Reported at 1129 Columbia St., July 3. Reported at 404 East Fourth St., July 1. Reported at 901 East Sixth, July 6. Reported at 800 block of Monmouth St., July 6. Reported at 145 Fairfield Ave., July 6.

Theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal mischief Reported at 1914 Monmouth St., June 27.

Theft of mail matter

Reported at 910 Roberts St., June 30.

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com | cincinnati


On the record

July 15, 2010

Alexandria Recorder

B9

DEATHS From B8

Preston Fryman

Preston David Fryman, 86, Carlisle, died July 3, 2010 at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. He was born August 16, 1923 in Mason Co. to the late Charley & Edith Herndon Fryman, was a retired employee of Cincinnati Gas & Electric and a member of the First Baptist Church of Carlisle. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Beulah Linville Fryman; son, David P. (Toddy) Fryman, Jr. of Dry Ridge; daughters, Diana Owens Carlisle and Janie (Marty) Thomas of Florence; brothers, Charles Fryman of Silver Grove and Everett Fryman of Wilder; sister, Julie Moran of Florida; 13 grandchildren, 15 greatgrandchildren and 3 great-great grandchildren. Mathers-Gaunce Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Burial was in Elizaville Cemetery. Memorial contributions are suggested to the church.

Joyce Guzauskas

Joyce Opal Dahlstrom Guzauskas, 70, of Erlanger, formerly of Alexandria, died July 1, 2010, at Woodcrest Manor, Elsmere. She was a self-employed housekeeper. Her daughter, Cindy Guzauskas, died previously. Survivors include her son, John Guzauskas of Florence. Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: Boone County Animal Shelter, 5643 Idlewild Road, Burlington, KY 41005.

Barbara Hamlin

Barbara A. Hamlin, 49, Newport, a homemaker, died July 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Survivors include her sons, James and Johnathan Hamlin of Florence; daughter, Pamela Waddle of Ludlow; brother, Edward C. Carberry Jr. of Edwardsburg, Mich.; sisters, Dorothy Carberry of Fort Thomas, Rebekah Pinkston of Niles, Mich.; and nine grandchildren. Fares J. Radel Funeral Home, Newport, handled the arrangements.

Bud Haynes

Bud Haynes, 60, Alexandria, died July 5, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was an Army veteran and a driver for Chicago Airport. Survivors include his daughter, Victoria Granger of California; mother, Dorothy Haynes of Alexandria; sisters, Sue Keith of Joliet, Ill. and Nancy Loyd of Sycamore, Ill.; and four grandchildren.

Mark Inloes

Mark Townsend Inloes, 49, Brooksville, died July 4, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He owned Lenoxburg Motorcycle and was a member of New Hope Church of Christ.

Survivors include his wife, Elaine Spaulding Inloes; daughter, Mellissa Newman of Highland Heights; sons, Mark Inloes and Michael Inloes of Foster and sister, Dori Bachman of California. Burial was in Lenoxburg Cemetery, Foster.

Rodgers of Columbus, Ga.; brothers, Edwin Bray of Fairfield, John Mattingly of Butler, Rodney Mattingly of California; sisters, Linda Ferrel of California, Betty Smith of Lakeside Park and Deborah Bishop of Florence; 14 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Judith ‘Peaches’ Jacks

John ‘Sonny’ Owens

Judith “Peaches” Jacks, 68, Dayton, died July 3, 2010, at her home. She was the owner of the Dream Bar in Newport and also worked at Dayton Chili. Survivors include her sons, John Jacks III and Bobby Jacks, both of Dayton; Michael Everman of Texas and Gary Everman of Newport; daughters, Deborah White of Dayton, Treasa Cummings and Marla Purcell, both of Falmouth; sisters, Rose Cheeks of Highland Heights, Terri Fischer of Melbourne, Diane Bruce of Bellevue and Linda Thompson of Dayton; brothers, Tom Schweinzger of Dayton and Ernie Schweinzger of Florence; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp & Erschell Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

John R. “Sonny” Owens, 72, Fort Mitchell, died July 2, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He worked for Wiedemann Brewing Co. Survivors include his daughter, Pamela Leopold of Loveland, Ohio; son, John R. Owens Jr. of Maineville, Ohio; brothers, Jerry Owen of Morehead, George Owen of Latonia and Timmy Owen of Erlanger; sisters, Rose McCarver of Texas, Violet Garneau of Covington, Linda Paynter of Alexandria, Wanda Cullum of Aurora, Ind., and Darlene Collins of Newport; and four grandchildren. Entombment was in Highland Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Healthcare Dialysis Unit, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Spc. Russell Madden

Mary Jean Pelle, 63, died June 30, 2010, in Townview Health and Rehabilitation Center, Cannonsburg Pa. She was preceded in death by her brothers Arthur Pelle and Raymond Pelle. Her survivors are brothers Jack Pelle of Cold Spring, William Pelle and Thomas Pelle of Melbourne, her sisters Ruth Schalk of California, Rose Prodoehl and Cathy Bertram of Cold Spring and Sandra Twehues of Dearborn Michigan.

Spc. Russell E. Madden, 29, Fort Thomas, died June 23, 2010, in a rocket-propelled grenade attack on an Army convoy in the Charkh District of Afghanistan. He was an honor graduate of basic training at Fort Still, Okla., a member of Delta First Squadron, 91st Calvary Regiment, 183 Brigade Combat Team, recipient of a Posthumous Award promotion to Specialist, a Bronze Star, Purple Heart, NATO Medal-Combat Action Badge, and when home, active in youth football in Bellevue. Survivors include his wife, Michelle Reynolds Madden of Fort Thomas; son, Parker Madden of Fort Thomas; step-son, Jared Pulsfort of Fort Thomas; mother, Peggy Davitt of Newport; father, Martin Madden of Bellevue; step-mother, Pamela Madden of Bellevue; stepfather, Mike Davitt of Newport; brother, Martin Madden of Bellevue; sister, Lindsey Madden of Bellevue; grandfather, William Strange of Falmouth and grandmother, Peggy Strange of Falmouth. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Spc. Russell E. Madden Memorial Fund, c/o any Fifth Third Bank.

Thomas Mattingly

Thomas Lee Mattingly, 57, Alexandria, died July 3, 2010, at Bardstown Hospital. He was the owner of the Mattingly Expert Tree Service. Survivors include his wife, Mabel Mattingly; sons, Thomas Mattingly Jr. of Alexandria, Brian Thacker of Somerset, Billy and Jeffrey Thacker of Tallahassee, Fla.; daughters, Nichole Mattingly of Falmouth, Sheri Eggleston of Bardstown and Tonia

Mary Jean Pelle

Ex-Change House, Inc., Mentoring Plus, Dayton. Call 859-982-5895. Mentor a teen once each week for a minimum of one year at the Salvation Army in Newport.

Fundraising

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Planning for fundraisers throughout the year.

Youth Transportation

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859.491.8303. Responsible adults who are free during the day to transport youth (ages 11-17) to school and doctor’s appointments.

Summer Series Volunteers

Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, Newport. Call 859 431-6216. The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra is actively seeking volunteers for its 2010 Summer Series, July 10, Aug. 7 and Sept. 4. The KSO’s Summer Series concerts are held at Devou Park in Covington, Kentucky.

Gift Shop Cashier

St. Elizabeth Healthcare - Ft. Thomas, Ft. Thomas. Call 859301-2140. To staff the Gift Shop and providing service to all customers. Accept responsibility for shop operation and ringing in all sales on the register.

Teen/Young Adult AA/NA Class

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. Lead an AA and or NA group for youth and young adults ages 1521 at Brighton Center’s facility for homeless youth.

Senior Support

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. Plan and execute weekly and monthly activities for senior residents living independently, such as bingo, birthday parties, exercise routines. Provide transportation to local stores, banks and doctor appointments.

Raphael Petering, 82, Southgate, died July 6, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a commercial artist, a World War II Navy veteran, a glider pilot with Caesar Creek Soaring Club and member of the Moeller High School Football Boosters. Survivors include his wife, Rose Petering; son, Ray Petering of Columbus, Ohio; daughters, Liz Appel of Florida, Shelly McGraw of Eastgate and Wendy Vogel of Cincinnati; sisters, Peggy Crawley of Cincinnati and Barb Miller of Green Hills; brothers, Ron Petering of Columbus, Ohio and Roger Petering of Franklin, Ohio; caretaker, Stevie Vogel; and five grandchildren Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate.

Joseph M. Schacherer, 95, Bellevue, died July 8, 2010, at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. He was a former city councilman for Dayton, Ky., and a member of the Divine Mercy Parish and the Holy Name Society. His first wife, Anna Rolfes Schacherer, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Laura

Cat Foster

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S), Alexandria. Call 859-694-7672. Cat fosters to care for the cats and kitties until adopted. All expenses are paid by the rescue.

Need crafters

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Help with data entry, checking emails, mailings, fundraising, event planning etc.

Fosters for small breed dogs

Transport

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. Foster homes are needed for the small breed dogs this would include taking care of the dog until he/she has found a forever home. All supplies are provided for the dog until it is adopted. Transportation for the dog to a vet appointment or an adoption event could be necessary.

Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. RSVP offers a full range of volunteer oportunities in the Northern Kentucky community for individuals 55 and over. Locations include libraries, hospitals, museums, local schools and social services agencies. Benefits include mileage reimbursement, supplemental accident insurance, appreciation events and recognition from the State of Kentucky Governor’s office.

Randall Sizemore

Randall Sizemore, 47, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at his home. He was a blacktop contractor. Survivors include his sons, Chris Purnell of Dayton, and Randall Purnell of Dry Ridge and daughter, Christina Purnell of Covington. Cooper Funeral Home, Alexandria, handled the arrangements.

Loretta Snyder

Loretta Julia Snyder, 90, Newport, died July 6, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. She was a nurse’s aide for St. Luke Hospital in Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughter, Pat Lepper of Alexandria; sons, Larry Snyder of Alexandria and David Snyder of Milan, Ind. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass Northern Kentucky, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

ton County, Sylvia Gibson of Deshler, Ohio, Anna Schnitzler, Maggie Hyde and Pearl Stockton, all of Falmouth; and brothers, Walter Morris of Fort Thomas, Jerry, Golden and John H. Morris Jr., all of Pendleton County. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell.

Christopher Young

Christopher David Young, 36, Dayton, died July 7, 2010, in Covington. He was a self-employed drywall finisher and Navy veteran. Survivors include his son, Christopher David Perkins; daughter, Chelsea Young; father, William Young; mother, Sheila Mullins; and sister, Tammy Spradlin. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Kevin Ziolkowski

Bobby Sebastian, 65, Newport, died July 5, 2010, at his home. He was a self-employed carpenter, member of Masonic Lodge 109 in Covington and former district deputy grandmaster. Survivors include his wife, LaVonda Sebastian of Newport; sons, Mike Sebastian of Villa Hills, Bobby, Jerry and Joey Sebastian, all of Newport; daughter, Lisa Schlueter of Hebron; sisters, Aloma Herald of Michigan and Terri Gosney of Burlington; eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery.

Linda Faye Morris Winterman, 55, of Cincinnati, formerly of California, died July 5, 2010, at Mercy Hospital Western Hills. She was a member of Cincinnati West Baptist Church in Addyston. Survivors include her sisters, Jean Zint of Erlanger, Leova Gish of Highland Heights, Ella Wilson of Burlington, Mae Russell of Pendle-

Kevin Ziolkowski, 41, Hebron, died July 2, 2010, at his home. He worked for Procter and Gamble and was a member of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity. Survivors include his wife, Lila Ziolkowski of Hebron; children, Keanu and Kiara Ziolkowski, both of Hebron; mother, Alice Ziolkowski of Milwaukee, Wis.; mother-in-law, Vivienne Macedonio of California; father-in-law, Don Macedonio of California; sisters, Chris Schneider of Milwaukee, Wis., Karen Sobczak of Milwaukee, Wis., Donna Matias Bell of California; and brothers, Keith Ziolkowski of Milwaukee, Wis., Peter Matias of California. Memorials: The Ziolkowski family for the education of their children.

FLORIDA

NEW YORK

SOUTH CAROLINA

Bobby Sebastian

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Joseph Schacherer

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue Inc., Alexandria. Call 859-635-9114. If you are a crafter and would like to help with the animals in our care we are in need of people with the special talents such as: Sewing, crocheting, and knitting items for the animals.

Administrative

Memorials: Bobby Sebastian family, c/o Cooper Funeral Home, 10759 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Linda Winterman

Raphael Petering

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Life Coach

Hagemeyer Schacherer of Bellevue; daughters, Jo Ann Thomas of Bellevue, Edwina Domaschko of Aurora, Ind., Jackie Glore of Florence, Jerri Payne of Fort Thomas, Debbie Schacherer of Covington; sons, Joe Schacherer, Jr. of Oceana, Calif., David Schacherer of Edgewood, Bob Schacherer of Gardena, Calif.; step-daughters, Karen Hamilton of Fort Thomas, Cheryl Champlin of Columbus, Laurie MacLeod of Hawthorne, Fla.; step-son, Richard Hagemeyer of Alexandria; brothers, Ed Schacherer of Dayton, Ohio, Paul Schacherer of Dayton, Ohio; 24 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and 2 great-great grandchildren. Burial was in the St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home in Bellevue handled the arrangements. Memorials: Muscular Dystrophy Association, 1080 Nimitzview Dr., Suite 208, Cincinnati, OH 45230.

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S), Alexandria. Call 859-694-7672. Transport animals to vet appointments, and adoption events. Also available to transport from other rescues to the northern KY area.

Donation Sorting

Brighton Center Inc., Newport. Call 859-491-8303. To sort clothing and household donations donated from the community for our Clothing Closet. The store is open Monday through Friday 10 a.m to 4 p.m. and each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

NKY.com/community

NORTH CAROLINA

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach BEST VALUE ON THE BEACH! CLEAN beach condo, 2BR, 2BA, pool. 513-875-4155 . Rent weekly. www.bodincondo.com

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN. Deeply discounted 2BR, 2BA condo, five pools, on-site restaurant & golf course. 513-561-4683 , local owner. Visit arieldunes.us

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

Fundraising

Rescue Our Shelter Animals and Strays, Inc. (ROSA’S), Alexandria. Call 859-694-7672. Fundraising for special events.

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

OHIO

GLENLAUREL • Scottish Inn with Cottages. Luxurious hideway in Hocking Hills. Fine dining, hot tub frolics, onsite spa. 50% off 1st night/1st time guest. Exp. 7/31/10 Call for details. Peaceful rest awaits! 877.322.7031 • www.glenlaurel.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

Vacation Resorts of South Carolina. Hilton Head or Myrtle Beach. Lovely 1 or 2BR condos, weekly rates from $775 to $1400! Excellent locations! www.vrosc.com. 877-807-3828 Hilton Head Island, SC

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

GATLINBURG . Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

GATLINBURG ! Luxurious cabins on trout streams. Park-like settings. Hot tubs. Close to National Park & Dollywood. Great rates! $105 & up. 800-404-3370 www.countryelegancecabins.com

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, directly on pristine Crescent Beach. All ammenities, nicely appointed. Available weekly, now to July 17th and after July 24th. 513-232-4854

NORRIS LAKE. Located at Powell Valley Resort. 2 BR/1BA, fully furnished priv. home. Covered porch, deck. Lake access. $95/nt. 423-5628353, www.norrislakehse.com

www.NorrisLakeCedarCottage.com Great 2 BR, 1½ bath cottage on the water. Sleeps 7. Two fireplaces, pri vate boat dock. $650/wk, $220 wknd. 865-363-4330 865-966-1775


B10

Alexandria Recorder

July 15, 2010

PREVIEW NIGHT & FAMILY COOKOUT WEDNESDAY, JULY 21 ST | 5:30 PM

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TO REGISTER FOR THE JULY 21ST PREVIEW NIGHT, CALL (859)344-3332 OR VISIT WWW.THOMASMORE.EDU.

CE-0000409594

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