Page 1

C

inamagic

November

Our Photographer Spotlight: Jim O’Brien

Two Sides Of MAIN Street and

Harmony Manor

Our Model Feature: Photos by Beth Roose

Fallscapes and Dogs

Amanda Grieve NOVEMBER 2014

Model: Ginny Posey Photo by: Beth Roose Headpiece The Flower House


2

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Model: Caia England Photo by: Patsy Trigg Photography & Beth Rose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

3


4

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Get ready to party with favorite moose and squirrel. It’s Rocky and Bullwinkle Day! Although I have to wonder, do kids today even know who R&B are?

November 19, 2014:

Rocky and Bullwinkle Day On November 19, 1959, Rocky and Bullwinkle saved the world for the first time. The show was witty, but outrageously poorly animated, yet it ran for six years and eventually became a cult classic, inspiring all sorts of spin-offs. Between Rocky and Bullwinkle, Boris and Natasha, Dudley Do-Right, and Snively Whiplash, right always wins, until next week’s cliffhanger is set up. Personally, my favorite is always the Fractured Fairy Tales, but the puns are just great everywhere. I think we’ve all attended Bullwinkle’s alma mater, Wossamatta U. If you get started early enough, you can also celebrate Carbonated Beverage with Caffeine Day while you watch (yes, that is a thing). Just don’t come crying to me if you can’t sleep tonight! In honor of Dudley Do-Right: Turn from evil and do good; seek peace and pursue it. Psalm 34:14 cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

5


November 2014

29

ARTICLES 10 The Real Mother Goose

156 60

HOLLYWOOD

26 Classic Movies for Thanksgiving Day!

18 Pocahontas Bio 29 Classic Movies 22 Faith of the Pilgrims 218 Story of the Pilgrims

156 Hollywood

PARTY & RECIPES 226 The Non-Turkey, Turkey Day Recipes, Side Dishes, Stuffing and Desserts! 240 Letters to Santa Party to have for kids

6

226 cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

208

SPOTLIGHTS 46 Photographer: Jim O. Brien 86 Model: Amanda Grieve

LETTERS 222 Shared Letters: A Family to Be Thankful For Be Thankful Poem 49 Gratitude Quotes

34


Family Volunteer Day

is a day of service that demonstrates and celebrates the power of families who volunteer together; supporting their neighborhoods, communities and the world. Points of Light created the day 23 years ago to showcase the benefits of family volunteering and to provide opportunities for families to help create supportive environments in their communities. This year, Family Volunteer Day takes place on November 22. It is managed by generationOn in partnership with our exclusive sponsor Disney Friends Of

Change, a global initiative that inspires kids and families to take action to help people, communities and the planet; and our HandsOn network affiliate partners across the country. Family Volunteer Day is strategically held on the Saturday before Thanksgiving to “kick-off” the holiday season with giving and service. It also signals the start of National Family Week, sponsored by the Alliance for Children and Families and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Get Involved!●

When we change

our clocks Most of the United States begins Daylight Saving Time at 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March and reverts to standard time on the first Sunday in November. In the U.S., each time zone switches at a different time.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

7


November 2014

Cover Stories:

Photo by: Beth Rose

8

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

46 86 114 148 208

jim o. brien AMANDA Grieve Harmony MANOR fallscapes dogs


From the Editor’s Desk The first Thanksgiving was celebrated more than 300 years ago after a successful harvest. The Pilgrims were thankful for surviving a long and brutal New England winter, and for having enough food to feed their families. On Thanksgiving Day, we celebrate by gathering with friends and family, eating good food, watching football, and sharing what we are thankful for. We are thankful that we have a roof over our heads and good food to eat in this terrible economy. We are thankful that we have such wonderful friends like you that are right next to us in good and bad times. We all have at least one wonderful person/family in our life’s that has stood by us in these times. Thank you for reading “CinaMagic Magazine”, and we hope you enjoy this edition we have all helped to put together.

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

9


10

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


a

Who was the Real

Mother Goose?

nursery necessity and childhood favorite, Mother Goose is a household name and the writer of dozens of wellknown nursery rhymes like Baa Baa Black Sheep, Jack and Jill Went Up the Hill, Pat-a-Cake, and Three Blind Mice. In answer to your question, you may be disappointed to learn that according to most historians, the author “Mother Goose” was not a real person. The name was likely given as something of a generic moniker for an “every-woman” type person. The rhymes and fairy tales attributed to “her” were actually written by numerous authors, both men and women, and handed down in the form of folk tales for generations. With a history that is several centuries old, the origin stories of “Mother Goose” are just as varied as the lyrics of the nursery rhymes. While an 8th century French queen has been called the “real” Mother Goose, it is more likely that the name originated around the 17th century, with the first documented reference being in 1650 in the publication of La Muse Historique by Jean Loret. The papers contained the phrase “like a Mother Goose story.” Nearly fifty years later, Charles Perrault published a book in French called “Histories and Tales from Long Ago, with Morals” which was an anthology of eight fairy tales including “Sleeping Beauty” and “Cinderella.” On the front was a picture of an old woman and a placard that read, “Tales of my Mother the Goose.” (Incidentally, Sleeping Beauty is based on a story where a married King comes across a young girl he can’t wake, so rapes her instead.) In 1729, Charles Perrault’s compilation was translated into English and paved the way for John Newbery’s publication of “Mother Goose’s Melody: or Sonnets for the Cradle” in 1765. The book was small and filled with traditional rhymes that children learn to this day. Many different editions of the book became popular in England and America, some including different rhymes. Newbery is considered one of the most important people in popularizing the name “Mother Goose” and provided a stepping stone from “Mother Goose tales” to “Mother Goose rhymes” with his book. For those who have persisted on believing Mother Goose was once a real person, rather than simply an invented “every-mother” name, there are two widely accepted theories as to the identity of the “real” Mother Goose, though both are highly unlikely. The first is the

aforementioned French queen, Bertrada of Laon, who lived in the 700s. She was the mother of Charlemagne and bore the nickname “Goose-foot Bertha.” However, while the earlier date could mean that Loret referred to her in La Muse Historique, there is little information on whether Queen Bertrada spun tales and stories, so stating that she was “Mother Goose” is pure speculation, with no supporting evidence other than the connection of a “Goose” nickname. The more well-known theory, which can easily be proved false, is that the woman was Elizabeth Goose, a Bostonian woman whose great-grandson was Isaiah Thomas, a publisher. Elizabeth married Isaac Goose in 1692 at the age of 27, adding her six children to his ten. With sixteen children to care for, Elizabeth became adept at telling stories and singing rhymes. The claim that she was the real Mother Goose arose in 1860, but there is no substantial proof that the woman was the originator of so many of today’s childhood favorites. Supposedly, there is a “ghost volume” of tales attributed to Mrs. Goose, but scholars have been searching for evidence of its existence for years and have found nothing. More to the point, Elizabeth Goose was not yet born when Jean Loret made the earliest recorded comment about “Mother Goose” in 1650, so it is unlikely that Elizabeth was the real thing, even if she did contribute a story or two (of which there is no evidence). The idea that Elizabeth Goose is the real Mother Goose is so widespread, however, that her alleged gravestone has become a tourist attraction in Boston. To add more humor to the ordeal, it is likely that these tourists are not only misled that the woman was “Mother Goose”, but also, Elizabeth’s grave is unmarked, and the grave they are visiting is actually that of a Mary Goose. Lacking substantial evidence to prove either Elizabeth Goose or Queen Bertha is the real Mother Goose, it is generally thought far more likely that the name originated around the 17th century, possibly even with Loret, as an “every-woman/mother” name to assign as the author of so many tales and rhymes that mothers the world over have been telling their children throughout history. The story of the “woman” since then proceeded to take on a life of its own. Even if there was at some point a real Mrs. Goose being referred to, the Mother Goose rhymes and stories we know today are from a multitude of authors who have been published without their names attributed to their work.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

11


Story TIME

Photo by: Patsy Trigg Photography & Beth Rose Concept Designer: Beth Roose Concept Editor: Beth Roose MUA: Beth Roose

12

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

13


Photo by: Patsy Trigg Photography & Beth Rose

14

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Patsy Trigg Photography & Beth Rose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

15


Photo by: Patsy Trigg Photography & Beth Rose

16

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

17


Photo Source: WIkipedia

18

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Pocahontas Biography

p

Folk Hero (c. 1595–c. 1617)

Synopsis ocahontas was a Powhatan Native American woman, born around 1595, known for her involvement with English colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia. In a well-known historical anecdote, she saved the life of Englishman John Smith, by placing her head upon his own at the moment of his execution. Pocahontas later married a colonist, changed her name to Rebecca Rolfe and died while visiting England in 1617.

Early life Pocahontas was the daughter of Powhatan, the leader of an alliance of about 30 Algonquian-speaking groups and petty chiefdoms in Tidewater Virginia known as Tsenacommacah. Her mother’s identity is unknown. Historians have estimated Pocahontas’ birth year as around 1595, based on the 1608 account of Captain John Smith in A True Relation of Virginia and Smith’s subsequent letters. Even Smith is inconsistent on the question of her age, however. Although English narratives would remember Pocahontas as a princess, her childhood was probably fairly typical for a girl in Tsenacommacah. Pocahontas was a favorite of her father’s -- his “delight and darling,” according to the colonist Captain Ralph Hamor -- but she was not a princess in the sense of inheriting a political station. Like most young females, she learned how to forage for food and firewood, farm and building thatched houses. As one of Powhatan’s many daughters, she would have contributed to the preparation of feasts and other celebrations. Like many Algonquian-speaking Virginia Indians of the period, Pocahontas probably had several names, to be used in various contexts. Early in her life she was called Matoaka, but was later known as Amonute. The name Pocahontas was used in childhood, probably in a casual or family context. Saving John Smith Pocahontas was primarily linked to the English colonists through Captain John Smith, who arrived in Virginia with more than 100 other settlers in April 1607. The Englishmen had numerous encounters over the next several months with the Tsenacommacah Indians. While exploring on the Chickahominy River in December of that year, Smith was captured by a hunting party led by Powhatan’s close relative Opechancanough, and brought to Powhatan’s home at Werowocomoco.

Although English narratives would remember Pocahontas as a princess, her childhood was probably fairly typical for a girl in Tsenacommacah.

The details of this episode are inconsistent within Smith’s writings. In his 1608 account, Smith described a large feast followed by a talk with Powhatan. In this account, he does not meet Pocahontas for the first time until a few months later. In 1616, however, Smith revised his story in a letter to Queen Anne, who was anticipating the arrival of Pocahontas with her husband, John Rolfe. Smith’s 1616 account describes the dramatic act of selflessness which would become legendary: “... at the minute of my execution”, he wrote, “she [Pocahontas] hazarded the beating out of her own brains to save mine; and not only that, but so prevailed with her father, that I was safely conducted to Jamestown.” Smith further embellished this story in his Generall Historie, written years later. Historians have long expressed doubts that the story of Pocahontas saving Smith occurred as told in these later accounts. Smith may have exaggerated or invented the account to enhance Pocahontas’s standing. Another theory suggests that Smith may have misunderstood what had happened to him in Powhatan’s longhouse. Rather than the near victim of an execution, he may have been subject to a tribal ritual intended to symbolize his death and rebirth as a member of the tribe. It is possible that Powhatan had political motivations for bringing Smith into his chiefdom. Early histories establish that Pocahontas befriended Smith and assisted the Jamestown colony. Pocahontas often visited the settlement. When the colonists were starving, “every once in four or five days, Pocahontas cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

19


C

inamagic President Beth Roose Editor Fina Florez Graphic Designer Fina Florez Contributing Writers & Photographers: Beth Roose Patsy Trigg David Bolduc Inspire4more Photography Jim O. Brien Steven Stewart Gary Stretch Gray Christina Bowles Rich Johnson-Wicked Art Photography Storybook Photographer Josh Triggs- 3MI Photgraphy Annie Laura - 621 Studios Ian Arneson Photography Address: 22777 Franz Rd, Suite 4212 Katy, Texas 77449

We are accepting images for the December issue that embrace, Christmas, Family, Winter, Snow Sports, Roller and Ice Skating.. All Images are due by Nov 16th. We need pictures that are 300DPI and 8.5x11. Submissions to be sent to nationalpark4u@yahoo.com 20

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


with her attendants brought him [Smith] so much provision that saved many of their lives that else for all this had starved with hunger.” Despite this connection, there is little in the historical record to suggest a romantic link between John Smith and Pocahontas. In late 1609, John Smith returned to England for medical care. The English told the Indians that Smith was dead. According to the colonist William Strachey, Pocahontas married a warrior called Kocoum at some point before 1612. Nothing more is known about this marriage, which may have dissolved when Pocahontas was captured by the English the following year. Captivity and Later Life Pocahontas’ capture occurred in during the First Anglo-Powhatan War. Captain Samuel Argall pursued an alliance with the Patawomencks, a northern group of dubious loyalty to Powhatan. Argall and his indigenous allies tricked Pocahontas into boarding Argall’s ship and held her for ransom, demanding the release of English prisoners and supplies held by Powhatan. When Powhatan failed to satisfy the colonists’ demands, Pocahontas remained in captivity. Little is known about Pocahontas’ year with the English. It is clear that a minister named Alexander Whitaker instructed Pocahontas in Christianity, and helped her to improve her English through reading the Bible. Whitaker baptized Pocahontas with a new, Christian name: Rebecca. The selection of this name may have been a symbolic gesture to the Rebecca of the Book of Genesis who, as the mother of Jacob and Esau, was the mother of two nations. In March 1614, violence broke out between hundreds of English and Powhatan men. The English permitted Pocahontas to talk to her father and other relatives as a diplomatic maneuver. According to English sources, Pocahontas told her family that she preferred to remain with the English rather than returning home. Pocahontas met John Rolfe during her year in captivity. Rolfe, a pious farmer, had lost his wife and child on the journey over to Virginia. In a long letter to the governor requesting permission to wed Pocahontas, he expressed both his love for her and his belief he would be saving her soul through the institution of Christian marriage. Pocahontas’ feelings about Rolfe and the marriage are unknown. Rolfe and Pocahontas married on April 5, 1614, and lived for two years on Rolfe’s farm. On January 30, 1615, Pocahontas gave birth to Thomas Rolfe. According to Ralph Hamor, the marriage created a period of peace between the colonists and Powhatan. Pocahontas became of symbol of Indian religious conversion, one of the stated goals of the Virginia Company. The company decided to bring Pocahontas to En-

gland as a symbol of the tamed New World “savage.” The Rolfes traveled to England in 1616, arriving at the port of Plymouth on June 12 with a small group of indigenous Virginians. Although Pocahontas was not a princess in the context of Powhatan culture, the Virginia Company nevertheless presented her as a princess to the English public. The inscription on a 1616 engraving of Pocahontas, made for the Virginian Company, read: “Matoaka, alias Rebecca, daughter of the most powerful prince of the Powhatan Empire of Virginia.” While some considered her a curiosity rather than a princess, Pocahontas was apparently treated well in London. On January 5, 1617, she was brought before the king in Whitehall Palace during a performance of Ben Jonson’s The Vision of Delight. Shortly thereafter, John Smith met the Rolfes at a social gathering. The only accounts that exist of their interaction come from Smith, who wrote that when Pocahontas saw him, “without any words, she turned about, obscured her face, as not seeming well contented.” Smith’s record of their later conversation is fragmentary and unclear. He wrote that Pocahontas reminded him of the “courtesies she had done,” saying, “you did promise Powhatan what was yours would be his, and he the like to you.” In March of 1617, the Rolfes boarded a ship to return to Virginia. The ship had only gone as far as Gravesend when Pocahontas fell ill. She was taken ashore, where she died, possibly of pneumonia or tuberculosis. Her funeral took place on March 21, 1617, in the parish of St. George’s. The site of her grave was probably beneath the chancel of St. George’s, which was destroyed in a fire in 1727. Members of a number of prominent Virginia families trace their roots to Pocahontas and Chief Powhatan through her son, Thomas Rolfe. Popular Legend Very few records of the life of Pocahontas remain. The only contemporary portrait is Simon van de Passe’s engraving of 1616, which emphasizes her Indian features. Later portraits often portray her as more European in appearance. The myths that arose around Pocahontas’ story in the 19th century portrayed her as an emblem of the potential of Native Americans to be assimilated into European society. The imagined relationship between John Smith and Pocahontas romanticizes the theme of assimilation, and dramatizes the meeting of two cultures. Many films about Pocahontas have been made, beginning with a silent film in 1924 and continuing into the 21st century. She is one of the best-known Native Americans in history, and one of only a few to appear regularly in historical textbooks.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

21


Faith of the Pilgrims From my years young in days of youth, God did make known to me his truth, And call’d me from my native place For to enjoy the means of grace. In wilderness he did me guide, And in strange lands for me provide. In fears and wants, through weal and woe, A pilgrim, past I to and fro. -William Bradford

t

Photo copyright Todd Atteberry

he Mayflower Pilgrims arrived on these shores in 1620 in hopes of making a better life for themselves and their children while being able to worship freely and in peace. Undoubtedly the most famous colonists in world history, their faith and fortitude are legendary. Their perseverance laid the cornerstone of a new Nation. The Pilgrims’ courage, gratitude to God, and love for one another still inspire people today. The story of Plymouth Colony, with its tragic first winter, treaty with the Wampanoag People and celebrated First Thanksgiving echoes down the ages and around the world. Regardless of anything that came before or after, Plymouth is the ‘once upon a time’ to the story of the United States -- the symbolic, if not literal, birthplace of our Nation. In describing the emotional worship service before the Pilgrim church’s departure from Holland, Governor William Bradford wrote that Reverend John Robinson: …spent a good part of the day very profitably and suitable to their present occasion; the rest of the time was spent pouring out prayers to the Lord with great fervency, mixed with abundance of tears. And the time being come that they must depart, they were accompanied with most of their brethren out of the city, unto a town sundry miles off called Delftshaven, where the ship lay ready to receive them. So they left that goodly and pleasant city which had been their resting place near twelve years; but they knew they were pilgrims, and looked

22

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Photo copyright Todd Atteberry

not much on those things, but lift up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest country, and quieted their spirits. This passage from Bradford’s manuscript Of Plymouth Plantation makes reference to the Epistle to the Hebrews 11:13-16. According to the Geneva Bible (1560), the translation preferred by most Pilgrims, this reads: (13) All these dyed in faith, and received not the promises, but sawe them a farre of, and beleved them, and received them thankefully, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgremes on the earth. (14) For they that say suche things, declare plainely that they seke a countrey. (15) And if they had bene mindeful of that countrey, from whence they came out, they had leasure to have returned. (16) But now they desire a better, that is an heavenlie: wherefore God is not ashamed of them to be called their God; for he hathe prepared for them a citie. Bradford’s description of Robinson’s worship service first appeared in print in Nathaniel Morton’s New England’s Memorial (1669), a popular chronicle of Plymouth Colony written by the governor’s nephew. It is on the basis of this excerpt that Mayflower’s passengers first became known as the Pilgrim Fathers, or Pilgrims, in the late 1700s. Who were the Pilgrims? If we really want to understand them, we must try to look beyond the legends and see them as they saw them-


Photo copyright Todd Atteberry

selves. They were English people who sought to escape the religious controversies and economic problems of their time by emigrating to America. Many of the Pilgrims were members of a Puritan sect known as the Separatists. They believed that membership in the Church of England violated the biblical precepts for true Christians, and they had to break away and form independent congregations that adhered more strictly to divine requirements. A passage from the Second Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians gave urgency to their actions. The Geneva translation for Second Corinthians 6: 16-18 reads: (16) And what agrement hathe the Temple of God with idoles? for ye are the Temple of the living God: as God hathe said, I wil dwell among them, and walke there; and I wil be their God, and shalbe my people. (17) Wherefore come out from among them, and separate your selves, faith the Lord: and touche none uncleane thing, & I wil receive you. (18) And I wil be a Father unto you, and ye shalbe my sonnes and daughters, saith the Lord almightie. At a time when Church and State were one, such an act was treasonous and the Separatists had to flee their mother country. Other Pilgrims remained loyal to the national Church but came because of economic opportunity and a sympathy with Puritanism. They all shared a fervent and pervasive Protestant faith that touched all areas of their lives.

As English people, the Pilgrims also shared a vital secular culture both learned and traditional. They lived in a time that accepted fairies and witches, astrological influences, seasonal festivals and folklore as real parts of their lives. They looked at the world they lived in not as we do today - through the eyes of quantum physics and psychology - but through the folklore of the countryside and academic traditions that stretched back to antiquity. They were both thorough Protestants of the recent Reformation and the inheritors of the Medieval worldview that infused the imaginations of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson. The Separatist Faith The Separatists’ faith experience was part of the larger English Reformation of the 16th century. This movement sought to “purify” the Church of England of its corrupt human doctrine and practices; the people in the movement were known as “Puritans.” Separatists were those Puritans who no longer accepted the Church of England as a true church, refused to work within the structure to affect changes, and “separated” themselves to form a true church based solely on Biblical precedent. Puritans rejected Christmas, Easter and the various Saint’s Days because they had no scriptural justification, and in their worship services, they rejected hymns, the recitations of the Lord’s Prayer and creeds for the same reason. cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

23


abreast, and are led by a sergeant without beat of drum. Behind comes the Governor, in a long robe, beside him on the right hand comes the preacher with his cloak on and on the left hand, the captain with his sidearms and his cloak on, and with a small cane in his hand; and so they march in good order, and each sets his arms down near him. Once they reached the meetinghouse, the men and boys sixteen and older sat on one side; the women and children sat on the other side. John Winthrop, governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, attended morning and afternoon Sabbath meetings while on a brief visit to Plymouth in October 1632. While de Rasiere described the manner in which the Pilgrims progressed to worship, Winthrop provides details on the order of worship. He pays special attention to prophesying. While no examples of prophesies have come down to us, it seems to have been similar in nature to a mini-sermon, consisting of a reading or quoting of a text and an exposition of its meaning and spiritual application, with some discussion of Christian doctrine: On the Lord’s day there was a sacrament which they did partake in, and in the afternoon, Mr. Roger Williams (according to their custom) propounded a question, to which the pastor, Mr. Smith, spake briefly. Then Mr. Williams prophesied; and after, the Governor of Photo copyright Todd Atteberry Photo copyright Todd Atteberry

The Separatists believed that the worship of God must progress from the individual directly to God, and that “set” forms, like the Church of England’s Book of Common Prayer, interfered with that progression by directing one’s thoughts down to the book and inward to one’s self. The only exceptions were the Psalms and the Lord’s Supper, both of which had scriptural basis, and possibly the covenant by which individuals joined the congregation. As Pastor Robinson expressed it, even two or three “gathered in the name of Christ by a covenant [and] made to walk in all the ways of God known unto them is a church.” Sabbath services were held twice on Sunday; in addition, sermons were often given on Thursdays, and as occasion demanded, Days of Thanksgiving or Days of Fasting and Humiliation were proclaimed. These latter were movable weekday holidays called in response to God’s Providence. Both were observed in a manner similar to the weekly Sabbath, with morning and afternoon services. The approximate times were from 9:00 AM to noon and from to 2:00 to 5:00 PM. In Plymouth Colony, according to the famous passage from Isaack de Rasiere’s 1627 letter: They assemble by the beat of drum, each with his musket or firelock, in front of the captain’s door; they have their cloaks on, and place themselves in order three

24

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Plymouth spake to the questions; and after him the elder, them some 2 or 3 more of the congregation. Then the elder desired the governor of Massachusetts and Mr. Wilson to speak to it, which they did. When this was ended, the deacon Mr. Fuller put the congregation in mind of their duty of contribution; whereupon the governor and all the rest went down to the deacon’s seat and put it into the box, and then returned. William Brewster served as the Ruling Elder of the Pilgrim church from its days in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England to Leiden, Holland and finally Plymouth Colony. Ruling Elders were responsible for the government of the congregation, but as they were laymen and not ordained ministers, they could not deliver the sacraments. Elders were often referred to as the “eyes of the


church,” governing and admonishing the congregation. In the absence of Pastor Robinson, who remained in Holland, Brewster preached and taught the in Plymouth. In memorializing Brewster after the Elder’s death in 1643, Governor William Bradford also supplies additional details on aspects of worship in Plymouth: In teaching, he was very moving and stirring of affections, also very plain and distinct in what he taught; by which means he became the more profitable to the hearers. He had a singular good gift in prayer, but public and private, in ripping up the heart and conscience before God in the humble confession of sin, and begging the mercies of God in Christ for the pardon of the same. He always thought it better for ministers to pray oftener and divide their prayers, than be long and tedious in the same, except upon solemn and special occasions as in days of humiliation and the like. His reason was that the

heart and spirits of all, especially the weak, could hardly continue and stand bent as it were so long towards God as they ought to do in that duty, without flagging and falling off. Prayer, in keeping with Separatist belief, was completely extemporaneous. The Lord’s Prayer was considered a model to be followed, but not slavishly copied. Prayer was given by the Pastor or Teaching Elder. At this point in the service, the congregation rose. The speaker removed his hat, raised his eyes and lifted up his arms toward Heaven, and spoke. At the end, all joined in saying, “Amen.” Scripture in the 16th century was often interpreted in a metaphorical sense; scholars searched for hidden meaning. Separatists concentrated of the literal and historical possibilities, generally ignoring the metaphorical interpretations. During this part of the service, a passage of scripture was read and expounded upon in this literal manner by the Pastor or Teaching Elder. Finally, Psalms were the only music allowed in the service. Hymns were rejected because they had no scriptural basis. The versions of the Psalms used in Plymouth Colony came from Henry Ainsworth’s Psalter, in which he had “Englished” the Psalms in prose and metre, and set them to livelier music than had been heard before. These were sung, without musical accompaniment, by the whole congregation. Years later, in the 1670s, when the first generation of settlers--many of whom had musical training--had died, the colonists had difficulty with the music of the psalms. At this point, the practice of “lining” psalms began. In lining, each line of the psalm is first sung by the Pastor, then repeated by the congregation.

Photo copyright Todd Atteberry

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

25


Top 10 Most Popular Films For Thanksgiving Day 10. Son in Law (1993) Is it “outrageously funny”? No. Is Pauly Shore’s Crawl character a bit grating? Yes. However, it does deal with coming home for Thanksgiving from the big city, and having changed as a person (into awful ’90s fashion). It’s the perfect example of a “movie to wash dishes by.” Best Scene: Crawl mowing his name into the corn field.

9. The House of Yes (1997) Oh, Parker Posey, how I love thee. Only you can pull off a Jackie O-obsessed, incestuous nutcase. I know Thanksgiving is a time when family members fight, but murder? What a silly little goose you are.

Best Scene: “You speak French?”

8. Pieces of April (2003) This is great little film. In its own way, it highlights the trials and tribulations of holiday gatherings, from trying to make a good impression on your SO’s parents, to making your first big dinner as a young adult. Oh, and smoking pot. Lots of smoking pot.

26

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Best Scene: Remembering “nice” April moments

7. Grumpy Old Men (1993) This movie, about, well, grumpy old men, was great on a couple of levels. One, it was super funny with wonderful performances by Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. Two, it introduced extremely impressionable 13-yearold me to Ann-Margret (and Sophia Loren in the sequel). I am forevermore a firm believer that women get better with age. So, thanks for that.

Best Scene: The backseat fish

6. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) One of Woody Allen’s top 10 films, the story is bookended by Thanksgiving dinners and is a nice remembrance of Woody and Mia Farrow pre-Soon-Yi. Now that’s a Thanksgiving to be a fly on the wall.

Best Scene: The failed suicide


When dinner’s all done, curl up on the couch with one of these 10 films for every member of your clan 5. The Ice Storm (1997) What a beautiful, haunting film. It is the film that taught us that if you attend a Thanksgiving weekend party that has a bowl for keys, be prepared to get freaky.

Best Scene: Sliding on the ice

4. Scent of a Woman (1992) The movie, which takes place over Thanksgiving weekend (like The Ice Storm) was responsible for Al “Hoo-ah!” Pacino’s first Academy Award for Best Actor (he had been nominated 4 times before).

Best Scene: Dutch setting off fireworks

2. Home for the Holidays (1995) A seriously underrated movie directed by Jodie Foster with terrific performances by Holly Hunter, Anne Bancroft, and a Polaroid-snapping Robert Downey Jr. If you haven’t seen it, I implore you to immediately.

Best Scene: The Thanksgiving dinner prayer

Best Scene: The tango

3. Dutch (1991) John Hughes was the master of the feels, no doubt about it. When Dutch (Ed O’Neill) volunteers to drive his girlfriend’s boarding school brat Doyle (Ethan Embry) home for Thanksgiving, it seems harmless enough. However, what ensues is a fireworks-blasting, prostitute-thieving road trip that ultimately proves to Doyle that not all adults are idiots or assholes like his father.

1. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987) Again, John Hughes with the feels. This is without a doubt not only the best Thanksgiving themed movie of all time, but one of the greatest comedies of all time.

Best Scene: “Those aren’t pillows!”

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

27


Classic Movies

28

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


I

OVERVIEW / Brief Synopsis n 1861, Scarlett O’Hara, the headstrong sixteenyear-old daughter of wealthy Georgia plantation-owner Gerald O’Hara, is sick of hearing talk about going to war with the North. She much prefers to have beaux like Brent and Stuart Tarleton talk about the next day’s barbeque at Twelve Oaks, the neighboring Wilkes plantation. When the twins reveal the “secret” that Ashley Wilkes is planning to marry his cousin Melanie Hamilton from Atlanta, Scarlett refuses to believe it because she is in love with Ashley herself. Her father later confirms the news when he returns home to Tara, the O’Hara plantation, and advises Scarlett to forget about the serious-minded Ashley, because “like should marry like.” At the barbeque, Scarlett acts coquettish with all of the young men, hoping to make Ashley jealous, then, during an afternoon rest, sneaks into the library to see him. He says that he will marry Melanie because they are alike, but leads Scarlett to believe that he loves her instead of Melanie. When he leaves, Scarlett angrily throws a vase and is startled to discover Rhett Butler, a notorious rogue from Charleston, who has been lying unnoticed on a couch the entire time. She is angry at his seeming indifference to the seriousness of her feelings for Ashley and annoyed by his frank appreciation of her physical beauty. Later, when news arrives that war has broken out between the North and the South, Scarlett is stunned to see Ashley kiss Melanie goodbye as he leaves to enlist, and in a daze accepts the impulsive proposal of Melanie’s brother Charles. Just after Ashley and Melanie marry, Scarlett and Charles marry as well, delighting Melanie, who tells Scarlett that now they will truly be sisters. Some time later, Scarlett receives word that Charles has died of the measles, and she is forced to don widow’s black clothing and refrain from going to the parties she loves. Her understanding mother Ellen decides to let her go to Atlanta to stay with Melanie and her Aunt Pittypat, hoping that Scarlett will feel less restless there. At an Atlanta fundraising bazaar, Scarlett is so bored watching other girls dance, that when Rhett bids for her in a dance auction, she enthusiastically leads the Virginia Reel with him, oblivious to the outrage of the shocked local matrons. Rhett, who has become a successful blockade runner, continues to see Scarlett over the next few months and brings her presents from his European trips. As the war rages, Melanie and Scarlett receive word that Ashley will be returning home on a Christmas leave. Atlanta is now suffering the privation of a long siege, but the women manage to give Ashley a small Christmas feast. Before he returns to the front, Ashley tells Scarlett that the South is losing the war and asks her to stay by the pregnant Melanie.

Melanie goes into labor as Atlantans leave the city before Northern troops arrive. When Aunt Pitty leaves for Charleston, Scarlett desperately wants to go with her, but remembers her promise to Ashley, and remains with Melanie. Because Melanie’s labor is difficult and the doctor is too busy attending wounded soldiers to come to her aid, Scarlett must attend her alone. After the baby is born, Scarlett sends her maid Prissy for Rhett, who reluctantly arrives with a frightened horse and a wagon. Though he thinks that Scarlett is crazy when she insists upon returning to Tara, he risks his life to drive the women and the infant through the now-burning city. Outside Atlanta, as Rhett and Scarlett see the decimated Southern army in retreat, he feels ashamed and resolves to join them for their last stand. Scarlett is furious with him, even after he admits that he loves her and gives her a passionate kiss before leaving. When the women finally arrive at Tara, the plantation is a shambles and the house has been looted. Scarlett’s mother Ellen has just died of typhoid and her father’s mind is gone. Desperate for something to eat, Scarlett first tries drinking whiskey, then goes into the fields. After choking on a radish, she vows that if she lives through this she will never go hungry again. [An Intermission divides the story at this point.] Soon Scarlett bullies her sisters and the remaining house slaves into working in the fields. After she kills a Yankee scavenger and, with Melanie’s help, hides the body, the contents of his wallet provide them with some money for food. When the war ends, Ashley returns and Scarlett goes to him for advice when Pork, one of the former slaves who has remained with the family, tells her that $300 in taxes are owed on Tara. Ashley offers no solution to her problem, but admits once again that he loves her, even though he will never leave Melanie. More determined than ever to obtain the money after Jonas Wilkerson, a ruthless Yankee who was once Tara’s overseer, says that he is going to buy Tara when it is auctioned off for taxes, Scarlett decides to ask Rhett for the money. With no proper clothes to wear, Scarlett and her old governess, Mammy, use material from Tara’s velvet drapes for a new dress. In Atlanta, they discover that Rhett has been imprisoned by the Yankees, but has charmed his way into their good graces. Scarlett tries to pretend that everything is fine at Tara, but Rhett soon sees her roughened hands and realizes what her situation is. Because he is under arrest and his money is all in an English bank, Rhett cannot help Scarlett, so she leaves, infuriated. That same day, she runs into Frank Kennedy, her sister Suellen’s beau, and sees that he has become a successful merchant. Scarlett tricks Frank into marrying her by telling him that Suellen loves someone else, and is thus able to use his money to save Tara. cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

29


Scarlett then moves to Atlanta to work at Frank’s shop and to make his fledgling lumber business a success. She also uses an unwitting Melanie to help make Ashley come to work at the lumber mill. One day, Scarlett is attacked by scavengers while driving her carriage near a shanty town, but is saved by Big Sam, a former Tara slave. Scarlett is not physically harmed, but that night Frank, Ashley and some of the other men band together to “clear out” the shanty. While Scarlett, Melanie and the other women wait at Melanie’s house, Rhett arrives to warn them that the Yankees are planning an ambush. Melanie tells him where the men have gone, and some time later, he prevents their arrest by pretending to the Yankees that they have all been drinking with him at the notorious Belle Watling’s bordello. Ashley is wounded, but Frank has died on the raid. A few weeks later, Scarlett, who is drinking heavily, is visited by Rhett, who proposes to her and offers to give her everything she wants. Though she says that she does not love him, she agrees to marry him, and on their expensive honeymoon, he vows to spoil her to stop her nightmares of the war. A year later, Scarlett gives birth to a daughter, whom Melanie nicknames “Bonnie Blue.” Though Rhett has never cared about Atlanta society, he now wants to ensure Bonnie’s future. He begins to acquire respectability, and within a few years his charitable contributions and sincere devotion to Bonnie impresses even the hardest of Atlanta’s matrons. Meanwhile, Scarlett still longs for Ashley and has told Rhett that she no longer wants him to share her bedroom. One day, Ashley’s sister India and some other women see Scarlett and Ashley in an embrace. Though nothing improper happened, Scarlett is afraid to attend Melanie’s birthday party for Ashley that night. A furious Rhett forces her to attend, though, then leaves. Melanie’s open affection to her makes Scarlett ashamed, and when she returns home she sneaks into the dining room to drink. There she finds Rhett drunk and a violent quarrel erupts. After Scarlett calls Rhett a drunken fool, he grabs her and carries her upstairs, angrily telling her that this night there will not be “three in a bed.” The next morning, Scarlett is happy, but when Rhett scoffs that his behavior was merely an indiscretion, her happiness turns to anger. Rhett then leaves for an extended trip to England and takes Bonnie with him. Some months later, because Bonnie is homesick, Rhett returns to Atlanta and discovers that Scarlett is pregnant. She is happy to see Rhett, but his smirk of indifference and accusation about Ashley enrages her so that she starts to strike him and falls down the stairs. She loses the baby, and although she calls to him during her delirium, Rhett does not know and thinks that she hates him. After she recovers, he suggests that the anger and

30

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

hatred stop for Bonnie’s sake, and Scarlett agrees, but as they are talking, the headstrong Bonnie tries to make her pony take a jump and she falls and breaks her neck. Both are shattered by Bonnie’s death, especially Rhett, who refuses to let her be buried because Bonnie was afraid of the dark. Only Melanie, to whom Rhett has always felt a closeness, convinces him to let the child go. After her talk with Rhett, Melanie, who has become pregnant despite the danger to her health, collapses and suffers a miscarriage. On her deathbed, Melanie asks Scarlett to take care of Ashley, but when Scarlett sees how much the distraught Ashley loves Melanie, she finally realizes how wrong she has been for years and knows that it is Rhett she truly loves. She rushes back home and tries to prevent him from leaving her, but he will not stay because it is too late for them. Scarlett tearfully asks him what she will do and as he leaves he answers, “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.” Through her sobs, Scarlett begins to think of Tara, from which she has always gained strength, and determines that she will return there and will think of a way to get Rhett back. She resolves to think about it tomorrow for, “after all, tomorrow is another day.” will return there and will think of a way to get Rhett back. She resolves to think about it tomorrow for, “after all, tomorrow is another day.”● Cast & Crew Victor Fleming: Director Sam Wood: Director George Cukor: Director Thomas Mitchell: Gerald O’Hara Barbara O’Neil: Ellen, his wife Vivien Leigh: Scarlett [O’Hara Hamilton Kennedy Butler] Evelyn Keyes: Suellen [O’Hara] Ann Rutherford: Carreen [O’Hara] George Reeves: Brent Tarleton Fred Crane: Stuart Tarleton Hattie McDaniel: Mammy Oscar Polk: Pork Butterfly McQueen: Prissy Victor Jory: Jonas Wilkerson, the overseer Everett Brown: Big Sam, the foreman Howard Hickman: John Wilkes Alicia Rhett: India [Wilkes], his daughter Leslie Howard: Ashley [Wilkes], his son Olivia deHavilland: Melanie Hamilton [Wilkes] Rand BrooksCharles Hamilton, her brother Carroll NyeFrank Kennedy, a guest Clark GableRhett Butler Laura Hope Crews: Aunt Pittypat Hamilton Eddie Anderson: Uncle Peter, her coachman Harry Davenport: Dr. Meade Leona Roberts: Mrs. Meade


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

31


32

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Mrs. Miniver (1942) starring Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Teresa Wright, Dame May Whitty, Reginald Owen, Henry Travers, Richard Ney, Henry Wilcoxon

I

Brief Synopsis n early summer 1939, middle-class English housewife Kay Miniver happily returns from a London shopping trip to Belham, the Thames Valley village in which she lives, and is flattered that station master Ballard has named his newly propagated rose after her. That night, Kay feels slightly guilty over buying an expensive hat, while her architect-husband Clem feels the same way about his new sportscar. When they eventually confess their respective purchases, they laugh, happy in the knowledge that they can now afford some of life’s little luxuries. The next day, Kay and Clem welcome home their eldest child Vin, who has returned home for the summer holiday and is a bit pompous after his year at Oxford. Vin embarrasses his parents when he insults Carol Beldon, granddaughter of local aristocrat Lady Beldon, when Carol comes to ask Kay to influence Ballard to withdraw his rose from competing against Lady Beldon’s in the annual flower show. At a dance that night, Carol receives a secret message from Vin asking her to meet him. The two confess their mutual attraction and promise to write to each other while Carol and her grandmother are away in Scotland. Some weeks later, concern over the fall of Poland dominates village conversations, and at church on Sunday, the vicar’s sermon is interrupted by news that England is now at war with Germany. While Clem, Kay and their two youngest children, Toby and Judy, return home, Vin goes to the Beldon estate to make certain that the newly returned Carol and her grandmother are adequately prepared. Although Lady Beldon at first refuses to take seriously new air raid regulations, Vin takes charge of the situation. He and Carol also come to an “agreement” about their relationship and kiss for the first time. Eight months later, after Vin has left school to join the RAF, the Minivers, like others in the village, have made accommodations for the war, but have yet to seriously feel its effects. In the pub, the locals laugh at the radio admonitions of the traitor Lord Haw Haw that England will soon fall, and discuss a German pilot who parachuted out of his plane and may be hiding near the village. That night, Vin proposes to Carol, much to the delight of Clem and Kay. Immediately thereafter, Vin is ordered back to his airbase, and in the middle of the night, Clem, a member of the Thames River patrol, is awakened and told to meet at the pub. Like the other local boat-owners, Clem is at first amused and somewhat irritated by the call-up, but soon finds that his is one of thousands of privately owned, seaworthy crafts needed to evacuate stranded British soldiers from Dunkerque, France. Five

days later, Kay’s only news of what Vin and Clem may be doing comes from the papers. When she goes for a stroll in her garden one morning, she sees the boots of the missing German pilot. Unable to get the sleeping flyer’s gun away, she rushes to the house, but he forces his way into her kitchen and holds her at gunpoint while she brings him food. Weakened from his wounds, the flyer collapses and Kay is able to take his revolver and call for help. Before the police arrive, though, the German bitterly tells Kay that England will soon fall, just as Holland and Poland did, and she slaps him. After the police take the flyer away, Clem returns in his badly damaged boat, unharmed, but exhausted from his ordeal, and soon they learn that Vin, too, is safe. A short time later, Vin and Carol marry, after Kay convinces Lady Beldon that the couple are right for each other. One night, while Carol and Vin are on their honeymoon, Clem, Kay, Judy and Toby retreat to their bomb shelter while an air battle rages overhead. As the children sleep, Kay calmly knits and Clem reads until the bombing becomes so fierce that the children awaken, crying, and the family fearfully huddles together, realizing that their house has been hit. When Carol and Vin return from their honeymoon, they are shocked by the bomb damage, but Kay and Clem shrug off the partial destruction of their home and look forward to going to the annual flower show. At the show, Lady Beldon is secretly informed that she has won the competition, but when Kay helps her to realize that the judges chose her rose over Ballard’s more worthy flower because of her position in the village, Lady Beldon announces that Ballard has won the prize. The show is then interrupted by an air raid warning. As Kay drives Carol home, they are heartsick at the destruction they see. When a plane dives toward them, Kay thinks that the car has been hit but soon realizes that Carol has been badly wounded. Kay is able to get Carol home, but she dies before medical help can arrive. On Sunday morning, in the badly damaged village church, the vicar sadly talks of those who have died, including Carol and Ballard. As the vicar reads from the Ninety-First Psalm, Vin goes to Lady Beldon’s pew to comfort her, and more British planes take to the air.●

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

33


enerations G

34

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Models: Fran Cowely (Grandmother), Sheley Cowley (mom) & Paisley Cowley (daughter/granddaughter) Photo by: Beth Rose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

35


Photo by: Beth Rose

36

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Rose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

37


Photo by: Beth Rose

38

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

39


Photo by: Beth Rose

40

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

41


Photo by: Beth Rose

42

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Rose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

43


Photo by: Beth Rose

44

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

45


Photographer

46

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


PHOTOGRAPHER SPOTLIGHT: Jim O. Brien

THE TWO SIDES OF

ain M

treet S Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

47


48

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

49


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

50

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

51


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

52

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

53


54

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

55


56

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

57


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

58

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

59


TIMS FORD

ake L & the

arina M

60

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

61


Photo by: Beth Roose

62

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

63


64

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

65


Photo by: Beth Roose

66

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

67


68

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

69


DECAY OF

Photos by: Beth Roose

70

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

71


Photo by: Beth Roose

72

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

73


Photo by: Beth Roose

74

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

75


Photo by: Beth Roose

76

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

77


Photo by: Beth Roose

78

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

79


Photo by: Beth Roose

80

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

81


Photo by: Beth Roose

82

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

83


84

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photos by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

85


Model Feature

Photo by: Annie Laura - 621 Studios

86

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


MODEL SPOTLIGHT:

A manda grieve

I am a 25 year old alternative/tattoo model from Virginia, USA. I’ve been modeling a little over two years now, in a variety of styles including boudoir, pinup, fashion, glamour, editorial and conceptual art. Modeling is my one true passion that I put my all into, and I’m glad to say that I’ve been published a few times to show for it. Furthermore, modeling has brought me into a life of “piracy.” I spend a lot of my time traveling and attending Pirate Festivals. I am part of a pirate crewe based out of Florida called, Thee Leviathans. My pirate name is La Diabla. Aside from modeling I spend most of my days as a private caregiver for a retired disabled combat veteran. I also have a Bachelors degree in Environmental Management (which I hopefully one day plan to use!). My hobbies include kayaking, cooking, traveling, working out and dancing.●

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

87


Photo by: Annie Laura - 621 Studios

88

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

89


Photo by: Annie Laura - 621 Studios

90

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

91


Photo by: Ian Arneson Photography

92

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Ian Arneson Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

93


Photo by: Josh Triggs- 3MI Photgraphy

94

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

95


Photo by: Rich Johnson - Wicked Art Photography

96

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Rich Johnson - Wicked Art Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

97


98

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Rich Johnson - Wicked Art Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

99


100

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Rich Johnson - Wicked Art Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

101


Photo by: Beth Roose and Patsy Photographer

102

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Fantasy Art cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

103


Photo by: Beth Roose and Patsy Photographer

104

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

105


Models: Amanda Lee, Jackie Coroe, Kory Lynn, Allison White, Nikol Flowers & Gabriella Bolduc Photos by: Beth Roose and Patsy Photographer Concept Design and Concept Editor: Beth Roose

106

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Experimental

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

107


Photo by: Beth Roose

108

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


SteamPunk

Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

109


110

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

111


Photo by: Beth Roose

112

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

113


114

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


armony H anor M

Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

115


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

116

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

117


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

118

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

119


120

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

121


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

122

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

123


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

124

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Jim O. Brien

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

125


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

126

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

127


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

128

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

129


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

130

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

131


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

132

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

133


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

134

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

135


Photo by: Gary Stretch Gray Photography

136

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

137


Photo by: Gary Stretch Gray Photography

138

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Gary Stretch Gray Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

139


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

140

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

141


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

142

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

143


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

144

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

145


Photo by: Steven Stewart Photography

146

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

147


Fallscapes Models: Joey Locker, Ginny Posey, Lindsay Colter, Rachel Hill & Paisley Cowley Photo by: Beth Roose Editor: Storybook Photographer

148

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

149


Photo by: Beth Roose

150

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose Editor: Storybook Photographer

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

151


Photo by: Beth Roose

152

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose Editor: Storybook Photographer

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

153


Photo by: Beth Roose

154

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose Editor: Storybook Photographer

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

155


Hollywood

Bill

“Bojangles” Robinson

156

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Bill

“Bojangles” Robinson was a standout tap dancer, actor and performer, and the bestknown and highest-paid Black entertainer for much of the early half of the 20th Century. Mr. Robinson’s iconic legacy has remained intact, and this native son of Richmond, Va. has gone on to inspire other greats over the years. Born May 25, 1878, Robinson was raised in Richmond’s Jackson Ward neighborhood. His parents died when he was just seven years old, so his grandmother, a former slave, raised him. It was around then that Robinson started dancing, earning pennies performing acts in front of the city’s Globe Theater with a friend. He was discovered by a manager who cast him as a “pick” or “pickaninny” actor in a “blackface” stage show performed by whites. Robinson joined Mayne Remington’s pickaninny chorus in 1891, traveling to New York in 1900 where he began performing in vaudeville shows. In those early days, the only way Blacks could perform was in pairs and thus Robinson was often partnered with George W. Cooper. He split from that tandem in 1915 and started on his solo act. Robinson’s graceful style of tap dancing revealed a level of elegance never before seen in vaudeville, which further catapulted his career. By 1928, Robinson was a crossover artist who was embraced by white and Black audiences. A Broadway revue intended for whites, The Blackbirds Of 1928, featured an all-Black cast and made Robinson a darling of the national media. However, many Blacks felt his happy-go-lucky image and “Bojangles” nickname was a form of selling out. According to Robinson’s own accounts and those of his biographers, in truth he was very proud of his race and stood up for himself other Blacks on more than several occasions. As a former veteran, Robinson fought for equal rights for Black soldiers during World War II and he lobbied for the hiring of the first Black policeman in Dallas. Robinson balked at critics calling him terms such as “Uncle Tom,” and broke many barriers onstage and in Hollywood by his sheer will and talent alone. Robinson’s first name was actually Luther. Reportedly, he forced his brother, who was named Bill, to switch names with him as he hated his own. His nickname came from a term “jangler,” which was someone always causing mischief. Robinson was also known for his cheery disposition and his “Everything’s Copacetic” catchphrase. Robinson starred in 14 Hollywood films, alongside stars of the time like Shirley Temple and others. Robinson was also the inspiration for a TV movie by late tap legend Gregory Hines in 2001. A park in Harlem bears Robinson’s name and his birthday was established as National Tap Day via a joint congressional resolution in 1989. Robinson died at age of 71 on November 25, 1949. cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

157


Clara 158

Bow

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


H

ollywood’s original “It” Girl and the first true sex symbol of the silver screen, silent-era actress Clara Bow enjoyed unprecedented stardom, even as she endured an exhausting work schedule and escalating emotional problems. Emerging from the tenements of Brooklyn in the early 1920s, Bow was signed by independent movie producer B. P. Schulberg and placed in projects like “Black Oxen” (1923) and “Wine” (1924), films that established the free-spirited actress as Hollywood’s “perfect flapper.” Efforts like “The Plastic Age” (1925), “Mantrap” (1926), “Wings” (1927) and the career-defining “It” (1927) transformed Bow not only into the biggest movie star of her age, but a bona fide screen legend as well. Off the set, her freewheeling, non-conformist lifestyle - which included several affairs with various leading men and industry power players - brought Bow much unwanted scrutiny from the tabloid media. Even more problematic was her unstable mental health, long untreated and further exacerbated by the demands of near constant film work. Unlike many of her fellow silent film stars, the advent of the “talkie” failed to knock Bow off her throne as the reigning movie queen, and sound pictures like “The Wild Party” (1929) and “True to the Navy” (1930) continued to attract audiences in droves. When at last the pressures of stardom and her tenuous mental state led to a breakdown, Bow chose to leave film forever in 1933. Though nearly forgotten, Bow’s legacy was kept alive through film restoration efforts and her influence clearly evident in the style choices of many top contemporary female entertainers decades after her departure from the screen. Clara Bow was born on July 29, 1905 in Brooklyn, NY to parents Sarah and Robert Bow in the midst of a record-breaking heat wave that threatened the lives of both the newborn and her mother. Her Dickensian childhood was marked by poverty, uncertainty and violence. Bow’s mother, Sarah, had for years suffered from mental illness, a condition worsened by the infant deaths of two girls born prior to Clara, and a severe head injury sustained in a fall at the age of 16. Her father, Robert, although bright and personable, was a resolute underachiever who was frequently unemployed and absent from the family’s tenement home for extended periods of time. Never comfortable in the company of girls her age, Bow was an unrepentant tomboy as an adolescent, and often sought refuge from her chaotic home life in the dreamlike confines of the cinema. It was while studying the actresses performances on screen that a 16-year-old Bow made the decision to become a movie star. In 1921 she entered the annual Fame and Fortune Contest sponsored by an entertainment magazine publisher. After a

grueling series of audition rounds - the final one against an obviously more experienced, traditionally attractive contestant - the young Bow won the competition, receiving an evening gown, a trophy and a promise to help the aspiring young actress gain entrée into the film industry. After a period of nerve-wracking inactivity - during which time Clara’s father encouraged her to go “haunt” the offices of the publisher until they lived up to their part of the bargain - Bow was offered a small role in the melodrama “Beyond the Rainbow” (1922). In her film debut, she played a young, mercurial debutante who stirs up trouble at a high society function. Bow was mortified, however, when, after inviting her school friends to come see the movie upon its release, she discovered that her brief scenes had been removed entirely. Oddly, her name and cast listing were maintained in reviews of the film at the time, and after her rise to fame, “Beyond the Rainbow” enjoyed a re-release with her scenes restored. Distraught and fearing that winning the contest would ultimately lead nowhere, Bow continued to make the rounds at the New York studios, going on auditions and hoping for a break. That break finally came when a director, who was looking to cast a “tomboy” character for his next picture, plucked her out of thin air after seeing her contest photos. Ecstatic about the offer, Bow was also nervous about the fact that she would have to leave her Brooklyn neighborhood for the first time in her life, as the film was being shot on location in New Bedford, MA. Clara’s first trip away from home was, unfortunately, the least of her concerns. Her schizophrenic episodes on the rise, Bow’s mother, who had vehemently opposed Clara’s acting pursuits, had recently made ominous comments about her daughter being better off dead. Late one night in early 1922, Clara was awakened by her mother, who calmly held a butcher knife to her daughter’s throat and announced her intention to kill her. Miraculously, the young girl escaped, locked her mother in her room and fled to a neighbor’s until her father returned. Later, Sarah - who remembered nothing about the attack - was admitted to a sanitarium, only to return home where her health rapidly deteriorated until she passed away a year later. Immediately following the traumatic incident with her mother, Bow left with a chaperone to film “Down to the Sea in Ships” (1922), a drama detailing life and romance in a New England whaling community. Traumatized by her mother’s condition, the youngster considered giving up her movie aspirations, but managed to pick up small, uncredited turns in the films “Enemies of Women” (1923) and “The Daring Years” (1923). At about this time, Bow was brought to the attention of B.P. Schulberg, studio chief of independent Preferred Pictures. Initially offered a three month contract by Schulcinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

159


berg, Bow was announced as a member of Preferred’s permanent stock of actors within days of her arrival in Hollywood. Schulberg quickly set about casting Bow in Preferred projects such as “Maytime” (1923), as well as recouping his investment by loaning the neophyte actress out to other studios - a common practice at that time - for features like the Frank Lloyd-directed “Black Oxen” (1923). It was in the latter film that Bow first played a high society “flapper” - a freewheeling, convention-flouting persona for which she would be forever associated. The following year, based largely on the strong reviews she had received for “Down to the Sea in Ships,” Bow was assigned the title of WAMPA Baby Star of 1924 by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers. Her fortunes continued to rise, when she was assigned a co-starring role in the juvenile delinquent melodrama “Grit” (1924), in which she was cast as a former gang member attempting to walk the straight-and-narrow with her formerly lawless boyfriend (Glenn Hunter). By now, Bow was beginning a brutally taxing pace of work, shooting as many as three films simultaneously, she once claimed. A pair of well-received efforts, “Poisoned Paradise” (1924) and “Daughters of Pleasure” (1924), even managed to oust the more established silent film star - and Bow’s primary rival - Colleen Moore as Hollywood’s preeminent flapper. On loan to Universal, she took on her first top-billed role in the prohibition dramatic-comedy “Wine” (1924), playing an innocent society girl whose exposure to speak-easies transform her into a “red-hot mama,” as one reviewer of the time so eloquently put it. She was becoming a box-office bonanza for Schulberg, and working incredibly long hours. Bow was also, by her own admission, “running wild” and engaging in escapades that would both endear her to the press at the height of her fame, and plague her during her final years as an actress. Not simply a popular feature in movie theaters, Bow was influencing American culture in clearly recognizable ways, the most famous being her iconic lipstick application, giving the upper lip a heart-shaped appearance, something referred to as putting on a “Clara Bow.” In 1925, working both for Preferred and on loan to other studios, the actress appeared in a staggering total of 15 films. One of them was “The Plastic Age” (1925), a collegiate romantic comedy, with Bow playing a cute coed romancing the school’s star athlete (Donald Keith). Although many critics found the idea of Bow as an academic hard to swallow, audiences loved her in the role, marking a radical departure from her established flapper image. It was also on this film that she met actor Gilbert Roland, with whom she later became engaged. A temporary romance - one of many to come - gossip

160

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

scribes of the day considered Bow’s “engagement” a useful euphemism for what was essentially a thinly disguised sexual affair. “The Plastic Age” proved not only to be Preferred’s biggest Clara Bow hit, but her final effort at the struggling studio, as well. In 1925, Preferred filed for bankruptcy and Schulberg soon went to work at Paramount Studios, taking his prize asset along with him - Clara Bow. At Paramount, the actress continued to garner ever more glowing reviews for work in such projects as “Dancing Mothers” (1926) and “Mantrap” (1926). Exceedingly happy with their return on investment, Paramount quickly re-signed Bow to a five-year contract. Looking to further capitalize on their new acquisition, Paramount hired popular women’s author Elinor Glyn to pen a story around which a Clara Bow vehicle would be created. That film, simply titled “It” (1927), was a Cinderella story about a poor shop girl (Bow) whose inescapable charm wins the heart of her wealthy employer (Antonio Moreno). Loosely defined, “It” was an unquantifiable (and undeniable) sex appeal. According to Glyn and nearly every reviewer and newspaper pundit of the time - even acerbic wit Dorothy Parker acknowledged the actress’ attributes - Bow had “It” in spades. Immediately dubbed “Hollywood’s ‘It’ Girl” by the ever shrewd Schulberg, Bow not only became the most popular movie star of her day, but a true film legend. Backed by Paramount’s formidable marketing muscle, “It” became the biggest hit of her career. It also brought her more public scrutiny, compliments of an often vicious press, than she had ever endured before. Bow’s unconventional, live-for-the-moment lifestyle and unapologetically unrefined manners became fodder for the tabloids and a source of ridicule amongst many of Hollywood’s elite - most of whom had come from equally humble beginnings themselves. Also that year, Bow starred alongside a young, unknown Gary Cooper in the romantic drama “Children of Divorce” (1927). With her “engagement” to Roland and a secretive affair with director Victor Fleming both ended, the pair entered into a brief, stormy relationship. Notoriously jealous, Cooper soon tired of her flirtatious behavior and the two parted ways. Bow next starred in the World War I aerial adventure “Wings” (1927). A romantic drama about two fighter pilots in love with the same girl (Bow), the film won the very first Academy Award for Best Picture, and was yet another hit for Paramount’s biggest star and the No. 2 box-office draw in the country. Continuing to work at a furious pace, Bow pushed her way to the top of the box-office heap with such films as “Red Hair” (1928) and “Ladies of the Mob” (1928). Then there was the advent of sound to motion pictures - the bane of nearly


all movie actors at the time, and the death knell for the careers of many. Like most of her contemporaries, Bow had nothing but distain for the technological advancement, complaining that it distracted her during shooting and sapped the energy and mystery out of her performance. To the surprise of many, however, neither her slightly nasal voice nor her unrefined Brooklyn accent proved to be a deterrent with audiences. Bow’s first “talkie,” “The Wild Party” (1929), was yet another hit for the still reigning No. 1 film star in the U.S., as were subsequent releases, including “Dangerous Curves” (1929) and “The Saturday Night Kid” (1929). Although not a fan of her own voice, Bow was actually a reasonably accomplished singer when called upon for vocal performances in films like “True to the Navy” (1930). Despite her successful transition to sound and continued box-office domination - surpassed in 1930 only by fellow film icon Joan Crawford - Bow was quickly reaching the end of her physical and emotional rope. Several factors contributed to the actress’ fragile state at the time, having made an astonishing 45 films in six years being primary among them. Additional pressures of fame, an intrusive media, and various court battles - she was actually sued once on the basis of stealing another woman’s husband - built to the breaking point. A scandal involving a former employee and confidant who first embezzled from Bow, then spread embarrassing and exaggerated stories about her sexual behavior, was the last straw. By the end of the year, Schulberg was publicly referring to the troubled star as “Crisis-aday Clara.” Upon completing two more pictures - “No Limit” (1931) and “Kick In” (1931) - Bow’s inevitable breakdown finally arrived. After asking to be released from the final film in her contract with Paramount, she was admitted into a sanitarium in the spring of 1931. It was during her convalescence that she met cowboy actor

Rex Bell. Clearly a much-needed calming influence on the high-strung actress, Bell married Bow in Las Vegas in December of 1931. She returned to Hollywood the following year and signed a two-picture deal with Fox Studios, for whom she made “Call Her Savage” (1932) and “Hoopla” (1933) before retiring for good at the age of 28. Shortly thereafter, Bow and her new husband moved to a ranch in Nevada, where she gave birth to two sons. Never fully free from her mental problems, Bow attempted suicide in 1944 while Bell was making a bid for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. A suicide note later revealed that the emotionally fragile and publicity shy Bow found death preferable to a future life in the public eye. In 1949, Bow voluntarily entered a mental health institution in hopes of finding relief from her erratic emotional state and chronic insomnia. After being subjected to a multitude of tests and, unfortunately, shock therapy, the doctors offered schizophrenia as a primary diagnosis. More likely, Bow was suffering from bi-polar disorder, a little understood condition at the time. Disappointed and unconvinced by their findings, she soon left the facility and returned to Bell at the ranch in Nevada, where her husband was later elected Lieutenant Governor. Shortly after Bell’s death in 1962, Bow moved to the Century City area of Los Angeles, remaining there under the care of a nurse until her death from a heart attack in 1965. Clara Bow, Hollywood’s original “It” girl, was 60 years old. Although Bow was rightfully acknowledged with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame years after her death, tragically, many of the 57 films she made during her career were lost forever. Of those that remained, several existed only in fragments or as incomplete prints. Thankfully, some of her most famous, including “It” and “Wings,” were preserved for future generations to enjoy.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

161


DeForest 162

Kelley

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Birth Name: DeForest Kelley Born: 01/20/1920 Birth Place: Atlanta, Georgia, USA Death Place: Woodland Hills, California, USA Died: 06/11/1999 ackson DeForest Kelley was born on Jan. 20, 1920 in Atlanta, GA to parents Clora and Ernest David Kelley, a Baptist Minister. A talented singer from an early age, DeForest, as he was known, performed regularly with the local church choir while attending Decatur Boys High in nearby Decatur. He began his entertainment career singing on an Atlanta area radio station and later performed on the stage at the Paramount Theater with Lew Forbes and his orchestra. After serving with the United States Army Air Forces during World War II, Kelley launched his acting career with a supporting role in the misleadingly titled “Time to Kill” (1945), a military recruitment film starring future “Superman” George Reeves, in which a group of friends ponder their career options during a friendly game of cards. Spotted by a Hollywood talent scout, he was called in for a screen test, signed to a contract with Paramount Studios, and was soon cast in his only true leading role for his feature film debut, “Fear in the Night” (1947), a minor but effective film noir. At first, Kelley believed he was on the road to film stardom. What followed, however, was only a series of minor parts in easily forgotten film and TV projects. Somewhat discouraged, Kelley and his wife moved to New York City, where he appeared in several stage productions and a few East Coast-produced television anthology dramas for the next few years. Eventually, Kelley gave Hollywood another try and was rewarded with work on series such as the Walter Cronkite-hosted historical recreation drama “You Are There” (CBS, 1953-57) and in episodes of the hugely popular “The Lone Ranger” (ABC, 1949-1957). He gradually resumed his feature career with tiny roles in Samuel Fuller’s Tokyo noir “House of Bamboo” (1955) and the Gregory Peck drama “The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit” (1956), in which he would utter the eerily prophetic line “This man’s dead, Captain” to Peck. A slightly larger role in “”Tension at Table Rock” (1956) set the stage for much of the character actor’s future output in Westerns, in which he was frequently cast as a secondary villain. He bucked the latter part of the trend when he played Morgan Earp, the loyal brother of legendary gunfighter Wyatt (Burt Lancaster) in the highly-regarded account of the “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” (1957). However, he was soon relegated back to bad guy supporting roles in such gun-toting morality tales as “The Law and Jake Wade” (1958) and “Warlock” (1959), two more Westerns which both starred popular leading man Richard Widmark. Increasingly, television work was becoming Kelley’s professional bread-andbutter, and a leading role in writer-producer Gene Roddenberry’s crime-drama pilot “333 Montgomery” (NBC, 1960) held out the promise of a higher-profile and steadier work. When a regular series did not come to pass, the actor moved forward with dozens of guest star appearances on such popular programs as “Route 66” (CBS, 1960-64) and “Have Gun - Will Travel” (CBS, 1957-63). Appearances alongside Bette Davis and Susan Hayward in the Edward Dmytryk-directed “Where Love Has Gone” (1964) and a smaller turn in the Frank Sinatra-Dean Martin divorce comedy “Marriage on the Rocks” (1965) gave the struggling Kelley a much needed boost in visibility in decidedly more contemporary material. However, more small roles in cowboy fare like the by-the-book Westerns “Town Tamer” (1965) and “Waco” (1966) seemed to herald a career forever relegated to saddles, sagebrush and six-guns. That was until Kelley received a call from Roddenberry, who remembered him from “333 Montgomery” and wanted the actor

J

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

163


for a little space show he was developing over at NBC. The rest was history. Pitched to the network by Roddenberry as a sort of Western adventure set in outer space, “Star Trek” (NBC, 1966-69) followed the ongoing adventures of the crew of the starship U.S.S. Enterprise as it explored the farthest reaches of the galaxy and beyond. Although not cast in either the first or second pilot for the proposed show, Roddenberry had always pictured Kelley in the role of the ship’s doctor, so when “Star Trek” went into regular series production Roddenberry immediately cast the actor in the role of Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy. From the beginning, the series’ focus was on the dashing, impetuous Capt. James T. Kirk (William Shatner), along with his second in command, the supremely logical and emotionless Vulcan, Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy). That dynamic soon began to shift, however, as Kelley’s endearing portrayal of the excitable, argumentative and, above all else, human McCoy quickly elevated him to co-starring status, forming the Kirk-Spock-McCoy triptych of indelible characters beloved by fans. Alternately serving as Kirk’s conscience and as a foil to Spock’s sterile logic, McCoy, at heart an old-fashioned country doctor, ill-at-ease with gallivanting across the cosmos, was the emotional core of the Enterprise crew. Kelley’s impassioned delivery of recurring lines like “He’s dead, Jim,” and “I’m a doctor, not a [fill in the blank], dammit” eventually found their way into the pop culture lexicon. As was so often the case with the most competent supporting actors, Kelley’s work on the show was overshadowed by the scenery-chewing performance of Shatner and Nimoy’s iconic characterization. Consequently, when “Star Trek” was cancelled by an unconvinced NBC in 1969, Kelley watched his two co-stars go on to further lucrative endeavors, while he waited for the phone to ring. There were the odd television guest spots and a role in the horrendous giant rabbit horror feature “Night of the Lepus” (1972), but little else. Glad for the work, Kelley briefly revived McCoy - albeit in voice only - for the surprisingly well-made animated version of “Star Trek” (NBC, 1973-75), along with most of the other original cast members, including Shatner and Nimoy. Eventually pushed into a de facto retirement by a lack of offers, Kelley subsisted largely off of fees he made for appearances at various Star Trek conventions around the country. The fan gatherings had been building in both frequency and attendance in the years since the show’s demise. This, combined with a growing resurgence of interest due to ubiquitous reruns of “Star Trek” in syndication, eventually prompted Paramount Studios to develop a property that would capitalize on its enduring popularity. At last, after years of false starts and re-conceptions, the entire original crew of the Enterprise

164

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

made their feature film debut a full decade after the series cancellation in “Star Trek: The Motion Picture” (1979). Helmed by Academy Award-winning director Robert Wise, the film was a lavish, special effects-laden feast for the eyes that found Kirk and the crew banded together once again to prevent an all-powerful entity from destroying Earth. If not entirely the rousing space adventure “Trekkies” had long been hoping for - many critics noted the film’s slow pace - it nonetheless satisfied audiences and studio execs enough to warrant a sequel. Having learned their lesson from the previous outing, Paramount and director Nicholas Meyer delivered a crowd-pleasing, swashbuckling space adventure in the form of “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan” (1982). Bringing back a character from the original series, Kirk’s antagonist was Khan (Ricardo Montalban), a genetically-engineered superhuman on an Ahab-like quest to destroy the legendary starship commander. While not given as much prominence as he enjoyed on the television show, Kelley still managed to steal a scene or two and deliver a few classic “Bones” zingers. He was given a bit more to do in the second sequel “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock” (1984), this time directed by Nimoy. Having been imbued with the “living spirit” of Spock after the Vulcan’s apparent death at the end of the previous film, “Bones” literally carried the essence of his friend’s being within him until Spock’s corporeal form could be miraculously regenerated via the power of the aptly-named Genesis devise. Kelley returned along with Shatner, Nimoy, George Takei, James Doohan, Walter Koenig and Nichelle Nichols for the fan-favorite “Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home” (1986), a more playful entry in the franchise that saw the crew returning to 20th-century Earth on a mission to save the whales. With the “Star Trek” universe more popular than ever, Kelley did a favor for Rodenberry when he christened the long-gestating spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation” (syndicated, 1987-1994) with a cameo as an elderly Dr. McCoy on the show’s pilot episode, “Encounter at Farpoint.” He reprised the role of McCoy twice more in “Star Trek V: The Final Frontier” (1989) - Shatner’s sole contribution as director on the series - and “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991), the final big screen adventure to feature the original Enterprise crew. Largely retired from screen appearances, he gave a nod to his early intergalactic adventures with his last performance as the voice of the deep space probe Viking 1 in the animated family adventure “The Brave Little Toaster Goes to Mars” (1998). One year later, Kelley passed away in his Sherman Oaks, CA home at the age of 79 after a lengthy bout with stomach cancer, plunging fans and his longtime co-stars into genuine mourning.●


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

165


Gene

Tierney

166

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Gene Tierney Biography Film Actress, Pin-up (1920–1991) Actress Gene Tierney had a rocky start in Hollywood, but is best known for her role as a memorable murder victim in the 1944 film Laura. Synopsis ctress Gene Tierney was born into a wealthy family on November 20, 1920, in Brooklyn, New York. She appeared on Broadway in 1938 and transitioned to film in 1940, starring opposite Henry Fonda. She continued in films through the ‘40s and ‘50s. Her most famous role was in the 1944 movie Laura. She struggled with depression in the later part of her life and died in 1991 from emphysema.

A

Early Life and Career Actress Gene Eliza Tierney was born on November 20, 1920, in Brooklyn, New York. The daughter of a wealthy insurance broker, Tierney grew up with a lavish lifestyle and was educated at the finest schools in Connecticut and Switzerland. The young beauty made her Broadway debut in 1938’s Mrs. O’Brien Entertains. After several years on the stage, she went to Hollywood to star opposite Henry Fonda in Fox’s 1940 Western The Return of Frank James. Tierney received her first major role that same year in Tobacco Road. Critics, however, put the young actress in disfavor, and she appeared in a long line of forgettable roles until the 1943 comedy Heaven Can Wait, which signaled an upward turn in her career. The following year, she starred as the enigmatic murder victim in the mystery classic Laura, which would prove to be the most memorable role of Tierney’s career. Career Highlights The momentum continued and in 1945 she received an Academy Award nomination for her role as femme fatale Ellen Berent in Leave Her to Heaven. She subsequently starred in The Razor’s Edge opposite Tyrone Power and in 1947’s The Ghost and Mrs. Muir. Tierney appeared in smaller supporting roles through the late 1940s, reemerging in 1952’s Plymouth Adventure with Spencer Tracy and Never Let Me Go with Clark Gable. She continued to be one of the hottest actresses in Hollywood with such films as Night and the City and The Left Hand of God to her credit. However, the following decades proved difficult for the actress, who battled a troubled emotional life that included hospitalization and shock treatment for depression. She retired several times only to be lured back to Hollywood for such films as Advise and Consent and Toys in the Attic, along with a few television movies. Death Tierney was married to Oleg Cassini from 1941 to 1952; they have two daughters, Daria and Christina. She was married Texas oil baron Howard Lee from 1960 until his death in 1981. The actress died of emphysema in 1991.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

167


Hattie

McDaniel

168

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Hattie McDaniel Biography Born: June 10, 1898 Wichita, Kansas Died: October 26, 1952 Hollywood, California African American actress and singer Hattie McDaniel’s portrayal of the “mammy” figure in the film Gone with the Wind, for which she received an Academy Award for best supporting actress in 1940, is still widely seen as a role that could only have been played by her. She was the first African American to receive an Oscar. Hattie’s youth attie McDaniel was born on June 10, 1895, in Wichita, Kansas, the youngest of thirteen children in a family of performers. Her father, Henry McDaniel, was a Baptist minister, carpenter, banjo player, and minstrel showman, eventually organizing his own family into a minstrel troupe. Henry married a gospel singer named Susan Holbert in 1875 and moved their growing family to Denver, Colorado, in 1901. Hattie was one of only two black children in her elementary school class in Denver. Racial prejudice (an unfair judgment based on race) was less hostile in the West than elsewhere in the United States. For her talents as a singer and reciter of poetry, McDaniel became something of a favorite at the 24th Street Elementary School, where mainly white students attended. McDaniel sang at church, at school, and at home; she sang so continuously that her mother reportedly bribed her into silence with spare change. Before long she was also singing in professional minstrel shows, as well as dancing, performing humorous skits, and later writing her own songs. In 1910 Hattie left school in her sophomore year at East Denver High School and became a full-time minstrel performer, traveling the western states with her father’s show and several other troupes. The minstrel shows were usually performed by black actors, but were also sometimes performed by whites in blackface. The shows presented a variety of entertainment that poked fun at black cultural life for the enjoyment of mostly white audiences. When Hattie’s father retired around 1920, she joined Professor George Morrison’s famous “Melody Hounds” on longer and more publicized tours. She also wrote dozens of show tunes such as “Sam Henry Blues,” “Poor Wandering Boy Blues,” and “Quittin’ My Man Today.”

H

Broke into radio and film McDaniel’s first marriage ended brutally in 1922, when her husband of three months, George Langford, was reportedly killed by gunfire. Her career was much better, including a first radio performance in 1925 on Denver’s KOA station. McDaniel was one of the first black women to be heard on American radio. cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

169


In 1929 McDaniel was left without a job due to the Great Depression (a time in the late 1920s and 1930s of economic hardship that resulted in unemployment for many), so she went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and found work at Sam Pick’s Club Madrid—as a bathroom attendant. Eventually she became a performer there and remained at the Club Madrid for about a year. Next she went to Hollywood, California, where her brother and sister lived. Sam and Etta McDaniel had already played small roles in a number of motion pictures. Sam McDaniel had a regular part on the KNX (Los Angeles, California) radio show “The Optimistic Do-Nuts” and was able to get Hattie a small part, which she promptly turned into a big opportunity. McDaniel eventually became a hit with the show’s listeners. A big break came for McDaniel in 1934, when she was cast in the Fox production of Judge Priest. In this picture McDaniel was given the opportunity to sing a duet with Will Rogers (1879–1935), the well-known American humorist. Her performance was well received by the press and her fellow actors alike. In 1935 McDaniel played “Mom Beck” in The Little Colonel. A number of African American journalists objected to Hattie’s performance in the film. They charged that the character of Mom Beck, a happy black servant in the Old South, implied that black people might have been happier as slaves than they were as free individuals. This movie marked the beginning of McDaniel’s long feud with the more progressive elements of the African American community. Won Oscar for Gone with the Wind Once established in Hollywood, McDaniel found no shortage of work. In 1936 alone she appeared in twelve films. For the decade as a whole her performances numbered about forty—nearly all of them in the role of maid or cook to a white household. McDaniel won the role of “Mammy” in Gone with the Wind over several rivals. Her salary for Gone with the Wind was to be $450 a week, which was much more than what her real-life counterparts could hope to earn. McDaniel’s performance as Mammy in Gone with the Wind was more than a bit part. It so impressed the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences that she was awarded the 1940 Oscar for best supporting actress, the first ever won by an African American. McDaniel’s award-winning performance was generally seen by the black press as a symbol of progress for African Americans, although some members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) were still displeased with her work. At the least, her Oscar was a symbol of possible conciliation (the act of settling a dispute) between the races.

170

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Feuds with NAACP McDaniel spent much of 1940 touring the country as Mammy, and in the following year she appeared in three substantial film roles, earning no less than $31,000 for her efforts. She was married, for a third time, to James L. Crawford in 1941. The mid-1940s brought trying times for McDaniel, who experienced a heart-wrenching false pregnancy in 1944 and soon after became the victim of racist-inspired legal problems. The actress found herself in a legal battle over a system in Los Angeles that limited the land and home ownership rights of African Americans. Having purchased a house in 1942, McDaniel faced the possibility of being thrown out of her home. She was one of several black entertainers who challenged the racist system in court, however, and won. Still, throughout the 1940s a growing number of activists viewed McDaniel and all she represented as damaging to the budding fight for civil rights. NAACP president Walter White pressed both actors and studios to stop making films that tended to ridicule black people, and he singled out the roles of Hattie McDaniel as particularly offensive. In response McDaniel defended her right to choose whichever roles she saw fit, adding that many of her screen roles had shown themselves to be more than equal to that of their white employers. Renewed success in radio By the late 1940s McDaniel found herself in a difficult position. She found her screen opportunities disappearing even as she suffered insults from progressive blacks. After her third marriage ended in divorce in 1945, she became increasingly depressed and confused as to her proper path. McDaniel could still use her vocal talent on radio. In 1947 she won the starring role of “ Beulah” on The Beulah Show, a CBS radio show about a black maid and the white family for whom she worked. When Hattie McDaniel took over the role as Beulah, she became the first black performer to star in a radio program intended for a general audience. The program was generally praised by the NAACP and the Urban League, along with the twenty million other Americans who listened to it every evening at the height of its popularity in 1950. McDaniel’s last marriage, to an interior decorator named Larry Williams, lasted only a few months. In 1951 she suffered a heart attack while filming the first few segments of a projected television version of The Beulah Show. By summer she was diagnosed with breast cancer. McDaniel died in Hollywood, California, on October 26, 1952. She will always be remembered as Mammy of Gone with the Wind.●


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

171


Walter 172

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Pidgeon


“Maybe it was better never to become red hot. I’d seen performers like that, and they never lasted long. Maybe a long glow is the best way. At Metro I was never considered big enough to squire around Norma Shearer or Joan Crawford or Greta Garbo. Well, I outlasted them all at MGM, didn’t I? It takes a lot of work to appear easy going, and I tried to avoid being stuffy.” --Walter Pidgeon, quoted by James Edward Bawden, “Walter Pidgeon: Team Player,” Films of the Golden Age. f there was one constant in Walter Pidgeon’s career it was the easy going charm that carried him through a variety of images: operetta star, “the other man,” Mr. Greer Garson, elder statesman. That may not have been enough to propel him to the top rank of stars, but it kept him working for half a century and kept him at MGM, where he and studio head Louis B. Mayer shared a conservative approach to politics and a home town, St. John, New Brunswick, Canada. Pidgeon was born in 1917, the son of a men’s clothing store proprietor who died when he was only six. He had always dreamed of being a performer, so when his childhood sweetheart, Edna Pickles, moved to Boston in 1919 to study art, he followed, enrolling at the New England Conservatory of Music. He then won a spot in E.E. Clive’s theatre company, making his stage debut in George Bernard Shaw’s You Never Can Tell. He and Edna married in 1922, and he gave up acting to support them with a job in a brokerage firm. When Edna died in childbirth, he named their daughter Edna Verne Pidgeon but asked his mother to care for her so he could return to acting. Fred Astaire heard Pidgeon singing at a party and gave him references to two New York producers. Although neither had anything for him, singing star Elsie Janis also gave him an audition and signed him to tour with her in vaudeville. At the time, he was using Walter Verne as his professional name, but Janis insisted he keep his own name, arguing that “Pidgeon” was so funny it would stick in people’s minds. Pidgeon toured the vaudeville circuit with her, introducing two Irving Berlin standards: “What’ll I Do” and “All Alone.” Janis then included him in her act in the revue Puzzles of 1925, which marked his Broadway debut. His first Broadway engagement won Pidgeon a screen test for First National Studios, which hired him to co-star with Constance Talmadge. That film never happened, so he made his screen debut in the first of many “other man” parts in Mannequin (1926), starring Alice Joyce and Warner Baxter. With a Hollywood contract, Pidgeon sent for his mother and daughter. When sound arrived, Pidgeon was a natural for the new medium, appearing in a series of operettas that

I

showcased his light baritone voice. He chased Claudia Dell through 18th century England in Sweet Kitty Bellairs (1930) and played a French Foreign Legion officer in love with cabaret singer June Collyer in Kiss Me Again (1931). By that point, however, musicals, and particularly operettas, were box-office poison. One of his films was even advertised with the line “Mr. Pidgeon will only sing once in this picture.” At the same time, his personal life took a positive turn when he married his secretary, Ruth Walker. They would remain together for the rest of their lives. Pidgeon tried to switch his career to straight dramatic roles. Although there were three songs in The Hot Heiress (1931), in which he’s the society type who loses heiress Ona Munson to riveter Ben Lyon, he didn’t sing any of them. With few decent roles available at the time, he returned to Broadway to take over Melvyn Douglas’s role in No More Ladies. Then he got to create the role of gangster “Guts” Regan in Ayn Rand’s sole Broadway hit, Night of January 16. The popular melodrama ran for seven months and revived Hollywood’s interest in Pidgeon, though he turned down the role of Gaylord Ravenal in the 1936 version of Show Boat for fear of once again being type-cast as a musical star. Independent producer Walter Wanger signed him to play second leads in glittery productions like Big Brown Eyes (1936), in which manicurist Joan Bennett helps police detective boyfriend Cary Grant break up a ring of jewel thieves (guess who turns out to be the ringleader?). From there he moved to Universal, which didn’t do much with him. Good luck hit again, however, when MGM head Louis B. Mayer bought up his contract. Years earlier, Pidgeon had approached the movie mogul for a job. They had bonded over memories of St. John, and Mayer promised to call him when he had the right role. The right role was, as usual, a second lead, but this time he got to lose Jean Harlow to Clark Gable in Saratoga (1937), the blonde bombshell’s last film. Even as a supporting player, Pidgeon was treated like royalty at MGM. The studio had such an extensive production line-up, he even got to play leads in less expensive films like 6000 Enemies (1939), in which he’s a no-nonsense DA sent up the river himself when he’s framed for bribery. Pidgeon also had a sympathetic ear in Mayer. When he asked for the chance to prove he could do action leads, Mayer cast him as private eye Nick Carter in three fast-moving crime thrillers, starting with Nick Carter, Master Detective (1939). Those films kept him in leads, even as he was supporting top box office stars like Robert Taylor in Flight Command (1940), in which green flyer Taylor is suspected of seducing Pidgeon’s wife (Ruth Hussey). cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

173


Pidgeon’s move to more action-oriented roles must have made an impression on somebody at 20th Century-Fox, which asked to borrow him to play an American hunter who tries to assassinate Hitler then goes into hiding in Man Hunt (1941). The Fritz Lang film was one of Pidgeon’s favorites, and also brought him his next major role. William Wyler was originally signed to direct How Green Was My Valley (1941) and got the studio to sign Pidgeon for a central role, as the Reverend Mr. Griffud. When John Ford took over the project, Pidgeon stayed in the cast, with MGM negotiating top-billing for him in one of the year’s most prestigious films and the Oscar®-winner for Best Picture. Back at MGM, Mayer decided to cast Pidgeon opposite his new protégée, a young Irish-born actress named Greer Garson. Their first teaming, in Blossoms in the Dust (1941), clicked with fans, leading to their making eight films together, playing married couples in seven of them (and in the eighth, That Forsyte Woman (1949), anybody familiar with the source material, John Galsworthy’s The Forsyte Saga, would know they were fated to be mated after the final titles). They were the perfect couple for the World War II era -- dignified, classy and quietly heroic. Yet that image, and the assumption that Garson did most of the heavy lifting in their films, blinds even their fans today to the amazing range Pidgeon displayed in the films. He may have been stoic in Mrs. Miniver (1942) and Madame Curie (1943), both of which brought him Oscar® nominations for Best Actor, but he got to show a more playful side in Blossoms in the Dust and Mrs. Parkington (1944). His role as an inveterate scamp in the latter moved him into Clark Gable territory, only with more sophistication. By the end of the war years, however, the aging actor (now in his fifties) was too old for action or even much in the way of romance, leading to his move into elder statesman roles. Given MGM’s extensive production slate, that still meant some leads. He played a crusading defense attorney taking on government corruption in The Unknown Man (1951), with an appropriately mature Ann Harding as his wife, and stepped into the shoes vacated by Ronald Colman, Ralph Richardson, Ray Milland, Tom Conway and many others as the famed British sleuth, now retired, in Calling Bulldog Drummond (1951). But he also was moving comfortably into character roles in MGM’s bigger films. He had one of his best roles ever as an Air Force general questioning Gable’s Command Decision (1949) during World War II and was part of the strong ensembles in the Hollywood roman a clef The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), with Lana Turner and Kirk Douglas, and the searing business drama Executive Suite (1954), co-starring William Holden, Barbara Stanwyck and Fredric March. But the days of

174

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

quiet stoicism were over. An attempt at a sequel to Mrs. Miniver, The Miniver Story (1950), failed badly at the box office. And his final teaming with Garson, Scandal at Scourie (1953), which cast them as a Protestant couple who adopts a Catholic orphan, didn’t do much better. Garson would leave the studio within a year. Pidgeon continued with strong supporting roles, developing a cult following as the interstellar scientist Dr. Morbius in the science-fiction classic Forbidden Planet (1956). Co-star Anne Francis was so fond of him she named her poodle “Walter Smidgeon,” which triggered gossip when a columnist got the dog’s name wrong and reported Francis had run off to Palm Springs with the very married actor. By the mid-fifties, Mayer was gone from MGM, and the studio was not the house of glamour Pidgeon had loved. He left after playing Paul Newman’s strict military father in The Rack (1956), one of the few actors to stay with MGM long enough to draw a studio pension. The only one of their classic stars to stay longer than he was Robert Taylor. Instead of staying in Hollywood, however, Pidgeon returned to Broadway, first as eccentric Philadelphia millionaire Drexel Biddle in The Happiest Millionaire, then winning a Tony nomination as one of the stars of the musical Take Me Along. He lost the Tony to co-star Jackie Gleason and also lost the chance to play Biddle in the earlier play’s film version, a musical produced by Walt Disney. The role went, instead, to Fred MacMurray, with Garson as his wife. Pidgeon returned to the big screen as the rebellious admiral in Irving Allen’s science fiction feature Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961), taking star billing over such names as Joan Fontaine and Peter Lorre. It was more elder statesman roles that sustained him, including the Senate majority leader in Otto Preminger’s political drama Advise and Consent (1962) and Flo Ziegfeld in Funny Girl (1968). While shooting a scene in the former with Franchot Tone and Lew Ayres, the former quipped, “Look, it’s the MGM Newcomers of 1938!” (quoted in Bawden) Pidgeon even returned to the MGM lot, by then a far cry from its former glory, to play a U.S. Senator in Skyjacked (1972). He finished his career with a small role as the chairman of an international business conference disrupted by Mae West, also in her last role, in Sextette (1978). At that point, Pidgeon retired from acting, mainly for health reasons. Several strokes affected his speech and mobility and eventually killed him in 1984. He was truly mourned in Hollywood, where he was not only well liked but was also one of the last survivors of the studios’ golden years. Many obituaries referred to him as “Mr. Miniver,” something he had predicted jokingly in later interviews.●


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

175


THE LOOK THE FEEL OF

C otton

Photo by: Beth Roose

176

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

177


Photo by: Beth Roose

178

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

179


Photo by: Beth Roose

180

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

181


season of

Fashion

Photo by: Christina Bowles

182

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Christina Bowles

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

183


Photo by: Christina Bowles

184

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Christina Bowles

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

185


CARNIVAL

ashion F all F 186

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Models: Yana Poly and Joanna Moccia Photo: by Kendra Paige @ kendrapaige.com Styling by Gen Bell @ genbell.com Modeling by Yana Poly @ Mega Model Management Makeup & Hair by Andrea Joe Cicalese Retouching by Svetlana Pasechnik

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

187


Photo by: Kendra Paige Photography

188

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Kendra Paige Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

189


190

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Kendra Paige Photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

191


Model Paisley Cowley Photographer Beth Roose MUA Beth Roose Headpiece The Flower House Gown: Faith McGary Photo by: Kendra Paige Photography

192

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


GOLDEN

ask M

Photo by: Beth Roose

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

193


194

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


flow rs and

DragonFlys

Photo by: Inspire4more photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

195


Photo by: Inspire4more photography

196

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Inspire4more photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

197


Photos by: Inspire4more photography

198

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

199


Photo by: Inspire4more photography

200

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

201


Photos by: Inspire4more photography

202

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

203


Photo by: Inspire4more photography

204

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Inspire4more photography

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

205


Photos by: Inspire4more photography

206

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

207


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

208

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Dogs cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

209


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

210

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

211


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

212

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

213


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

214

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

215


Photo by: Shannon Simpson

216

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

217


The Story of the Pilgrims At this time each year America’s school children review the Story of the Pilgrims and Their First Thanksgiving

y

ou know the story. A group of rugged individuals, seeking religious freedom, set sail from England on the Mayflower, finally reaching Cape Cod in late November, 1620. Half of the colonists die due to the harsh winter. But with the help of the Indians, especially Squanto, the Pilgrims learn about new crops and farming techniques. They reap a bountiful harvest in 1621 and proceed to celebrate a three day feast – the first New England Thanksgiving – and live happily ever after! Surely the Pilgrim experience is a lesson in how people with courage, perseverance, hard work, and thankfulness established a new home in a hostile new world. But the usual story is not totally accurate. Moreover, the most significant aspects of the Pilgrim experience are ignored altogether! Our chief source of knowledge concerning the Pilgrims is the 1647 classic book “Of Plymouth Plantation” by their great governor, William Bradford. Let’s learn the rest of the story as chronicled by Governor Bradford. In the process we’ll not only get our facts straight, we’ll learn some significant lessons and insights still applicable for Americans today.

Religious Beginnings The Pilgrims were not known as “Pilgrims” until after 1669! Originally they were Puritan Separatists. That is, due to the corruption within the Church of England in the second half of the 1500s, there arose a group of people who wanted to democratize and purify its rituals. Most “Puritans” remained faithful to the Church of England, but others could not tolerate it. They left and became known as Separatist, from which the Pilgrims emerged. The government of England arrested and persecuted the Separatists for their refusal to belong to the Church of England. By the fall of 1607 the persecution had become so intolerable that one Separatist group at Scrooby, a small village in England, decided to go to Holland. By August 1608 over one hundred men, women, and children had reached Amsterdam even though the king was opposed to all migrations and had ordered all ports closed for those without a royal license. Within a year these Separatists moved to Leyden, Holland. But it soon became apparent that their new homeland was far from ideal. They also feared that a European war was on the horizon. Thus, after much discussion, they voted to go to America.

218

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

The Pilgrim experience is a lesson in how people with courage, perseverance, hard work, and thankfulness established a new home in a hostile new world.

But the Pilgrims soon discovered that they did not have sufficient money to rent, equip, and establish a colony. Therefore, they sought financial help for the expedition from the Virginia Company of London and the Virginia Company of Plymouth – two profit seeking businesses. These adventurers, as they were called, were organized to finance and outfit colonial enterprises. Agreement With The Adventurers The contract between the Adventurers and the Pilgrims consisted of ten points. The most critical of which stated, “That all such persons as are of this colony are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock and goods of the said colony.” Further, it was agreed that during the first seven years. “all profits and benefits that are got by trade, traffic, trucking, working, fishing, or any other means of any persons, remain still in the common stock until the division.” Today we would call this a socialist commune. In other words, the Pilgrims accepted the socialist principle, “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need.” Each person was to place his produc-


Photo source: Wikipedia.org

tion into the common warehouse and receive back, through the Governor, only what he needed for himself or his family. The surplus after seven years was to be divided equally, along with the houses, lands, and chattels, “betwixt the Adventurers and Planters.” Apparently the entrepreneurially-minded Adventurers felt this arrangement was their best means to recover their profits. They saw no inconsistency between their own private profit seeking companies and their denial to the Pilgrims the right to work their own land for the benefit of themselves and their families. Frankly, the Pilgrim leaders had expressed their desire to own their own lands and homes and even work two days each week for their own gain. But the Adventurers would not hear of it. The contract was a “take it or leave it” proposition. The Pilgrims reluctantly took it. Historic Journey Begins Once the agreement was signed, properties were sold, money collected, goods donated, and tools, foodstuffs, and supplies were purchased. Their plans originally called for two ships. The Holland group was to sail on the Speedwell and an English Separatist group on the Mayflower. The rendezvous was to take place at Southhampton, England. It did. Both ships set sail on August 15, 1620. However, the Speedwell proved unseaworthy. Repairs were made at Dartsmouth and then again at

Plymouth, England – about 150 miles from Southhampton. But it was to no avail. Much of the Speedwell cargo was then transferred to the Mayflower. Hesitant individuals used the opportunity to exit out. One hundred and two individuals used the opportunity to exit out. One hundred and two individuals then crowded onto the tiny Mayflower. Their journey into history commenced September 16, 1620. The ocean voyage took sixty-six grueling days. One person died and one child was born – Oceanus Hopkins. Finally at daybreak on November 20, they sighted what is now known as Cap Cod. This was not their destination – the mouth of the Hudson River was – but the lateness of the season and rough weather forced them to anchor in what is now Provincetown Harbor. They decided to forego their patent or claim in the Virginia Company’s territory. While still anchored, a crises emerged. In Bradford’s words: “Occasioned partly by the disconnected and mutinous speeches that some of the strangers amongst them {from London} had let fall…that when they came ashore they would use their own liberty, for none had power to command them, the patent they had being for Virginia and not for New England.” The complainers had a point. But the Mayflower leaders acted decisively by assembling the men into the main cabin. The discussion lead to the historic Mayflower Compact. cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

219


It was signed by 41 of the 43 men aboard. (It is believed the two non-signers were too sick to be present. Both died soon afterwards.) The Mayflower Compact was the beginning of our American Republic – forerunner of the U.S. Constitution. It was a document by which the Pilgrims established a civil self-government promising to enact “just and equal laws.” Their first order of business under it was to elect John Carver as their first governor. Governor Bradford describes him as “a man godly and well approved amongst them.” Unfortunately, Mr. Carver died about five months later, whereupon William Bradford (15901657) was chosen Governor until his death in 1657. Now for a slight digression. Did you ever wonder how these Separatists came to be called “Pilgrims?” The answer is that it was due to a passage in “Of Plymouth Plantation” where Governor Bradford, in paraphrasing Hebrews 11:13-16, referred to his group as Pilgrims – “but they knew they were pilgrims” After this passage was published in 1669, the term “Pilgrim” and “Pilgrim Fathers” came into general use. Now to return to the story. After a month of exploration around the coast of Cape Cod, the sea-weary Pilgrims finally decided to land at what is now Plymouth. Massachusetts. It was December 21. Their exploration party had uncovered an attractive site that was once an Indian village which had been wiped out in 1617 by a smallpox plague. The area had a stream of crystal clear water, some cleared land, and it contained a hill that could be fortified. First Two Years in the New Land Most school children know of the Pilgrims’ infamous first winter. According to Governor Bradford, within “two or three months’ time, half of their company died, especially in January and February, being the depth of winter, and wanting houses and other comforts; being infected with the scurvy and other diseases which this long voyage and their inaccomodate condition had brought upon them.” Of 24 households that arrived, four were wiped out completely and only four families were untouched by death that first year. In their desperate straights, help did arrive in unexpected form. An Indian named Samoset walked into their camp in March. They marveled at his language – broken English! Soon he introduced the colonists to another Indian named Squanto, who had been in England and could speak English quite well. Again, let Governor Bradford explain. “Squanto continued with them and was their interpreter and was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation. He directed them how to set their corn, where to take fish, and to procure other commodities, and was also their pilot to

220

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Photo source: Wikipedia.org

bring them to unknown places for their profit, and never let them till he died.” Now we are ready to unmask a common myth. Contrary to legend the harvests were extremely poor in 1621 and 1622. It was normal to be hungry. Governor Bradford referred to 1621 as the “the small harvest” year. Yet he notes that in “the summer there was no want.” Thankful for what God had given them, Governor Bradford declared a three-day feast for the purpose of prayer and celebration. We all know it as the first New England Thanksgiving – apparently observed in late summer. It was quite a festival. Apparently ninety Indians attended this special occasion.. They brought wild turkey and venison. The Pilgrims prepared geese, ducks, and fish along with corn meal bread, journey cake, and succotash. The scarcity continued into 1622. “Now the welcome time of harvest approached, in which all had their bellies filled. But it arose to a little, in comparison of a full year’s supply.” Why? Governor Bradford attributed the poor harvest to “their weakness for want of food.” He then added, “Also, much was stolen both by night and day before it became scarce eatable and much more afterward. And though many were well whipped…yet hunger made others, whom conscience did not restrain, to venture. So as it well appeared that famine must still ensue, the next year also if not some way prevented.” So what was their proposed solution to overcome famine in 1623? Let’s listen to Governor Bradford at length for he comes to some most significant conclusions. Socialism Abolished – Free Enterprise Established “So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they


had done, that they might not still languish in misery. At length, after much debate of things, the Governor (with the advice of the chiefest amongst them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves; in all other things to go on in the general way as before. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land…This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise…The women now went willingly into the field, and took the little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.” The leaders of Plymouth colony decided to scrap their socialistic agreement with the Adventurers and the philosophy of “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need.” Individuals were now able to own their own homes, property, and keep the fruit of their own efforts. What happened? In 1621, the Pilgrims planted only 26 acres. Sixty acres were planted in 1622. But in 1623, spurred on by individual enterprise, 184 acres were planted! Somehow those who alleged weakness and inability became healthy and strong. It’s amazing what incentive will do to improve bad attitudes! Continuing, Governor Bradford chides ancient socialists for their lack of insight: “The experience that was had in this common course (socialism) and condition, tried sundry years and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince (display) the vanity of that conceit of Plato’s and other ancients applauded by some of later times; that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a common-wealth would make them happy and flourishing; as if they were wiser than God! The Governor here expresses his belief that Socialism is not Godly order or economic system. Consider his observations and analysis: “For this (socialist) community was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For the young men, that were most able and fit for labour and service, did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense. The strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes than he that was weak and not able to do a quarter the other could; this was thought injustice. The aged and graver men to be ranked and equalized in labours and victuals, clothes, etc., with the meaner and younger sort, thought it some indignity and disrespect unto them. And for men’s wives to be commanded to do service for other men, as dressing their meat, washing their clothes, etc., they deemed it a kind of slavery, neither could many husbands well brook (en-

dure) it. Upon the point all being to have alike, and all to do alike, they thought themselves in the like condition, and one as good as another; and so, if it did not cut off those relations that God hath set amongst men, yet it did at least much diminish and take off the mutual respects that should be preserved amongst them. And would have been worse if they had been men of another condition. Let none object this is men’s corruption, and nothing to the course (system) itself. I answer, seeing all men have this corruption in them, God in His wisdom saw another course (economic system) fitter for them.” Did you grasp the last point Governor Bradford made? He felt their social and economic problems were rooted in an ungodly economic order. Socialism was contrary to God’s laws which sanctify private ownership. Drought of 1623 But the Pilgrims had another lesson to learn. From the third week of May until the middle of July there was no rain, just heat. Governor Bradford then set a “solemn day of humiliation (fasting) to seek the Lord by humble and fervent prayer in this great distress.” Their prayers were answered. By evening it began to rain. It revived the corn and other fruits. Even the Indians were astonished. The soft showers continued along with beautiful fair weather. The result was a “fruitful and liberal harvest …for which mercy they also set apart a day of thanksgiving.” Concerning that autumn, Governor Bradford concludes: “By this time harvest was come, and instead of famine now God gave them plenty…and the effect of their particular planting was well seen, for all had, one way and other, pretty well to bring they year about, and some of the abler sort and more industrious had to spare, and sell to others: so as any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day. (1647)” By the fall of 1624, the colonists were able to export a full boat load of corn! And the Pilgrims settled with the Adventurers. They purchased the Adventurers stock in the colony and completed the transition to private property and free markets. Conclusion The Pilgrim experience dating from 1623 was and is yet a prototype for the United States of America. They learned the hard way that: (1) Socialism does not work; it diminishes individual initiative and enterprise; (2) Socialism is not a Godly economic system; and (3) Famine and drought can be used by God to humble a people and set them on a proper course. The Pilgrims responded. The real question today is: Can Americans learn these vital insights from the Pilgrims or must we too face famine and drought in the coming years?● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

221


A Family to Be Thankful For A mother of four has her faith restored by store-bought pies and the prayer of a child. By Cynthia Cutts, Lincoln, California

I knew putting together a traditional Thanksgiving dinner would take extra organization, what with four kids (two still in diapers) and my husband, Jerry, working long hours. So I wrote a to-do list and stuck it on the fridge at the beginning of the week. I figured I’d cross off a few items each day. But now it was the day before Thanksgiving and nothing was done. Not the fresh cranberry sauce. Or the homemade dinner rolls. Not even the most important thing on our family’s menu—the pies. Pumpkin and apple, made from scratch using recipes passed down from my mom and Jerry’s. I put Halley and Casey down for their naps. Now I can start the pies, I thought, setting the ingredients out. The phone rang. Justin, my 13-year-old. “Mom, can you bring my basketball uniform to school? I just found out we have a game tonight.” “Sure,” I said, stifling a sigh. I hung up and saw that a stack of newspapers had been dropped off in the drive for my nine-year-old, Corbett, to deliver. The papers were bulging with Thanksgiving ads. Corbett couldn’t carry them on his bike. I’d have to drive him. I took out the trash, hauled in the papers, then cleaned sticky fingerprints from the fridge. There, practically smirking at me, was my to-do list. I checked my watch: 3:45 already?! The door slammed. “Hi, Mom,” Corbett said. “Corbett, your brother has a game so let’s get your paper route done,” I said. I bundled the babies into their car seats, then ran back for Justin’s uniform. I looked at the apples, pumpkin and spices on the counter. “Guess I’m not making those pies now,” I grumbled. Jerry got out of work early enough to go to the game, but by the time we got home, ate dinner and tucked the kids in, it was almost 10:00 P.M. The sight of the pie ingredients on the counter made me want to cry. I sat down and buried my head in my arms. “What’s wrong?” Jerry asked. “I wanted Thanksgiving to be perfect,” I moaned, “but I never even had time to make pies!” “Don’t worry, honey. I’ll just buy some,” he said. “We can’t buy Thanksgiving pies!” “Sure, we can,” Jerry said. “But they won’t be our family’s pies.” Jerry gave me a hug. “The kids won’t care. They’ll eat anything. You’re so busy taking care of everyone. Let the boys and me take over this Thanksgiving.” “Fine,” I said, too tired to argue. The next morning I surrendered the kitchen to the guys. Six hours later Corbett came to get me. I followed him into the dining room. There on the table was a Thanksgiving feast. A beautifully browned turkey, Jerry’s handiwork. Cranberry sauce and hot dinner rolls, both straight from a can and proudly prepared by Corbett. Sweet potatoes topped with melted marshmallows, and instant mashed potatoes, whipped up by Justin. And on the sideboard sat the pies—apple and pumpkin, store-bought. We sat down and Corbett said grace. “Dear God, thanks for all the food, especially the yummy pies. Thank you for a great mom who does so much for us. Thanks most of all that we get to be together. Amen.” I opened my eyes and looked around the table. Corbett was right. Being together was what mattered. I’d gotten my perfect Thanksgiving after all.●

222

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Be Thankful Be thankful that you don’t already have everything you desire, If you did, what would there be to look forward to? Be thankful when you don’t know something For it gives you the opportunity to learn. Be thankful for the difficult times. During those times you grow. Be thankful for your limitations Because they give you opportunities for improvement. Be thankful for each new challenge Because it will build your strength and character. Be thankful for your mistakes They will teach you valuable lessons. Be thankful when you’re tired and weary Because it means you’ve made a difference. It is easy to be thankful for the good things. A life of rich fulfillment comes to those who are also thankful for the setbacks. GRATITUDE can turn a negative into a positive. Find a way to be thankful for your troubles and they can become your blessings.● Author Unknown

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

223


49

Gratitude Quotes

Gratitude has been linked to increased levels of happiness and life satisfaction. Giving thanks is one of the most powerful ways there is to increase your well being. Here, then, are 49 gratitude quotes to help keep you focused on all of the good that is present in your life, and everything that you have to be thankful for. 1. “At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” — Albert Schweitzer 2. “You say grace before meals. All right. But I say grace before the concert and the opera, and grace before the play and pantomime, and grace before I open a book, and grace before sketching, painting, swimming, fencing, boxing, walking, playing, dancing and grace before I dip the pen in the ink.” — G. K. Chesterton 3. “No duty is more urgent than that of returning thanks”. — Unknown 4. “Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” — Marcel Proust 5. “He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has.” — Epictetus 6. “You simply will not be the same person two months from now after consciously giving thanks each day for the abundance that exists in your life. And you will have set in motion an ancient spiritual law: the more you have and are grateful for, the more will be given you.” — Sarah Ban Breathnach 7. “We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.” — Thornton Wilder 8. “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” — Albert Einstein 9. “Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings.” — William Arthur Ward 10. “Take full account of the excellencies which you possess, and in gratitude remember how you would hanker after them, if you had them not.” — Marcus Aurelius 11. “Real life isn’t always going to be perfect or go our way, but the recurring acknowledgement of what is working in our lives can help us not only to survive but surmount our difficulties.” — Sarah Ban Breathnach

224

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

12. “We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.” — Cynthia Ozick 13. “Can you see the holiness in those things you take for granted–a paved road or a washing machine? If you concentrate on finding what is good in every situation, you will discover that your life will suddenly be filled with gratitude, a feeling that nurtures the soul.” — Rabbi Harold Kushner 14. “We can be thankful to a friend for a few acres or a little money; and yet for the freedom and command of the whole earth, and for the great benefits of our being, our life, health, and reason, we look upon ourselves as under no obligation.” — Marcus Annaeus Seneca 15. “When we become more fully aware that our success is due in large measure to the loyalty, helpfulness, and encouragement we have received from others, our desire grows to pass on similar gifts. Gratitude spurs us on to prove ourselves worthy of what others have done for us. The spirit of gratitude is a powerful energizer.” — Wilferd A. Peterson 16. “Whatever our individual troubles and challenges may be, it’s important to pause every now and then to appreciate all that we have, on every level. We need to literally “count our blessings,” give thanks for them, allow ourselves to enjoy them, and relish the experience of prosperity we already have.” — Shakti Gawain 17. “Thou that has given so much to me, Give one thing more–a grateful heart; Not thankful when it pleaseth me, As if thy blessings had spare days; But such a heart, whose pulse may be Thy praise.” – George Herbert 18. “(Some people) have a wonderful capacity to appreciate again and again, freshly and naively, the basic goods of life, with awe, pleasure, wonder, and even ecstasy.” — A.H. Maslow 19. “If the only prayer you say in your life is thank you, that would suffice.” — Meister Eckhart 20. “Find the good and praise it.” — Alex Haley 21. “Give thanks for a little and you will find a lot.” — The Hausa of Nigeria


22. “What if you gave someone a gift, and they neglected to thank you for it-would you be likely to give them another? Life is the same way. In order to attract more of the blessings that life has to offer, you must truly appreciate what you already have.” — Ralph Marston 23. “Happiness is itself a kind of gratitude.” — Joseph Wood Krutch 24. “The moment one gives close attention to anything, even a blade of grass, it becomes a mysterious, awesome, indescribably magnificent world in itself.” — Henry Miller 25. “There is a calmness to a life lived in gratitude, a quiet joy.” — Ralph H. Blum 26. “Gratefulness is the key to a happy life that we hold in our hands, because if we are not grateful, then no matter how much we have we will not be happy — because we will always want to have something else or something more.” — Brother David Steindl-Rast 27. “Happiness cannot be traveled to, owned, earned, worn or consumed. Happiness is the spiritual experience of living every minute with love, grace and gratitude.” — Denis Waitley 28. “As each day comes to us refreshed and anew, so does my gratitude renew itself daily. The breaking of the sun over the horizon is my grateful heart dawning upon a blessed world. ” — Adabella Radici 29. “For each new morning with its light, For rest and shelter of the night, For health and food, for love and friends, For everything Thy goodness sends.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson 30. “Grace isn’t a little prayer you chant before receiving a meal. It’s a way to live. ” — Attributed to Jacqueline Winspear 31. “When eating bamboo sprouts, remember the man who planted them.” — Chinese Proverb 32. “Only a stomach that rarely feels hungry scorns common things.” — Horace 33. “But the value of gratitude does not consist solely in getting you more blessings in the future. Without gratitude you cannot long keep from dissatisfied thought regarding things as they are.” — Wallace Wattles 34. “Blessed are those that can give without remembering and receive without forgetting.” — Author Unknown 35. “If you concentrate on finding whatever is good in every situation, you will discover that your life will suddenly be filled with gratitude, a feeling that nurtures the soul.” — Rabbi Harold Kushner 36. “Nothing that is done for you is a matter of course. Everything originates in a will for the good, which is directed at you. Train yourself never to put off the word or action for the expression of gratitude.” — Albert Schweitzer

37. “God gave you a gift of 86,400 seconds today. Have you used one to say “thank you?” — William A. Ward 38. “Gratitude is a vaccine, an antitoxin, and an antiseptic.” — John Henry Jowett 39. “Feeling grateful or appreciative of someone or something in your life actually attracts more of the things that you appreciate and value into your life.” — Christiane Northrup 40. ”The best way to pay for a lovely moment is to enjoy it.” — Richard Bach 41. “Reflect upon your present blessings, of which every man has plenty; not on your past misfortunes of which all men have some.” — Charles Dickens 42. “Both abundance and lack exist simultaneously in our lives, as parallel realities. It is always our conscious choice which secret garden we will tend… when we choose not to focus on what is missing from our lives but are grateful for the abundance that’s present — love, health, family, friends, work, the joys of nature and personal pursuits that bring us pleasure — the wasteland of illusion falls away and we experience Heaven on earth.” –Sarah Ban Breathnach 43. “Whenever we are appreciative, we are filled with a sense of well-being and swept up by the feeling of joy.” — M.J. Ryan 44. “Gratitude is riches. Complaint is poverty.” –Doris Day 45. “Many people who order their lives rightly in all other ways are kept in poverty by their lack of gratitude.” — Wallace Wattles 46. “Let us rise up and be thankful, for if we didn’t learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn’t learn a little, at least we didn’t get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn’t die; so, let us all be thankful.” — Buddha 47. “Two kinds of gratitude: The sudden kind we feel for what we take; the larger kind we feel for what we give.” — Edwin Arlington Robinson 48. “There is a law of gratitude, and it is . . . the natural principle that action and reaction are always equal and in opposite directions. The grateful outreaching of your mind in thankful praise to supreme intelligence is a liberation or expenditure of force. It cannot fail to reach that to which it is addressed, and the reaction is an instantaneous movement toward you.” — Wally Wattles 49. “Gratitude should not be just a reaction to getting what you want, but an all-the-time gratitude, the kind where you notice the little things and where you constantly look for the good, even in unpleasant situations. Start bringing gratitude to your experiences, instead of waiting for a positive experience in order to feel grateful.” — Marelisa Fábrega.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

225


Recipes

Cider-Braised Pheasant with Pearl Onions & Apples

Photo by Deborah Ory; Food styling: Elizabeth Duffy

226

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


Long, slow cooking is the key to these tender, juicy birds, braised in an autumnal mix of apples, cider, and caramelized onion. If pheasant is hard to come by, you can substitute chicken. Makes 8 servings Ingredients For marinade: • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil • 5 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped • 3 tablespoons fresh tarragon leaves, whole • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (from 1 1/2 oranges) • 3 tablespoons finely grated orange zest (from 1 1/2 oranges) • Large pinch kosher salt • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper • 3 (3-pound) pheasants, each rinsed inside and out, patted dry, cut into 6 pieces To braise: • 1 teaspoon kosher salt • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter • 3 large yellow onions, halved and thinly sliced (about 6 cups) • 1 bay leaf • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds • 1 teaspoon table salt • Pinch sugar • 2 to 3 cups low-sodium chicken broth, plus additional, if necessary • 2 cups apple cider • 1 cup dry white wine • 3 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and diced For caramelized onions and apples: • 10 ounces pearl onions, root ends trimmed • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil • 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and cut into 1-inch cubes • 2 teaspoons sugar • Pinch kosher salt • Pinch freshly ground black pepper • 3 tablespoons apple cider Preparation Make marinade: In blender, combine olive oil, ginger, tarragon, orange juice, zest, salt, and pepper and purée until smooth. In

large bowl, combine marinade and pheasant and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate overnight or up to 48 hours. Braise pheasant: In very large Dutch oven over moderately high heat, heat olive oil until hot but not smoking. Remove pheasant pieces from marinade, scraping off excess, and sprinkle with salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Working in batches, sear pheasant pieces until well browned, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towel-lined platter to drain. Preheat oven to 325°F. Skim off all but 1 tablespoon oil from pan, leaving browned bits at bottom, and set pan over moderately low heat. Add butter and heat until melted. Stir in onions, bay leaf, fennel seeds, salt, remaining 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and sugar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are well caramelized, 30 to 40 minutes. Return pheasant to pot. Add chicken broth, cider, and wine. (Liquid should cover half of pheasant pieces. Add more chicken broth if necessary.) Raise heat to high and bring liquid to simmer. Add apples, cover, and transfer pot to oven. Braise, turning pheasant pieces occasionally, until meat is cooked through and tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Using tongs or slotted spoon, transfer pheasant to platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Set pot over high heat and bring pan juices to boil. Boil, uncovered, until sauce is well reduced and thickened, about 25 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and pepper, if necessary. While juices are reducing, Prepare caramelized onions and apples: Bring medium pot of water to boil. Add pearl onions and boil, uncovered, 1 minute. Drain and run under cold water until cool enough to handle; slip off skins. In small skillet over moderately high heat, heat oil until hot but not smoking. Add onions, apples, sugar, salt, and pepper and stir to combine. Sear, shaking pan occasionally, until onions and apples are dark golden, about 10 minutes. Stir in apple cider, scraping up any browned bits in pan. Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook until onions are fork tender, about 2 minutes more. Serve: Spoon some of sauce over pheasant and garnish with onions, apples, and chopped tarragon. Serve additional sauce alongside and some fresh tarragon leaves, chopped.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

227


Photo by Deborah Ory; Food styling: Elizabeth Duffy

Crown Roast of Pork with Corn Bread Poblano Stuffing - 8 Sevings Ingredients For Roast: 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 cloves garlic, chopped 1 shallot, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 (10-pound) crown roast of pork, rib ends frenched For Stuffing: 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter 4 large poblano chiles, seeded and diced 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1 stalk celery, diced 1 clove garlic, minced 6 cups corn bread for stuffing (1 1/2 recipes) or packaged corn bread stuffing 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1/4 to 1/2 cup chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped 1 teaspoon hot sauce such as Tabasco 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Preparation In blender, purée olive oil, garlic, shallot, sage, salt,

228

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

and pepper until blended. Rub mixture over roast, concentrating on areas between chops. Transfer roast to roasting pan. Cover with foil and refrigerate overnight or up to 48 hours. Let sit at room temperature 1 hour before roasting. Preheat oven to 450°F. Turn roast upside down (rib bones down) in roasting pan. Roast 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 350°F and roast until instant-read thermometer registers 155°F when inserted 2 inches into center of meat (do not touch bones), about 1 1/2 hours more. While roast cooks, prepare stuffing: In large skillet over moderately high heat, melt butter. Add poblanos, onion, celery, and garlic, and sauté, stirring, until softened, 7 to 10 minutes. In large bowl, combine corn bread and sautéed vegetables. Add eggs, 1/4 cup chicken stock, cilantro, hot sauce, salt, and pepper. If mixture seems dry, mix in additional stock, slowly, until stuffing is lightly moistened. Press into 2-quart casserole dish. Thirty minutes before removing roast, transfer stuffing to oven. Bake until golden, about 45 minutes. When roast is done, remove from oven, tent with foil, and let stand at least 15 minutes (it will stay warm 1 hour). When stuffing is done, mound 1/2 on platter. Flip roast upright on top of stuffing. Fill center of roast with remaining stuffing.●


Panko & Mustard Crusted Rabbit with Sorrel Cream Sauce - 8 Sevings Ingredients 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted 1 cup Dijon mustard 2 cups panko (Japanese bread crumbs) 1/4 cup fresh thyme leaves, chopped 2 (2 1/2 to 3-pound) fryer rabbits, cut into 8 serving pieces, rinsed, and patted dry 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Sauce: 2 cups of sorrel leaves, packed 1/2 tbs. of butter 1 large shallot, peeled and finely chopped 1/2 tsp. of all-purpose flour 1/2 cup of heavy cream kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To make the sauce, wash sorrel leaves thoroughly. Remove the center ribs and stems, then give the leaves a rough chop and set aside. Next, melt 1/2 tbs. of butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Add chopped shallot and sauté until softened, about 2-3 minutes. Then add sorrel leaves and a pinch of salt. Stir often until leaves are wilted and tender, 5-10 minutes.

Then whisk in 1/2 tsp. of all-purpose flour to the wilted sorrel. Cook this mixture, which will turn into a paste, for 2 minutes and stirring often. Next whisk in 1/2 cup of heavy cream and bring the sauce to a simmer. Do not boil. Simmer to desired consistency then take off heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste, then set aside, covered. Preparation Preheat oven to 500°F. In medium bowl, whisk together butter and mustard. In large bowl, toss together panko and thyme. Season rabbit pieces with salt and pepper. Using pastry brush, brush 1 piece generously with mustard mixture, then dip in panko mixture and toss to coat. Transfer to large rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining pieces, using 2 baking sheets. Drizzle pieces with olive oil. Bake 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 350°F. Bake until crust is golden and juices run clear when meat is pricked with fork, about 10 minutes more. Cook’s note: Although rabbit is frequently compared to chicken in terms of cooking methods and times, be careful not to overcook it. Unlike chicken, perfectly cooked rabbit meat should still be very slightly pink near the bone.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

229


you’ll be spooning leftovers on ice cream or slathering it on toast in place of jam. It’s worth buying extra cranberries and freezing them so you can make more to last you through the winter. Ingredients 1 cup Cabernet Sauvignon 6 ounces dried calimyrna figs, stems trimmed and figs coarsely chopped (1 cup) 1 (12-ounce) bag fresh or frozen cranberries 3/4 cup sugar 3 (3- by 1/2-inch) strips orange zest

Cabernet-Cranberry Sauce with Figs

Makes 4 servings, with leftovers Active time, 30 minutes - Total time, 2 1/2 hours Who knew Cabernet and cranberries would make such a dynamic duo? Add dried figs (plumped in the Cabernet ahead of time), and you end up with a winey, fruity fig bar, minus the cookie. This sauce is so fine,

Preparation Bring wine to a boil with figs in a small saucepan, then remove from heat and steep figs, covered, until tender, about 30 minutes. Strain mixture through a sieve into a medium heavy saucepan and reserve figs in a small bowl. Add cranberries, sugar, and zest to wine and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring until sugar has dissolved. Adjust heat and continue to simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until cranberries burst and mixture is thickened slightly, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat and discard orange zest strips, then stir in figs. Let cool completely.●

Chestnut, Wild Rice, and Pistachio Dressing Makes 8 serving Between the rich chestnuts and the buttery rice, this dish has the chops to be a main. Ingredients 1/2 cup natural wild rice 1 cup basmati rice 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) salted butter 2 cups diced celery (from 5 stalks) 2 cups diced yellow onion (from 1 large) 3 garlic cloves, minced - Fine sea salt 2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme 1/2 cup shelled salted pistachios, crushed 8 ounces cooked chestnuts, roughly chopped 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley Preparation Put wild rice in a fine-mesh sieve and rinse it under cold running water, swishing rice with your hand until water runs clear. Transfer rice to a medium bowl and add water to cover. Pour off any black bits or floating kernels, and then pour rice back into sieve to drain. Cook rices separately: Combine wild rice with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1 cup water in a small saucepan. Bring

230

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Photo by Jennifer May

to a simmer, cover, reduce heat to low, and steam until rice is tender and curling into a C shape, 20-25 minutes. At the same time, combine basmati rice, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 13/4 cups water in another small saucepan. Bring to a simmer, cover, reduce heat to low, and steam until rice is tender, 25 minutes. Combine rices in a large bowl and cover. Cook the vegetable base: Heat butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add celery and onion and cook, stirring often, until vegetables are limp but still bright, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and thyme and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Pour over rices, scraping the pan for the juices, and stir to combine. Add pistachios, chestnuts, and parsley and mix thoroughly.●


Chorizo Corn Bread Stuffing 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup milk 1 large egg 3/4 stick (6 tbs) unsalted butter, melted & cooled

Photo by Chris Gentile

Makes 8 to 10 servings (10 cups) Active time 45 minutes, Total time 1 1/2 hours This corn bread stuffing is a stroke of genius. It’s so easy, you’ll be making it far more often than once a year for Thanksgiving! Shelley Wiseman, author of Just Tacos, knows a thing or two about corn—and not just in tortillas—and she decided to skip the process of drying the cubes of corn bread in the oven. That alone is a huge time-saver. To enliven the corn bread, she balances the flavor punch of chorizo with the sweetness of onions and corn kernels. When it comes time to bake it in a dish (not inside the turkey), she forgoes the old process of covering the stuffing—which allows steam to soften the dried bread—because the bread isn’t dry. She simply bakes it uncovered, so that the top gets golden with crispy brown edges, while the interior stays moist. Ingredients Corn bread: 1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup sugar

Stuffing: 1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter 2 cups chopped onions 8 ounces Spanish chorizo (dry-cured spiced sausage), casing removed and sausage coarsely chopped (about 1 1/2 cups packed; see Cooks’ Notes) 2 cups fresh, or thawed frozen, corn kernels (one 10-ounce package) 1 teaspoon dried sage 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley 2 cups turkey stock or reduced-sodium chicken broth Special equipment: 8-inch square baking pan Preparation For Corn Bread: Heat oven to 400°F with rack in middle and butter an 8-inch square baking pan. Whisk together cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Whisk together milk, egg, and butter in a small bowl and stir into dry ingredients. Pour batter into buttered baking pan. Bake until golden and a tester comes out clean, 25 to 30 minutes. Cool corn bread in pan on a rack 10 minutes, then turn out onto rack to cool completely. Cut corn bread into 3/4-inch cubes and put in a large bowl. For Stuffing: Melt butter in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium heat, then add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 8 minutes. Add chorizo, corn, sage, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add parsley. Toss chorizo mixture with corn bread and transfer to a 13- by 9-inch baking pan. Drizzle with chicken broth. Bake at 400°F uncovered, until golden brown, about 30 minutes.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

231


5 tablespoons unsalted butter 1/3 cup shallot, finely chopped (about 2 medium) 3 tablespoons packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste

Photo by Lara Ferroni

Green Beans with Caramelized Pecans

Makes 10 servings Active time 45 min., Total time 45 min. Green beans have a certain suave, slender elegance that makes them a classic accompaniment to rosy-red roast beef. But too often, they get short shrift. We suggest tossing them in a hot skillet with shallots and pecans that get caramelized in buttery brown sugar, and you’ll see just how special green beans can be. Ingredients 1/2 cup pecan halves and pieces (2 ounces) 2 1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed

Preparation Heat oven to 350°F with rack in middle. Spread out pecans on a rimmed sheet pan and bake in oven until pale golden on inside, about 6 to 8 minutes. Cool and coarsely chop. Have ready a colander submerged in a large bowl of ice water. Cook beans in a 6- to 8-quart pot of well-salted boiling water, uncovered, until just tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Using a large slotted spoon and/or tongs, transfer beans to colander in ice water to stop cooking, then drain well and dry on towels. Heat butter in a 12- to 14-inch deep heavy skillet (preferably straight-sided) over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then add shallot and cook, stirring until pale golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and stir in sugar until almost dissolved, then cook pecans, stirring, 1 minute. Add green beans, kosher salt, and pepper, and sauté beans, turning them with tongs, until heated through, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a platter and serve.●

Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Speck and Chimichurri Makes 4 servings active time 15 minutes, total time 35 minutes Feel free to play with different herbs in the chimichurri recipe—that’s what these brothers and co-chefs have always done. Ingredients 4 small sweet potatoes, unpeeled, cut lengthwise into wedges 2 tablespoons plus 1/4 cup olive oil Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves with tender stems 1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 1/4 cup fresh oregano leaves 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves 2 garlic cloves 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 ounces thinly sliced Speck or prosciutto, torn Preparation Heat oven to 425°F. Toss sweet potatoes and 2 tablespoons oil on a large rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, turning once, until tender, 2530 minutes. Meanwhile, pulse cilantro, parsley, orega-

232

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Photo by Hirsheimer & Hamilton

no, thyme, and garlic in a food processor until finely chopped. With motor running, slowly add vinegar and remaining 1/4 cup oil and process until combined; season with salt and pepper. Spoon chimichurri onto a serving platter and top with sweet potatoes and Speck.

3 More Ideas For…Sweet Potato Wedges - Crispy on the outside, velvety within, and with a prep time of about, oh, three minutes, sweet potato wedges are perfect for family dinner. Herb Yogurt Blend - Spoon yogurt with a handful of chopped cilantro onto a plate and top with wedges. Almonds + Sage Just before the potatoes finish cooking, add sage leaves to the baking sheet. Finish with sprinkle chopped smoked almonds and the crisp sage. Glazed Toss cooked wedges with a mixture of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sugar.●


Photo by Jeremy Liebman

Panko & Mustard Crusted Rabbit with Sorrel Cream Sauce - 8 Sevings Traditional Thanksgiving flavors (squash, cinnamon, butter) are given a beautiful Persian accent. The exotic spiced butter is also a treat mixed into couscous. Ingredients Spiced butter: 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature 1 tablespoon crushed dried rose petals (optional) 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin Kosher salt Squash: 4 pounds assorted small winter squash (such as acorn, kabocha, or delicata) Kosher salt 3/4 cup pomegranate seeds Ingredient info:Dried rose petals are available at Middle Eastern markets and kalustyans.com.

Preparation For Spiced Butter: Mix all ingredients except salt in a small bowl until lime juice is incorporated. Season with salt. Cover; keep in a cool place. Spiced butter can be made 1 week ahead. Roll into logs, wrap in parchment paper, and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or freeze for up to 3 months. For Squash: Trim ends of acorn and kabocha squash and cut in half through the stem end. Scrape out seeds and place squash cut side down on a cutting board (do not peel). Cut halves crosswise into 1/2” slices. If using delicata squash, cut crosswise into 1/2” rings; scrape out seeds. Fill a large wide pot with water to a depth of 1/2” and add a pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Add squash slices; reduce heat to mediumlow. Cover and steam, adding more water as needed to maintain 1/2” of water at bottom of pot, until squash is tender but not falling apart, 20-25 minutes. Carefully transfer squash slices to a large platter (some squash at bottom of pot may be too soft; save for another purpose4) and season with salt. Reduce water in pot over high heat (or add hot water) to measure 3/4 cup. Remove from heat and whisk in spiced butter, 1 tablespoonful at a time, to form a rich, glossy sauce. Season to taste with salt. Drizzle spiced butter over squash. Top with pomegranate seeds.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

233


6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 4 cups (loosely packed) baby spinach leaves 1 Anjou pear, peeled, cored, and cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices 3/4 cup coarsely grated Asiago cheese (about 5 ounces) 1/2 cup red bell pepper, cut into fine dice 2 tablespoons shallot, minced

Photo by Ellen Silverman

Perfect Pear Salad Makes 4 servings

Recommend pears that are tender but crisp, giving the salad a divine texture and bite that is at once crunchy and juicy. Ingredients 10 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into large dice

Preparation 1. In a large skillet over moderately high heat, sauté the bacon, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 10 to 12 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper-towel–lined plate to drain. Set aside. 2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper. In a large bowl, toss the spinach with half the dressing. 3. Divide the spinach among 4 plates. Top with the pear slices. Sprinkle the bacon, cheese, red pepper, and shallot over each plate. 4. Finish drizzling with the remaining dressing and serve immediately.●

Oyster–Swiss Chard Gratin with Country Bacon Makes 8 servings

Swiss chard is a winter green that is in season just as oysters are at their peak. As the weather cools, the chard gets sweeter and the oysters get saltier, a beautiful balance of earth and sea when together in the same bite. Ingredients 3 thick slices smoky bacon, cut into small dice 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 small onion, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 bunches Swiss chard, stemmed, chopped into 1/2-inch dice 2 cups heavy cream 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 18 oysters, freshly shucked, patted dry, and coarsely chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 1 cup fresh bread crumbs Preparation Preheat the oven to 400°F. Brown the bacon in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the butter, onion, garlic, and Swiss chard and sauté until the chard

234

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Photo by Ed Anderson © 2012

is completely wilted. Remove from the heat. Pour the mixture into a colander set in the sink and squeeze out all excess liquid. Reserve. Return the pan to the stove and add the cream and nutmeg. Bring to a boil over high heat, then decrease the heat to medium-low so the cream does not boil over. Cook the cream until it reduces to 1 cup. Set aside to cool. In a bowl, combine the chard mixture, cooled cream, and oysters. Mix well and season with salt and pepper. Spoon the mixture into a 3-quart gratin dish. Using the back of a spoon, spread the mixture evenly. In a small bowl, mix together the Parmesan cheese and bread crumbs and sprinkle the topping evenly over the gratin. Bake until the mixture is bubbling around the sides and the crust is lightly golden brown, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly before serving.●


Cranberry and Wild Blueberry Pie Crust: 2 pie crust frozen discs Heavy whipping cream (for brushing) Freshly grated nutmeg (for sprinkling)

Photo by Hans Gissenger

Makes 8 servings Active time1 hour, Total time 4 hours (includes baking and cooling time) The technique: To create a lattice top, roll out the dough, then cut it into strips. Make the lattice by draping half the strips in one direction across the filling, then draping the other half in the opposite direction, or weave the strips over and under for a classic basket-weave pattern. The payoff: A professional-looking dessert that’s sure to impress your guests. A perfect Thanksgiving treat for berry pie lovers. Ingredients Filling: 16 ounces frozen organic wild blueberries (do not thaw) 12 ounces fresh or frozen cranberries (do not thaw; about 3 cups) 1 1/4 cups sugar 3 tablespoons cornstarch 2 cinnamon sticks 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel

Preparation For Filling: Combine all ingredients in large saucepan. Cook over medium heat until mixture thickens and begins to boil, stirring occasionally, 12 to 14 minutes. Continue to boil 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Transfer berry mixture to glass or ceramic dish; cool completely (mixture will thicken). DO AHEAD: Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover; chill. For Crust: Position rack in center of oven; preheat to 400°F. Roll out 1 dough disk on floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer crust to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish; trim dough overhang to 1 inch. Remove cinnamon sticks from filling; spoon into crust. Roll out second dough disk to 13x10- inch rectangle. Cut dough lengthwise into 3/4-inch-wide strips (11 to 12 strips). Arrange half of dough strips across top of filling, spacing evenly apart. Form lattice by arranging remaining dough strips at right angle to first dough strips and weaving strips, if desired. Trim off excess dough from strips. Brush edges of bottom crust lightly with whipping cream. Press dough strip ends to adhere to bottom crust edges. Fold edges of bottom crust up over strips, pinching to seal. Crimp edges decoratively. Brush edges and lattice lightly with cream. Sprinkle lattice strips lightly with nutmeg. Place pie on rimmed baking sheet and bake until crust is golden and filling is bubbling thickly, about 1 hour 10 minutes. Cool pie on rack. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Serve pie at room temperature.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

235


1 cup heavy cream 1/3 cup sour cream 2 large eggs 3/4 cup sugar 3 1/2 tablespoons bourbon 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice 1/4 teaspoon salt Equipment: a 9 1/2-inch deep-dish pie plate (6-cup capacity); pie weights or dried beans Accompaniment: lightly sweetened whipped cream (add 1 teaspoon bourbon per 1/2 cup cream if desired) Photo by William Abranowicz

Bourbon Pumpkin Pie Makes 8 servings Active time 35 min, Total time 6 hr For many, Thanksgiving without pumpkin pie is unthinkable, but that doesn’t mean you can’t jazz up the old standby. A judicious hand with the spices lends this custardy version a certain lightness of being. There is a bit of tang, too, from sour cream, and an underlying warmth from the jigger of bourbon (to amplify the depth of flavor, add some to the whipped cream accompaniment, too). Ingredients Pastry dough 1 (15-ounces) can pure pumpkin

Preparation Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface with a lightly floured rolling pin into a 12-inch round and fit into pie plate. Trim edge, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang. Fold overhang under and lightly press against rim of pie plate, then crimp decoratively. Lightly prick bottom all over with a fork. Chill until firm, at least 30 minutes (or freeze 10 minutes). Preheat oven to 375°F with rack in middle. Line shell with foil and fill with pie weights. Bake until side is set and edge is golden, about 20 minutes. Carefully remove weights and foil and bake shell until golden all over, 10 to 15 minutes more. Cool completely. Whisk together remaining ingredients and pour into cooled shell. Bake until edge of filling is set but center trembles slightly, about 45 minutes (filling will continue to set as it cools). Cool completely.●

Pumpkin Spice Muddy Buddies Make a great fall dessert for Fall parties, as Halloween treats, and picnics at the pumpkin patch! Ingredients 8 cups Chex cereal 1 bag (10 oz.) Wilton Pumpkin Spice candy melts ½ cup pumpkin butter ¼ cup (½ stick) butter, melted 1 cup spice cake mix, dry ½ cup powdered sugar Preparation Place the Chex cereal in a large bowl that has a lid or a large paper grocery bag. Set aside. In a small bowl, combine the dry cake mix and powdered sugar. Set aside. In a medium saucepan over low heat, melt the pumpkin spice candy melts, butter and pumpkin butter until smooth. Stir constantly.

236

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Working quickly, pour the candy melts mixture over the cereal. Shake or stir until thoroughly combined and the cereal is mostly covered. Immediately pour the dry cake mix mixture over the top and shake until the cereal is well coated.●


Pound Cake with Grand MarnierPoached Apricots Lightly sweetened whipped cream (for serving) Special equipment: A 10”-diameter tube pan or angel food cake pan

Photo by Hirsheimer & Hamilton

Makes 12 servings Active time 45 minutes, Total time 3 hours Beating the butter and sugar until light and fluffy is essential to this cake’s moist, tender crumb. Ingredients Cake: 2 cups (4 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan 3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for pan 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar 1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom 2 cups superfine sugar 6 large eggs 1/2 cup heavy cream 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Apricots and assembly: 2/3 cup Grand Marnier 2/3 cup granulated sugar 2 cups dried apricots (about 8 ounces) 1 1 1/2” piece peeled ginger, sliced

Preparation For Cake: Place a rack in middle of oven; preheat to 325°F. Butter and flour pan. Whisk salt, cream of tartar, cardamom, and 3 cups flour in a medium bowl. Using an electric mixer on high speed, beat 2 cups butter until very light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Reduce speed to low and gradually add superfine sugar. Increase speed to high and beat until very light and creamy, 6–8 minutes longer. Add eggs 1 at a time, beating to blend between additions. Beat in cream and vanilla. Reduce speed to low; gradually add dry ingredients, mixing until mostly combined. Finish mixing with a rubber spatula just until combined. Scrape batter into prepared pan. Bake cake, rotating halfway through, until top is golden brown and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 70–80 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack; let cake cool completely before turning out. DO AHEAD: Cake can be baked 3 days ahead. Store tightly wrapped at room temperature. For Apricots and assembly: Bring Grand Marnier, granulated sugar, and 2/3 cup water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar. Add apricots and ginger, reduce heat to low, and simmer gently until apricots are very soft, 20–25 minutes. Let cool. Remove ginger just before serving. Serve cake with apricots and syrup and whipped cream. DO AHEAD: Apricots can be poached 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

237


2 tablespoons all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon Miso Streusel Topping: 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, melted, cooled slightly 3 tablespoons white miso 2 large eggs 2 cups all purpose flour 1 1/3 cups sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger Vanilla ice cream Photo by Kenji Toma

Preparation

Makes 10 servings Active time 25 minutes, Total time 1 hour 45 minutes

For Apples: Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Toss first 5 ingredients in large bowl. Add sugar, flour, and cinnamon; toss to combine. Transfer to baking dish.

Ingredients Apples: 4 medium granny smith apples, peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 5 1/2 cups) 3 large fuji apples, peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 4 cups) 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/3 cup (packed) golden brown sugar

For Streusel: Whisk butter, miso, and eggs in medium bowl until smooth. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, and ginger in large bowl. Form well in center of flour mixture and add butter mixture. Using rubber spatula, toss until large clumps form. Using fingertips, break up streusel clumps into smaller pieces and sprinkle streusel topping over apples. Bake until apple mixture is bubbling and streusel is golden brown, 50 to 55 minutes. Cool slightly. Serve with vanilla ice cream.●

Warm Apple Cobbler

Pumpkin Spice Cheesecake Enchiladas with Caramel Drizzle Makes 9-12 servings

If you’re looking for a different dessert to make on Halloween, then try this delightful recipe. Ingredients 1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened 1 cup canned pumpkin 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice 2½ cups Cool Whip, thawed 18-24 Flour tortillas 6 tbsp. butter, melted 2 tsp. sugar 2 tsp. cinnamon Caramel sauce

238

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

Preparation In a large bowl, beat the cream cheese, pumpkin, sugar and pumpkin pie spice with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended. Gently stir in the whipped topping. Divide the cream cheese mixture evenly between the tortillas. Roll each tortilla up and put on serving plates. In a small bowl, combine the butter, sugar and cinnamon. Brush the mixture over the over the rolled tortillas. Top with caramel sauce.●


Iced Salted Caramel Latte

This Iced Salted Caramel Latte is the perfect way to indulge a bit and get your caffeine fix! This drink is an easy and tasty variation of Starbucks’ Iced Caramel Latte. With the Starbucks Versimo Brewer, it is sooooo simple to make this Iced Salted Caramel Latte at home - and it rivals what you get at your local Starbucks store! I was recently given the opportunity to try the Starbucks Verismo Brewer and Starbucks Verismo Pods. Being a huge coffee drinker and fan of Starbucks, I couldn’t wait to try out this brewing system! It didn’t disappoint!

I was impressed with how sleek it looked and with how easy it is to use. I tried a few drink variations - and this Iced Salted Caramel Latte was by far my favorite! Most of y’all know I’m a coffee drinker. Before getting this Starbucks Verismo Brewer, I had never tired an espresso. I’m gonna admit something - I tried to drink an espresso .... straight. I’m not even sure if that’s what you’re supposed to do?! Wow-eeeeee!! That’ll jolt you awake! LOL. It was not a favorite (personally) .... it was too strong!! However, mix it with some syrup and milk and it’s a pretty fantastic little drink! :)● cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

239


Letters to Santa Party I found this cute felt Santa advent calendar in the dollar section at Target. The kids are excited to see Christmas is so close.

We had Santa’s favorite snack, milk and cookies, along with some strawberries. We turned on some Christmas music and got to work.

While the kids were at school today, I set up for a Santa letter writing party. I set out a basket of Christmas stationary, pencils, markers, crayons, and stickers. Little J wrote his letter back in September...experienced one! However, just to get some sneaky fun writing practice in, I had him write a letter to Santa asking that he visit the child whose card we picked off the angel tree. I helped Juiciness and Sassyfras write their letter and they tried super hard to write something that looked like their name. After that they colored and decorated their letters to the nines.

After their letters were sealed and addressed, they put them in the mailbox. They can’t wait to hear back from Santa! Now the younger two wouldn’t know, but Little J is getting old enough to catch details about Santa that just don’t make sense. So Santa has to be a bit more careful these days. Santa’s letter has to look authentic. *If you send your letter to the North Pole, it must be there by Dec 10th to get a reply before Christmas*●

240

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


A little sneak peak on what will be in our December Issue: Our Classic Movies List:

Photo by: Beth Roose

Christmas In Connecticut It Happened On 5th Ave It’s A Wonderful Life Miracle on 34th St The Bishops Wife

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

241


Photo by: Beth Roose

242

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


A little sneak peak on what will be in our December Issue: Our Hollywood Actors List:

Our Actors are from the Cast of Christmas In Connecticut: Barbara Stanwyck, Dennis Morgan, and Sydney Greenstreet. We will also feature Actors from It’s A Wonderful Life.. Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed. Last we will feature Actors from The Bishops Wife.. Loretta Young, David Niven, Elsa Lanchester cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

243


Photo by: Beth Roose

244

cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014


cinamagic NOVEMBER 2014

245


Photo by: D.G. Bolduc Photography

CINAMAGIC - Nov 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you