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inamagic

Our Song Artist Spotlight:

CELESTE KELLOGG

February Edition

Our Featured Story:

WALTZ ACROSS TEXAS

Person of the Year:

GAIL HALVORSEN

FEB 2014 Model: Aleena Embree Photo by: EMBREE Photography (Sarah Embree)


Candles By Nature Homemade, all natural candles, soaps, and healing balms all handmade with love www.candlesbynature.etsy.com www.facebook.com/ CandlesByNature.

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Photo by: Nancy Vuu Production and Design Designer: Love Baby J and Threaded Creations Models: Isabella and Nicolas MUA: Caroline Vuu Nguyen cinamagic february 2014

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Candles By Nature 4

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www.candlesbynature.etsy.com


Candles By Nature

Using natural, eco-friendly ingredients is important to us, which is why we seek out the most sustainable options available. With each Candles By Nature handcrafted item, you can bring the lovely scents of fresh flowers and herbs into your home.

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Caty's Cribs Creating a one-of-a-kind space for the little ones allowing for a unique niche that Custom Decorating by Catalina is known for. www.catyscribs.com 6

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Custom Decorating by Catalina


Caty's Cribs cinamagic february 2014

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February 2014

Cover Stories:

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40 42 58

CELESTE KELLOGG WALTZ ACROSS TEXAS GAIL HALVORSEN


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February 2014

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ARTICLES

HOLLYWOOD

22 Before Flutes

28 Movie Reviews

60 A Mother’s Courage

152 Water Spirits 162 Making a Dream Catcher

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106 Actors

RECIPES 196 Moroccan Lamb & Apricot Kebabs 198 Cherry Cheese Pie

CRAFTS 118 Groundhog Day: Cupcakes Games, Crafts & Activities Party Ideas 122 Valentine’s Day: Love Bug Love Potion Drink

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Heart Headband Puppy Love Lovin’ Spoons Piglet Cupcakes Heart Wand Table Ideas

SPOTLIGHTS 40 Celeste Kellogg 42 Waltz Across Texas 52 Make-Up-Artist (Sabina Yunusova) 58 Gail Halvorsen FRESH FACES: 68 Hayden Bella 74 Natalie Harrison 78 DeNise Evans


Caty's Cribs

Custom Decorating by Catalina

Caty's Cribs offers excellence and exclusivity that can not be mass produced along with the vision from an experienced decorator/designer. www.catyscribs.com cinamagic february 2014

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Models: Kamden, Isabella, Sophia, Isobel, Simone & Ava Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography Designer: Love Baby J Headpieces: by Nancy Vuu Photography & Charm City Chic Couture Makeup: Thy Dinh Hair: Thy Dinh & Nancy Vuu Photography cinamagic february 2014

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Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography

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Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography

Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography

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Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography

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Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography

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inamagic President Beth Roose Editor Fina Florez Graphic Designer Fina Florez Contributing Writers & Photographers: Beth Roose, Stephanie Hubbard, Nancy Vuu, Sara Embree, Edward Faulkner, Address: 22777 Franz Rd, Suite 4212 Katy, Texas 77449 Accepting Stories and Photo’s for our March “Easter, Kentucky Derby, Cinco de Mayo, Star Wars” edition at nationalpark4u@yahoo.com

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Alexander Art Pet Portraits Ceramic Sculptured Tiles

Ceramics 3-d portrait tiles & fine art Find my items at: www.sondraalexander.com cinamagic february 2014

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From the Editor’s Desk

Once in a while in the middle of an ordinary life, Love gives us a fairytale. With that said...

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otivational and love stories have the ability to lift us up, make us smile, encourage, motivate, and teach us valuable life lessons. As I think about what drives you to pick up and read love & motivating stories that will hopefully help you spark that motivational feeling. I ask myself, what gives you or any of us an empowering sense of hope, that if ‘he/she’ can do it, so can I. Throughout history, people have used inspirational stories to teach, encourage, and inspire in hopes that the listener or reader will use it as a stepping stone and as an example to live a better life. Some will make you think, some will make you cry. Hopefully, some will give you that motivation to go for your dreams. The important thing to remember when reading these inspiring love stories is that when you get that feeling of motivation, where you want to do something, do something. Nothing is more of a waste than to be inspired and motivated and not take any action. Your life will only change as a result of taking focused action. An inspirational love story is nothing if it doesn’t cause you to do something or at least make you believe in yourself a bit more. Hopefully, by reading or listening to inspiring love stories, they will change your life in some way.

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An inspirational love story is nothing if it doesn’t cause you to do something or at least make you believe in yourself...


Alexander Art www.sondraalexander.com cinamagic february 2014

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There was a time before flutes . . .

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any generations ago, the people had drums, gourd rattles and bull-roarers, but no flutes. At that time, a young man went out to hunt. The people in his camp were hungry as meat was scarce. He found the tracks of an Elk and followed them for a long time. The Elk, wise and swift, is the one who owns the love charm. If a man possesses Elk Medicine, the girl he likes can’t help liking him, too. He will also be a lucky hunter. This young hunter had no Elk Medicine. After many hours, he finally sighted his game. Although a skilled hunter, the Elk always managed to stay just out of range, leading him deep inside a thick forest. The tracks had disappeared and so had the Elk. There was no moon. He realized he was lost and, it was too dark to find his way out. He came upon a stream with cool, clear water.where he stopped to drink and eat food that he had brought with him. He rolled himself into his fur robe, propped his back against a tree and tried to rest. But he couldn’t sleep because of the strange noises that filled the forest, the “groaning” of trees in the wind, and the cries of 22

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night animals such as the owl. It was as if he was hearing these sounds for the first time. Suddenly, he was aware of an entirely new sound, one that neither he nor anyone else had ever heard before.The sound was mournful and ghost-like; it made him afraid, so he drew his robe tightly about himself and reached for his bow, making sure it was properly strung and ready for immediate use. As frightening as the sound was, it was also like a song, sad but beautiful, full of love, hope and yearning. Before he knew it, he was asleep, dreaming of the bird called wagnuka, the red-

headed woodpecker. In his dream, Wagnuka appeared singing the strangely beautiful song and telling him, “Follow me and I will teach you.” The sun was already high when the hunter awoke the next morning. On a branch of the tree against which he was leaning, he saw a redheaded woodpecke who flew from tree to tree, but never very far, looking back all the time as if to say, “Come on!” Suddenly, he heard that wonderful song again, and his heart yearned to find the singer. Flying toward the sound, leading the hunter, the bird flitted through the leaves, while its bright red top made it easy to follow.


“ At last, the woodpecker lighted on a cedar tree and began hammering on a branch with his strong beak, making a noise like the fast beating of a small drum. A gust of wind arose, and again the hunter heard that beautiful sound right above him. Looking up, he discovered the song came from the dead branch on which the woodpecker was tapping his beak. He realized it was the wind which made the sound as it whistled through the hole the bird had drilled. The hunter took the branch, a hollow piece of wood full of woodpecker holes that was about the length of his forearm. He walked back to his village bringing no meat, but happy with his discovery. In his tipi, the young man tried to make the branch sing for him. He blew on it, he waved it around, no sound came. It made him sad. He wanted so much to hear that wonderful new sound. He purified himself in the sweat lodge and climbed to the top of a lonely hill. There, resting with his back against a large rock, he fasted, going without food or water for four days and nights, crying for a vision which would tell him how to make the branch sing. In the middle of the fourth night, wagnuka, the bird with the bright red top, appeared, saying, “Watch me,” turning himself into a man, showing the hunter how to make the branch sing. In his dream, the young man observed very carefully, as instructed. When he awoke, he broke off a branch from a cedar tree and, working many hours, hol-

In his dream, Wagnuka appeared singing the strangely beautiful song and telling him, ‘Follow me and I will teach you.’

lowed it out with a bowstring drill, just as he had seen the woodpecker do in his dream. He whittled the branch into the shape of the birds with a long neck and a open beak. He painted the top of the birds head with washasha, the sacred red color. He prayed. He smoked the branch up with incense of burning sage, cedar and sweet grass. He fingered the holes as he

had seen the man-bird do in his vision, meanwhile blowing softly into the mouthpiece. All at once, there was the song, ghost-like and beautiful, that drifted all the way to the village, where the people were joyful to hear it. With the help of the wind and the woodpecker, the young man had brought them the first flute. cinamagic february 2014

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LOVE OF

Alice

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS

Photos by: Travis Dewitz Photography

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Photo by: Travis Dewitz Photography

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Photo by: Travis Dewitz Photography

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Classic Movies

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What’s the story? et in French-controlled Casablanca in the early part of WWII, CASABLANCA follows hardboiled American nightclub owner Rick (Humphrey Bogart), who agrees to hide some stolen (and highly coveted) transit letters, which are used to by refugees to leave the country and escape from the Nazis. Police Captain Renault (Claude Rains) and Nazi Major Strasser (Conrad Veidt) are tipped off that Rick might have the letters, and they put the pressure on him. Strasser is also hunting escaped Czech resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid), who arrives at Rick’s with Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) Rick and Ilsa have a history, and Rick is still deeply angry at the stunning beauty. What ensues is a story of love, betrayal, sacrifice, narrow escapes, and the most memorable airport tarmac scene in film history.

Is it any good? Probably the most famous Hollywood movie of all time, certainly the most quoted, and the most frequently cited as an all-time favorite, CASABLANCA won Best Picture, Director, and Writer awards at the 1943 Oscar ceremony. The definitive rebuttal to notions of the “auteur” (one author) in film, the romantic drama was put together in pieces by many different sources, with script pages completed just moments before the cameras rolled. The performances by Bogart and Bergman are so subtle and complex because the actors themselves had no idea how it was going to end. Almost every frame of the movie is an icon, and it has been endlessly copied and parodied. The Woody Allen movie Play It Again, Sam (rated PG, but not for kids as the entire plot is about seduction) is an affectionate tribute to Casablanca and other Bogart movies. cinamagic february 2014

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he quintessential American epic, Gone With the Wind sweeps across the Old South, the Civil War and Reconstruction. The tale of a selfish, headstrong Southern belle who draws her strength from the land, it’s a sumptuous costume drama and a richly entertaining movie. By today’s standards, Gone With the Wind occasionally lapses into outright melodrama, and its often-stereotypical 1939 portrayal of black people rankles modern viewers. Despite the flaws of its time, this star-studded, big-budget spectacular is an icon of American filmmaking, and not to be missed. The Plot The film is quite faithful to Margaret Mitchell’s blockbuster best-seller, and follows the adventures of Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh in her debut role). Stunningly beautiful and utterly self-absorbed, Scarlett is the daughter of plantation owner Gerald O’Hara, and secretly in love with neighboring plantation owner Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard). Ashley, meanwhile is pledged to his sweet-tempered and lovely cousin, Melanie (Olivia De Havilland). The movie opens with a flowery description of the Old South as the place where “gallantry took its last bow,” and “a dream remembered, a civilization gone with the wind.” On the eve of the Civil War, the wealthy families gather for a party at the Wilkes’ plantation, Seven Oaks, where Scarlett first catches sight of Rhett Butler (Clark Cable). This rakish and slightly disreputable gentleman is clearly interested in the pampered southern belle – and the only man there who understands the North will overpower the South in the conflict to come. And that very night, war is declared. Rejected by Ashley, Scarlett impulsively marries Melanie’s brother Charles, tying the two families together before Charles goes off to war (where he promptly dies of pneumonia). We follow the indomitable Scarlett through the ravages of war, her reluctant protection of Melanie, the fall of Atlanta, the ruin of Tara and near-starvation. Then it’s another marriage and her plucky and scandalous behavior during Reconstruction. She relies on Rhett throughout – but continues to reject him and cling stubbornly to her belief that she loves Ashley. The Cast of ‘Gone With the Wind’ Leigh didn’t land the role until after filming had begun – in fact, she signed on the day the famous burning of Atlanta was filmed, using an actual conflagration of old sets on the studio’s back lots. (A stunt woman played Scarlett in the fire scenes.) The young English actress was an excellent choice

for the selfish, scheming Scarlett, a delicate beauty with a will of iron. She’s hard to like, but she must be admired. Gable is irresistible as the rake with a heart of gold and his own admirable code of honor. His confidence and easy masculinity so far overshadow the pale attractions of Ashley Wilkes that Scarlett’s continued devotion strains credulity. De Havilland is strong as the almost too-saintly Melanie, and Howard is just the right sort of weak tea as Ashley. Hattie McDaniel almost walks away with the movie as Mammy, the family servant who sees through Scarlett’s schemes and has more life and zest in her little finger than half the genteel household. She was the first African American nominated for an Oscar, and the first to win one, as Best Supporting Actress. By contrast, Butterfly McQueen’s squeaky-voiced turn as the simple-minded Prissy has become the stuff of parody, especially her “I don’t know nuthin’ ‘bout birthin’ no babies” line. With more than 50 speaking roles, keeping all the characters straight is a daunting task, but the huge cast adds to the scope of the story. The lush score by Max Steiner, detailed sets and sumptuous costumes, superb art direction, and gorgeous Technicolor cinematography by Ernest Haller round out the sweep of this epic film. The Backstory Years in the making, at $4 million it was one of the most expensive films ever made, and it held the record as highest-grossing movie for many years. Although that record has since been eclipsed, Gone With the Wind is still the box office champ for most theater tickets sold. It won the Best Picture Oscar in one of the most creatively competitive years ever seen in Hollywood. Other movies released in 1939 included Ninotchka, Stagecoach, Wuthering Heights and Goodbye Mr. Chips. Incredibly, the former stunt man who directed Gone with the Wind, Victor Fleming, is also credited with the other immortal classic released in 1939: The Wizard Of Oz. ‘Gone With the Wind’ - the bottom line It’s a little overblown, with attitudes that are more than a little dated, yet Gone with the Wind is justly famous. Mostly for the better, and sometimes for worse, this epic movie is a uniquely American story. Just the Facts: Year: 1939, Color Director: Victor Fleming Running Time: 222 minutes Studio: MGM cinamagic february 2014

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his powerful black and white drama of the Titanic still surpasses all the other versions--yes, even the James Cameron extravaganza. Cameron turned this unforgettable sea tragedy to a Romeo and Juliet love story that went on and on and could have benefitted by at least 30 to 45 minutes cut. But in this l953 version, we’re told the story through a battling married couple who somehow rediscover their love before the tragic end of the doomed liner. We’ve got two towering professionals: Barbara Stanwyck and Clifton Webb who make us believe in them as tragic characters. Both shine throughout and we feel genuine pathos at the end when they’re parted. The production and cast members are all superb and the script rightfully won an Academy Award. The dialogue is adult, gripping and adds immeasurably to the sense of doom. A young Robert Wagner can be seen, along with Audrey Dalton. This version was first conceived by that masterful genius, David O. Selznick back in the early l940s as a Technicolor spectacular but World War II curtailed such an idea because of the physical materials that would be needed for bringing this legendary tragedy to life on the screen. James Cameron re-conceived this original concept and his final product certainly its champions but to me, this stunning black and white version has all the punch and emotional intensity that the other versions lack. Barbara Stanwyck and Clifton Webb are unforgettable and they’ll linger in your mind long after you’ve seen them on the screen. cinamagic february 2014

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What’s the story? ranky TV broadcaster Phil (Bill Murray) and his crew are sent to tiny Punxsutawney, Penn., to capture the “thrills” of its annual Groundhog Day celebration. A snowstorm strands them there overnight, and when he wakes up the next morning, Phil soon realizes that something strange is going on: It’s Groundhog Day again. As bitter-pill Phil repeatedly relives the tedium of the same day over and over again, he gradually learns to treat people decently. He also falls for producer Rita (Andie MacDowell) working every angle to figure out how to seduce her. Each defeat means a little more information -- and gets him a little closer to winning her over the next time around. Is it any good? Bill Murray shines in this good-natured comedy that delivers lots of laughs and some honest sentiment. Funny and uncommonly sweet, GROUNDHOG DAY has just the right blend of comedy and romance. Bill Murray is hilarious in his usual role as the detached wiseacre. Remarkably, the movie manages the almost impossible task of making us care about this sarcastic man. The story is simple but clever, and uses repetition to great effect. Director Harold Ramis also uses sound and music to great comic effect. Phil wakes up every morning at 6 a.m. to the ironically cheery Sonny and Cher song “I Got You Babe.” cinamagic february 2014

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LOVE OF

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Song Artist

Celeste Kellogg Photo by: Brittany Berggren Photography

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i my name is Celeste Kellogg I’m an Actress, Songwriter and Nashville Recording Artist. Like many kids I started singing in my church and school choirs. It didn’t take long for me to realize this is what I wanted to do. So before I knew it, I was putting myself into every Musical and Talent Show I could find. A few years later I found where Radio Disney was holding auditions for a NEW Tween Pop Group called RD7. I auditioned for the group and, lucky for me, I made it. The year with Radio Disney was Amazing. We opened for Raven, The Jonas Brothers, Miley Cyrus and the Cheetah Girls. It didn’t stop there; we also performed an hour long show at the Kelly Clarkson, Addicted to Love Tour. When Radio Disney came to an end, I decided to start my own group called No Limit. The reason for the name??? I wanted to send a message, “That if you work hard, stay true to yourself, there is No Limit to what you can do.” I would end each show with that statement. I had such a great time with No Limit, we performed in front on thousands each year, including a show on the Aircraft Carrier USS Eisenhower, wow what a treat. It was during my time with No Limit that the group got the attention of Grammy nominee Dave Moody of Elevating Entertainment, hence the movie “No Limit Kids: Much Ado About Middle School” was born and so was my love for acting. Not only was I a singer, choreographer and dancer, now I had become an Actress, and I loved it. I had also become more of a songwriter... Coming off the set of “No Limit Kids: Much Ado About Middle School”, I had so many emotions in me. I ended up writing 19 songs and recording my first CD titled “This is Where I Wanna Be” My song “The Look” charted #20 in Germany - Thank You Germany. My music is Andrew Lane who I met in LA while attending the School of Pop. Drew is a Multi-Platinum producer with such credits as High School Musical, Hannah Montana, Back Street Boys to name a few. When it came time to record, Drew said “Nashville”. After all, it is where music is made and Country was my true love. So, that’s kinda the gist of how I got started. 2011 was amazing, I released my debut CD, Gibson Guitars Endorsed my first Promo Tour and Pop Star Magazine covered the Tour along the way. I was the 2nd Pop Country Artist to be featured in Pop Star Magazine, the first being Taylor Swift. I Heart Radio, said I was an artist to watch, I’ve done TV and Radio Appearances, filmed a TV Pilot, My music video The Look was in rotation on The Country Network... 2012 would be a year that I guess will best be known as life changes....while I continued to promote my music through performing and interviews ~ it would also be the year that I would graduate

from High School, Headline my first tour ~ titled ~ The Country Pop Rock Tour. Our mission was to share our music while taking a stance against bullying. We had kids and adults tell us that we helped them out; we also found out that we actually saved a life. When I received that messaged I cried a happy cry. To know that you saved a life was a feeling I won’t forget. It was also in 2012 that I was offered the opportunity to star in a major TV series, after 5 callbacks ~ a plane ticket and contract was sent, for me to fly to LA for further testing. Where I was sincerely honored and thankful for the offer that in fact would have changed my life immediately, I felt that I had to stay true to myself. This incident truly told me that yes, I am a musician, songwriter ~ Nashville Recording Artist first...to this day I still keep the plane ticket in my desk drawer and can honestly say I have no regrets. 2012 - Ended with me recording my 2nd CD titled “Broken Record”. I wrote all the songs on the CD and once again I teamed up with Drew Lane to produce it. We recorded it at the House of Blues Studio in Nashville, Tenn. and Encino, CA. Throughout 2013, I have continued to work my music, through performing, interviews, radio, tv and another tour. I also attended CMA Fest in June. Once you meet a country fan at CMA Fest you feel like you have met an old friend or relative...they’re the best. My NEW EP “Broken Record” was released April 30th 2013...I hope you get a chance to check it out. I just finished filming my fourth music video titled “Broken Record” TBR in February 2014. February will be known as Broken Record month in hopes we will break sales and chart with this song. I guess one of my biggest compliments came from Linda Davis (Hilary Scott’s mother) after watching me perform “The Look” in Nashville...she said, “Celeste you are the Shania of this generation. Your songs will cross two charts”.... wow what a HUGE compliment and very big shoes to live up to. From the Industry people, I have been told I’m amazing, that I have an amazing tone to my voice, a force to be reckoned with, a rising star, gorgeous, confident, infectious, genuine and that I have IT. I have also been told I’m too young, too pretty, a girl, need more power in my voice, need to work on my breathing, never will make it, ugly, to nasal, it’s harder for girls then guys. What I’m trying to say is regardless of what people say, listen to your inner self, it will lead you in the right direction and never use people to get there, let your God given talents do that for you. I hope you know me a little bit more and NOW I hope to see you on the road. Please take time to check out my website and you will see everything this girl has been up to. ~Celeste~ cinamagic february 2014

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Featured Story

The boots, The rhinestones, The dresses And, oh, the music! We live it and breathe it all on the dance floor. Welcome to the world of the Country Western Dancesport by Bob Wheatley, Photo by Action Photos

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ny discussion about competitive Country Western dancing needs to begin with where it all started. Country Western dancing got most of its roots from the lifestyle of the working class in Houston, Texas back in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Many hard workin’ folks in Houston and the surrounding suburbs still find it quite normal to cap off their work week with a night on the town on Friday or Saturday nights. There are probably fifty or more country western dance clubs or bars within reasonable driving distance of the greater Houston area. It is just plain and simply part of the culture here and in fairness it is also big business in many other Texas cities. As silly as it may seem John Travolta managed to play a huge role in the uprise of Country Western Dancing with the 1979 release of “Urban Cowboy” which was shot at Gilley’s, a bar in Houston TX, actually Pasadena, a SE suburb of Houston.. The soaring popularity of that movie and the lifestyle that it portrayed here in Houston caught on like wildfire around the nation. Every nightclub that had converted to Hustle dance clubs after the other dance craze Travolta started in 1977 with “Saturday Night Fever” was quickly changing their formats to country. With the additional country music explosion of the mid-80s and early-90s, there were groups of country dancers in most every small town dancing in honky-tonks, community centers, church basements, school gymnasiums and VFW halls. With virtually every city in the nation offering CW dance clubs, it didn’t take long for there to become a huge industry of country dance instructors. The only problem was… what to teach and how? Enter the United Country Western Dance Council The United Country Western Dance Council (UCWDC) was born when people across the United States recognized this grassroots dance phenomenon. What would happen

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if these groups came together? What if there was a competitive circuit for country dancers? Over time that vision became a reality. When the founders of the UCWDC got together to form a competitive dance organization, they selected dances that came from the social arena: Schottische, pony swing, polka and two-step, They mixed in a smattering of popular dances borrowed from ballroom, like waltz, chacha and east coast swing. Keeping an eye on popular social dances, they added triple-two step, nightclub, and west coast swing and opened doors for line dance and team dancing. Over the next 20 years, the competition format was refined and organized in a way that put country dance on a par with other dance forms, each January hosting the World Championships of Country Western Dance. The organization is now priviledged to be a part of the World DanceSport Federation (WDSF) and is represented in the Olympic movement. While this International organization is committed to advancing country dance as a competitive dance sport, the UCWDC remains committed to making dance accessible to as many people as possible from small towns across the United States to cities and countries across International Borders. It IS our common language shared across this world. <credit www.ucwdc.org> A smaller, “sister” organization to the UCWDC is the American Country Dance Association (ACDA). It is comprised of regional events throughout the year in the United States, amounting to the Nation Championships each November in Fort Worth, Texas. Of course the king of all country dances is the Texas Two Step. A little history of it is essential to any discussion about country dancing. The Texas Two Step The two-step that is now the main dance in country and western comes out of Texas. However, the exact history, as of so many dances, is unclear. A certain connection with American

Cory Decuire and Catherine Pisano

Foxtrot is very likely: both have the same 6-count basic rhythm. In the late 70’s to early 80’s a group of instructors that were running a disco dance school changed with the trend and moved into teaching Country and Western. Enter Exclusive Dance Club. This would have followed the movie “Urban Cowboy” which came out in 1979. The teachers and dance directors had a background in teaching ballroom. So a lot of the early patterns on the syllabus were founded in foxtrot. I still have all of the original teaching charts and a lot of the videos from the time period. Exclusive Dance Club and staff formalized many of the roughly existing patterns and then added and created a bunch more. The main contribution would be weave patterns, spin tunnels, etc. Along comes UCWDC, somewhat late in the game. But none the less, a strong player. I learned to two-step as a child some 30 years ago. Which predates Exclusive and UCWDC. And it had been around long before that. But the similarities in the two dances, Bronze Foxtrot and Two-step are very apparent. There are many patterns especially in the beginning parts of 2-step that are and were taken from Bronze American Foxtrot. The misleading part of the argument is that 2-step, as


we know it today, was taught in the late 70’s and early 80’s like a bronze Foxtrot.This is mainly because the first teachers trying to make a buck at it were former ballroom instructors that applied the knowledge that they already had. The weave or more correctly whip pattern was taken from the swing or jitterbug influence. Then formalized for teaching purposes. Spin tunnels, We B. Wrappin’s, Wrap and rondes and a whole slew of other patterns you probably dance originated in Houston in the early 1980’s. Probably before you had even learned your first 2-step. When teachers began to apply what they knew about foxtrot to teaching basic two-step, everyone got the idea that 2-step derived from foxtrot. But in reality only a few patterns did. And in those days, there were no rotational patterns; only couples doing closed continuous turns down to the next corner of the dance floor and then breaking into a jitterbug. A lot of credit for the country and western craze in Houston should be given to Eddie Lopez. Eddie Lopez owned the most popular chain of studios in the Houston area called Exclusive Dance Club, which today can be found on the corner of Fondren & Westheimer in Houston, Texas. In its hey-day, Exclusive boasted close to 12 different studios and many well known instructors including Joyce Clarkson (of Evenin’ Star Boots), Laurie and Larry Sepulvado, Mary Hoedeman, Eddie Griffith and many, many more. The Two Step that is seen on the UCWDC circuit today is essentially the same as what was being taught at Exclusive nearly 30 years ago! The Sepulvados did much to popularlize this wonderful style of the dance as well. I recall watching very early videos of “major” Country Western competitions from the late 1980’s and thinking that no one was doing a “real” two step-I wasn’t sure what they were doing, but it wasn’t “genuine” from my perspective. After all, I’d learned the dance in TEXAS, in HOUSTON, in the motherland of country dancing! There is a syllabus that has been hammered out with some cooperation between the many studios in the Houston area. This cooperation was an attempt to develop some minimal standards of instruction and content to eliminate the typical conflicts that

can arise about who’s teaching the real thing. It was an effort that was successful in my opinion; look at competition videos from 1987 and compare them with current performances. What started in Houston is now generally recognized as THE Two Step. On a technical side note, in ALL Houston studios, the two step starts with the slow steps (SSQQ) rather than the quick steps (QQSS). In most cases and with most music, this still makes sense and is more than just a relic from the fox-trot. Currently, eight dances exist in the social and competitive CW Dancesport: Triple Two Step, Polka, Nightclub, Cha Cha, Waltz, Two Step, East Coast Swing, and West Coast Swing. Waltz Across Texas – An American Country Western Dance Event Our event, Waltz Across Texas, is a fully sanctioned American Country Dance Association event owned and operated by the partnership of Bob Wheatley and David Appel in Houston, TX. Over 20 years running, it is the last stop of a series of Regional Country Western dance events leading up to the the ACDA National Championships. We offer over 50 different divisions of competitive dancing and a fantastic Saturday Evening Show. Waltz Across Texas 2013 was amazing! We had record breaking entries for the ACDA, more social dancing, awards after each competitive session, tons of spectators, a Pizza Party, Ice Cream Social and over $5,000 in cash prize money awarded to our top competitors and instructors. Please join us in 2014 for another spectacular event where we will continue doing all we can to give you a great competion weekend and glimpse of our Dance Family that we so love. More information can be found at www.waltzacrosstx.com About the author Bob Wheatley began his competitive dance career in the late 1980’s and competed ProAm with his then coach (and dear friend) Carmen Goodman and went on to win 3 consecutive ProAm World Championships. After ProAm he partnered with the lovely Shawna Dysart where they began competing Couples in New Orleans in 1998 in Classic Division II. They went on an unprecedented 3 year run

through Division II, Division I, and Classic Masters, winning all three of those divisional World Championships in a row. They retired after winning the Classic Masters World Championship in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in 2001. Since then Bob has been busy as a UCWDC event director with Arizona and the Texas Classic. For that same time period he has also served as the Chairman of the UCWDC Music Committee. He is also one of the owners (along with David Appel) of Waltz Across Texas, a fully sanctioned ACDA event. He remains active as one of the top Master certified judges, teacher and choreographer. He did come out of competitive retirement a few years ago to dance as Pro for his beautiful fiancé Catherine Pisano, helping her to win 10 World Championships in the Open Female and Couples Divisions. David Appel David Appel has been a teacher, choreographer and competitor for 30 years. Starting in country and western in 1982. He competed in Pro-Am, professional and club competitions. He won the professional open and rising star with partner Gayla Wilmore. He went on to work at Fred Astaire dance studios for 8 years. He was fortunate to have been trained by many top coaches...Vernon Brock, Andrew Sinkinson and Rufus Dustin to name a few. He competed in American Rhythm, American Smooth and Theatre Arts. Then he went on to successfully competed on the swing and hustle circuits. Currently, he judges on UCWDC as a Master’s Level Judge, the ACDA and on the swing circuit. He coaches and choreograph’s for couples dancing all levels and styles. He has trained many couples and students over the years helping them to win titles and awards. He is still very active in coaching and choreography, and is sought after for his knowledge of lifts and tricks. David has won numerous titles, here are a few: 2 time U.S. Open Swing Champion, Division I World Champion, 2 time U.S. Hustle Champion, Over 40 Cabaret Titles and he has won two pickup trucks! In addition, David runs one of the largest West Coast Swing and C&W parties in Houston, TX. cinamagic february 2014

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Models: Matthew, Isabella, Sophia, Isobel, Simone & Ava Photo by: Nancy Vuu Photography Designer: Love Baby J Headpieces: by Nancy Vuu Photography & Charm City Chic Couture Makeup: Thy Dinh Hair: Thy Dinh & Nancy Vuu Photography

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iolin V Model: Jessica Middleton Photo by: Leslie Spurlock Photography www.lesliespurlock.com

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teampunk S Model: Sofia Stobl Wardrobe: Kelly Raby Lyerly Makeup & Hair Styling: Hollie Bryant Spencer Photo by: Duane Jones Photography

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Model: Karolina Bill Photos by: Gary Price Makeup & Hair: Sabina Yunusova

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MUA

(MAKE-UP-ARTIST)

abina S

SPOTLIGHT

Sabina Yunusova is a theatrical hair and media makeup artist (also ladies hairdressing). She studied at the University College Birmingham, UK. She worked as a freelancer with Geoff Cox and Anna Orkiszewska at the London Fashion Week with Luna Sky fashion designer last year and at the LWF London International this year (2013) as a hair stylist. She also worked with international Photographers, designers, and Next Top Models. You can see Sabinas work in VOGUE ITALY online, Dark Beauty, Beau nu, Elegant Magazine Cinamagic, Digital Photography,style Birmingham, Science, Fashion Show, photoshoots and videos.ď&#x20AC;˝ For more information, go to: http://www.modelmayhem. com/2915966 cinamagic february 2014

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Person of the Year

GAIL HALVORSEN

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ail Halvorsen in Berlin in 1989, during the 40th anniversary of the airlift. Colonel Gail Halvorsen (born October 10, 1920) is a retired career officer and command pilot in the United States Air Force known as the original Candy Bomber or the “Rosinenbomber” in Germany He was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He is best known for piloting C-47s and C-54s during the Berlin airlift (also known as “Operation Little Vittles”) during 1948–1949. Operation Little Vittles Gail Halvorsen in Berlin 1983 Shortly before landing at the Tempelhof airport in the American sector of Berlin, Halvorsen would drop candy attached to parachutes to children below. This action, which was dubbed Operation Little Vittles and sparked similar efforts by other crews, was the source of the popular name for the pilots: the candy bombers. Halvorsen wanted to help raise the morale of the children during the time of uncertainty and privation. Halvorsen started by giving a few treats to children watching the planes from outside the Tempelhof base. Wanting to give more, he promised to drop more candy from his plane the next day. Because the planes would arrive nearly every three minutes, the children naturally couldn’t distinguish his aircraft from the others. However, Halvorsen promised to wiggle the wings to identify himself, which led to his nickname “Onkel Wackelflügel” (“Uncle Wiggle Wings”). The other American candy bombers became known as the Rosinenbomber (Raisin Bombers). Halvorsen’s initiative drew the attention of the operation’s commanding officer, Lieutenant General William H. Tunner, who approved of it and ordered it expanded into Operation Little Vittles. The operation was soon noticed by the press and gained widespread attention. A wave of public support led to donations which enabled Halvorsen and his crew to drop 850 pounds of candy. By the end of the airlift, around 25 plane crews had dropped 23 tons of chocolate, chewing gum, and other candies over various places in Berlin. The Confectioners Association of America donated large amounts to the effort, and American school

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Gail Halvorsen

children cooperated in attaching the candies to parachutes. Military career Halvorsen would go on to fill several domestic and overseas assignments during the remainder of his Air Force career. He returned to Germany in 1969 or early 1970, this time as the commander of Tempelhof Air Base in western Berlin. In this role Halvorsen was required to host official parties at his house. Being a devout member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormon, Halvorsen became famous for his non-alcoholic concoctions served at these parties. German-American relations Halvorsen’s actions as the original candy bomber had a substantial impact on the postwar perception of Americans in Germany and are still point-


Halvorsen would wiggle the wings of his aircraft to identify himself, which led to his nickname “Uncle Wiggle Wings

Gail Halvorsen

ed to as a symbol of German-American relations. Halvorsen has appeared many times on German TV over the years, often paired with some of the children, now grown adults, who received his candy parachutes. In 1974 he was decorated with the “Großes Bundesverdienstkreuz” (Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany), one of Germany’s highest medals. During the opening march for the 2002 Winter Olympics on February 8, Halvorsen carried the German team’s national placard into Rice-Eccles Olympic Stadium. In 1989, Halvorsen engaged in a re-enactment of the actions in Berlin for the fortieth anniversary of the Airlift. During Operation Provide Promise in Bosnia and Herzegovina, he dropped candy from a USAF C-130 of the 435th Airlift Wing, flying from Rhein-Main Air Base, Germany. Halvorsen also participated in closing ceremonies for Tempelhof Air Base in 1993 and in 50th anniversary celebrations of the Airlift in Berlin in 1998. In 2004 Halvorsen hoped to launch a similar action for the children of Iraq. The United States military has modeled some of Halvorsen’s actions in Iraq, dropping toys, teddy bears, and soccer balls to Iraqi children.[1] In 2008, Halvorsen was honored as Grand Marshal of the German-American Steuben Parade in New York City.[2] He was celebrated by tens of thousands of spectators on Fifth Avenue.

Legacy The US Air Force has helped cement Colonel Halvorsen’s airlift legacy by naming its next-generation, 25,000-pound capacity aircraft loading vehicle in his honor. The Air Force has also named the award for outstanding air transportation support in the logistics readiness career field the Colonel Gail Halvorsen Award. Colonel Halvorsen’s son, Robert, was a USAF C-130 pilot and is currently a captain with Delta Air Lines. Colonel Halvorsen’s grandson is currently in the Navy as an LDS Chaplain at the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in San Diego, California. The Gail S. Halvorsen Elementary School at Rhein-Main Air Base, Frankfurt, Germany was named in his honor; Rhein-Main has since closed. On June 15th 2013 a secondary school in the Berlin suburb of Zehlendorf was named in his honor. Colonel Halvorson was present for the naming of the school. This marked the second time a school in Berlin has been named after a living namesake. Service as LDS missionary In 1995, Halvorsen, along with his wife Alta, arrived in St. Petersburg, Russia to serve as missionaries for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Their duties included training teachers and visiting institute classes, as well as working with church youth groups. Halvorsen and his wife also served as missionaries for the church in London, England in the 1980s. cinamagic february 2014

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A Mother’s Courage

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ell I embarrassed my Bailie Jade at Pizza Hut. My thing is as a parent, if you see an opportunity to teach a lesson do it because your kids are a reflection on how they are raised. So Bailie Jade has had stomach issues all her life. So we are in the bathroom stall when 3 teenagers come in and start making comments about her because she was in the stall and they didn’t have to face her. I wanted to go off but I didn’t. When Bailie Jade was done she didn’t want to walk back to the table because the three older girls were at the table with their dad by us. So I thought to myself as bad as this could go I have to show Bailie Jade that words hurt and also don’t let anyone make you uncomfortable to the point of tears over something you can’t control. So I walked up to the table and looked at the dad and said hello my name is Brandi and shock his hand I said I’m not trying to be rude but as a mom I have to teach my daughter certain things. I proceeded to tell him what happen (their face drop and funny how what they thought was so cute didn’t have them laughing anymore) and I said i wanted Bailie Jade to learn words can hurt and also that it wasn’t ok to give someone that much control over her feelings. Much to the surprise of the teenagers the dad said thank you for coming over here because your right we have to teach our children right and wrong and he looked at Bailie Jade and said honey you listen to your mom words can hurt but if you don’t tell the person that said them how they make you feel they may not know how wrong they were and he look at his daughters (with a disappointed stare that all is parents pull out when our kids are acting bad and we know they know better) and said you should be ashamed of yourself I know you know better and I know you have something to say they all three apologized to Bailie Jade as we were walking off I heard him say so that was what you thought was so funny. Well I have something even funnier since you want-

ed to pick on a child we will be going home because I will not be spending any money at the mall on you three. Again, no laughter. I have to say it’s nice to see good parents not defend their children when they are wrong. Bailie Jade was embarrassed but when I said see why we are so hard on you when you say mean things see how you make people feel. She said yes mam and I know, a lesson was learned by my nine year old and three teenage girls. So yes I was the crazy momma at Hattiesburg Pizza Hut!

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I was the crazy momma at Hattiesburg Pizza Hut!


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Model: Kayla Hernandez Photo by: Cheryl Hudgins (B&C Photography) Stylist: Brooke Hudgins cinamagic february 2014

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Dogs

Model: Sofia Photo by: Sandra Bianco Photography Styling by: Style me Jaime

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Model: Morgan Hasmann Dog Model: Bella great for the pictures. Photo by: Lobe Photography Graphic Design: Mistic Images by MDK

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Model: Emilia Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Model: Ocean Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

Model: Penelope Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Model: Jayden Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

Model: Liam Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Model: Luciana Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

Model: Kaeo Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Model: Kaeo Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Fresh Faces

CHILD FRESH FACE

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Hayden Bella-Rose Hoppe is 5 year old with blonde curls and light brown eyes....her middle name is a combination of both of her Great grandmothers Willy bell and Rose...Hayden has been riding and working horses and ponies since she could walk, her mother is a retired model and now a photographer so Hayden thinks nothing of a “spur of the moment” photo session at the family farm near Nashville Tennessee. Hayden’s personal horse is a miniature she named “Dora The Explorer” they enjoy spending many hours together on the farm working in hand and on the obstacle course. Hayden is a natural in front of the camera, and works very well under direction...she enjoys dance, reading books, and art as well. cinamagic february 2014


Photos by: Diana Hoppe Photography

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Photo by: Diana Hoppe Photography

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Photo by: Diana Hoppe Photography

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PRE-TEEN FRESH FACE

Natalie

Natalie Gabriella Harrison is a beautiful 6th grader with an amazing outlook on life, an excitement in her eyes, and a very bright future ahead of her! She has been a member of the Girl Scout Organization for the past 6 years and has volunteered the past two years at the local community Thanksgiving Dinner. Natalie is a talented girl! She has been acting in the Summer Youth Musical Theater for two years. Like most girls her age, she loves music and is very active [looking forward to being in track]. She was the pitcher on her softball team this past summer, is an ice cream junkie, and she wants to be a lawyer when she grows up. She can really do anything!! She helps out at home, gets wonderful grades, is a very loyal friend and loves her family. In fact, for her Mom’s birthday she wants to give her the day off by doing ‘all the things that Mom does’ so her Mom can have a TRUE day off. She’s amazing. .

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Photo by: Land of Wild Designs Photography

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Photo by: Land of Wild Designs Photography

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ADULT FRESH FACE

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ise

Photo by: Jermaine Isaac Photography cinamagic february 2014


I was born in Washington D.C., on August 9th 1990 and raised in Maryland. Growing up, I’ve always wanted to be in the spotlight, whether it was dancing or singing. Unfortunately, because I wasn’t vocally talented, lip syncing was the next best thing for me where I began to develop my passion for performing. I grew up in the dance studio like almost every other little girl who loved to be the center of attention. I started dancing at the age of 5 and continued to dance until my late teenage years. I trained in Ballet, Hip Hop, Modern, Jazz, African, and Pointe. After taking a short break from dance while taking college courses and working as an intern for the Department of Education, my passion for dance couldn’t help but resurface. This past year (2013) I decided to continue to purse dance as a career already by being a feature dancer at live performances for various known music artists like En Vogue, Ginuwine, and The Wailers. It’s been nothing but a hardworking, yet amazing experience. When I began modeling, it started off as just something to do for fun, more of a hobby, but as I continued doing it, learning more about the industry, I also began to develop more of a passion for modeling as well. Over the past couple years, I’ve grown and become more experienced as model as I now also pursue this as a career. During this time, I’ve had the pleasure with working with many talented photographers, makeup artists, stylist, and hairstylist to help me get closer to my dreams. But it all started back in 2011 when I had my first professional photoshoot with Kymmar Williams. He told me I had something special and I should pursue modeling. Then I had the pleasure of working with Jazzy Photos, Creative Hysteria Photography, and more recently Jermaine Isaac Photos, who have helped me with vital guidance, direction, and advice that helped me and continues to me improve and make intelligent decisions in the modeling industry. Throughout this year I had the pleasure of adding a few more great photographers to my list like Voxefx Photography, Sharpe Photographics, and Steve Bennett, just to name a few. I also have runway experience participating in a number of various runway shows, even as a petite model, I’ve been selected at numerous casting calls and thankfully have had the opportunity to do so for productions not having the usual strict height requirements. My ultimate dance goal is to make it on the big stage and/or screen with major artists, such as Beyoncé, Ne-Yo, Ciara, Lady Gaga, and many more. My ultimate goal with modeling is to be featured in major publications in wellknown fashion, lifestyle magazines, be the face of a product and much more. I definitely would love to be featured with Victoria Secrets, unfortunately they currently have a set criteria for models that they feature, but hopefully one day, this will change and I can be the very first petite Victoria Secret Model! DeNise Evans - “Addicted to Success” cinamagic february 2014

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ummer S DAY

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Model: Giavonna Lyerly Photo by: JSK Photography

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alentines V DAY

Model: Aaliyah Orozco

92Abigail Reiter Model:

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Models: From Left: Alexia Blikre, Shyloh Moore, Emma Dumas, Piper Parks, Aaliyah Orozco & Genesis Kanae Photos by: Embree Photography Clothing by: A Pocket Full of Sunshine Boutique

Model: Aubree Embree

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Model: Mia LeBlanc

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Photos by: Embree Photography Models: Aaliyah Orozco & Shyloh Moore Wardrobe: Aaliyahs Tutus


VALENTINE

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Photos by: Embree Photography Models: Aaliyah Orozco & Shyloh Moore Wardrobe: Aaliyahs Tutus

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Hollywood

Bill

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orn on September 21, 1950, in Wilmette, Illinois, Bill Murray eventually relocated to New York City, where he took comedic talents to National Lampoon Hour. In 1975, he was in an off-Broadway spin-off of the comedy radio show when Howard Cosell recruited him for Saturday Night Live. It was on the set that he created the comedic character that became his calling card for many films to come, including Hyde Park on Hudson (2013). “I think all phases of one’s career are serious if you take it seriously no matter if you are doing high profile dramatic pieces or not.” – Bill Murray “Movie acting suits me because I only need to be good for ninety seconds at a time.” – Bill Murray

Early Career Actor and comedian Bill Murray was born William J. Murray on September 21, 1950, in Wilmette, Illinois. The fifth of nine children, Murray was a self-proclaimed troublemaker, whether it was getting kicked out of Little League or being arrested at age 20 for attempting to smuggle close to nine pounds of marijuana through Chicago’s O’Hare Airport. In an attempt to find direction in his life, he joined his older brother, Brian Doyle-Murray, in the cast of Chicago’s Second City improvisational comedy troupe. He eventually relocated to New York City where he took his comedic talents on air in National Lampoon Hour alongside Dan Aykroyd, Gilda Radner and John Belushi In 1975, both Murray brothers were in an off-Broadway spin-off of the radio show when Bill was spotted by sportscaster Howard Cosell who recruited him for the cast of his ABC variety program, Saturday Night Live With Howard Cosell. On NBC, a program also named Saturday Night Live was creating a much bigger sensation. A year later producer Lorne Michaels, tapped Murray to replace Chevy Chase who had moved on to pursue a film career. It was on the set of Saturday Night Live that Murray created the sleazy, insincere comedic character that became his calling card for many films to come. He also earned an Emmy for Outstanding Writing for his work on the show. His first major film role was in the 1979 box office hit Meatballs. This was followed by the biography flop Where the Buffalo Roam, where Murray starred as gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson In 1980, he redeemed himself by going back to his comedic roots with the cult classic Caddyshack. The roll continued with the army farce Stripes in 1981, Tootsie in 1982, and Ghostbusters in 1984 with Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis. The comedy was one of the decade’s biggest hits, spawning a cartoon series, action figures and even a chart-topping theme song. Murray’s next move caught loyal fans off guard. He starred in and co-wrote an adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham novel The Razor’s Edge in 1984, which had been a lifelong dream. The hairpin turn from farce

to literary drama proved too sharp, and the film was a failure. Murray spent the next several years away from Hollywood, making only a cameo appearance in the 1986 musical comedy Little Shop of Horrors. Comeback He finally made his comeback in 1988 with Scrooged, a darkly comedic version of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. While it performed moderately well, it was not the smash many predicted. Nor was 1989’s Ghostbusters II. But in 1991, he starred in What About Bob?, which was an unqualified hit followed by the equally acclaimed Groundhog Day in 1993 and Ed Wood in 1994. In 1998, Murray played what many believed to be one of his finest roles in Wes Anderson’s Rushmore. As a business tycoon competing with an eccentric 15-yearold for the affections of a first grade teacher. Murray won Best Supporting Actor from both the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Society of Film Critics. The film’s success helped put the actor back in the forefront, and he drew further exposure that year from his appearance as a sleazy lawyer in the controversial Wild Things. In 1999, he appeared in Tim Robbins Cradle Will Rock and in 2000 he played the affably dense Bosley in the Charlie’s Angels remake. In 2001, he once again gained critical praise for his role in The Royal Tenenbaums. In 2003, Murray signed on to voice Garfield in Fox’s live-action adaptation of the comic-strip feline. He has also reteamed with Tenenbaums director Wes Anderson for the offbeat comedy The Life Aquatic. In 2004, Murray received an Oscar nomination for his starring role in Sofia Copula’s Lost in Translation and starred in Broken Flowers (2005). For his next performance, Murray made a cameo in the Wes Anderson film, The Darjeeling Limited (2007). The next year he starred in the comedy film Get Smart and the children’s adventure film, City of Ember (2008). In 2009, he starred in the Jim Jarmusch film, The Limits of Control. Recent Roles More recently, Murray has earned raves for his portrayal of Franklin D Roosevelt in Hyde Park on Hudson (2012). The film follows Roosevelt’s relationship with his distant cousin and confidante Margaret Stuckley (Laura Linney). He also reunited with Wes Anderson for a role in Moonrise Kingdom that same year. Murray has also landed in Anderson’s next film The Grand Budapest Hotel with Johnny Depp and Jude Law which is set for a 2014 release. Personal Life Murray was married to Margaret “Mickey” Kelley from 1981 to 1994. They have two sons, Homer and Luke. In 1997, he married Jennifer Butler with whom he had four sons: Jackson, Cal, Cooper and Lincoln. They divorced in 2008. cinamagic february 2014

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ctress and singer Lena Horne was born June 30, 1917, in Brooklyn, New York. She left school at age 16 to help support her mother and became a dancer at the Cotton Club in Harlem. She later sang at Carnegie Hall and appeared in such films as Stormy Weather and The Wiz. She was also known for her work with civil rights groups, and refused to play roles that stereotyped African-American women. Early Life Lena Mary Calhoun Horne was born on June 30, 1917, in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of a banker and an actress. Her parents divorced when she was 3, and because her mother traveled as part of various theater troupes, Horne alternately accompanied her on the road and stayed with family and friends around the country. Early Career At age 16, Horne dropped out of school and began performing at the Cotton Club in Harlem. A few years later, she joined the Noble Sissle Society Orchestra, using the name Helena Horne. Then, after appearing in the Broadway musical revue Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1939, she joined a wellknown white swing band, the Charlie Barnet Orchestra. Charlie Barnet was one of the first bandleaders to integrate his band, but because of racial prejudice, Horne was unable to stay or socialize at many of the venues in which the orchestra performed, and she soon left the tour. In 1941 she returned to New York to work at the Café Society nightclub, popular with both black and white artists and intellectuals. A long run at the Savoy-Plaza Hotel nightclub in 1943 gave Horne’s career a boost. She was featured in Life magazine and became the highest-paid black entertainer at the time. After signing a seven-year contract with MGM Studios, she moved to Hollywood, where she filmed movies like Stormy Weather and Cabin in the Sky. Producers quickly realized that she was a difficult woman to cast, however. She could only get limited roles in films with whites, and her light skin made it difficult to cast her alongside popular African-American actors in full-color films. Horne also refused to accept parts that stereotyped African-American women, and she was shunned by the community of black actors.

Lena Horne

Activism and Blacklists By the end of the 1940s, Horne had sued a variety of restaurants and theaters for discrimination and become an outspoken member of the leftist group Progressive Citizens of America. McCarthyism was sweeping through Hollywood, and Horne soon found herself blacklisted. Since she was unable to work in film, television, theater or recording, she performed primarily in posh nightclubs around the country. The ban eased in the mid-1950s, and Horne returned to the screen in the 1956 comedy Meet Me in Las Vegas. In spite of having been blacklisted, Horne remained active in the civil rights movement. She performed at rallies around the country on behalf of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the National Council for Negro Women, and participated in the 1963 March on Washington. cinamagic february 2014

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Clark Gable

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orn William Clark Gable on Feb. 1, 1901 in Cadiz, OH, he was the son - despite being mistakenly listed as a girl on his birth certificate - of William Henry Gable, an oil-field worker, and Adeline Gable. Tragically, Gable’s mother, already ill at the time of his birth, passed away before he had reached the age of one. After remarrying in 1903, Gable’s father relocated to the town of Hopedale, just outside Akron, where young Clark was raised until financial difficulties forced his father to attempt farming in the nearby town of Ravenna. Although he was an adequate student with a keen interest in reading and music, Gable dropped out of school in 1917, and at the encouragement of a friend, traveled to Akron where he took a job at a tire manufacturing company. It was around this time that young Gable saw his first theatrical play. Thoroughly enamored by what he saw on stage, he immediately knew what he wanted to do with his life. Financial concerns, however, made the pursuit exceptionally difficult until an inheritance allowed the then-21-year-old to travel across country to Portland, OR, where he met a woman who would dramatically alter the aspiring young actor’s career trajectory. In Portland, Gable met and eventually married the considerably older stage manager-acting coach Josephine Dillon, who quickly set about cleaning up the rough-around-the-edges wannabe actor. Following numerous voice, elocution and movement classes, Dillon now acting as Gable’s manager - took her newly-refined husband to Hollywood. Going under the stage name of C.W. Gable for a brief time, he picked up a few minor roles in such silent films as Erich von Stroheim’s “The Merry Widow” (1925) and “The Plastic Age” (1925), the latter starring silent-era “It Girl” Clara Bow. Despite the recent re-sculpting, producers saw little star potential in Gable, who returned to the stage within a few short years. After gaining valuable experience with a stock theater company, Dillon and Gable moved to New York City, where he made his Broadway debut in a production of the drama “Machinal” in 1928. His performance, described by one critic as “brutally masculine,” quickly led to more work on the Great White Way. Even as his career advanced, Gable’s marriage to Dillon began to crumble, while the onset of the Great Depression forced the closure of dozens of Broadway productions by the end of the decade. Within a year Gable had left Dillon and returned to Los Angeles in the company of wealthy socialite Maria “Ria” Langham, another mother-figure, several years his senior, who he would marry in 1931. Although he failed an early screen test with Warner Bros. producer Darryl F. Zanuck - who reportedly said of Gable, “His ears are too big. He looks like an ape” - the actor’s performance in a stage production of “The Last Mile” - bankrolled by Langham -sufficiently impressed executives at RKO studios, who gave him a supporting role opposite William Boyd in the Western “The Painted Desert” (1931). Gable’s fan-favorite performance as an unrepentant former outlaw in his first “talkie” earned him a contract with MGM studios, where he would re-

main until 1954. In his first year alone, Gable appeared in a dozen features, quickly transitioning from supporting player - typically, as a violent thug - to romantic lead, opposite MGM’s greatest leading ladies. Known as a lifelong philanderer, he began an on-again/off-again affair with frequent co-star Joan Crawford during the productions of their first two films “Dance, Fools, Dance” (1931) and “Possessed” (1931). A scene in which he roughed up feisty female lead Norma Shearer in “A Free Soul” (1931) unequivocally moved Gable into star status. Not all of Gable’s leading ladies were as enamored with the actor - most notably Greta Garbo, his co-star in “Susan Lenox, Her Fall and Rise” (1931), who was unimpressed with his “wooden” acting skills. For his part, Gable considered Garbo a “snob.” Action sagas like “The Secret Six” (1931) - the first of six films with his female equivalent, sex symbol Jean Harlow - “Sporting Blood” (1931) and “Hell Divers” (1931) rounded out Gable’s incredible, breakout year. With such undeniable box office success under his belt, Gable was soon able to flex a bit of his newly-acquired star muscle at MGM. And although his output the following year was reduced to a more reasonable five films, the size of his roles and the range of genres he tackled both increased significantly. Having been told by studio chief Louis B. Mayer to cool off his illicit relationship with Crawford - who was married to Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. at the time - Gable directed his amorous attentions toward Marion Davies, his co-star in “Polly of the Circus” (1932) for a brief period. Onscreen, he found himself in the middle of a love-triangle opposite Harlow and Mary Astor in the hit romantic-adventure “Red Dust” (1932), directed by Victor Fleming. Gable sported his famous mustache for the first time opposite Shearer in the romantic-drama “Strange Interlude” (1932), based on a play by Eugene O’Neill. A string of hit films followed, including the romantic-drama “Hold Your Man” (1933) - his third outing with Harlow - and the star-studded aviation drama “Night Flight” (1933), which featured Lionel Barrymore, Gable’s good friend from his days in the theater. For years, Gable’s casting in director Frank Capra’s seminal romantic comedy “It Happened One Night” (1934) was a subject of debate. While rumors circulated that the rising star was being punished by Mayer for being overly finicky about which roles he would accept, the more pragmatic explanation was that Gable was, at that moment, uncommitted to any other project and by loaning him out to lower rent Columbia Studios for more than his salary, MGM actually made money on the deal. Regardless, there would be little doubt as to the impact of the hit film, which became the first movie to sweep the five major Oscars categories - including Best Actor for the vindicated star - and vaulted Gable to new heights of prominence. Later, anecdotal evidence not only suggested that U.S. sales of men’s undershirts slumped as a result of the scene in which Gable was seen bare-chested after taking off his dress-shirt, but that the classic Warner Bros. cartoon character of Bugs Bunny was inspired by another moment in the film in which cinamagic february 2014

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Gable had undoubtedly earned his title as the ‘King of Hollywood.’

a fast-talking Gable vigorously chomped on a carrot. Regardless of the voracity of these tales, one thing was certain: Clark Gable had become the biggest male movie star in the world. The following year proved to be even more momentous for Gable. In one of the most anticipated, lavishly-produced movies ever made at the time, he starred as the conscientious mutineer Fletcher Christian in MGM’s “Mutiny on the Bounty” (1935), another Oscar-winner for Best Picture. That same year saw him in a screen adaptation of Jack London’s “Call of the Wild” (1935). Confined to a remote location during the two month production, Gable, not surprisingly, engaged in an affair with his attractive young co-star, Loretta Young. Although the tryst ended soon after filming wrapped, an unexpected by-product of the liaison arrived months later in the form of a baby girl. Fearing the disastrous effects the scandal would have on both their careers, Young went to great lengths to cover up the pregnancy. After delivering the child in private, she secretly placed Judy in an orphanage for the first 19 months of her life. Upon proudly announcing to gossip columnist Louella Parsons that she had adopted a baby girl, Young gave Judy the surname of her second husband, movie producer Tom Lewis. Eventually, rumors began to circle about Judy Lewis’ true parentage, especially in light of the fact that as she grew older, she developed large ears, strikingly similar to Gable’s. Raised in complete ignorance of the truth, Lewis met Gable only once when he came to visit her mother’s home, but even then had no idea he was her father. Widely known within Hollywood social circles, but never publicly acknowledged by Young or Gable during their lifetimes, Lewis would not learn the truth until, at the age of 31, she finally confronted her mother about the rumors, which were confirmed. Smash hits like the special effects-laden “San Francisco” (1936) - containing one of the actor’s finest per-

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formances - thankfully overshadowed Gable’s rare failures, such as the period drama “Parnell” (1937), a biopic about the doomed Irish political activist. So disastrous was the latter film that the star swore he would never act in a costume drama again. That same year, Gable appeared alongside Harlow for their sixth and final pairing in “Saratoga” (1937), which was derailed when the 26-year-old platinum blonde died tragically of kidney failure in the final weeks of production, necessitating a stand-in to complete her scenes. Around this time, Gable began courting Without a doubt, Gable was the biggest star at MGM, if not in all of Hollywood. Audiences sang along with Judy Garland while she crooned “(Dear Mr. Gable) You Made Me Love You” in the musical extravaganza “Broadway Melody of 1938” (1937). Mickey Rooney’s Gable impressions in the Busby Berkely musical “Babes in Arms” (1939) - also starring Garland - laid testament to the star’s preeminent placement in the pop-culture zeitgeist of the day. Still smarting from the debacle of “Parnell,” Gable was reluctant to take on a starring role in a Civil War epic being produced by David O. Selznick and based on Margaret Mitchell’s best-selling novel. From the beginning, Selznick had envisioned Gable, the personification of masculinity, as the dashing rogue Rhett Butler. Much to the delight of his devoted fans who felt he was perfect for the role, MGM finally agreed to loan Selznick their biggest star, prompting a wary Gable to at last sign on for “Gone with the Wind” (1939). With a behind-the-scenes story as epic as that depicted on screen, “GWTW” faced innumerable hurdles on its way to theaters, and, of course, Gable figured prominently in many of them. Initially, Selznick had lined up revered director George Cukor to helm the massive undertaking. A few weeks after production had begun Cukor was suddenly pulled from the film and replaced with director Victor Fleming. Although official explanations for the switch were scant, those associated with the picture acknowledged that it was Gable who had insisted on the change of director. Cukor’s reputation as Hollywood’s most adept director of women concerned Gable, who feared his performance would be overshadowed by those of his female co-stars, Vivien Leigh and Olivia de Havilland. Having enjoyed his experience with Fleming - a true man’s man, like himself - on the successful “Red Dust,” Gable successfully lobbied to place Fleming in the director’s chair. Another tense moment for Gable came prior to filming the famous scene in which Butler cries. Always insecure about his range as an actor, Gable stubbornly pushed to alter the scene, until his co-star in the scene, de Havilland, buoyed his confidence in a heart-toheart talk. He played the scene to perfection, and the fact that Gable had never shown such vulnerability on screen before made the moment all the more affecting. “Gone with the Wind” went on to become one of the most successful, beloved films of all time, winning several Academy Awards, and earning Gable another Best Actor nomination. At the very pinnacle of his


success, Gable had undoubtedly earned his title as the “King of Hollywood,” an honor bestowed upon him by columnist Ed Sullivan. Not only was the period the best of his career, but it also marked a highpoint in Gable’s personal life when he finally married Lombard in 1939. Although they had first met while co-starring in 1932’s “No Man of Her Own,” Lombard’s then-happy marriage to actor William Powell and Gable’s unease with her bawdy nature kept their interaction strictly professional. It was not until a chance meeting at a party four years later that they began a torrid affair. One of Hollywood’s worst kept secrets, their romance was nonetheless kept under wraps to prevent a scandal, as Gable was still married to Langham, who demanded an exorbitant amount of money before she would agree to a divorce. As a way of convincing the star to accept the role of Rhett Butler, Louis B. Mayer increased Gable’s salary to a degree that would allow him to pay off Langham, thus paving the way for the public consummation of America’s favorite Hollywood couple. By all accounts, it was the most fulfilling relationship Gable had ever enjoyed, as the outspoken, liberal-minded Lombard kept him on his toes and encouraged the usually solitary Gable to become more social. Additionally, she endeared herself to her husband by developing an appreciation for the pastimes he loved, such as hunting and fishing. Their storybook romance was cut tragically short after Lombard died in a plane crash in the mountains of Nevada in 1942 while returning from a successful war bonds fundraiser. After immediately rushing to the crash site - there were no survivors - a clearly devastated Gable returned to Los Angeles, where friends despaired as they watched the actor drink himself into oblivion while watching Lombard’s old films, night after night. In what some viewed as a death wish, the 41-yearold Gable turned his back on the movie business and enlisted in the Army Air Corps, where he served as a “motion picture specialist” and saw combat as a tail gunner during several missions over Europe. Reportedly, even Adolf Hitler was not immune to Gable’s charms and offered a reward to any Nazi soldier who could deliver the Hollywood star to the Fuhrer, unscathed. After attaining the rank of Captain, Gable - who felt his age and celebrity status was preventing him from effectively serving his country - requested a discharge from active duty. A bigger hero than ever before in the eyes of fans, Gable returned to film with much ballyhoo for the Fleming-directed “Adventure” (1945), co-starring Greer Garson. While the novelty of Gable’s return initially sold tickets, the sub-par romantic-adventure ultimately proved a disappointment. Although he continued to turn out projects throughout the remainder of the decade, both Gable’s zeal for filmmaking and his status as the undisputed “King of Hollywood” began to wane. Also less successful than his previous experience, was his 1949 marriage to actress-model-socialite Lady Sylvia Ashley, a woman noted by many for her

striking resemblance to Gable’s dearly departed Carole. From the beginning, their relationship was a troubled one, possessing none of the mutual trust and admiration he had shared with Lombard. Even though he was no longer the dependable box office draw he had once been, there was still no substitute for Clark Gable. When MGM remade “Red Dust” as “Mogambo” (1953), Ava Gardner was in for Harlow’s character and a young Grace Kelly played the Mary Astor role. And what of Gable’s part? Only Gable could fill Gable’s shoes, even 21 years later. Following his divorce from Ashley and his parting ways with long-time home MGM, Gable became an independent freelance actor in 1955. That same year he married for the fifth and final time to Kay Williams - the union would bring him some semblance of security and happiness after years of grief. After starting GABCO, his own short-lived production company formed with actress Jane Russell, Gable appeared in “The King and Four Queens” (1956) - the one and only film he both starred in and produced. Back to working as a freelance actor, Gable took a critical drubbing opposite Yvonne De Carlo and a young Sidney Poitier in the antebellum plantation melodrama “Band of Angels” (1957). More successful was his work alongside Burt Lancaster in the wartime submarine drama “Run Silent, Run Deep” (1958), followed by a turn opposite Sophia Loren in the romance “It Started in Naples” (1960). As he neared his 60th birthday, Gable seemed both physically and emotionally a mere shadow of the virile, life-loving man he had once been. Still, there was one final great performance left in him, although it would come at a price. Directed by acclaimed filmmaker John Huston, “The Misfits” (1961) was not merely a requiem for the mythology of the Old West, but a love letter to its star, Marilyn Monroe, written by her then-husband, playwright Arthur Miller. Starring opposite Monroe, Montgomery Clift and Eli Wallach, Gable’s tragic, yet noble portrayal of a broken-down cowpoke would be regarded as one of his very finest. It would also be his last. Prior to filming, Gable was already in poor health, having suffered at least one heart attack years earlier. His use of amphetamines to quickly drop from 230 to 195 pounds certainly could not have helped his condition. Reportedly, the aging screen icon also insisted on performing many of his stunts for the film, shot in the grueling heat of the Nevada desert. Just two days after completing work on “The Misfits,” the actor suffered a major heart attack at his Encino home. Ten days later, at a Los Angeles hospital, Gable died from coronary thrombosis on Nov. 16, 1960. News of his death was announced to a mournful public via the short, somber headline, “The King is Dead.” As per his final wishes, his widow, Kay Williams, graciously buried him at Los Angeles’ Forest Lawn Memorial Park, alongside his lost love, Carole Lombard. Gable was 59 years old. Months later, Williams gave birth to John Clark Gable, the son Gable had always longed for but had not lived to see. cinamagic february 2014

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Punxsutawney

Phil

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o who is Punxsutawney Phil? He does exist, even if what he is famous for doing is a bit far-fetched. (Phil is that famous groundhog who comes out of his hole-in-the-ground home once a year and makes a weather prediction that is taken as official by many people across America.) Phil is indeed a groundhog. He does indeed live in the little Pennsylvania town of Punxsutawney. He lives there with Phyllis, a friendly female groundhog that locals refer to as Phil’s wife. Technically, Phil and Phyllis live in a hole in the ground. However, that hole isn’t just any hole in the ground. Despite the cold-weather climate, the two groundhogs live in relative comfort, in a temperature-controlled underground space next to the children’s section of the town library. Their hole is full of the comforts of home, including wood and hay and, every so often, food. The town has a Groundhog Club, and members of the club’s Inner Circle make sure that Phil and Phyllis are well fed and comfortable. Phil weighs about 12 pounds, which is a couple of pounds more than the average groundhog weighs. The Inner Circle members are careful not to put too much food in the hole for Phil and Phyllis to eat. All of this is done to make Phil and Phyllis more comfortable, of course. Also, however, the Groundhog Club want Phil to feel at home and not get restless, as happened once a few years back, when he escaped. The panicked population turned out in force to find their favorite furry son and found him in the woods outside town. Returned to his “natural” home, Phil hasn’t felt like wandering for a few years now. He’s probably more felt like sleeping, since groundhogs are one of the few mammals that do indeed hibernate. cinamagic february 2014

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ivien Leigh was born November 5, 1913 in Darjeeling, India to a Yorkshire stockbroker. She was convent-educated in England and throughout Europe, and inspired by her schoolmate Maureen O’Sullivan to embark on an acting career. Leigh earned international popularity and an Academy Award for her unforgettable portrayal of Scarlett O’Hara in David O Selznick’s production of Gone with The Wind. Early Life Famed actress Vivien Leigh was born Vivian Mary Hartley on November 5, 1913, in Darjeeling, India, to an English stockbroker and his Irish wife. The family returned to England when Hartley was 6 years old. A year later, the precocious Hartley announced to classmate Maureen O’Sullivan that she “was going to be famous.” She was right, though her fame would eventually come under a different name. As a teen, Vivian Hartley attended schools in England, France, Italy and Germany, becoming fluent in both French and Italian. She went on to study acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, but put her career temporarily on hold at age 19, when she married a lawyer named Leigh Holman and had his daughter. Replacing the “a” in her first name with the less commonly used “e,” Hartley used her husband’s name to craft a more glamorous stage name, Vivien Leigh. Film and Onstage Debuts Vivien Leigh made both her onstage and film debuts in 1935. She starred in the play The Bash, which, although wasn’t particularly successful, allowed Leigh to make an impression on producer Sydney Carroll, who soon cast the actress in her first London play; and landed the lead role in the aptly titled movie Things are Looking Up (1935). Although Leigh was initially typecast as a fickle coquette, she began to explore more dynamic roles by doing Shakespearean plays at the Old Vic in London, England. There, she met and fell in love with Laurence Olivier, a respected actor who, like Leigh, already happened to be married. The two soon embarked on a highly collaborative and inspired acting relationship—not to mention a very public love affair. “Gone With The Wind” Around the same time, American director George Cukor was hunting for the perfect actress to play the lead role of Scarlett O’Hara in his film adaptation of Gone with the Wind. “The girl I select must be possessed of the devil and charged with electricity,” Cukor insisted at the time. An impressive list of Hollywood’s top actresses, including Katherine Hepburn and Bette Davis, had long been vying for the part by the time Leigh, who was on a two-week vacation in California, took and passed the screen test. Casting a virtually unknown British theater actress in the role of a Southern belle struggling for survival during the American Civil War was risky, to say the least—especially considering that Gone with the Wind was already, even in pre-production, one of the most highly anticipated Hollywood pictures of all time. However, the decision paid off as the film smashed box office records, and garnered 13 Academy Award nominations and eight wins—including one for Leigh as best actress. cinamagic february 2014

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Crafts

Groundhog Day

Cupcakes On February 2, a certain groundhog in Pennsylvania will emerge from his winter burrow. Legend says an early spring is on its way if he doesn’t see his shadow, but it’s six more weeks of winter if he does. Whatever Punxsutawney Phil predicts, your kids will surely dig this adorable Groundhog Cupcake. What you’ll need Baked cupcakes Almond Joy® candy White frosting White jelly beans Black decorators’ gel Watermelon slice candy Brown M&M’s® Minis Chocolate cookie How to make it Remove a piece of cake the width of an Almond Joy® candy from the center of a baked cupcake. Set the candy upright in the hole, then spread a layer of white frosting on the cupcake. For the groundhog’s eyes, trim the ends from a white jelly bean, stick them in place with frosting, then dot them with black decorators’ gel. Add a tiny triangle cut from a watermelon slice candy for a nose, brown M&M’s® Minis for ears and cheeks, and a tiny rectangular piece of white jelly bean for teeth. Sprinkle chocolate cookie crumbs around the partially emerged groundhog, and he’s ready to greet his fans.

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Create a Groundhog Mask! Courtesy of Makingmerrymemories.blogspot.com. Let the creative juices flow with this fun activity. For this craft you will have to arrange for brown paint (or brown markers), paper plates, scissors, pink large beads, straws, elastic string and brown construction paper before the party. Give each guest a paper plate and ask them to paint the back of the plate with brown paint or a brown marker. Then tell them to draw the face of the groundhog on the plate, and cut out the eyes and mouth. Then make them cut curved ears using the brown construction paper and glue it to the top of the plate. You can give them pink beads for a nose and help them glue it on the plate. Then give them 2 straws each to stick on the plate as whiskers. Put holes in both sides of the mask and tie elastic string to it so that it will stay on the child’s head. You can let your guests take these masks home as party favors. I am sure they will have a lot of fun with this Groundhog Day party activity and remember it for a long time.

Groundhog Day Party Games & Activities!!! Groundhog Search Game This is an easy to play game. Prior to the party, purchase some cheap alphabet toys or you can cut cardboard pieces of the letters from “Groundhog”. Hide those letters around the party space. Then all you need to do is pair up your guests. The teams are supposed to search for the missing letters. The pair who finds all the missing letters from the word “Groundhog” first will be the winner.

The Weather Forecaster Game This is yet another crazy game of luck. For this you will have to arrange for several spring green cards and winter white cards. Hand out 2 cards each to all your guests, one for spring and the other for winter. Keep some cards for yourself in a bag. Then ask all your guests to make their predictions by choosing the appropriate card. Then you need to pull out a card from your bag. Guests who’s predictions do not match the picked card are OUT. This game will continue in similar fashion until only one guest is left, and they will be the winner of the game.

Toss the Little Groundhog Game For this game you will have to arrange for a broad basket and a stuffed groundhog toy. Then ask your guests to throw the hog into the basket. Prizes could be given for various categories like, greatest number of successful throw, best behind the back toss and the best longest throw. You guests will love this Groundhog Day party game! cinamagic february 2014

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Groundhog Day Party Planning Ideas!!! H olding your own Groundhog Day party should not be a baffling job. You don’t even need a real groundhog. Any critter will be perfect for the starring role. Simply make your star “Groundhog” appear from a hiding place, glance at the ground, and scratch his back. If you want to celebrate this customary day with your family and kids, here are some ideas to help you get into the flavor.

Groundhog Day Party Invitations Sending out impressive invitations is the first step for your Groundhog day party. Unlike any other traditional holiday, groundhog day does not have any official color. But if we need to select some color it could be green and white (for winter and summer). So sending out party invitations in green and white would be a perfect way to grab your guests attention. Create memorable times at your celebration with matching invitations and party games to fit the atmosphere. A creative way to send your invitations and to please little guests would be to buy stuffed Groundhog toys. Then take a light green paper and write the party details on it. Roll the paper up and then tie the paper to the stuffed toy using a green or white ribbon. You can then hand deliver these invitations or send them through mail. You guests will love this festive Groundhog Day party idea! Yet another simple way to impress the children would be to write the invitations on the backside of Groundhog masks. Then ask you child to hand deliver these invitations to his/her friends or send them in the mail. Your guests will be thrilled, and will look forward to your party to add some festive fun to their otherwise, gloomy February days. Probably the most easy, convenient and inexpensive way to send out invitations is to send online invites. They have become much more common and have many benefits. To send these all you need to do is select the most appropriate Groundhog Day party theme and customize the invitations with a perfect title. Uploading some Groundhog pictures (check out some nice images at flickr.com) to make it personalized would also be very easy to do. Invitations should be sent

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at least a week or two before the party to allow enough time for guests to hold the date. It also allows enough time for you to collect RSVPs and make final preperations for the party. Decorations One great way to decorate the party space would be to divide the room into two zones – one as winter and one as spring. For winter decorations you can use white streamers, snowflakes, and sleighs etc. For spring decorations you can use green streamers, flowers, hula hoops and some other outdoor toys. For further decorations, you can buy or print some nice groundhog posters and pictures and hang them through out the party room. Another idea is to put one of the famous Groundhog day movies on the TV in the background with the volume turned down. People will get a kick out of seeing it. A great choice for a movie would be one of the most well known movies. It is the 1993 movie “Groundhog Day” starring Bill Murray. Groundhog Day Party Food The spring and winter party theme can be carried over to the food planning as well. Green lemonade made with green food coloring, green grapes and small pieces of green apple, honeydew melon or kiwifruit are great choices. You can also make any baked goods and add green food coloring. If you are planning to serve cake, it could be in the shape of a groundhog. You can also prepare a cake at home with half of the cake depicting jolly good spring time and other half representing the snowy winter season. Another great snack for you children is Groundhog Day Dirt Pie. All you need to do is take their favorite chocolate pudding to represent the dirt and some graham crackers into the dish. As groundhog party favors you can give sunglasses, flower seed packets, jump rope, modeling clay, paddle ball or a spinning top. You can also impress your guests with groundhog shaped goody bags which consist of Groundhog stickers, tattoos and groundhog pencils. These great food ideas will make your Groundhog Day party a hit. Let’s hope there aren’t six more weeks of winter! Enjoy the Groundhog Day party!


Potato

Groundhog’s

Day Craft

When I told our daughter that we were going to turn a potato into a groundhog with some brown paint and googly eyes I immediately had her attention. This is a cute groundhog’s day craft that lets your child choose which version of the story they would like to see happen. They get the option of putting clouds in the sky (no shadow) or a sun (shadow). Our daughter chose to put clouds in the sky so the groundhog wouldn’t see his shadow and spring would come early so she could go outside and play! What you’ll need: Brown paint Potato Paper towels Knife (for an adult to use ONLY) Googly eyes Black marker Construction paper (white, green, blue, yellow) Stickers (optional) Scissors Glue stick How to make your Potato Groundhog’s Day Craft Have an adult cut a potato in half lengthwise. Dab the potato onto a few paper towels to remove some of the moisture. Pour some brown paint onto a paper plate and dip one half of the potato in it. We also tried using a paintbrush to apply the paint to the potato, but if you do this you need to really glop it on there. Stamp your potato onto a piece of white construction paper. Dip your finger in the brown paint and add two ears to the top of your potato print. Set the page aside and let it dry. The groundhog (your potato print) is popping out of his hole in this craft, so you need to cut a green piece of construction paper to put on the bottom half of the groundhog/paper. We cut a little dip out of the green paper around the groundhog to make it look more like a hole. Decorate the grass with flowers (stickers, etc.) if you would like to. Glue two googly eyes on the groundhog and use the marker to draw on his nose and mouth. Now your child gets to choose which version of the tale they would like to make. Option 1: Phil does not see his shadow and we get an early spring. For this one cut some cloud shapes out of blue paper and glue them to the picture. No sun means no shadow! Option 2: Phil does see his shadow and we have six more weeks of winter. For this one cut a sun shape out of the yellow construction paper and glue it on to the picture. Use your black marker to draw a shadow on the grass around the groundhog. cinamagic february 2014

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Styrofoam Lovebug Craft

A fantastic Valentine’s Day craft and a party favor gift to give! • • • • • • • • • • •

We’ve found that creating realistic craft bugs is a lot of fun but that it’s even more fun to create imaginary craft bugs! One of our daughter’s nicknames is “lovebug” and this craft was made for her. While this styrofoam lovebug craft is fun to make for Valentine’s Day, it can also be made anytime of the year. 122

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What you’ll need: Small styrofoam egg Serrated knife Pink construction paper Red and pink craft paint Black 3-D paint 2 googly eyes Pink pipe cleaner Pink craft foam Scissors Glue Paint brushes

How to make your Styrofoam Lovebug Craft: Use the serrated knife to cut a small amount of styrofoam off the side of the egg so that it will lay flat on it’s side. Paint the smaller tip of the egg pink and paint the remainder of the egg red. Once the red body has dried, paint some pink hearts on it. Glue two googly eyes onto the pink part of the egg (the face). Cut a small circle out of craft foam and glue on the face of the lovebug under the eyes as a nose. Use the black craft paint to paint a smile on the lovebug’s face. Cut the pipe cleaner in half and insert each half on the top of the bug behind the face portion. Cut two small hearts out of craft foam and glue to the top of each pipe cleaner. Cut two medium size hearts out of construction paper and glue onto the top of the bug to create wings.


Lemony Love Potion: When Cupid

invites guests over, this is the beverage he serves. For the first time ever, he has graciously agreed to share his magic recipe which also happens to make an excellent dessert drink for Valentine’s Day dinner. What you’ll need: 12-ounce can pink lemonade concentrate 1 cup raspberry sherbet 12-ounce can of lemon/lime soda (we used 7-Up) How to make it: In a pitcher, mix the lemonade concentrate with the recommended amount of water. In a separate pitcher, combine the sherbet with 1 cup of the lemonade mixture. Add the soda, stir, and serve. Makes 3 cups cinamagic february 2014

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Heart Headband Craft: Need a

wearable Valentine’s Day craft? This headband craft is a lot of fun for kids to create and parade around the house in. Enjoy! What you’ll need: White poster board or just a headband 2 red pipe cleaners Pink construction paper or pink ribbon Red crayons or glitter Tape or Glue Scissors How to make your Paper Heart Headband Craft: Cut a head band out of the white poster board that is slightly larger than the child’s head. If using a headband, wrap and glue the pink ribbon around the headband. Decorate the paper head band using crayons or glitter. Cut two equal size hearts out of pink construction paper. Tape each heart to one of the pipe cleaners and then tape the pipe cleaners on the undecorated side of the headband or twist it around the headband. Staple the headband so that it fits around the child’s head. Cut off any excess.

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Puppy Love

This Valentine’s Day show someone you care with a silly snack of heart-shaped hot-dogs!

What you’ll need Hot dog Piece of uncooked linguini Cheese How to make it Cut the ends from a hot-dog at a diagonal and place the cut edges together as shown. Spear the heart with a length of uncooked linguini. Add pieces of cheese trimmed to resemble the ends of an arrow. cinamagic february 2014

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Lovin’ Spoonfuls: These whimsical

white chocolate confections are perfect for Valentine’s Day gifts or party favors. Eat them right off the spoon or stirred them in hot cocoa. What you’ll need White chocolate Small candies OTHER MATERIALS Plastic spoons and lollipop bags How to make it: Arrange plastic spoons so that their bowls are level. For every eight spoons, melt 6 ounces of white chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl according to the package directions, then transfer the chocolate to a ziplock bag and snip off a corner. Pipe the chocolate into each spoon and gently tap the spoons on your work surface to level the chocolate. Sprinkle small candies, such as conversation hearts, red hots, and nonpareils, on top. Let the chocolate cool completely. Helpful Tip: Present the spoons in lollipop bags sealed with twist ties or ribbon. If you like, include a note explaining that the spoons make great hot cocoa stirrers.

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Piglet’s Valentine Cupcakes

To: My Valentine From: Your Valentine

• • • • • • • 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

What you’ll need Batch of baked cupcakes Pink frosting Small candy hearts Black decorator’s gel Small bowl Toothpick Swedish Fish® candies How to make it To shape the cupcakes like Piglet’s face, use a knife to trim halfway around each cupcake top close to the baking paper (this tapered portion will be the top of the head and the wider untrimmed half will be the jowls). Frost the cupcakes. For each Piglet, gently press a candy heart into the frosting in the center of the cupcake. Squirt a little bit of black decorator’s gel into a bowl. Use the tip of a toothpick to add drops of gel for eyes and eyebrows (remember to keep them small like Piglet’s). Then dip the toothpick into the gel and draw on a short grin. For each ear, gently press the ends of two Swedish Fish® candies into the frosting at the top of the head.

Helpful Tip: You can simply use Conversation Hearts candies. Or, another option is to spread melted red Candy Melts on waxed paper, let the candy set up again, and use a fondant cutter to cut out a bunch of small candy hearts. cinamagic february 2014

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Valentine’s Day Heart Wand Turn a little craft foam and a popsicle stick into this great Valentine’s Day craft for kids! E N I

M BE

What you’ll need: Craft foam Tongue depressor or popsicle stick Glue Scissors Marker (optional) Stickers (optional) How to make your Valentine’s Day Wand Craft: We used pre-cut craft foam hearts for this project. If you don’t have the pre-cut variety, simply cut out your own. You will need two equal sized hearts for this craft and they should be about 5 inches tall. Glue two small pieces of ribbon to the popsicle stick. Glue the hearts together with the popsicle stick in the center to make a wand. Write “Be Mine!” on the hearts using a black marker. Optional: Decorate the hearts with glitter and color the popsicle stick red or pink. Continue to decorate the hearts however you would like!

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Valentine’s Day Party Table Ideas! Valentine’s Day is the perfect occasion for throwing a little party for your kids and their friends. It doesn’t have to be anything elaborate, they simply love getting together with their friends for an afternoon of fun with treats, games and crafts. There are some really cute Valentine’s Day parties for kids popping up around the web, so today we wanted to share some of them with you and give you a little inspiration to plan your own little get-together for the little ones. This ‘Call me Maybe’ party is hot off the press as a collaboration between Giggles Galore & A Blissful Nest featured on Pizzazzerie. The pops of gold are absolute perfection!

The simple red, white and silver color scheme of this Valentine’s Day party from Bella Grey Designs featured at Double the Fun Parties is wonderful, with plenty of kid-friendsly treats.

A cute ‘Puppy Luv’ Valentine’s Day party on HWTM for those little dog lovers!

“Puppy Love” Theme

Red, White & Silver color Theme

Traditional Pink and Red Heart themed Valentine’s Day party from Paisley Petal Events.

‘Bee My Valentine’ party from The Party Wall has some great DIY ideas!

“Pink & Red Heart” Theme

“Be My Valentine” Theme

“Call Me Maybe” Theme

Love this non-traditional Valentine’s Day ‘Monster Love’ party from The Purple Pug.

An ‘Owl you Can Eat Pancake’ Valentine’s Day breakfast from A to Zebra Celebrations – yes please!

The ‘Mustache-themed Valentine’s Day party’ created by Anders Ruff featured on The Party Wagon.

“Owl you Can Eat Pancake” Theme

“Monster Love” Theme “Mustache” Theme

I hope you have gathered some great ideas and inspiration for you to throw your own little Valentine’s Day bash for the kids – they’ll love it! cinamagic february 2014

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asquerade M

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Photo by: Mark Barrett Horse: Jasmine

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Water Spirits Gift of Horses

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n the days before horses a poor orphan boy lived among the Blackfoot. Because he was so poor he knew that he could never obtain the things he wanted without the secret power of the gods. One day he left his camp to seek a vision that would tell him what he must do. He slept alone on a high mountain, he prayed near some great rocks, he fasted beside a river, but no vi...sion came to him, no voice spoke to him. He traveled beyond the Sweetgrass Hills to a large lake, and because no sign of any kind had come to him he bowed down and wept. In that lake lived a powerful Water Spirit, a very old man, and he heard the crying of the poor orphan boy. The Water Spirit sent his young son to find the boy and ask why he was crying. The son went to the weeping boy and told him that his father who lived in the lake wished to see him. “But how can I go to him if he lives under the lake?” the poor boy asked. “Hold on to my shoulders and close your eyes,” replied the Water Spirit’s son. “Don’t look until I tell you to do so.” They started into the water. As they moved along, the Water Spirit’s son said to the boy: “My father will offer you your choice of the animals in this lake. When he does so, be sure to choose the oldest mallard of the ducks and all its young ones.” As soon as they reached the underwater lodge of the Water Spirit, the son told the boy to open his eyes. He did so, and found himself standing before an old man with long white hair. “Sit beside me,” the Water Spirit said, and then asked: “My boy, why do you come to this lake crying?” “I am a poor orphan,” the boy replied. “I left my camp to search for secret powers so that I may be able to make my way in the world.” “Perhaps I can help you,” the Water Spirit said. “You have seen all the animals in this lake. They are mine to give to whom I wish. What is your choice?” Remembering the advice of the Water Spirit’s son, the boy replied: “I should thank you for the oldest mallard of the ducks and all its young ones.” “Don’t take that one,” the Water Spirit said, shaking his head. “It is old and of no value.” But the boy insisted. Four times he asked for the mallard, and then the Water Spirit smiled and said: “You are a wise young man. When you leave

my lodge my son will take you to the edge of the lake. After it is dark he will catch the mallard for you. But when you leave the lake don’t look back.” The boy did as he was told. The Water Spirit’s son gathered some marsh grass from the edge of the lake and braided it into a rope. With this rope he caught the old mallard and led it ashore. He placed the rope in the boy’s hand and told him to walk on, but not to look back until sunrise. As the boy walked on toward his camp in the darkness, he heard the duck’s feathers flapping on the ground. Later he could no longer hear that sound. Instead he heard the sound of heavy feet pounding on the earth behind him, and from time to time the strange cry of an animal. The braided marsh grass turned into a rawhide rope in his hand. But he did not look back until dawn. At daybreak he turned around and saw a strange animal at the end of the rope, a horse. A voice told him to mount the animal and he did so, using the rawhide rope as a bridle. By the time he reached camp, he saw many other horses following him. The people of the camp were frightened by these strange animals, but the boy told them to have no fear. He dismounted and gave everybody horses from the herd that had followed him. There were plenty for everyone, and he had a large number left over for himself. Until that time, the people had only dogs for carrying their packs and dragging their travois. The boy now showed them how to use the horses for packing, how to break them for riding, and he also gave the horse its Blackfoot name, elk dog. One day the men asked him: “These elk dogs, would they be of any use in hunting buffalo?” “Yes, let me show you,” the boy replied, and as soon as they were mounted he led them out to a buffalo herd where he showed them how to chase buffalo on horseback. He also showed them how to make bridles, saddles, hackamores, whips and other gear for their horses. Once when they came to a river, the men asked him: “These elk dogs, are they of any use to us in water?” He replied: “That is where they are best. I got them from the water.” And he showed them how to use horses in crossing streams. When the boy grew older, his people made him a chief, and since that time every Blackfoot chief has owned many horses. cinamagic february 2014

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Photo by: Bob Langrish Horses: Esmeralda and Panda Rose

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Photo by: picsofyou Horses: Jasmine and Esmeralda as pair and Wr Ranch 4 inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;hand teamRose

Photo by: Mark Barrett Horses: WR Pie and Vanilla Swirl (aka Sky)

Photo by: Mark Barrett Horse: WR Panda Rose Model: Alisha Patrick

Photo by: picsofyou Horses: Jasmine and Esmeralda as pair and Wr Ranch 4 inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;hand teamRose

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Rustic Horse Shoe All of our handmade items are original designs. Custom orders are welcome.

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We use high quality materials intended to last, made from canvas & beautiful accent blanket stitching.

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How The Dream Catcher Was Made

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okomis loved her young grandson. Each day she took him out, showed him things and made him laugh. In the afternoons he often played in the courtyard while Nokomis rested on her bed, watching him through the window. When he wanted to show her something he ran inside noisily and climbed on her bed to see if she was sleeping. Sometimes she laughed at what he broug...ht her, and he liked that. One day Nokomis was resting and watching him. The sun shone through the window and she felt sleepy. Suddenly she saw something shimmering in the corner. She sat up to look more closely. A spider was spinning a web near the floor, the sunlight glinting on the thread as she moved. Nokomis smiled and called out gently “Hello spider. Your web is beautiful.” Then she settled back down on her cushions again. For the rest of the afternoon she watched both her grandson playing outside and the spider working slowly in the corner. The next day when Nokomis came to her room again, the spider was still spinning and the web was much bigger. Nokomis bent down to look at it. The spider stopped spinning and looked up at her. “You’re doing a great job with this web,” said Nokomis softly. “The threads are evenly spaced and the shape is perfect. It looks strong and beautiful.” The spider waved two of her front legs at Nokomis and then started spinning again. Nokomis straightened up and moved over to settle on her bed so she could watch her grandson through the window as usual. A short time later the boy stopped playing and ran inside. “Grandma!” he called as he pounded across the hall to her room. “Grandma, are you asleep?” He rushed through the doorway, then stopped and stared at the spider sitting in its large web. “Spider,” he said and pulled off his shoe. He crept towards the web, ready to break the beautiful threads and kill the spider. “No, wait!” called Nokomis. “Don’t hurt it!” The boy stopped and looked at her. “Why not?” he asked. “It’s just a spider.” “Leave it alone,” said Nokomis. “It’s not hurting you and the web is beautiful. Come here and sit with me.”

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The boy pulled his shoe back on and ran over to the bed. Then he laughed and climbed up next to his grandmother. She tickled him and stroked his head gently. The two of them lay curled up for a while. Then Nokomis sang one of the boy’s favourite songs and he laughed again and joined in. When they finished, he clapped his hands, jumped down and ran outside again. His footsteps echoed through the house. When the room was quiet again the spider climbed down from its web and walked across the floor to the bed. Nokomis sat up, surprised “Thank you for saving my life,” said the spider. “I’ve seen you watching me while I’ve been spinning my web. I heard you speak to me and I know you like my work. So I’m going to give you a gift.” Nokomis couldn’t believe what she’d heard. She sat very still as the spider moved again on its eight legs and started climbing the wall by her bed. As it climbed it left a new shining trail behind. Nokomis watched the spider crawling slowly around the corner near the ceiling, weaving a bigger web this time. Evening came and the moon rose outside the window. The spider crawled and spun for hours. Just before dawn it stopped and the web was finished. Nokomis knelt on her pillows and leaned up to inspect it. The threads were shaped into many circles, held apart by strands fanning out from a tiny ring up to the largest circle at the edge of the web. Moonlight shone on the strands and lit up the spider as it clung at the top. “I’ve made this to catch your dreams when you sleep,” said the spider. “Good dreams will slide through the hole in the middle and float down to you. Bad dreams will get stuck in the web and disappear when the sun rises. This dream catcher is my gift to you.”


Model: Giavonna Lyerly Photo by: Bobby Dalto

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Native American Prayer For Peace Oh Great Spirit of our Ancestors, I raise my pipe to you. To your messengers the four winds, and to Mother earth who provides for your children. Give us the wisdom to teach our children to love, to respect, and to be kind to each other so that they may grow... with peace of mind. Let us learn to share all good things that you provide for us on this Earth.

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Model: Alycesaundra Lyerly Photo by: Bobby Dalto

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ugar & S

Model: Marie Hufnagle Photo by: Leslie Spurlock Photography www.lesliespurlock.com

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Model: Jessica Middleton Photo by: Leslie Spurlock Photography www.lesliespurlock.com

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Glitter Photos by: Chad Braithwaite FACES photography

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Model: Kaylee Photos by: Amy B Photography

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Model: Kaylee Photo by: Amy B Photography

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Recipes

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Moroccan Lamb & Apricot Kebabs Don’t let this dish’s distant origins fool you -- the classic flavors of North Africa are probably already in your spice cabinet. Tender, smoky chunks of lamb and the sweet surprise of dried apricots, served with grilled zucchini and couscous, make these kebabs irresistible to kids and parents alike. What you’ll need 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon honey 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons smoked sweet or plain paprika 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus some for seasoning 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger Pinch of cayenne pepper 1 1/2 pounds boneless leg of lamb, trimmed and cut into 24 (1-inch) chunks 16 dried apricots Almonds (optional) 8 (9-inch) bamboo skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes How to make it In a large bowl, whisk together all the ingredients, except for the lamb and apricots. Reserve 1 tablespoon of the marinade. Add the lamb to the bowl, and toss well to coat. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Bring the lamb to room temperature. Place the apricots in a small, heat-proof bowl, cover them with hot water, and set them aside for 15 minutes to plump. Prepare your grill or heat a grill pan to medium-high. Lightly oil the grates or pan. Drain the apricots and toss them lightly in the reserved marinade. Thread 3 chunks of lamb and 2 apricots onto each skewer, alternating the meat and fruit. Season the lamb with kosher salt, then grill it until it is just cooked through and still pink in the center, about 3 minutes per side. Serves 4.

HP Sauce Cookbook

Nutritional Information Per serving (2 skewers): Calories 671 • Total Fat 49 g • Saturated Fat 19 g • Cholesterol 112 mg • Sodium 607 mg cinamagic february 2014

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Cherry Cheese Pie What you need: 1 - 8oz jar pie filling mix 1 - 9” unbaked pie shell 1 tsp. of nutmeg 1 tbsp. of butter or margarine Cream cheese topping How to make it: Pour cherry pie filling mix into the pie shell. Sprinkle the nutmeg over the cherries; dot with butter or margarine. Bake the pie at 425 degrees for 15 minutes. Take it out and spoon cheese topping over the top of the cherry filling. Reduce the oven’s temperature down to 350 degrees and bake the pie for 30 more minutes or until center is set. Once it is done, let it cool. For the Cream Cheese topping What you need: 1 - 80z pkg. of cream cheese. Room temperature 2 eggs 1/2 cup of sugar 1/3 of cup of orange juice 3/4 tsp. of vanilla extract How to make it: Combine the cream cheese with the eggs. Mix it together and then add the sugar, orange juice and the vanilla extract. Beat until smooth and creamy. cinamagic february 2014

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Model: Caia Photo by: Conceptions Photography

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Model: Rena Photo by: Conceptions Photography

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Model: Penelope Photo by: Meri Valentin Photography

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Model: Alycesaundra Lyerly Photo by: Bobby Dalto

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