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3 RESULTS

-- References: MCGOWAN and BERRY (1984); OLIVAR and FORTUÑO (1991);

-- Reference material: 2925 specimens; 11/97: S4 (P18858-999; P181000-3692); S6 (P183693-3704); S7 (P183705-3719); S10 (P18818-848); S13 (P18849-857); 04/99: S14 (P183720); 05/99: S1 (P183721-3725); 03/02: S4 (P18814-815); S5 (P18816); S7 (P18817); S10 (P18801-805); S11 (P18806-810); S14 (P18811-813);

-- Distribution: During winter, larvae were mainly found at the epipelagic stations southeast of Fuerteventura at a depth range from 22 – 219 m during the day as well as during the night. Some specimens were caught southeast of Fuerteventura at a neritic station at a depth range of 15 – 43 m during the night as well as at a epipelagic station in 31 – 140 m depth during daytime. The highest numbers of E. encrasicolus larvae of the entire period of investigation were caught in autumn. During this period, the largest amounts of larvae were caught at neritic stations southeast of Fuerteventura at a depth of 22 – 35 m during the daytime, southeast of Lanzarote at 13 – 41 m depth during daytime and northeast of Lanzarote at a depth of 20 – 64 m during the night. Smaller numbers of larvae were found at epipelagic stations west of the channel between Lanzarote and Fuerteventura at 28 – 43 m and southeast of Fuerteventura at 90 – 107 m depth each around dawn. In spring, fewer specimens were caught. One larva was found at a mesopelagic station southwest of Gran Canaria at a depth of 480 – 694 m during the day. This single larva may derive from an earlier, shallower tow, most probably it remained in the net from the previous neritic haul and contaminated the mesopelagic trawl. Some more larvae occurred at a station far east off Fuerteventura at a depth of 38 – 40 m at dawn.

Clupeidae The body is elongate and has an approximate number of 50 myomeres.The relation of gut to body length is longer in clupeids than in engraulids and there is a gap between the posterior margin of the dorsal fin and the anterior margin of the anal fin.

•  Sardinella sp. The number of vertebrae is less than 50 in the east Atlantic species in contrast to the genus of Sardina with more than 50 vertebrae. The larvae of Sardinella (exception S. tawilis (HERRE, 1927)) have 16 – 20 dorsal and 14 – 23 anal fin rays. The number of melanophores on the hindgut is smaller in the genus Sardinella than in Sardina. Using the fin ray count and the number of vertebrae/myomeres made it easy to distinguish Sardinella and Sardina. Both were found to be easily countable in well preserved larvae.

-- References: BERTOLINI et al. (1956); MCGOWAN and BERRY (1984); OLIVAR and FORTUÑO (1991);

-- Reference material: 2 specimens; 11/97: S7 (P183726); 03/02: S4 (P183727);

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Inf. Téc. Inst. Canario Cienc. Mar. n°13

Spatial and seasonal patterns in species composition of fish larvae in the Canary Islands  

Technical report consisting on a comprehensive annotated larvae taxa list with the most important taxonomic characters of this region

Spatial and seasonal patterns in species composition of fish larvae in the Canary Islands  

Technical report consisting on a comprehensive annotated larvae taxa list with the most important taxonomic characters of this region

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