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BECOME THE CURE


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TABLE OF CONTENTS STORY 04 MISSION

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PURPOSE

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THE PROBLEM

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OUR PLAN

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OUR GOAL

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YOUR IMPACT

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FINANCIALS 22

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HISTORY OUR STORY

From humble beginnings as a small laboratory in Issaquah, Washington with an initial staff of five and a budget of only $17,000, Seattle BioMed became the world’s largest center focused solely on infectious disease research with nearly 300 staff and an annual budget of over $30 million. NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS DISCOVERED RNA EDITING

IDENTIFIED AGENTS CAPABLE OF KILLING TB

SEQUENCED 3 PARASITE GENOMES

CREATED A REVOLUTIONARY VACCINE CANDIDATE FOR HIV/AIDS

DEVELOPED A MALARIA VACCINE CANDIDATE CURRENTLY IN HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS

We are proud of our progress. But for the 14 million people who died last year from these diseases, progress was not enough. Just as was the case 40 years ago, there are still no vaccines to prevent or drugs to treat most of these infectious diseases. This is not only tragic; it is unjust.

GLOBAL PARTNER LOCATIONS 1. Australia 2. Bangladesh 3. Belgium 4. Brazil 5. Canada 6. China 7. Colombia 8. Czech Republic 9. Denmark 10. France 11. Germany 12. India

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13. Israel 14. Italy 15. Japan 16. Kenya 17. Korea 18. Netherlands 19. New Zealand 20. Portugal 21. South Africa 22. Spain 23. Switzerland 24. Taiwan 25. Thailand


FUTURE

The Center for Infectious Disease Research OUR MISSION

At the Center for Infectious Disease Research, our mission is to make transformative scientific advancements that lead to the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. In the 200 years since Edward Jenner’s discovery of a vaccine for smallpox, the science behind vaccine development has remained largely unchanged. As we look toward our fifth decade, we hope to answer 21st century problems with 21st century science. We have grown as a center and developed our science to meet our mission. With this, our identity must expand as well. It must reflect our three tenets: the people who are both affected by and fighting disease; the cutting-edge science developing future interventions; and the hope derived from our research and the potentiality of global health. To match the scope of these tenets, we are now the Center for Infectious Disease Research.

A place for

PEOPLE SCIENCE HOPE

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PEO PG. 06


OPLE PG.07


OUR PURPOSE

We advance the science to develop vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics for the infectious diseases that claim the lives of 14 million people every year. We concentrate our efforts on the people that need it most – those in developing nations throughout the world. Progress for those most affected has moved at a slow and inhumane pace. In 1815, the average life expectancy was 47 years in the United States. In Africa, in 2015, 200 years later, the life expectancy is still only 47 years. Our science is for people, regardless of outside funding priorities. By investing in global health, we are investing in so much more. We are investing in the global economy, increased education rates, the waning of national and international conflict, and the opportunity for equality. We value the potential of people, and that is why we produce great science.

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IN 2013

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MALARIA KILLED

“Just living in my village, seeing their struggles has been a motivation. I realized that more research needed to be done. We need to support their health and that starts with vaccines.” Dr. Albanus Moguche, a postdoctoral scientist at the Center for Infectious Disease Research, witnessed the suffering of those infected with disease in his small village in Kenya. He began as a veterinarian, knowing that the cattle in his village were considered a very important asset. However, he soon grasped that disease was a penetrating handicap to his community. Most of the people in his village had tuberculosis. Because of poor diagnostic tools, they were not aware of it until it became an active infection – therefore, Albanus decided to become a scientist. Albanus’ community supported his decision to become a scientist by coming together to raise funds for him to attend a national high school - something very few people in his village achieve. “I became a scientist, because again, I asked myself – ‘how can I help my people?’”

THOUSAND CHILDREN

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A SCIENTIST’S JOURNEY

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SCIENCE PG. 11


THE PROBLEM

At this point in scientific discovery, all vaccine candidates for HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria have failed. Though there have been advances, current interventions for HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria are badly outmatched by these formidable pathogens. Thirty-three million people live with incurable HIV/AIDS, approximately two billion people are infected with TB, and 40 percent of the world’s population is at risk of malaria. Together, these diseases kill nearly four million people per year. For real progress in combating the “Big Three” (HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria) and other infectious diseases, fundamental knowledge is still lacking. Successfully preventing and treating these infectious diseases will require, and will be dramatically hastened by, a deep scientific understanding of pathogen biology, the human immune system, and the interface between them. Knowledge of the complex interplay between pathogens and their hosts will enable a rational and direct approach to develop vaccines and drugs that prevent and treat infection.

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OUR VISION

Our research aims to make transformative advances that lead to the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Over the next ten years, we look to advance the science to prevent, treat, and cure HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, and other emerging infectious diseases. This requires transformative advances that can come only from a deep scientific understanding of pathogen biology, the human immune system, and the interactions between them. Advancing our understanding of the interface between pathogens and host responses is a major challenge. This interface is where the war between a pathogen and its host takes place. Thus, we must understand how the host responds to infection and how these pathogens evade the human immune system.

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OUR PLAN

Through pursuing our goals un-siloed by disease archetype, we are achieving science on a grand scale. We seek to overcome the grand challenges of infectious disease research, which prevent the development of vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics from moving forward. The Center’s singular focus on global infectious diseases and its integration of systems biology uniquely positions us in the fight against infectious diseases. We pioneered systems biology approaches to understand complexity in biology, applied these approaches in the context of innate immunity, and are currently applying systems biology approaches to the host-pathogen interfaces we study.

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HIV/AIDS.

BECAUSE OF

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THERE ARE

We focus our science on the three areas of infectious disease research that will have the most transformative impact on global health: vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics. Our vaccine work includes research to: determine what elements of a pathogen are effective in eliciting immune protection or evading immune responses, and control the immune system to generate effective immune protection. Through this approach, we can more clearly see the challenges hindering vaccine development and learn how to dismantle them. Our drug development work includes research to: discover how pathogens infect and survive in humans and the mechanisms to block them, identify chemical compounds to invoke mechanisms to kill pathogens, and understand, predict, and bypass drug resistance. Drug resistance is becoming a huge concern throughout the world. Our goal when creating effective drugs is to target the causes of drug resistance in order to avoid future outbreaks and maintain the efficacy of treatment. Our diagnostics work includes research to: uncover molecular fingerprints of infection useful to predict disease onset, and develop diagnostic tests to identify disease before it becomes an active infection – the opportune time for treatment intervention.

MILLION ORPHANS

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OUR AREAS OF FOCUS

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HO PG. 16


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OUR GOAL

With your support in advancing our research we seek to build a healthier, more hopeful world. Infectious diseases destroy families and communities. When a mother has an infectious disease, such as malaria, she cannot go to work or support her family. Since there is no vaccine, her children are constantly at risk for contracting malaria. Every year, over half of all school-aged absences in Africa are from malaria. When children aren’t educated, they are not able to break the cycle of death and suffering from infectious diseases. For those unhealthy and sick children who do not die, they grow up to be unhealthy and sick adults who cannot contribute to a growing and thriving economy. Every year, Africa loses over 525,000 children and $12 billion to malaria. That’s just one disease on one continent. Help us break this cycle of poverty, suffering, and death. A vaccine for just one of the diseases we work on would save 15 million lives in the coming decade. That’s 15 million healthy people who get an education, have a job, and contribute to the global economy. It’s 15 million more people contributing to a socially and politically stable world.

Imagine – more peace, more equality, more prosperity

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YOUR IMPACT

Funding for infectious disease research remains stagnant, and public awareness is almost nonexistent. It’s time that we do more. It’s time that we do better. Roughly every 2.5 seconds, someone dies from infectious disease. That’s 14 million people every year. Perhaps the greatest injustice of this global catastrophe is that we have, sadly, learned to accept it. You have the power to help us end this tragedy. Your support of the Center for Infectious Disease Research will serve to establish the means for our innovative and life-saving science to thrive. Become the cure.

and more potential, all because of a healthier world.

All because of you.

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TB KILLS

1.5 MILLION PEOPLE EVERY YEAR.

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HOPE DOESN’T HAPPEN WITHOUT YOU.

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FINANCIALS OUR FUNDING SOURCES

Scientific projects at the Center for Infectious Disease Research depend entirely on external funding, principally from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with some public support. We have and will continue to compete effectively for funding from the NIH and other major, mission-aligned agencies. The whole framework of external research funding is shifting, however, and resources available to the NIH are diminished. This makes public support of our mission more critical than ever. We believe that a well-considered investment in the Center will serve to establish a means for science to thrive despite the current funding environment. This will ensure the continuation of our life-saving mission of developing vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics.

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REQUESTS

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THE NIH CAN ONLY SUPPORT

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Join the Movement for Global Health. Give Today.

CIDResearch.org/give

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Website: cidresearch.org/give Facebook: facebook.com/CIDResearch Twitter: @CIDResearch Instagram: CIDResearch Ph. 206.256.7200

The Center for Infectious Disease Research Brochure 2015  

The Center for Infectious Disease Research is a nonprofit research institute with a mission on fostering a healthier, more hopeful world.

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