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FocalPoint A Chicago International Charter School Publication

Respected. Refined. Realized.

VOL. 03 NUM. 2 SPRING/SUMMER 2010

Priceless Partnership The Juvenile Protection Association Helps Urban Schools Serve Children in Jeopardy CICS Northtown’s Debate Team Prepares for Competition—and Life CICS Loomis Gets Creative with Programming for Parents The Museum of Science and Industry: Becoming an Active Steward of Science Education in Public Schools

w w w.c h i c a g o i n t l .o r g


OpeningThoughts Friends, Nothing good ever happens after midnight; so said my mother as I was growing up. As with most maternal advice, I have come to understand and agree with her mantra. I am happy to say that a lot of good happens at Chicago International between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. From 8:00-3:30, CICS campus buildings are bustling with bell-to-bell learning activities including literary circles, science experiments, and use of 21st-century technology. From 3:30 to 7:00 p.m. on all 13 CICS campuses, another type of “busy” is underway. Walk down any hall on any school day on any CICS campus, and you’ll hear sounds of choral singing, violin strings, tap dancing, vegetable chopping, ball dribbling and, on occasion, you’ll be engulfed in silence as the Chess Wizards move across the game board.

Meghan Schmidt, Director of Special Projects

For Chicago International students, this is time well spent—time that a “latchkey” kid would otherwise spend at an empty house with few learning-focused social choices. The 13 CICS campuses are located in some of Chicago’s highest crime areas, and approximately 86 percent of students who attend CICS are considered “low-income.” Affordable out-ofschool programming options are often very limited in communities where financial resources are scarce. This is why Chicago International has developed relationships with partners that provide out-of-school programming to close the achievement gap and keep students safe. These programs can be categorized by four areas: academics, health & wellness, arts & culture, and family involvement. As you page through this 6th edition of FocalPoint magazine, you will meet some of our partners who dedicate their time to serving Chicago International’s whole community. You’ll hear from a social service organization that helps troubled youth cope with issues at home, a winning debate team that teaches kids valuable life lessons, and a family program that helps to grow local businesses—to name a few of the topics shared within these pages.

We invite our readers to create a dialogue with CICS. Please share your comments and stories with us. We may feature your comments in our next edition of FocalPoint. Thank you. Chicago International Charter School p (312) 651-5000 f (312) 651-5001 e focalpoint@chicagointl.org (see opposing page for mailing address)

Despite the progress we have made, a potentially devastating situation is upon us as a public charter school: State and local budget cuts are threatening our ability to provide such essential programming. With a proposed 25 percent decrease from last year’s after-school funding and 18 percent “per pupil” budget cuts looming*, program dollars are stretched thin. The sustainability and longevity of high-quality programming is in peril. Although we face these financial constraints, Chicago International will persevere in its mission to continue providing this crucial programming. I implore you to read through these stories and ask yourself how these children and families would be doing without these out-of-school activities. If you are as concerned as we are, please reach out to your state lawmakers, and ask for equitable and fair funding for all Illinois public schools. As Chicago International’s Director of Special Programs, I am motivated by the following points that illustrate the importance of out-of-school programming. I hope you will be, too.

*As of press time Wilson, BJ. “Why America’s disadvantaged communities need twenty-first century learning.” The Case for Twenty-First Century Learning: New Directions for Youth Development, Number 110. Ed. Eric Schwartz and Ken Kay. Danvers, MA: Wiley Periodicals, Summer 2006. 47.

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Afterschool Alliance: Policy & Action Center. 22 December 2005. Afterschool Alliance. Accessed November 2008. http://www.afterschoolalliance. org/policyFedNewsArchive.cfm

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Hannaway, Jane and Duncan Chaplin. “A Day in the Life of DC Kids.” 14 September 2000. Urban Institute. http://www.urban.org/url. cfm?ID=900678

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• • •

As many as 14 million children in the United States—or 25 percent of the total youth population— find themselves without adult supervision during after-school hours,2 usually from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. when the rates of violent crime against minors are the highest.3 A study by Dr. Robert Halpern from the Erikson Institute concluded that out-of-school programs produce positive effects in several areas such as improving teens’ abilities to work in groups, communicate effectively, plan and meet deadlines, and cooperate with flexibility. Teens who participate in extracurricular activities are six times less likely to drop out, two times less likely to be arrested, and 75 percent less likely to smoke or use drugs.1

Please join us as Chicago International continues to provide high-quality out-of-school programming for its students. Sincerely,

Meghan Schmidt


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contents

VOL. 03 NUM. 2 | SPRING/SUMMER 2010

features 08 Necessary Good

Each year, public schools need more resources to serve children in need. At schools across the city, the Juvenile Protection Association steps in to fill the gap—and help some of Chicago’s most vulnerable kids.

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14 If You Build It, Will They Come?

Discover how the Museum of Science and Industry transformed into a public school partner and is now inspiring the next generation of scientists.

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18 Who’s Up for Debate?

If you think debate is all about disagreement, think again. At the Northtown campus, 13 students rev up their critical thinking skills, build self-esteem, and pursue excellence— for themselves and their teammates.

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FocalPoint MAGAZINE A Chicago International Charter School Publication 228 South Wabash Avenue, Suite 500 Chicago, IL 60604 www.chicagointl.org

CONTRIBUTORS Kate Floyd, Hilary Masell Oswald, Meghan Schmidt, Caroline Elise Eberly, Dr. Elizabeth D. Purvis, Daniel Anello, Dr. Andrea Brown-Thirston, Michael Cotter

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GetInvolved

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Extensions

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Achievement

DESIGN MORRIS w ww.thinkmorris.com PRINT Haapanen Brothers www.haapanenbrothers.com

PHOTOGRAPHY Tommy Giglio www. tommygiglio.com

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“Out-of-school programs add on to the school day an outlet for creative selfexpression, as well as the opportunity to learn and practice valuable life skills such as cooperation, risk-taking, practice, and setting and meeting goals. For many, such programs spark a life-changing sense of accomplishment and belonging.”

Michael Simon,

“As educators, we are quick to choose things for our students, but out-of-school programming allows them to choose what they like, and I believe it carries over into the classroom. The results of these programs show through in their self-esteem.”

Julia Hill, Director, CICS Avalon

“I get to experience new ideas and activities and learn things I never knew I could learn at CICS Avalon. In afterschool, I've gotten to experience drama, cheerleading, track, yoga, and exercise through dance.”

Alexis Williamson, 7th-Grade Student, CICS Avalon

Executive Director, Intonation Music

“There are a few kids who I see having trouble during the school day and I ask the out-of-school coordinators about them; they are shocked to hear that the child acts out during the day because they have the opposite experience with him or her. Some students just thrive during that after-school time.”

Amanda Harrison, Librarian, CICS Avalon

“Community Schools enables students to learn in a fun but organized environment. It introduces students to activities that otherwise may not financially be available to them.”

Georgina Fofana, Teacher, CICS Avalon

“I’m a dean and have to deal with discipline during the day, but after school, I enjoy being able to hang a little more loose with the kids and integrate character-building while doing other things. We teach them that even while we’re having fun, even while they’re exercising their gifts, there is still a need for self-control.”

Keit h Myles, Dean of Students, CICS Avalon

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PolicyReport

Supporting Student Outcomes Through Expanded Learning Opportunities What are the benefits of participation in afterschool and summer learning programs?2 by Priscilla M. Little

Afterschool programs can impact learning and academic success in a number of ways. Relative to participation in other afterschool arrangements (such as self-care or sibling care), participation can result in less disciplinary action; lower dropout rates; better academic performance in school, including better grades and test scores; greater on-time promotion; improved homework completion; and improved work habits (Little, Wimer, & Weiss, 2008). Three studies in particular illustrate this point:

In 2008, results from the Evaluation of Enhanced Academic Instruction in AfterSchool Programs, a two-year intervention and random assignment evaluation of adapted models of regular school-day math and reading instruction in afterschool settings, commissioned by the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the U.S. Department of Education, was released (Black, Doolittle, Zhu, Unterman, & Grossman, 2008). First-year implementation findings revealed that students in the enhanced programs experienced more targeted instruction, which resulted overall in significant gains for math but not reading. These findings suggest that participation in an afterschool program that intentionally targets specific skills may lead to positive impacts on learning. However, the results of the second year of implementation are needed in order to make summary statements.

A two-year longitudinal Study of Promising After-School Programs examined the long-term effects of participation in quality afterschool programs among almost 3,000 youth in 35 elementary and middle school afterschool programs located in 14 cities and 8 states (Vandell, Reisner, & Pierce, 2007). Findings for 2007 from that study indicate that, of the elementary and middle school students who participated in highquality afterschool programs, the elementary school students who regularly attended the high-quality afterschool programs (alone or in combination with other activities) across two years demonstrated significant gains in standardized math test scores, compared to their peers who were routinely unsupervised after school hours. It is important to note that this study found regular participation in afterschool programs to be associated with improvements in work habits and task persistence, which, in turn, may have contributed to the academic gains.

The national study of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program is an older, but still important, study of the impact of afterschool. Released in 2003, that study, which employed both experimental and quasi-experimental designs, showed mixed findings related to an afterschool program’s impact on student achievement as measured by grades and SAT-9 test scores, but it demonstrated some impact on school-related measures of success such as attendance and college aspirations (U.S. Department of Education, 2003). While the results were termed “disappointing� and used by the Administration as the rationale for a proposed $400 million budget reduction in the program, the evaluation was an important turning point in federal investments in research and evaluation, since it led to the realization that evaluating program outcomes necessitates also evaluating and supporting higher quality program implementation.

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“Historically, how best to use this time has been the topic of debate, but the past decade has seen a convergence in opinion...” Several other studies and meta-analyses confirm the same message: Afterschool programs can improve academic achievement. For example, Granger (2008) reviewed several narrative and empirical reviews of the effects of afterschool programs and concludes that “although reviews vary in their conclusions regarding academics, the most reliable reviews show that on average programs have positive impacts on important academic, social, and emotional outcomes” (p. 4). One of the studies he reviewed was a 2006 meta-analysis by Lauer and colleagues (2006), who found small but statistically significant effects on both reading and math across the 35 studies of out-of-school time educational interventions. Dozens of studies of afterschool programs and initiatives repeatedly underscore the powerful impact of supporting a range of positive learning outcomes, including academic achievement, by affording children and youth opportunities to learn and practice new skills through hands-on, experiential learning in project-based afterschool programs, which complement, but do not replicate, in-school learning. The evidence for summer learning is equally compelling. When students actively participate in summer programs, and particularly when they are encouraged to participate by their families, they stand to improve their reading and math levels going into the next grade, as well as their standardized test scores (Learning Point Associates, 2005). A meta-analysis of 93 summer programs (Cooper et al., 1996) indicated that summer learning has a range of effects on academic achievement for both remedial and accelerated programs. Remedial programs can have a positive impact on skill and knowledge building,

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particularly with smaller class sizes. Similarly, findings from the Chicago Summer Bridge program and Teach Baltimore summer program show that summer education can help to supplement students’ scholastic achievement in both reading and math (Denton, 2002). In addition, academically focused summer programs help students to successfully transition into the next grade level, a benefit attributable to smaller class size, individual-

Research Spotlight: Connections Matter The Massachusetts Afterschool Research Study found that afterschool programs with stronger relationships with school teachers and principals were more successful at improving students’ homework completion, homework effort, positive behavior, and initiative. This may be because positive relationships with schools can foster high-quality, engaging, and challenging activities, and also promote staff engagement (Intercultural Center for Research in Education et al., 2005). An evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services (SES) found that program quality suffered when there were not effective partnerships between schools and SES providers. School staff were needed to help coordinate SES and identify and recruit participants; without the partnerships, SES providers were less able to align their supplementary education with in-school learning needs (U.S. Department of Education, 2004a).

ized learning, and personal attention by teachers, all of which might not be available to students during the academic year (Cooper et al., 1996). Participation in well-implemented afterschool and summer learning programs can also support the healthy development requisite for learning. In the United States, over 50 percent of school-aged children’s waking hours are spent outside of school (Larson & Verma, 1999). Historically, how best to use this time has been the topic of debate, but the past decade has seen a convergence in opinion: Time out of school, such as that spent in afterschool and summer learning programs, offers opportunities to complement in-school learning and development and expose children to experiences to which they do not have access during the school day and year. Researchers and practitioners alike assert that, in addition to families, peers, and schools, high-quality, organized out-of-school time activities have the potential to support and promote youth development, equipping students with the skills needed to be “active learners” in the classroom. Such activities have multiple benefits. They (a) situate youth in safe environments; (b) prevent youth from engaging in delinquent activities; (c) teach youth general and specific skills, beliefs, and behaviors; and (d) provide opportunities for youth to develop relationships with peers and mentors (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2002). Thus, not only can afterschool and summer learning programs directly support academic success, but they can also equip students with the skills necessary to be effective learners and leaders. In addition to demonstrating that afterschool and summer learning programs support specific academic skills and overall develop-


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ment, the past decade of research and evaluation makes it clear that participation in well-implemented afterschool and summer learning programs can address some of the educational challenges for children and youth living in poverty. Specifically they can: • Connect youth to quality learning opportunities and to learning itself and keep youth engaged in school • Help youth practice social and interpersonal skills and gain from positive youth development models

Give youth more access to environments that support academic achievement, particularly in the current higher stakes educational environment

Summer programming, in particular, can help address the opportunity gap that occurs during this extended period when lower income children and youth have less access to enrichment opportunities than their more affluent and advantaged peers. In sum, the evidence indicates, first, that afterschool and summer programs are

important learning environments that can address some current educational inequities and, second, that participation in well-implemented programs can support academic and other developmental outcomes. TOP: Former Pro Player Luke Jensen and Tom Gullickson pose with young players from chicago international after a celebrity clinic at the midtown tennis club.

Adapted from Weiss, H., Little, P., Bouffard, S., Deschenes, S., & Malone, H. (2008). The federal role in out of- school learning: After-school, summer learning, and family involvement as critical learning supports. A paper commissioned by the Center for Education Policy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project.

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Why Should Schools and Afterschool and Summer Learning Programs Partner to Support Learning? Partnerships with afterschool and summer learning programs can help schools to: • Provide a wider range of services and activities, particularly enrichment and arts activities, that are not available during the school day • Support transitions from middle to high school • Reinforce concepts taught in school • Improve school culture and community image through exhibitions and performances • Gain access to mentors and afterschool staff to support in-school learning

About this excerpt: Reprinted with permission of Harvard Family Research Project (www.hrfp.org). Supporting Student Outcomes Through Expanded Learning Opportunities by Priscilla M. Little, January 2009. Copyright © 2009 President and Fellows of Harvard College. If you would like to read the complete article, please visit http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/supporting-student-outcomes-through-expanded-learning-opportunities.

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Where public school resources fall short, the Juvenile Protection Association steps in to support some of Chicago’s most vulnerable students. by Hilary Masell Oswald | photo by Tommy Giglio


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“America's future will be determined by the home and the school. The child becomes largely what he is taught; hence we must watch what we teach, and how we live.” – Jane Addams: founder of the U.S. Settlement House movement, teacher, Nobel Prize Winner

No one who works in urban education seems to remember a time when city schools only had to provide academic services to students. Perhaps those days never existed. No matter. Today, the reality is that schools don’t just teach students about the proverbial reading, writing and arithmetic; schools must also provide emotional, social, and support services to many, many students—and their families. The challenge is finding the time and resources to provide this help.

Just ask Hope Kyle-Mitchell. The director of CICS Bucktown, Ms. Kyle-Mitchell wonders at the depth of need she faces every day. “Every year, the demand gets higher,” she says. “We have to think about how we can get programs that support children’s mental and emotional health because if kids’ mental and emotional health is not restored, academic success is not possible.” That’s where the Juvenile Protection Association (JPA) steps in. A private non-profit organization dedicated to preventing and treating child abuse and neglect, JPA was founded more than 100 years ago by Jane Addams and her Hull House friends. Left: HOPE KYLE-MITCHELL, DIRECTOR OF CICS BUCKTOWN

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photo by Tommy Giglio

Today, JPA’s services include counseling for Chicago’s most vulnerable families, parent-infant services to prevent at-risk parents from abusing their children, and training to help other community groups identify child abuse and neglect.

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At schools throughout the city, JPA therapists meet with children weekly for individual or group counseling. They also provide teacher training sessions and host family nights when parents learn strategies for keeping their families emotionally healthy. JPA fills a void she could not otherwise fill, says Ruth Taxy, CICS Bucktown’s case manager. “In some of our families, there are so many layers to [their need],” says Ms. Taxy, who serves as team leader for the school’s special education teachers and manages the piles of paperwork that come with developing and maintaining students’ individualized education plans. “We need all the help we can get if we have any hope of educating the student.” JPA’s relationship with CICS began several years ago, when the two organizations had a board member in common. CICS’s leaders wanted help boosting parental involvement, so JPA launched a series of family nights, first at the Basil campus, then at Bucktown, West Belden, and Irving Park. Topics included positive discipline, building kids’ self-esteem, understanding and managing aggression, and keeping young children safe.

in high-need areas, that the school is willing to reach out. If we don’t offer help, who will?” Every week at CICS Bucktown, three JPA counselors meet individually or in small groups with about a dozen students. They’re children with absent parents and unstable homes, children who have been abused, children with health problems piled on top of learning disabilities. “You can’t imagine some of the challenges these students face,” Ms. Taxy says. The therapists’ consistency is key. If they miss a day because of a holiday or bad weather, they make it up. They never complain about Bucktown’s shortage of space, which leads them to meet with kids in unconventional places: at the ends of corridors, in large closets, just about anywhere they can find privacy. It’s not ideal, Ms. Kyle-Mitchell admits, but it’s the best she can do for now. In fact, making the best use of limited resources is an art form in urban education, she adds. “Even with all [JPA] does for us, our kids need so much more,” she says. So do her teachers. “We need time for general ed teachers and special ed teachers to gather around the table with the social worker and [JPA] therapist, so we can all brainstorm ideas and share information. There’s just not room in our day.” But the school has carved out time for JPA counselors and the social worker to discuss students’ needs, and Ms. Taxy says that ensuring that this conversation is a priority makes a big difference in the school’s ability to help the kids.

“We have to show parents, especially in high-need areas, that the school is willing to reach out. If we don’t offer help, who will?”

“To give parents support is really critical,” says Norma Irie, JPA’s coordinator for prevention. “They need good information, and they need a connection with other parents. It normalizes their experiences and reduces their anxiety.” Plus, it builds a stronger connection between the parent and the school—and, as Ms. Irie points out, piles of research show that parent involvement in school is a key factor in student success.

For all their good, family nights aren’t without their challenges. Even though JPA provides dinner and childcare, it’s not always easy to get parents to show up, particularly the single parents who often need support the most. “There’s a lot going on in these families’ lives,” Ms. Irie says. “Jobs and homework and a lot of stress. Schools really have to work to get the word out and promote the events.” Today, Bucktown is the only CICS campus that still offers family nights. As the leadership at other campuses changed, their relationships with JPA fizzled. But for Ms. Kyle-Mitchell, the service is invaluable: “We have to show parents, especially

It’s this shared mission that makes JPA such a valuable partner for urban schools like CICS Bucktown. “They come to us in the context of the school day with no financial output on our part or the families’ part. How much more valuable could an organization be?” Ms. Taxy says. “If we didn’t have them, I don’t know who would take on this case load. JPA is doing for these kids what public schools alone cannot.” TOP Left: RUTH TAXY, CASE MANAGER FOR CICS BUCKTOWN

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JPA Mission Statement: As a social welfare agency, JPA's mission is to protect and to promote the healthy development of children whose social and emotional well-being, or whose physical safety are in jeopardy, either because of neglector abuse at home or because of inimical interferences in the neighborhood, and, when necessary, to provide for the rehabilitation of families for such children.

JPA Provides the Following Services: Treatment and Counseling: to resolve the issues caused by abuse and neglect or that increase the likelihood of abuse and neglect Parent-Infant Services: to prevent high-risk families from abusing their children Consultation: to share direct service expertise and experience with public and private agencies involved in treating high-risk children and families Research and Publication: to contribute to knowledge in the field Professional Education and Technical Assistance: to train professionals practicing in the areas of child welfare, early childhood, developmental psychology, and pediatrics Advocacy: to support social policy and services which protect children and enhance their development and serve as a voice for children and families to ensure that children’s best interests are recognized Copy courtesy of juvenile.org

Visit www.juvenile.org for more info.

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Juvenile Protection Association’s Impact: Serving Children in Need Ruth Taxy, case manager at CICS Bucktown, sits in wonder every day, she says, at the elementary school children who can come to school and function “pretty well” while their home lives fall apart. “I don’t think most people—even teachers—are entirely aware of how difficult these kids’ lives are,” she says. “That the kids are here and learning, it’s amazing.” On a day in late February, Ms. Taxy reflects on the tremendous need she sees in the students she serves. “The challenges aren’t new,” she says. “We’re talking about divorce, lack of financial security, homelessness, abusive parents, parents who have drinking or drug problems, a lack of stability in living circumstances—the list is, sadly, long.” And while one of these problems would be very tough for a child to handle, the reality is that most of the children JPA serves are dealing with layers of family challenges, abuse, and uncertainty. And for most of these children, JPA and school are the only resources they have to cope with tumultuous home lives. Ms. Taxy points to a particularly poignant example: “A few weeks ago, we found out that a parent hit her child,” she says. “The situation at home is bad—the parent isn’t making enough money to make ends meet; she has to move; the child has diagnosed disabilities. It’s a mess.” Ms. Taxy, together with the social worker and school counselor, reported the incident to the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), the state-run child protection association. “Obviously, we are required by law to report instances of abuse,” Ms. Taxy says. “But no matter how many of these calls you have to make, it’s never a simple, easy thing”—particularly in cases such as this one because the DCFS case worker arrived on campus three weeks later. “What happens in the meantime?” Ms. Taxy asks. “We’re still dealing with the child on Monday morning. We’re still seeing that parent. We have to have resources that enable us to help that child as soon as we can, and that’s why groups like JPA are so valuable to us.” JPA counselors work with the same group of students from the first week of school to the end of the academic year. The students who will receive JPA services are identified prior to the start of school, and many of the students meet with their JPA counselors for years. Ms. Taxy sighs before she continues. “I wish that all these kids needed was academic instruction,” she says. “We need to teach and they need to learn, but along the way, we have to help them cope with very complicated lives. It’s just our reality.”


GetInvolved

Your Voice Matters What you can do to help stop public school budget cuts Recently, the state government proposed budget cuts to public education that would slash Chicago International Charter School’s budget by $13 million, and would devastate the budgets of all Chicago public schools. Over the next few months, Illinois lawmakers will be deciding upon the state budget, and thus the fate of public schools across the state and throughout Chicago. As friends, family, students and staff of CICS, we are calling on you to reach out to your legislators to make a difference.

TOP: CICS proponents speaking with state legislator, Deborah Mell of the 40th District in Chicago, Illinois.

Here are some frequently asked questions (and answers) that can help you get involved: Q: I want to call, write, or email my legislator, but I don’t

A:

know who my local state representative and senator are. How do I find their names and contact details? Visit http://ilga.gov and click on “Legislator Lookup.” Type in your home address and hit “search.”

Q: I don’t know exactly what to say to my lawmakers.

A:

Q: Okay, I’m ready to reach out to my legislators.

A: First, state that you are a voting consituent in his/her district.

The main point we are trying to get across is that public school funding cannot be cut at the proposed levels, for the following reasons:

The proposed state and citywide public education budget cuts will severely hinder our public schools’ ability to provide the quality education that our kids deserve.

Then, state your relationship to public schools and explain why they are important to you. You can point out that you went to public school, have sent children to public school, or work at a public school—anything that makes it personal to you.

Q: Where can I find general information and updates about

What are the main talking points?

How should I introduce myself?

Chicago International’s legislative outreach efforts?

A: Visit our newly designed website at www.chicagointl.org

and become a fan of “Chicago International Charter School” on Facebook.

www.chicagointl.org/facebook

• The proposed state and citywide cuts would directly affect teaching and learning, and would threaten to close high-performing public schools.

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IF YOU BUILD IT, WILL THEY COME?

How one of the world’s largest museums became a public education partner—and took a giant leap toward fulfilling its mission. by Hilary Masell Oswald | photos by Tommy Giglio

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Left: The Chicago Museum of Science and Industry opened in 1933. Right: Students learn about forensic science by analyzing fingerprints in their classroom.

It stands as a beacon to science-lovers across the world: Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. In its iconic Greek Revival building perched at the edge of Lake Michigan, the Museum houses 14 acres of hands-on exhibits, all world-class, all maintained in pursuit of the Museum’s mission: “to inspire the inventive genius in everyone.”

But until a couple of years ago, “everyone” meant “everyone who walked through the Museum’s doors,” and that excluded many of the city’s public school students. The Museum’s focus was primarily on encouraging teachers to organize field trips—a worthwhile, if short-sighted, goal. Local public schools with limited resources couldn’t afford the cost of transporting kids to the Museum, so its reach was small relative to the number of children growing up in the shadow of its magnificent building. “The fact that there are so many kids in Chicago neighborhoods who have never left their neighborhoods—we have to respond to that,” says Nicole Kowrach, assistant director of teaching and learning at the Museum. To that end, several years ago, the Museum’s board of directors took a hard look at its resources, its relationship with Chicago Public Schools (CPS), and the sobering results of national standardized test scores.

By eighth grade, American students have fallen behind the 10 leading countries in science. By age 15, American students are behind 27 other nations in math skills. “The big issues in science education seemed to be getting worse: the demand for quality science education, the need for the next generation of scientists,” says Bryan Wunar, the Museum’s director of teaching and learning. “That global perspective applied to our local audience here in Chicago.” So the Museum’s educators took the first steps toward transforming the Museum into the educational resource their mission challenged them to be. They began with a series of focused meetings that included science-content experts, educators from schools and other museums, and civic leaders. “We wanted help understanding where we fit within the scope of the city and other efforts already underway,” Wunar explains. He and his colleagues also took a hard look at funding sources. “We didn’t want to let the funders tell us what to do, but we needed to be sure we were considering programs and exhibitions that were in line with available funding,” he explains. “There’s nothing like building a plan you can’t implement.” From there, Wunar and his colleagues identified the audiences they wanted the Museum to serve and brainstormed ways to meet their needs. Wunar says he’s learned that organizations trying to reach public schools must follow a simple rule: “Our responsibility is to learn from [our audiences] and be responsive, and at the same time, challenge some of [public school educators’] ideas,” he says. “We said, ‘We can fill these gaps

[in your resources], and at the same time, we can push you to go even further.’” As they were developing the programs, the Museum’s staff kept an eye on the feedback they got from public school teachers and administrators. “One of the things we see a lot with CPS is they are quite under-resourced,” Kowrach explains. “Some schools are struggling to teach the basics, and they’re teaching from textbooks that are 10 years old. The schools don’t have the resources for updated books, much less to come on a field trip.” The Museum strategically removed that obstacle by offering a bus scholarship to schools that demonstrate need.

Similarly, educators at the Museum heard a common complaint from teachers: they were unable to participate in professional development activities due to budget and time constraints. In response, the Museum pays for substitute teachers to fill in for the full-time faculty who attend Museum workshops and then sends teachers back to their classrooms with all of the materials they need to do the activities they’ve learned.

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As Wunar and his team crafted and implemented their vision, the Museum’s programming got a formal name—the Center for the Advancement of Science Education (CASE)—and a lofty mission: “to inspire and motivate all children to achieve their full potential in the fields of science, technology, medicine and engineering.” Central to this mission is the task of helping children learn about science outside of the Museum walls. CASE comprises four main areas: instruction and resources for science teachers; community initiatives that deliver science education to established afterschool clubs across the city and then invite older students to attend special learning opportunities at the Museum; enhanced student experiences at the Museum, where labs and state-of-the-art technology help students enjoy hands-on learning; and beefed-up experiments for all Museum visitors. “It was important for us not to just add on to what the Museum already had,” Wunar explains. “We had to think about our resources differently, and we needed our exhibitions to play a different role than they had.”

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The Museum created three new permanent exhibitions, and it’s no coincidence that the new exhibits’ broad scope of content—life, physical, earth and space science—dovetail nicely with the schools’ science curriculum. These programs didn’t spring up overnight, Wunar emphasizes. Like many forward-thinking education groups that use data to inform programming choices, the Museum’s educators committed to evaluating its newly implemented pilot programs in real time. “Evaluations are not just the thing you do at the end when you turn in a final report,” he says. “It’s ongoing, and a big part of that is understanding the needs of the audience we’re serving.” Chicago International teachers make up an important part of that audience. For example, for three years, Keith Palz and Ronald Hale, who teach seventh– and eighth–grade science at CICS Bucktown and Avalon, respectively, have participated in CASE’s Institute for Quality Science Teaching—the Museum’s professional workshop series for fourth–eighth–grade teachers. Not only do they learn teaching strategies, but the Museum also provides materials so teachers can take the lessons back to their classrooms.

“This program has energized me,” says Mr. Palz, who has been teaching science for eight years. “And the kids love it. The lessons are dynamic, which gets them excited. The classroom atmosphere is really positive.” It shows: 80.7 percent of Mr. Palz’s seventh-graders and 72.2 percent of Mr. Hale’s seventh-graders met or exceeded state standards on the ISAT in the ’08-’09 academic year. One reason why participating teachers love the program: CASE makes it easy to teach the lessons. “Last week, I did a lesson [from the Museum] on electricity,” Mr. Palz says. “I had everything I needed, from batteries and lights to tin foil and even paper clips. They think of everything.” Mr. Palz says he’s gotten everything from a blender (for a lesson on recycling paper) to those paper clips he uses in the electricity lesson. “Inquiry-based science is a lot of fun, and [the Museum program] helps us do the things in class that


If You Build It, Will They Come?

energize kids. That’s what’s going to inspire a new generation of scientists.” Before kids can be inspired, teachers need inspiration. Kowrach says that she and her colleagues sometimes have to overcome negative perceptions about science. “The reality is that teachers come to us because they’ve taught language arts for 10 years, and then they’re told they have to teach eighth-grade science. They think it’s hard or boring—or both,” she says. “We get them engaged in inquiry science, and they get excited. We just have to show them that there are good strategies and resources out there.” No doubt, CASE is impressive. The Museum’s educators found a way to deliver high-quality science content to students across the city through a series of well-developed and well-placed programs. But it took some trial-and-error to get it right, Wunar says. When Wunar and his team first planned out-of-school programming, they thought they needed to bring kids from all over the city “and be the largest afterschool provider in the city,” he says. But there were too many insurmountable obstacles. “Then we thought,

‘Let’s build an army of science educators from the Museum and send them out to program sites,’ but that wasn’t sustainable.” Ultimately, they chose a model that enables the Museum to play a supporting role to the staff members who are already working in afterschool programs. Once CASE launched, adds Kowrach, the Museum had to work hard to re-establish itself as a go-to source for science education resources. “At first, we had to do a lot of outreach,” she says. “Now, word-of-mouth is creating more buzz. For the afterschool science clubs, there’s a waiting list of organizations. And we have roughly double the number of teacher applicants than we have room for.”

“I think we’re changing lives, and we’re having an impact on teachers and families and children,” Wunar says. “If everyone moves this direction—not necessarily replicating what we’ve done, but finding ways to reach kids with science education— then the collective whole can inspire the next generation of scientists.” LEFT: Keith Palz, a CICS Bucktown science teacher, and his students work on science lessons using Museumprovided materials. RIGHT: Using ink pads and balloons, students learn about different types of fingerprints.

The program’s popularity is affirming, but it also illuminates the significant need in public-school classrooms across Chicago.

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WHO’S UP

FOR DEBATE? CICS Northtown’s debate club proves that hard work and commitment really do pay off. by Kate Floyd | photos by Tommy Giglio

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Walk into CICS Northtown’s policy debate club practice, and you’ll wonder if you’ve stumbled onto the set of a younger, more diverse taping of “Meet the Press.” At the front of the room, two teams (each comprising a young woman and a young man) sit opposite each other, surrounded by stacks of notes and beeping timers. Other debate club members are seated at rows of desks, diligently writing notes as they listen carefully to the positions their peers drive home. LEFT TO RIGHT: CICS NORTHTOWN DEBATE COACH NIKI ANDERSON WITH TWO MEMBERS OF THE DEBATE TEAM, LINA AND SAM

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Who’sUpforDebate?

In today’s practice, the affirmative team’s debater, Catherine, provides details about MFIs that could preemptively squash the opposing team’s critique. Next, the opposing team’s debater, Lina, provides the first negative argument. Lina’s aim is to demonstrate the disadvantages of Catherine’s proposal, and to detail the negative consequences to which the pro-MFI plan could lead. Even when music starts blasting from the dance club’s practice room upstairs, the students barely bat a lash—nothing seems to divert their attention from the debate. Today’s practice session is critical because it is the last time the debaters will gather as a club before they send two of their best teammates to the conference championship. The club competes in the LCC conference, where Northtown is in the company of 15 high schools including Evanston Township, Jones College Prep, and Lincoln Park. Coach Niki Anderson says being in the second-ranked conference has helped to motivate the kids:

CICS Northtown’s 13-member team is part of the Chicago Debate League, an affiliate of the larger National Association for Urban Debate Leagues (NAUDL), which seeks to improve big-city education through the promotion of critical thinking and an active citizenry. This year, NAUDL teams are debating the resolution “The U.S. federal government should substantially increase social services for persons living in poverty in the U.S.” In this political era—when tea parties protest the tyranny of government, and budgets are being slashed to curb the federal deficit—the resolution couldn’t be more relevant. In September, members of the CICS Northtown club selected cases that fall under the resolution’s “social services” umbrella. Today, they will be debating whether microfinance institutions (MFIs), the organizations that offer financial services such as credit and savings to underserved populations, should play a key role in alleviating poverty in the U.S. As the debaters prepare their arguments, Danny, a senior who has been on the team for more than a year, sits down with me and explains the debate process. In policy debating, the “affirmative” team identifies a problem and proposes a specific “plan of action” to solve the problem. The opposing “negative” team argues that the plan of action is flawed or is no better than the status quo. At competitions, a judge listens to the arguments presented by both teams and decides who wins. There are no ties.

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“There is one conference above us, but also two below us. All of the teams we compete against have more experience in policy debate, but our kids are smart, and I’d rather they start at the bottom and work their way up.” Though the CICS Northtown debate tradition has been going on for nearly half a decade, the club’s debate style recently changed. When Ms. Anderson began coaching last school year, she saw her students struggling with a debating format called “congressional debate.” As a rule, congressional debate is more speech-heavy and involves a higher degree of politicking than policy debate, the alternative competitive debate format. “I felt we could benefit from a different type of competition, so I decided to try the Chicago Debate League’s policy debate,” Ms. Anderson says. Moving from congressional-style to policy-style debate was about finding the right fit for CICS Northtown, and exposure to both kinds of debate has given the team a competitive advantage. Moreover, the Chicago Debate League and the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues are good partners to the club, providing support


Who’sUpforDebate?

“We had some kids that came out for ‘intro to debate’ at the beginning of the year. They saw the amount of research and all the fasttalking that is required of participants, and they didn’t come back.” A common assumption is that only the smartest students will succeed in debate club; the truth, however, is that it’s not a student’s pre-club intelligence that counts. It’s the student’s willingness to work hard and dedicate his or her time that really matters. The kids who seek to improve themselves are the ones who keep coming back.

by training the students and coaches about how policy debate works. The organizations are also a source of small scholarships for the participating students, and judging by the fact that the club’s three seniors are headed to four-year colleges this fall, the scholarships will be put to good use. Mario Ortiz, CICS Northtown’s college counselor, encourages students to emphasize their debate experience on their college applications: “Debate has a certain caché about it that college admissions really love to see,” he says. “It’s a team activity that develops collaborative skills and has a strong intellectual and academic component. It also breeds perseverance, especially for those who stick it out for two or three years.” In terms of college readiness, there is little doubt that CICS Northtown debate graduates’ steadfast preparation will help them tackle the challenges of collegiate-level coursework. Despite the advantages, the CICS Northtown debate club, like any upstart organization, has had its share of challenges. The primary issue is recruiting new kids. “It’s a pretty intimidating activity,” Ms. Anderson says.

Those who do commit—showing up twice a week throughout the school year—see the club as a sport of sorts, and their competitive spirit drives them to improve. Ms. Anderson speaks with pride as she discusses the impact the club has had on her kids: “The students are reading really difficult texts, and they’ve all improved their reading skills.” This qualitative finding is supported by empirical research: A recent study by Briana Mezuk, Ph.D., revealed that debate participation was linked to college-readiness gains in English and reading (based on ACT test score correlations). The study shows that debating improves students’ abilities in English composition, understanding nonfiction works, evaluating evidence, presenting rational arguments, and vocabulary development. To see these students speaking confidently in front of their peers is to see them really shine. When Lina stumbles over a word in her practice argument, it barely fazes her—her partner, Sam, is there by her side, coaching and encouraging her. It’s this type of support that makes the difference. Ms. Anderson notes, “We have a lot of shy students, many of whom don’t normally speak up. You see them start to speak up, watch them stand up for themselves; it’s really neat to see.” Danny drills deeper, explaining that once you’ve spent some time learning the ropes, your personality shapes the role you’ll play as a debater. “If you like proving your point, you’ll like taking the affirmative side—if you like picking apart others’ arguments, you’ll like the negative side.” Though a few of the team’s best debaters are graduating this year, the club has some rising stars. Keelun, a freshman who graduated from CICS Bucktown, takes copious notes during the practice

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debate. He affords me the opportunity to flip through these notes, pointing out that each page represents a different technical aspect of the arguments his teammates are presenting. Keelun’s reputation as a quick study sparks a warm discussion among the club members. Sam (a debating mastermind) says affectionately, “He’s as good as I am.” Sam and his teammate Lina will represent CICS Northtown at the big championship this weekend. Keelun’s calm, respectful demeanor seems to fit the profile of a successful debater. As the NAUDL’s website describes it, “Debate is a structured competition, with procedures and rules designed to maximize educational value. Debaters cannot interrupt a speaker,

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therefore voice level, aggressiveness, and even raw eloquence cannot dominate a debate round. Rather, debaters learn to understand and argue both sides of an issue, even if they personally favor one viewpoint. Debating is structured to provide a fair opportunity to win on either side of each issue, based primarily on the persuasiveness of logic, evidence, and emotion presented.” Debaters look after each other, learn the value of team commitment, develop strong speaking and listening skills, and consistently strive for better performance. These aren’t just college preparatory skills; these are lessons that these students will take with them throughout their lives.


Who’sUpforDebate?

“It’s a team activity that develops collaborative skills and has a strong intellectual and academic component.” —Mario Ortiz, CICS Northtown College Counselor

DEBATE TEAM UPDATE:

2nd Place As an individual, Sam won an award for second best overall speaker at the championship.

5th Place Sam and Lina tied for fifth place out of 15 teams over the course of two days.

Chicago Debate League’s “Allstate CPS Conference Championships”

CHICAGO DEBATE LEAGUE www.chicagoudl.org The Chicago Debate League (CDL) serves to advance the Mission of the Chicago Public Schools (CPS): to be the premier urban school district by providing high quality instruction, outstanding academic programs, and development supports to prepare its students for tomorrow's challenges. The CDL is one of the nation's oldest, largest, and very best Urban Debate Leagues. It instructs student participants in reading, speaking, writing, and listening—all of the language arts. With a rigorous critical thinking component, it is an outstanding and challenging academic program. In university campus classrooms and on electronic research databases, CPS debaters are preparing for their future success. Debate empowers all participating students, and thereby helps create school-wide norms and expectations of academic excellence.

Dates: Friday, February 26 from 5:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.; and Saturday, February 27 from 8:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR URBAN DEBATE LEAGUES

Location: Carl Schurz High School, Chicago, IL.

The Chicago Debate League is an affiliate of the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues (NAUDL). The NAUDL's purpose is, “to improve urban public education by empowering youth to become engaged learners, critical thinkers, and active citizens who are effective advocates for themselves and their communities.”

www.urbandebate.org

Copy courtesy of chicagoudl.org and urbandebate.org, respectively

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Noteworthy

A Growing Network Since Chicago International’s Loomis Primary campus opened its doors last school year, out-of-school programming has taken off—and it’s not just students who are reaping the benefits. by Caroline Eberly | photos by Tommy Giglio

If you were to visit CICS Loomis Primary this spring during the campus’s out-of-schoolprogramming final show, you would see kindergarten through second-grade children showing off ballet or ballroom dance steps, playing the violin, and performing their own skits—talents they’ve honed throughout the year outside of their regular academic classes. But stick around after the show, and you would see an even greater picture of the benefits of extracurricular programming for students at CICS Loomis—and their families. Last school year, after the CICS Loomis students performed, parents set up booths to display their local businesses—from daycare and real estate services to bakeries and

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barber shops. Parents browsed the booths, mingled with each other, and discovered new resources within their neighborhood. “It’s the perfect venue to have the parents sell their products and promote themselves,” says student support manager Theresa Mills, who worked with the Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) to host the inaugural parent-networking event. Efforts like this are just the beginning of opportunities for CICS Loomis parents not only to support the enrichment of their children, but also to engage with the CICS Loomis community—and learn valuable skills themselves—through the school’s vibrant and ever-growing out-of-school programming.

This year, there will be a similar, yet enhanced, opportunity for parents to network during their children’s end-of-season show. Mills and her colleague, Assistant Director Lindsey Bixby, are taking it a step further with the help of an idea from the PTO. (CICS Loomis and its PTO “work collaboratively on everything,” Mills explains.) “We’ve decided to… provide a parent business directory so parents can search within our community to have their needs met.” This community is what PTO president Kim Turner, who’s helping create the directory, calls the “inner family” at CICS Loomis. Turner is passionate about the sense of community she’s found at the school, and she’s


Noteworthy

hoping that the business booklet—which will be distributed to each family this spring—will strengthen social and economic ties within the greater family. “We can touch everyone in the school that may have their own business, even if they don’t set up a booth,” she says. “We’ll have a one-stop shop.”

One-stop shop it will be: parents will be better able to make connections with each other, deepen their sense of belonging to the CICS Loomis community, and help support each other during a down economy —all while staying within the Loomis family.

Moving forward, the shared goal of the CICS Loomis faculty, staff, and PTO is to quickly address parents’ interest in and need for additional family activities and opportunities. “Last year we had a big request from parents at the end of the school year, and they said they were looking for more education, more programming for them. So that was something we really tried hard to get started for this year,” Bixby says. Loomis began by piggybacking on its PTO gatherings, using the group as a pilot to try out educational workshops for parents. The topic of the first PTO workshop was demystifying the two types of assessment tests all CICS Loomis students must take. Mills and Bixby are already noticing positive results. “Once parents attended the PTO workshop, they understood that their children were taking an important test,” Bixby says, “and that they would have the opportunity to

see their child’s scores and discuss them at conferences. When parents know what their children are doing at school, students perform better.” To that end, twice a year the school hosts “Curriculum Night”, an after-school-hours gathering during which parents go behind the scenes of the classroom to get to know what the CICS Loomis day is like. It’s not only educational; it’s a good time. “It’s a party. It’s really bumping,” Mills says. The entire CICS Loomis staff stays for the duration of the evening. Parents are invited to spend time in every classroom at every grade level. If their child is in first grade, they can visit a kindergarten classroom to pick up review activities—or second grade to take home materials that will challenge their son or daughter. Left: CICS LOOMIS PRIMARY PARENT AND LOCAL BUSINESS OWNER RAYTARA BLACK top: PTO PRESIDENT KIM TURNER

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Noteworthy

Parents typically stick around until they’ve visited each grade level and at the end of the night, they leave with a new understanding of their child’s experience at school—and bags chock full of activities to enjoy with their kids at home.

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The future plan is for CICS Loomis students and parents to collaborate on extracurricular enrichment activities. Mills and Bixby imagine a seminar in which children show their parents how to navigate the Web in the new computer lab or a book club in which students and parents read together. For the moment, CICS Loomis is focused on offering relevant educational opportunities for parents that are meaningful to them and extend new avenues for learning. This spring, special guests—members of the community, professionals from local banks and businesses, CICS Loomis’ own teachers—will present on topics that range from “balancing work and family” to “taking the hassle out of

homework” and “how to read with your child at home.” For the future, Turner talks about heading up money-management classes, among other personal development opportunities for parents, through the PTO. In the end, of course, the programming isn’t just about helping parents learn new skills or build their networks—though these are important goals. It’s about strengthening the ties that bind this family—this big, extended family—together and then watching that family grow. BOTTOM: CICS LOOMIS TEACHERS LINDSEY BIXBY AND THERESA MILLS RIGHT: CICS LOOMIS TEACHERS AND STUDENTS ARE ALL SMILES


Noteworthy

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Extensions

Get Ready! Get Set! Go, Chicago Run! A local non-profit creates a program that gets city kids running—and chasing important goals. by Meghan Schmidt | photo by Tommy Giglio

In spring of 2008, Chicago International Charter School teamed up with Chicago Run to begin a running program at CICS Bucktown and CICS Longwood. (CICS Wrightwood was added in fall 2009.) The timing of the partnership was beneficial for both parties: Chicago Run, a newly formed not-for-profit, was charged with bringing running programs to students from disadvantaged communities. Meanwhile, Chicago International was looking for ways to increase physical activity for students, as physical education classes are limited in what they can accomplish without supporting activities and programs. Strong partnerships tend to form between organizations that share a mission or vision. In the case of Chicago Run and Chicago International, both organizations were 28

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motivated by a disturbing trend: According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, between 1980 and 2004 the percentage of children ages 6-11 who were overweight or obese increased from 6.5 to 19 percent. Knowing these data and that obesity is a leading risk factor contributing to diabetes, heart disease, and strokes led CICS Bucktown and Longwood to embrace the Chicago Run program. Here’s how it works: Chicago Run identifies a teacher at each campus—usually the Physical Education Instructor—as the program coordinator. Campus coordinators are coached and receive professional development from the Chicago Run staff by way of a “train the trainer” method. The coordinator selects a target group, say fifth– graders, and starts incorporating Chicago

Run activities into the school day, 15 minutes per day, 3–5 days per week. Chicago Run founder Alicia Gonzalez points out that a successful program rollout depends on the site coordinator. “He or she really has to be on board with the program,” Ms. Gonzalez says. “[The coordinator has] to be the cheerleader. If you’re easily overwhelmed or set back by space constraints, then you may have a hard time getting the program to stick.” (One example of space constraints: Some schools’ programs rely upon students running in the gym, where 30 laps equal one mile.) For some CICS students, the running program began with setting a goal of one half-mile walk/run or a brisk walk around the campus gym. Over time, and with encouragement, students began to run outdoors around the school building.


Extensions

“I didn’t think I could run this far.” “What? Me…a runner?” “I don’t know how.”

Setting and meeting running goals increased students’ self confidence; by the end of 10 weeks, students had run a total of 26.2 miles —the equivalent of a marathon! To keep kids motivated and teachers engaged, Ms. Gonzalez says she wanted to add a technological and academic layer to the program. “[For safety reasons,] the kids are limited by the boundaries where they can explore, yet their neighborhoods have rich histories that are worth exploring. So my team created a computer application that the kids could use as a digital learning medium. The kids login and enter their running data, tracking their progress towards running a full 26.2-mile marathon. There’s also a visual animation component where they get to ‘run’ through historic Chicago neighborhoods. As they ‘run’ the virtual race, historic landmarks pop up, their school pops up, and they can also see where other Chicago Run-participating schools are located.” In addition to the virtual maps, students receive incentives as they reach certain mile marks. For example, wristbands are awarded at 10 miles and lanyards are awarded at the 15-mile marker. The Chicago Run team and CICS teachers also developed teaching resources that align with Illinois State Learning Standards. Chicago Run has made great strides in engaging the larger Chicago community. In November, Ms. Gonzalez and her team hosted a Washington Park Fall Fun Run. Participants included student and family participants from CICS Bucktown, Longwood, and Wrightwood, as well other Chicago Run-participating schools. Ron Huberman, CEO of Chicago Public Schools, jogged along with the young runners.

Ms. Gonzalez’s vision is clear: “Chicago Run has been on a path of rapid growth since the launch of our programs in March 2008 because of the positive feedback from the schools and community groups as well as the cost-effectiveness and simplicity of the programs. The goal when starting out was to ‘track’ these kids from the early ages in elementary school through high school by providing age-appropriate fitness programs that benefit them physically, cognitively, and behaviorally. The two programs that we have created in the last two years for elementary kids and middle school youth were also created to cater to the specific needs of the Chicago community, addressing not only the fitness element but also digital learning, team-building, social empowerment, and youth development. The vision is to eventually introduce running to every child in the city of Chicago as a means to improve health, increase self-esteem, and enhance academic performance.” That vision translates into hundreds of kids who no longer say they don’t know how to run or can’t run. Instead, Chicago has a new population of students with healthier bodies, greater curiosity about their neighborhoods, and stronger minds. It’s a vision well worth chasing. Left: ALICIA GONZALEz, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CHICAGO RUN Right top to bottom: CICS BUCKTOWN STUDENTS WORKING OUT IN THE SCHOOL GYM. PARTICIPANTS FROM THE WASHINGton PARK FALL FUN RUN.

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Achievement

Path to Higher Education CICS high school seniors set their sights on college The Chicago International mission is to provide, through innovation and choice, an attractive and rigorous collegepreparatory education that meets the needs of today’s student. High school seniors are encouraged to apply to at least three post-secondary schools. As students navigate the college admissions process, each student has the tough job of choosing ultimately one school he or she will attend en route to higher education. This map highlights some of the schools to which Chicago International’s class of 2010 has been admitted.

Academy of Art University Alabama A&M University Alaska Pacific University American Academy of Art Arkansas State University Aurora University Blackburn College Ball State University Benedict College Bradley University Carthage College Carleton College Central Michigan University Central State University Chicago State University Clark Atlanta University Coe College Columbia College Chicago Concordia University Coyne American Institute DePaul University DePauw University DeVry University

Chicago International would like to wish the class of 2010 the best of luck as they embark on their collegiate journey.

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Dominican University Eastern Illinois University Eastern Kentucky University East-West University Elmhurst College Everest College Fisk University Flashpoint Academy Fox College Grace College Grambling State University Hampton University Hanover College Harold Washington College Harrington College of Design Howard University ITT Technical Institute Illinois Institute of Art Illinois Institute of Technology Illinois State University Indiana State University Indiana Tech Indiana University/Purdue University Indiana Indiana University International Academy of Design & Technology Iowa State University Iowa Wesleyan College Jackson State University Joliet Junior College Kendall College Kennedy King College Kentucky State University Knox College Lake Forest College Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts Lewis University


Achievement Achievement

LincolnCollege College Lincoln LourdesCollege College Lourdes LoyolaUniversity University Loyola MalcolmXXCollege College Malcolm MillikinUniversity University Millikin MilwaukeeInstitute InstituteofofArt Artand andDesign Design Milwaukee MississippiValley ValleyState StateUniversity University Mississippi MonmouthCollege College Monmouth MoraineValley ValleyCommunity CommunityCollege College Moraine NorthCentral CentralCollege College North NorthPark ParkUniversity University North NortheasternIllinois IllinoisUniversity University Northeastern NorthernIllinois IllinoisUniversity University Northern NorthernMichigan MichiganUniversity University Northern NorthwesternUniversity University Northwestern OaktonCommunity CommunityCollege College Oakton OliveHarvey HarveyCollege College Olive ParklandCollege College Parkland PennState StateUniversity University Penn PhilanderSmith SmithCollege College Philander PrairieState StateCollege College Prairie PurdueUniversity University Purdue PurdueUniversity UniversityCalumet Calumet Purdue RichardJ.J.Daley DaleyCollege College Richard RiponCollege College Ripon RobertMorris MorrisUniversity University Robert RockfordCollege College Rockford RooseveltUniversity University Roosevelt St.Ambrose AmbroseUniversity University St. St.John's John'sUniversity University St. SaintLouis LouisUniversity University Saint SaintXavier XavierUniversity University Saint SavannahState StateUniversity University Savannah Schoolofofthe theArt ArtInstitute Institute School SouthernILILUniv. Univ.Carbondale Carbondale Southern SouthernILILUniv. Univ.Edwardsville Edwardsville Southern SouthSuburban SuburbanCommunity CommunityCollege College South StonybrookUniversity University Stonybrook

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TennesseeState StateUniversity University Tennessee TritonCollege College Triton TrumanCollege College Truman UniversityofofAlaska Alaska University UniversityofofArizona Arizona University UniversityofofChicago Chicago University UniversityofofIllinois IllinoisatatUrbana-Champaign Urbana-Champaign University UniversityofofIllinois IllinoisatatChicago Chicago University UniversityofofIllinois IllinoisatatSpringfield Springfield University UniversityofofIndianapolis Indianapolis University UniversityofofIowa Iowa University UniversityofofMaine Maine University UniversityofofMichigan Michigan University UniversityofofMinnesota Minnesota University UniversityofofSan SanDiego Diego University UniversityofofWisconsin-Madison Wisconsin-Madison University UpperIowa IowaUniversity University Upper ValparaisoUniversity University Valparaiso VincennesUniversity University Vincennes VirginiaState StateUniversity University Virginia WashburnInstitute Institute Washburn WartburgCollege College Wartburg WesternIllinois IllinoisUniversity University Western WrightState StateUniversity University Wright XavierUniversity University Xavier

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THE NEW STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE CICS Larry Hawkins, a 7th –12th – grade college preparatory charter school in Altgeld Gardens, is opening its doors in September 2010

The school will be providing a high-quality education to 500 7th–12th– grade students on Chicago’s far South Side. There is no tuition to attend CICS Larry Hawkins, which is a public charter school. As with all CICS campuses, students will have high academic standards and will follow a strict discipline code and wear school uniforms.

To learn more about CICS Larry Hawkins or to find more information about Chicago International Charter School in general, please visit our newly designed website: www.chicagointl.org.

Spring/Summer 2010  

Chicago International's sixth edition of FocalPoint magazine introduces you to the students, staff, and parents who believe in the power of...

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