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GENOVA TODAY GENOVA TOMORROW


This exhibition marks an important turning point for the city of Genova. It illustrates the journey that this ancient city is taking to respond to the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century: globalization, climate change, migration, economic and social change. The new ‘Piano Urbanistico Comunale’ (P.U.C.) establishes a vision of how Genova can evolve in a smart and sustainable way over the next decade, firmly grounded in its economic, social and cultural realities. By opening the 16th century Loggia dei Banchi at the heart of Genova to the public – Italy’s first stock exchange – the exhibition re-establishes a dialogue with its citizens and its visitors about its present and its future.


Towards a new City Plan for Genova Creating a new plan for a city is an exciting and complex challenge. It is a fine balancing act between the weight of history, the inertia of the recent past and present, and an ambitious but realisable vision for the future. A vision founded on the concepts of flexibility yet anchored to a system of shared values of co-existence, which can be understood easily and be adapted over time to new circumstances.

1

Our aim has been to embrace this complexity in a process which sets high standards but can be accommodated within the democratic process of public debate. The work carried out by the City of Genova’s Urban Lab has been guided by Renzo Piano who has taught us to reconnect the city with its seafront and preserve its precious natural contours by building on its architectural legacy and making the most of its natural and man-made assets (see figures 1 and 2). This involves limiting the amount of building on greenfield land and taking advantage of the city’s exposure to sun and wind along its south-facing coast.

2

The urbanist Richard Burdett has further developed this approach, providing Genova with the inspiration of other cities that have successfully turned themselves round, establishing a framework of success that gives rise to the Key Diagram (see figure 3) that will lead Genova’s future over the next decades. Marta Vincenzi Mayor of Genova

3


d

c

b A

The exhibition is organised around the following four themes:

a b c d

ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT REINFORCING RELATIONSHIPS ADDING VALUE TO THE URBAN FABRIC BUILDING ON AVAILABLE URBAN LAND


GENOVA TODAY 2011 608.015 243 km

2

inhabitants, 1 January 2010

municipal surface area

91 min 26.9% population above 65 years

75 foreigners per 1,000 inhabitants

33 km of coastline

train journey between Milan and Genova

21 railway stations

1

multi-modal car park

1.280.000 m2 of car parking spaces

609 ha

of public open space


GENOVA TOMORROW 2020 - 23.7% + 21% + 13 in Co2 emissions compared to 2005

- 8.2% of private car traffic

+ 50 km

of new tree-lined avenues

10 km

reclaimed coastline

+8

of open public space railway stations

of multi-modal car parks

+ 10%

of manufacturing and services

180 km

2

of greenfield land protected from development

58 min train journey between Milan and Genova


EPICENTRE OF THE MEDITERRANEAN Genova’s potential as a port-city stems from its continental geographical location at the very heart of the Europe and The Mediterranean. Its territorial advantage is strongly compromised by deficits in access and infrastructure. The new City Plan of Genova invests in connectivity as an economic generator, making the most of its connections to Europe and its favourable location in The Mediterranean.

Route 24

Genova > Rotterdam

Route 1

Palermo > Berlin

Route 5 Lisbon > Kiev


LOCATION OF PORT CITIES AND MAJOR CARGO ROUTES HAMBURG

Of 59 million containers in Europe during 2007:

ROTTERDAM

NORTHERN RANGE LE HAVRE

65% are processed by NORTHERN RANGE ports 17% are processed by WEST MED ports 18% are processed by ITALIAN ports

GENOVA MARSEILLES BARCELONA

ITALY

VALENCIA

WEST MED

valencia

Barcelona

MARSEILLES

le havre

rotterdam

HAMBURG

Valencia, Madrid’s ‘natural’ harbor connected to the Spanish capital by a 350 kilometres toll-free motorway, attracts cargo ships and cruise liners along the Suez-Gibraltar route linking Asia to America across the Mediterranean. With over 3 million TEUs per year, Valencia is Spain’s major commercial port, and a leading centre of the West Med ports system for container traffic. Amongst the top ten ports in Europe and the top 50 in the world, Valencia has invested heavily in modernizing its infrastructure and upgrading its urban image.

The port of Barcelona is connected to 850 other ports across the world and to the main commercial and urban centers of Spain and France through good road and rail connections, which have recently been enhanced. In order to improve its competitiveness, the port has benefitted from major investment by the city authorities leading to the repositioning of the Llobregat River and a substantial increase in harbor, dock and logistics facilities including a multi-modal hub for the storage and shipment of goods that are fully integrated with a logistics and distribution area, close to the airport and cruiser terminals.

The Marseilles-Fos harbor complex is the most significant petroleum port in the Mediterranean and the third in the world behind Rotterdam and Houston. It acts as a key hub in Europe for goods and passengers, with an efficient and extensive network of rail, road and water-based routes (as well as major oil distribution pipeline) that provides easy access to central European markets.

Le Havre is France’s major port and the ninth largest in Europe, occupying a strategic location on the English Channel and the North Sea, well connected by road, rail and canals to a densely populated region which includes Paris and Rouen. The port is the subject of continued investment, expansion and modernization, with deep water docks that can accommodate large container ships throughout the year, with no tidal constraints, offering the fastest transit time for intercontinental trade between Europe and America.

Rotterdam is the largest and most important port in Europe, acting as the main gateway for goods from south-east Asia and America. After occupying the top position in the world for decades, today it is the third largest port in the world with over 10 million TEUs per year. Its geographical position and sheltered location off the northern coast with direct links to the Atlantic Ocean, deep water docks and extensive capacity, is strenthened by access to an extensive rail, road and water-based transport system.

Hamburg occupies an important position at the top of global rankings of the world’s major ports, resulting from its geographical location and a sustained 10-year planning and investment strategy which has created a modern and efficient layout with a state-of-the-art container port and a ‘distripark’, highly reliable services, a fast and inexpensive customs operation, and access to an extensive network of water, rail and road systems that provides quick access to European markets.


PORT CITY OF THE NORTH WEST A 200km radius defines one of Europe’s most productive regions, accessible within 2.5 hours, where a third of Italy’s population resides with the nation’s highest employment and income levels. Genova is the natural opening to the sea and the principal harbour of the region. The new City Plan of Genova optimises the city’s assets, promoting its potential to act as a centre of learning, work and productivity.

Route 5

Lisbona > Kiev

Route 24

Genova > Rotterdam (cargo and passengers)

Route 24

Genova > Rotterdam (passengers)


CLUSTER CITIES PERCENTAGE OF FOREIGN-BORN RESIDENTS 2003 — 2009

Vercelli, Viterbo, Rovigo, Massa, Verbania

BIRTH RATE

Lions Major urban centres

120 114.4

115 10

110 9.2 9 100

100

8.8

100.6 96.9

90

8

8

7.8

Milano, Roma, Torino, Venezia, Bologna, Firenze, Verona, Bergamo, Brescia, Padova, Siena

7.6

7 GENOVA

LIGURIA

MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ OF ITALY 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY CLUSTERS

GENOVA

MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ OF ITALY 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY CLUSTERS

Panthers Competive urban centres

FOREIGNERS/1000 INHABITANTS (2009)

POPULATION GROWTH (GENOVA 2001- 2009) 4

LIGURIA

3.8 130

124.6

2.9

3

104

2.5

92.8 84.4

78

2

75.1

70.8

52 1

1

16

Trento, Parma, Vicenza, Ancona, Modena, Novara,Bolzano, Treviso, Pisa, Udine, Varese, Rimini, Piacenza, Mantova, Cremona, Pavia, Como, Biella, Lecco, Sondrio, Lodi, Pordenone

0.1 0

0 GENOVA

LIGURIA

MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ OF ITALY 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY CLUSTERS

GENOVA

LIGURIA

PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE ABOVE 65 YEARS

MIGRATION RATE 2009 7

44

43.4

MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ OF ITALY 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY CLUSTERS

6.5

Elephants Slow transition centres

6.7 6.2

6

43.3

41.2

38.7 34.4

33

4.7

5 4

Genova, Trieste, Livorno, La Spezia

3.7

3

22

2 11 1 0

0 GENOVA

LIGURIA

URBAN CENTRES MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY OF ITALY CLUSTERS

GENOVA

LIGURIA

URBAN CENTRES MAJOR URBAN CENTRES URBAN CENTRES IN THE NORTH-WEST WITH MORE THAN BELONGING TO THE ‘C’ 200,000 INHABITANTS GROUP OF CITY OF ITALY CLUSTERS

Gazzelles Growing urban centres Ravenna, Perugia, Reggio Emilia, Arezzo, Macerata,Lucca, Ascoli Piceno, Forlì, Pesaro, Alessandria, Asti, Cuneo, Belluno, Imperia, Aosta, Pistoia, Grosseto, Gorizia,

Giraffes Market towns of the South Napoli, Palermo, Bari, Catania, Salerno, Lecce, Pescara, Cagliari, Messina, Taranto, Cosenza, Caserta, Latina, Catanzaro, Avellino, Frosinone, Campobasso

Zebras Marginal cities L’Aquila, Reggio Calabria, Siracusa, Sassari, Foggia, Matera, Brindisi, Benevento, Potenza, Rieti, Chieti, Teramo, Ragusa, Trapani, Enna, Oristano, Nuoro, Agrigento, Vibo, Valentia, Crotone, Isernia


POLYCENTRIC METROPOLIS Genova possesses a spectacular natural configuration, between steep mountains and the coastline, creating an inverted π shape defined by two linear valleys that embrace the historic city centre. The extended linear city creates spatial complexities along its valleys and the eastern coastline. The new City Plan of Genova adds value to its natural and man-made context, proposing a vision for a multi-centred and integrated city which reduces the distinction between centre and periphery, making the most of its metropolitan mobility infrastructure and the distinct functional characteristics of individual boroughs and places.

29%

2%

11%

ITALIANS 60%

18%

FOREIGN-BORN

0 — 14 years 15 — 63 years 64 years

+

80%

0 — 14 years 15 — 63 years 64 years

+


-1,7

3,4

-2,9

2,3

4,2

-3 - -2

-1,99 -

-1

-0,99 -

13,1

-1,4

0,1 - 2,5

0

8,4

-2,4 -1,8

204

2,6 - 4,5

208 - 229

230 - 239

234,9

10,4

24,5 26,5 25,6

260 - 269

10 - 10,4

24 - 25,6

26 - 26,9

27 - 27,9

28 - 28,9

10,8

10,7 - 10,8

10,5 - 10,6

11 - 11,2

10,9 - 11

41,5

39,7

41

40,5

28,7 30,1

10,1

PERCENTAGE OF YOUNG PEOPLE AGE 0-13 YEARS

26,1 24,4

10,9

10,6

AGEING INDEX 2009

27,6

10,4

251,8

250 - 259

11,1 - 13,1

8,1 - 11

11,2

10,7 10,5

240 - 249

2,9

PERCENTAGE OF FOREIGN-BORN RESIDENTS

235,8

266,4

6,8

6,1 - 8

4,1 - 6

2 - 4

223,1 208,6 265,4

200 - 209

10,6

4,2

POPULATION GROWTH AMONGST RESIDENTS 2001-2009

247

6

10,4

3,6

-0,7

44

49

29,1

43,2 43,7

42,9

29 - 30,10

PERCENTAGE OF ELDERLY PEOPLE ABOVE 65 YEARS

0 - 40,4

40,5 - 41,5

41,6 - 42,9

43 - 44,9

45 - 49

PERCENTAGE OF SINGLE PERSON FAMILIES


OBJECTIVES OF THE NEW CITY PLAN KEY International and national routes

port areas

airport

built form

city centre

opportunity areas

historic metropolitan centres

major urban links

rural areas

rural centres

GENOVA KEY DIAGRAM 2020 ‘green’ Line

‘blue’ Line

municipal boundaries


2011 — 2020 The planning approach for Genova’s new City Plan has taken into account the potential for large-scale and infrastructure improvements which determine a set of Strategic Objectives that establish the next steps for the future of the city.

SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT Reinforcement of north-south and east-west connections; Investment in a diversified productive economy and optimisation of tourist potential; Maximising the competitive advantage of the Genova as port-city in a European context; Investment in housing, services and education Boosting multi-modal and sustainable public transport;

SPATIAL ORGANISATION AND URBAN IDENTITY Reduction in sound, air and light pollution; Protection of natural water systems; Optimisation of solar power, energy efficiency and reduced consumption;

PROTECTION OF THE QUALITY OF THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Transforming Genova into a multi-centred, integrated and equitable city; Promoting compact sustainable development and open space;

Regeneration of public open space;

Rebalancing the city’s diverse uses through local development;

Investment in the agricultural potential of the surrounding territory;

Making the most of the natural landscape and biodiversity; Reinforcing the links between the city and the sea;


POlCEVERA VALLEY A VITAL LINK TO NORTHERN ITALY Occupying a central location in the geographical heart of the city, the Polcevera Valley is the natural link between Genova and the Po Valley and its hinterland. With good connections and large areas of available ex-industrial land, the Polcevra Valley constitutes a unique opportunity for development of new residential and commercial quarters, well connected by public transport.


BISAGNO VALLEY A NEW AXIS OF SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT The Bisagno Valley is part of a historic link that connects Genova to Piacenza, representing a strategic zone of expansion due to its location and morphological characteristics. A new sustainable tram route, within dedicated lanes, will reduce travel times in the area by 50%.


HISTORIC CENTRE THE HEART OF URBAN REGENERATION Genova’s ancient urban core is one the nation’s most outstanding architectural and cultural assets. Between 1992 and 2004 it was the centre of a number of major regeneration initiatives that have made the most of its architectural and urban heritage, recognised by UNESCO in 2006. The current drive is to complete the improvement of historic experiences through the city, reinforcing vertical circulation routes and linking the centre to its ancient aqueduct and fortifications.


GENOVA’S URBAN LAB

The new City Plan for Genova has been developed and implemented by different municipal departments under the Mayor’s direction. These include: • Urban Lab and the Special Projects division for the Port; • Municipal Planning Department; • Environment and Heritage Protection departments; • Central Planning Projects Approval division; • Geological department; • GIS and internal development offices; Analysis and Evaluation: Anna Maria Colombo and Antonio Pastorino with the collaboration of Claudia Gallone, Antonella Colombini, Alessandra Figliomeni, Nicoletta Poleggi, Massimo Ferrari, Maurizio Ghezzani, Laura Marinato, Nadia De Maria, Paola Ghiglione, Enrico Ballarino, Daniela Ghiglione, Danilo Crocco, Gianfranco Di Maio, Domenico Minniti, Sergio Cortesia, Antonio Multari, Luca Frescia, Emma Sesto Rubino, Irma Fassone, Sara Talamazzi, Sara Iulianella, Carla Gerbaudi, Riccardo Panusa, Anna Chiara Succi, Cristina Giusso, Marina D’Onofrio Caviglione, Stefano Ortale, Riccardo Lavaggi, Ivana Sciutto, Roberto Lopo, Emilia Ameri, Maurizio Sailelli, Alessandra Maestro, Sonia Zarino, Sabrina Razzore, Claudio Falcioni, Diego Bruzzo, Michele Porta, Alessandro Robbiano, Claudia Lipani, Elena Rosa, Paola Sabbion, Beatrice Moretti Environment Impact Assessment: Anna Maria Colombo and Antonio Pastorino with the collaboration of Cristina Giusso, Maurizio Ghezzani


Development objectives: Anna Maria Colombo and Antonio Pastorino for the final version that integrates different work streams.

Geological investigations: Sabrina Razore, Claudio Falcioni, Diego Bruzzo, Michele Porta, Anna Chiara Succi

STRuCTURE OF THE CITY PLAN:

Plan development and elaboration: Level 1 – Alessandra Figliomeni and Sara Iulianellea, Level 2 – Maurizio Ghezzani, Level 3 – Mariangela Persano, Services – Gianluca Roggerone, Paola Sirolli, geological cartography – Sabrina Razzore, Claudio Falcioni, Diego Bruzzo, Michele Porta

Opportunity areas: Maurizio Sinigaglia, Annamaria Colombo, Anna Chiara Succi, Antonella Colombini, Claudia Gallone, Alessandra Figliomeni, Nicoletta Poleggi, Massimo Ferrari, Maurizio Ghezzani, Concetta Brancato, Nadia Demaria, Daniela Ghiglione, Gianfranco Di Maio, Sara Iulianella, Carla Gerbaudi, Gianluca Roggerone, Riccardo Panusa, Paola Sirolli, Alessandra Maestro, Sonia Zarino Planning levels: Opportunity and conservation areas, infrastructure, port and services: Anna Chiara Succi, Nicoletta Poleggi, Antonella Colombini, Claudia Gallone, Alessandra Figliomeni, Maurizio Ghezzani, Gianluca Roggerone, Paola Sirolli, Riccardo Panusa, Massimo Ferrari, Gianfranco Di Maio, Nadia De Maria, Daniela Ghiglione, Sara Iulianella, Mariangela Persano, Carla Gerbaudi, Cristina Giusso, Sonia Zarino, Alessandra Maestro Landscape and cartography: Marina D’Onofrio Caviglione, Stefano Ortale, Riccardo Lavaggi, Ivana Sciutto, Roberto Lopo, Emilia Ameri, Maurizio Sailelli, Gian Luca Terragna, Diego Bozzo Planning instruments: Anna Chiara Succi with the contribution of Nadia De Maria, Marina D’Onofrio Caviglione, Ferdinando Defornari, Annamaria Colombo

Environmental Impact documentation: Danilo Bertini with the collaboration of Carlo Pescetto, Cristina Olivieri, Stefania Manca Official Planning responsibility: Directorship of the Regional Development Office, urban and economic development and large-scale Special Projects Division – Paolo Tizzoni Coordination Planning process: Head of Urban lab and Port Project development team – Anna Iole Corsi With the professional collaboration of Umberto Bloise Chief Adviser on Architecture and Urbanism: Richard Burdett – London School of Economics with the collaboration of Stefano Recalcati – Politecnico di Milano With thanks to Bentley for services provided


genova today genova tomorrow

CURATOR: Ricky Burdett with Stefano Recalcati Concept: Aldo Cibic with Tommaso Corà EXHIBITION LAYOUT: Cibicworkshop: Dario Freguia GRAPHICS: Facci&Pollini: Riccardo Facci and Filippo Fontanel TEXTS: Marta Vincenzi Paolo Tizzoni Anna Iole Corsi Ricky Burdett Stefano Recalcati SUPPORT: Beatrice Moretti Paola Sabbion Claudia Gallone Alessandra Figliomeni MoDEL: Giovanni Laudani Planning Department - Genova Municipality PHOTOGRAPHY: Giovanna Silva Video Editing Department - Genova Municipality Anselma Lovens Adezati Riccardo Prosperi

COORDINATION: Culture and City Development - Genova Municipality Raffaele Gazzari with Eleonora Parlagreco Marilina Merra Elisa Videtta Cesare Torre Marisa Gardella Daniele D’Agostino Claudia Majoli PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Palazzo Ducale Fondazione per la Cultura: Pietro Da Passano with Claudia Bovis Roberto Gallo Giada Mazzucco ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Censis Air and sea department of the Guardia di Finanza, Genova Genova municipality: Urban Lab division and Port Project development team Planning and Human Resources directorship - Financial Management division - Public Works and Housing division - Design (Public Works office) - Refurbishment and Regeneration - Coordination of feasibility studies Planning and implementation of Public Works Management of Citizens’ Communications Services Press and Events Office Refurbishment of the Loggia di Banchi co-funded by Progetti FIR


GENOVA’S URBAN CENTER The City of Genova has established an Urban Center in the Loggia di Banchi, one of the most significant buildings of its historic core erected in the 16th century and the site of Italy’s first Stock Exchange. The Loggia di Banchi is a centre of communication for the transformation of the city, acting as a platform for public engagement. It will be the venue for the presentation, discussion and debate on the future of Genova: a shop-window which displays the most significant urban developments and proposals for the city. For this reason, the first exhibition features the new city plan (Piano Urbanistico Comunale) which will determine the future development of Genova over the next decades.

Genova Today Genova Tomorrow  

An exhibit about the new Genova Urban Plan at Loggia di Banchi, Genova.

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