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autumn.winter 14/15


ellie palmer N0428233 t r a c e y k e m p N 0 4 4 14 75 chy nna dav ies N0439882


etc. trends autumn.winter 14/15

we are the rightful owners of all images used, unless otherwise stated


Contents Retail Theatre and Visual Merchandising #hashtag interior exterior suspicious hangings

Creative Direction skin and bones appanasium birds eye view

Print and Graphics contortionist up your sleeve add_apt

Menswear you are what you wear no. 139,121 amalgam

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3 7 11 2117 25 31 39 35 Appendix

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1

Retail Theatre and Visual Merchandising


#hashtag

retail theatre and visual merchandising

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FIGURE 1

#hashtag – a symbolisation of virtual architecture that encapsulates the digital age of today, increasingly predominant technological values in society and social networking. The metallic crossroads of the metadata tag exemplifies a cage-like grid structure found influenced in retail theatre and visual merchandising from Berlin and other global spaces. #hastag-like props and visuals found in multiple retail spaces denote societies oppressive and capitalist nature, socialised to not question their oppressive state of their caged-in lives. References of the #hashtag cage structures can derive from modern-day aspects and media, such as well-renowned television program - Big Brother. The upcoming trend originates from the reality show in the form of contestants caged into a house for as many weeks as the public desires. Further connoting examples of an “Orwellian” society, defined by George Orwell as destructive to the welfare of a free and open society. This further relates to Big Brother through its control and public show of official deception, “secret” surveillance and manipulation by the authoritarian state. The ideology behind Big Brother popularised from George Orwell’s dystopian tale Nineteen Eighty-Four. The dystopian society or community related to in the book inspires this #hashtag trend through the undesirable, frightening and enclosing atmospheric creation the cage creates. Dystopia style films such as Blade Runner commonly go hand in hand also with the cinematic style of ‘Film Noir’. Often associated with low-key, black and white visuals - Film Noir also commonly contains camera angles that give the impression of looking from the outside in. These references similarly relate to #hashtag with the caged out and the Big Brother ‘looking in’ connotations created. Furthermore, are the visuals a further comment on societal entrapment and need for escapism today.


“#hashtag is the virtual architecture behind our digital age, the future lies on the metalic crossroads in urban expansion and technological growth.�


FIGURE 2

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interior exterior

retail theatre and visual merchandising

Inspired by an intriguing combination of the interior and exterior, this outdoorbased trend merges natural elements with autumnal coloured collections. The use of these alluring visual references to the retail theatre brings a refreshing natural aura for Autumn/Winter 2014/15. Traditional and timeless shapes now look to nature for inspiration - honest materials of animal and vegetal blends, glowing colourations and robust ranges. The trend takes inspiration not only from physical or aesthetic changes, but economic and scientific industries. The incentive of merging the interior and exterior derives from economic fascinations such as conservational organisation, The Eden Project. As one of Britain’s top economical visitor attractions, the biome takes you on a steamy trek through the world’s largest indoor rainforest. Marvel at the enormous trees towering over you without curiosity to why the plantations are outside of their natural habitat. Here the extremely large-scale example of the interior exterior combined, can relate to the erratic arrangement and similar merge brought to the fashion industry this season.

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“Traditional and timeless sha to nature for inspirat

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apes now look tion�


suspicious hangings retail theatre and visual merchandising

The fast-paced and ever-changing fashion industry is forever searching and seeking new and interesting designs and schemes, to lure in constant craving consumers of today. From beguiling visual merchandising, modernised technological involvements and extensive designs and collections generated constantly - where else can designers go? Adventuring further beyond the clothes, we found creative movement in the height of how garments were hung. References of very Suspicious Hangings were picked up all over Berlin and London cities. Items were hung off cats, belts and sporting equipment – ceaseless and though-provoking possibilities were shown in this form. The retail spaces themselves were completed with quizzical props such as a floating staircase, numerous umbrellas and a gonad-ski lift elevated above your heads. Designers now are further expanding from the original working space, broadening perspectives for a maximised retail experience.

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“Designers now are further expanding from the original working space, broadening perspectives for a maximised retail experience.�

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2

Creative Direction


skin and bones creative direction

In excessively materialistic Western society’s of today, Skin and Bones can be seen as a backlash from our superfluous buying tendencies. Fast fashion and speedy product renewal have created an accelerated and constant desire for impulse purchasing. This trend furthermore is bringing the simplicity and core necessities back to retail theatre and visual merchandising. With references to television programs such as “Building the Dream” with architectural designer Charlie Luxton, convinced in is possible to build a dream home without breaking the bank. The style of building and personalising ‘dream homes’ for under £1000 has derived this ‘stripped back’ aesthetic coming through. From trend scouting in cities such as Berlin and London it was picked up on these references that subtly screamed out Minimalism. Architect Ludwig Mies can der Roche who adopted the motto “Less is more”, describes the minimal aesthetic by arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create the impression of extreme simplicity. Products of today can relate to this aesthetic with retail spaces analysed giving off messages of why use a lamp shade - when you can just have a light bulb? Why have sleek plastered, clinical white wall - when we can just have plywood? The aesthetic relates to bringing this back to basics – the bare essentials. In other areas this Skin and Bones aesthetic will further influence the fashion industry. Colour palettes changing from the stereotypical autumnal shades into winter neutral and pastels. Seeking out for softer shades, including cream, spearmint and sherbet – this seasons trends are about to transform to take on the prettiest hue. Nonetheless, these colourations will alternatively be applied to precise-cut shapes and ‘back to basic’ androgynous tailoring. Skin and Bones inspired styling – no frills and flounces.

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“The aesthetic relates to bringing this back to basics – the bare essentials.”


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appanasium creative direction A linguistic combination of the nouns apparatus and gymnasium. In a digital age becoming more nostalgic every day, this trend combines childhood references with the increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles. In 2015, it has been estimated by the World Health Organisation that there shall be over 2.3 billion overweight adults across the globe [1]. Such statistics that did not even exist 50 years ago. As individuals are keen to lead fit and healthy lifestyles, we have seen the rise of ‘Sports Luxe’ and suddenly going to the gym and eating wholesome foods has become the fashionable and desirable way to spend time and money. To mirror the leisurewear wardrobes, the use of school gymnasium equipment has provided the perfect surroundings to frame garments. Such apparatus provides confirmation and understanding of the consumer’s lifestyle choices. Globally, the US drives the sportswear market along side three of the emerging markets in Brazil, Russia and China; combined, they accounted for 60% of the total global growth within the sector [2]. Sports brands have recently proved that they can be at the forefront of innovation and design; providing the human body with everything it needs and more. Consumers are easily blinded by science and are keen to believe that their consumption can aid their wellbeing. Cultural campaigns and events have acted as social motivation. The 2012 Olympic Games in London has lead great admiration and excitement towards the Brazilian games in 2016. Redefining the celebrity and adding desirability and pride to physical achievement.

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FIGURE 4

[1] http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7151813.stm [2]http://go.euromonitor.com/ApparelWebinar2013_RegistrationPage.html?mk


“Such apparatus provides confirmation and understanding of the consumer’s lifestyle choices.”

FIGURE 5

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birds eye view creative direction

In a world growing physically higher every moment, it is not a surprise that new perspectives and heights are appearing throughout our artistic expressions. Whilst the second tallest building was being climbed in February of 2014, creatives were already inspired by the development and growth of our society. Globalisation has been at the forefront of the social, political and economical positioning for over a decade. It has been the priority for many businesses and even whole continents at times. A watchful eye has been capturing every move of the fastest developing countries, as LEDCs chase and tighten the gap between the wealthiest of countries. For years, our interests have lied with the BRIC countries- Brazil, Russia, India and China; however, with our global demands become essential, we have turned our attention a new grouping of countries that are promised to hold the resources and energy for the future of the globe. These MINT countries include: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey. Berlin Fashion Week showcased the latest installations and artwork of Emell GĂśk Che; a creative whom bridges the differences between interior design and art. Latest exhibitions explore expressive floor space and the power of three-dimensional spaces. It is strange to believe that little thought is often given to the space below the consumers- a whole quarter of the boundaries that we stand within experiential retail.

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FIGURE 6

As early as 1982, Blade Runner-the American dystopia– suggested a symbolic connection between the future and physically higher architectural levels. Everything showing innovation was built mid-air, looking down on the dirty street scenes. We can expect to see imagery exploring higher perspectives and points-of-view. Creative teams may start to spatially experiment beyond their displays, productions and products.


“a whole quarter of the boundaries that we stand within experiential retail�


3 Print and Graphics


contortionist print and graphics An unusual form of physical display, which involves the dramatic bending and flexing of the human body This physical metaphor perfectly expresses a current social attitude. Individuals becoming social chameleons and searching for disguise. Born on the back of previous print trends surrounding the ideas of urban uniforms. For many years, those described as social butterflies have primed themselves as at the heart of the early adapters. These social butterflies want to be seen, and are who others want to be seen with. However, there has been a recent need for a sense of belonging. The Social Issues Research Centre highlighted that this need for belonging is a central aspect to our lifestyles. They explain how we hope to gain a sense of security, acceptance and loyalty [1]. This is not surprising in a society that lacks political and economical stability; there is a lack of trust and uncertainty regarding positions of authority. With a strong connection to colour and prints, we expect to inspirations of natural origins and animal disguises. An increase in headwear and accessories to change and hide our physical human forms. Abstract and surrealist art used as a method of inspiration to provoke escapism. Recent exhibitions have highlighted the power of such art forms- Surrealist and the Rue Blomet showcased in New York at the end of 2013, whilst Alex Katz shall grace the Tate Modern into 2015 which express the boundaries of abstract and expressive realism. As part of a global community with such uncertainty, why wouldn’t an individual decide to transform into anything but human.

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FIGURE 7

[1] http://www.sirc.org/publik/belonging.shtml


“The Social Issues Research Centre highlighted that this need for belonging is a central aspect to our lifestyles. They explain how we hope to gain a sense of security, acceptance and loyalty.�

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up your sleeve print and graphics Ofcom- the independent regulating authority- explained that the declining circulation of print media is occurring alongside a shift in the emphasis on online substitutes [1] (2012). The dwindling of sales figures for traditional print media is a well-known topic in many industries; as a result, print publications are becoming braver and bolder than ever to provide an experience and content that a digital version would not allow. Bellybands, double covers and book sleeves are all popular methods that are starting to popularise. Initially, small and niche brands have been the most experimental, however this trend is easy to adapt and appropriate and is therefore expected to continue across the innovation curve onto the supermarket magazine shelves. Although it may appear as a purely trivial turn in creative publication, 2013 holds a particular connection with this visual trend. During the summer of 2013, the biggest of magazine retailers gave publications of an adult nature their own ‘cover-up’ method. Supermarkets and many highstreet retailers gave leading titles a short time scale to provide ‘modesty bags’ for copies of sexually orientated publications, dealing with nudity and sexually explicit content. Although, this is not always the reason for providing sleeves, bands and additional covers for all publications- it helps to create an experience and interaction between the product and consumer within our highly demanding society. Generation Y is a perfect example; aware of fast-fashion and speedy production lines, they know what they want and the demands are high. The physical action of removing or opening the publication adds a sense of nostalgia to a once very traditional form of communication. A magazine can now become more than something only flicked through by a handful of grocery shoppers; but something that can be unwrapped and untouched until bought. All these qualities and values are differentiating print media from their digital twins.

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FIGURE 8

1. http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/market-data-research/market-data/communications-marketreports/cmr12/internet-web/uk-4.58


“The physical action of removing or opening the publication adds a sense of nostalgia to a once very traditional form of communication.� 37


add_apt print and graphics

The name Add_Apt came from the process of adding new dimensions and objects onto images. ‘Instagram had 150 million global users in late 2013 representing an increase of 15% in just two months.’ [1] Pinterest in 2012 had around 200,000 users compared to July 2013 had numbers of over 2 million. This is clearly showing the rise of personalisation which has become increasingly prevalent the last few years since Instagram and Pinterest became popular, as people are constantly feeling the need to be individual and to put their stamp on everything they do which social media enables individuals to share their thoughts and images with their own individuality. Snapchat is another example of showing your own individuality through the app since you can take a picture of yourself and draw on your own face after, which again is showing the rise of personalisation. Noticeable trends within graphics have been to ‘deface’ images to make them individual and different, for example, an image of a face will be then draw on, to make it not just an image of a face but to stand out from all the other generic images. [1] http://socialmediatoday.com/kate-rose-mcgrory/2040906/uk-social-media-statistics-2014

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Noticeable trends within graphics have been to ‘deface’ images to make them individual and different, for example, an image of a face will be then draw on, to make it not just an image of a face but to stand out from all the other generic images.

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4

Menswear


you are what you wear menswear Only last year we saw another sweatshop scandal unveil in the fashion retail industry. With H&M and Australian retailers such as Target, Rivers, Coles and Kmart are all linked to Bangladesh worker abuse, which includes, child labour, being cheated of their wages and physical abuse. We have also seen an increase in the amount of clothing people consume which consequently has an effect on the environment. ‘Statistics suggest that on average, UK consumers send 30kg of clothing and textiles per capita to landfill each year and that 1.2 million tonnes of clothing went to landfill in 2005 in the UK alone.’ [1] This trend will be showing strong influences of quality materials and tailoring which is bringing it back from when tailoring was so important years ago since they didn’t have the technology and machinery to produce garments as fast as they can now but had the time to take pride and care with the garments which is a contrast of our fast fashion industry which we are currently living in. These issues have brought the importance of good quality tailoring and how it is has brought awareness to the forefront for consumers. So now consumers want to know the heritage of where the product is made, understand where is has come from and know the quality is high.

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FIGURE 9

[1] http://www.ethicalfashionforum.com/the-issues/fast-fashion-cheap-fashion


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This trend will be showing strong influences of quality materials and tailoring which is bringing it back from when tailoring was so important years ago since they didn’t have the technology and machinery to produce garments as fast as they can now but had the time to take pride and care with the garments which is a contrast of our fast fashion industry which we are currently living in.


no.139,121 menswear On May 20, 1873, Levi received U.S.Patent No.139,121. This date is now considered the official birthday of “blue jeans.” Recently there has been a decline in nigerian, indigo dyers. ‘Kano, the main commercial hub of northern Nigeria, is bearing the brunt of the continuing insurgent in northern Nigeria, led by the Islamist sect Boko Haram.’ [1] The Kofar Mara dye pit began trading in 1498, however, since troubles has kept tourists away from visiting the ancient city. The material is dipped repeatedly into the dye up to four hours, with parts tied up with string, to create desired patterns. This process is as meticulous today as it was centuries ago, although today the craft is barely surviving. ‘Falling cotton prices are below historic averages and are therefore set to boost denim manufacturing. This is a consequence of over 100 billion bales of cotton in inventory worldwide. The US Agriculture department expects cotton farmers will grow even more cotton this year and shall increase their plantings by around 10% this season. China has lots of cotton and is also likely to be liquidating soon, which will consequently create a lot more selling pressure.’ [2] It is notoriously difficult to find well-fitted jeans, with the increase of cheap manufacturing and fast fashion can make it even harder. Cheaper materials, faster production lines, lower quality and poor design. A new high tech body scanner ‘Me-Ality’ is an innovative digital shopping aid installed in 5 Bloomingdale stores across the USA- enabling shoppers to find the perfectly fitted denim. All these factors shall contribute and inspire designers, buyers and other creatives to explore denim as a form of craftsmanship and cultural exploration. We can expect to see many classic shapes and cuts with jeanswear as a celebration of this fashion staple. An emphasis is likely to be given to well sourced materials and manufacturing processes. As resources become scarce consumers shall have an increased desirability and demand- want to be educated and informed of exclusivity and individual qualities behind garments.

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FIGURE 10

[1]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-25919537 [2] http://www.thestreet.com/story/12511004/1/quick-take-falling-cotton-prices-to-boost-denimmanufacturers.html


We can expect to see many classic shapes and cuts with jeanswear as a celebration of this fashion staple. An emphasis is likely to be given to well sourced materials and manufacturing processes.


amalgam menswear A combination of diverse elements; a mixture. With current global despair and panic surrounding extensive natural disasters and social uncertainties, attitudes are changing surviving our daily routines and tasks can be a life threatening challenge for some. Pilling our bodies with everything we might, could and will need to get back home safely. Unusual combinations, unthought-of of mixtures and new layering’s are to be expected. 2013 and 2014 brought England their wettest winter in 250 years; the extreme floods have caused huge damages and expenses to homes, businesses and infrastructure. ‘Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union has been €4.5bn But increasingly intense downpours driven by climate change, as well as population growth and urbanisation, will see that rise to €23bn a year by 2050.’ [1] ‘The latest statistics revel that in August 2013 the estimated number of visits abroad by UK residents was 7.7 million, an 8% increase on August 2012.’ [2] This is showing an increase of people wanting to live in the moment because we never know what is around the corner, especially with the recent natural disasters, which has brought the need for travelling and the want to show you appreciate experiences to the forefront. This is shown through this trend, as layering is key, not only in life experiences but also through clothing, which can be seen as almost a wearable diary, there is a constant pressure of the need to show that you are individual. Layering different textures and materials which could be collected from several different countries or locations that each individual has experienced.

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FIGURE 11

[1] http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/02/flood-damage-cost-europe [2]http://www.ttgdigital.com/news/general-news/ons-estimates-8-increase-in-travellingbrits/4689127.article


This is shown through this trend, as layering is key, not only in life experiences but also through clothing, which can be seen as almost a wearable diary, there is a constant pressure of the need to show that you are individual.


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Appendix

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Image References IMAGE 1-unkonwn, 2010 (photograph) available at:-http://www. worldarchitecturemap.org/buildings/dresden-military-history-museum IMAGE 2-unkown, 2013 (print) (photograph), published in: Premium Berlin Promotional Material IMAGE 3-unknown, 2012 (photograph) (print) ‘Liebeskind Berlin’ published in: Seek Promotional material IMAGE 4- Rik Balder, 2013 (photographs) (print) ‘Hans Boodt Mannequins’ published in: Sportswear Internationsl Jan/Feb 2014 edition IMAGE 5-Rik Balder, 2013 (photographs) (print) ‘Hans Boodt Mannequins’ published in: Sportswear Internationsl Jan/Feb 2014 edition IMAGE 6-unknowns, date unknown (photograph) published on: http://www. statravel.com/travel-paris.htm?wt.mc_id=pinterest_101013_paris IMAGE 7-Ben Newman, 2012 (edited photographs) (print) ‘Sony” published in: Show and Order promotional materials IMAGE 8-Ross Bruggink, 2012 (photograph) “invite” published on: http:// studiompls.com/blog/wedding-stationery/ IMAGE 9-Daniel Jackson, date unknown (photograph) S:L,S:N IMAGE 10-Ali Kepenek, 2013 (print) (photograph), published in: Streetwear International-Berlin Fashion Week IMAGE 11-Matthew Schneier, 2013 (photograph), published on: style.com avaialble at:-http://www.style.com/fashionshows/review/F2014MEN-RLAUREN

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Visualisation

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Analysis

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etc. Trend Report 14/15