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CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012



Education
Support


CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012

Professional
Development

Resources for Teacher Aides...

Go
visual
to
manage
kids Do
you
use
a
roster
for
kids’
jobs? Do
you
put
two
or
three
things
you
want
each
day
on
a
list
for
your
children
to
read?

Introduction The
 weather
 is
 changing
 and
 the
 days
 have 
 been
 glorious,
 it
 is 
 a
 wonderful 
time
to
live
and
work
 in
 Brisbane.
 Since 
our
last
newsletter
 I
 have
 had
 the
 pleasure
 of
 visiting
 several 
 schools
 including
 St
 Flannan’s 
Catholic
 School,
 St
 John’s
 Anglican
 College,
 Northside
 Christian
 College,
 St
 John
 Fisher
 College 
 and
 Samford
 State 
 School
 and
 I
 continue 
 to
 hear
 inspiring
 stories 
 of
 the 
 difference
 their
 teacher
 aides 
make 
to
these 
school
 communities. Churchill 
Education
 have
 a
teacher
 aide
website www.teacheraidecourses.com.au
 as 
 well
 as 
 a
 facebook
 page,
 we
 invite
 you
 to
 share
 some 
 of
 your
 stories 
on
these
sites 
or
contact
me
 at
 ruth@churchilleducation.edu.au
 so
 that
 I
 can
 profile 
 the
 work
 of
 your
 school
 officers.
 We 
 hope
 to
 create 
 a 
 community
 of
 practice
 where
 schools 
 can
 share,
 support
 and
inspire
each
other.

Do
you
use
hand
gestures
such
as
pointing
to
a
bedroom
while
you
say
a
child’s
name
 indicating
you
want
them
to
go
to
their
room? Angie
 Jones
 shares 
 her
 story
 of
 success 
 and
 I
 am
 pleased
 to
 offer
 some
tips
to
get
you
started. Our
 Activity
 Space,


Parenting


Newsletter
 and
Insights
 section
 this
 month
are 
all
about
 helping
 you
get
 the
 students
 organised
 &
 their
 learning
on
track. As 
 I
 put
 pen
 to
 paper
 NAPLAN
 is
 about
 to
 begin
 and
I 
hope
 that
 this
 month’s 
newsletter
 will 
give 
you
 an
 excuse 
 to
 take 
 a 
 break
 and
 make
 some
time
for
you… Until
next
month
…
Ruth P.S:
 Spaces 
are
still 
available
for
 our
 Learning
 Support
 Co‐ordinators
 Workshop
on
Tuesday
5
June, 1.30
 –
 3pm
 at
 the
 Whitehouse,
 Samford
 Village.
 This 
 session
 will
 share 
 simple
 strategies 
 to
 support
 the
work
of
teacher
aides
and
give
an
 insight
 into
 the
 “tool
 box”
 that
 so
 many
people
are
talking
about
…

This 
month
we
offer
you
support
to
 apply
 for
 Recognition
 of
 Prior
 Learning
 in
 our
 Profile
 section.
 I
 have
listened
to
many
teacher
aides
 who
 have
 been
 asked
 to
 jump
 through
 hoops
 to
 apply
 for
 recognition
 or
 even
 worse,
 are
 asked
to
study
units
of
work,















 regardless 
 of
 their
 expertise 
 or
 experience.
 © Churchill
Education
Pty
Ltd
2012

CH UR 2 C CHI L L SA IFF S L EDU MF A OR LISB CAT Q L D V I U RY I O N D 4 LLA CT FR 52 0 GE 130 EECA

07 93 LL 002

Ruth Kirkby Education Support Specialist Email:ruth@churchilleducation.edu.au

IN THE DIARY 4‐8
June
–
National
Cyber
Security
 Awareness
Week
 www.staysmartonline.gov.au
 5
June
‐
World
Environment
Day
 www.unep.org/wed
 14
June
‐
World
Blood
Donor
Day
 www.donateblood.com.au

30
June
‐
 
This
is
 the
last
day
 you
 can
 put
your
 office
 staff
 &
 teacher
 aides
 through
 a
 n a t i o n a l l y
 r e c o g n i s e d
 qualification
 &
receive
$4000
 in
 federal
 government
 incentives
 per
 eligible
 team
 member,
 including
 receiving
 the
incentives
by
installments
 instead
of
a
 lump
sum
at
the
 conclusion
of
the
training.

If
you
do,
congratulations!
You
are
using
the
visual
mode
to
help
your
kids
be
organised,
 be
cooperative
and
be
well‐behaved.

Most
homes
are
highly
verbal
and
in
that
we
rely
 on
our
words
to
ensure
things
get
done. We
tend
to
tell
kids
what
to
do
through
words
rather
than
pictures
or
hand
signals;
 relay
important
messages
using
words
and
even
verbally
give
kids
lists
of
things
to
do. This
may
appeal
to
auditory
learners
and
also
to
easy
kids. If
you
have
a
visual
learner,
and
this
includes
most
boys,
or
a
child
who
likes
to
think
they
are
calling
the
shots
then
 your
reliance
solely
on
verbal
messages
will
mean
that
not
everything
will
get
done,
and
a
great
deal
of
what
you
 want
to
get
done
will
be
resisted. When
we
go
verbal
with
our
all
our
instructions
we
often
teach
kids
to
shut
down.
As
a
principle,
try
to
go
visual
as
 much
as
possible
when
managing
kids,
and
keep
your
words
for
conversations,
relationship‐building
and
 encouragement. Use
visual
prompts
and
reminders Here
are
two
ways
to
go
visual
when
you
want
to
‘manage’
your
kids:

1.

Construct
simple
‘to
do’
lists.
Help
children
remember
routines
by
placing
3‐5
important
things
on
charts
and
 place
them
where
he
or
she
can
see
them.
These
can
include
bedroom
cleaning
routines,
getting
ready
for
 school
routines,
getting
ready
for
bed
routines,
and
even
chores
rosters.


2.

Place
non‐negotiables
on
signs.

My
son
had
a
“KEEP
OUT!”
sign
on
his
bedroom
door
as
a
child,
indicating
in
 strong
terms
to
his
sisters
his
wish
for
privacy.
Fortress
Bedroom
it
certainly
was!
Parents
can
do
something
 similar
when
circumstances
suit.

For
instance,
if
you
have
family
meetings
you
can
place
simple
rules
on
little
 signs
such
as
“Talk
about
one
thing
at
a
time.”
“No
interruptions”.
“Stick
to
the
point.”

By
going
visual
you
 indicate
that
this
is
non‐negotiable
and
important.

 http://imaginationsoup.net/2012/03/kids‐at‐the‐library‐scavenger‐hunts‐gear‐routines‐more/


National
Year
of
Reading
2012 Design
a
Library
Card!
So
many
options
…

 • you
could
have
a
competition
for
each
student
to
design
a
library
card
 • Have
each
class
design
a
mega
library
card
and
display
the
class
card
in
the
library
 with
all
the
books
the
class
borrows
recorded
on
the
card • Get
your
local
community
library
involved
&
have
them
display
the
winning
entries • Let
technology
shine
–
design
an
electronic
library
card,
for
example,
in
Powerpoint
and
create
 a
new
slide
for
each
book
borrowed,
creating
a
slideshow
of
books
your
students
read
during
the
year


CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012

Tool
Box
Tips

CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012

LEARNING
STYLES Getting
Them
Organised
By
Sandy
Russo


On
the
theme
of
getting
students
organised,
an
extra,
 low
 cost
 tool
 box
 addition
 …
 a 
 simple 
 reminder
 bracelet
 
...
 can
be
 made
from
 strips
of
 scrap
 paper.
 Write
 on
 the 
 bracelet
 what
 the
 student
 needs 
 to

 remember
 …
 whether
 that’s
 something
 for
 the
 next
 lesson,
 a
take 
home
 reminder,
 or
 a
visual
prompt
 for
 the
rest
 of
 the
day.
 Staple
the 
bracelet
 and
use
bright
 marker
pens
to
keep
the
reminder
 front
 of
 mind.
 This
 strategy
is 
great
 for
a 
variety
 of
ages
and
needs
…
and
 can
 effectively
 communicate
 with
 parents.
 The 
 same
 strategy
 can
 be 
used
 in
reverse 
by
 parents 
to
 remind
 the
student
to
do
something
at
 school.
You
could
even
 have
 the 
student
 make
 their
 own
 reminder
 bracelet,
 and
don’t
forget
to
add
a 
little
visual
cue!
Let
your
arty
 skills
flourish.


Students
with
learning
 difficulties
need
 simple
structured
routines 
to
help
them
become 
organised
within
their
 daily
lives,
both
at
 home
and
at
school.
This
article
looks
at
how
to
combat
the 
chaos
and
disorganisation
caused
 by
short‐term
memory
problems
with
a
combined
effort
by
parents
and
teachers. How
to
combat
disorganisation
in
the
classroom

Teachers
can
help
students
by:

Behaviour
Management‐Quick
Tips As 
a 
mother
of
sons,
I 
know
that
raising
a
boy
generates 
different
challenges 
than
raising
girls.
I
have
loved
this
 article 
by
Michael 
Grose,
“Raising
boys 
is
all 
about
time
and
timing”
and
thought
I’d
share
a
snippet
with
you
to
 help
us
to
assist
our
boys
to
get
organized. Their
 ability
to
 focus
 ‐
 Ever
 noticed
how
 some 
boys 
will
work
at
 diminished
 capacity
 on
anything
 that’s
not
 important
to
them?
This 
happens
around
schooling
a 
lot.
 Give 
them
a 
project
that’s 
due 
in
a
week
and
they’ll
 amble
along
for
 six
days 
and
then
focus
like
a
laser
beam
the
night
 before
it’s
due
(often
after
a 
great
deal
of
 panic
or
a
brief
mental 
meltdown!)

One
way
to
get
boys
to
focus 
is
shorten
their
deadlines.
Give
them
two
days,
 not
two
weeks
to
do
something.
 Even
better
shorten
the 
deadline
and
give 
them
a 
practical
purpose
(
or
a 
tangible
reward
if
you
can’t
think
of
a
 good
purpose)
for
doing
something
–
“hand
this
work
in
tomorrow
and
you’ll
get
ten
minutes
of
free
play!”
 Alternatively,
if
they
 drift
along
waiting
until
the 
last
minute
and
then
go
into
a
mad
panic,
don’t
sweat
it.
They
 may
just
be
saving
themselves
for
that
big
effort! The
greatest
gifts
to
give
boys
revolves
around
time.
Not
just
your
time,
although
that
is 
important,
particularly
 for
dads 
whose
time 
boys
crave.
In
fact,
most
boys
crave 
some 
one‐on‐one
time
with
their
dads,
as 
long
as 
it’s
 done
a
way
that’s
relevant
to
their
age.
 But
there’s 
two
other
time
aspects
to
consider.
First,
give
them
time
to
mature
and
develop.
Don’t
expect
them
 to
be
what
you
want
them
to
be
on
your
 timing.
Most
boys
take 
their
time
growing
 up.
It
takes
patience 
and
 time
to
grow
a
boy……..
sometimes
a
decade
or
two. The
other
 aspect
 refers
to
communicating
with
boys.
Adults 
who
do
best
 with
boys
have
a 
way
 of
getting
into
 their
timeframe.
They
can
talk
with
them
about
what
interests 
them
now,
what’s
important
to
them
now,
what’s
 grabbing
their
attention
now.
That’s
relatively
easy
when
your
sons 
are
under
ten,
but
challenging
when
they
are
 teenagers.
 You
have 
to
be
a
little
cunning
to
get
into
a 
teenage
boy’s 
timeframe.
A
parent
who
picks 
up
a
teenage
boy
from
 a 
party
 at
 midnight,
 just
 may
 have
a
better
 chance
of
 getting
 into
 this 
timeframe
and
getting
a 
window
into
 what’s
important
than
one
who
parents
from
a
distance. So
time
and
timing
are
the
keys!
Give
boys 
time
to
mature,
give
them
your
time
and
get
into
their
timeframe
if
 you
want
to
get
on
their
wavelength. © Churchill
Education
Pty
Ltd
2012

• • • • • • •

•introducing
colour
coding
in
their
class 
timetables,
book
coverings,
 sections
in
folders
and
using
A4
coloured
wallets •creating
 visual
 diaries 
 and
 calendars
 with
 colour
 blocking
 for
 different
subject
areas
and
due
dates
for
assignments •making
 checklists 
that
 are 
ticked
 off
 throughout
 the 
day
 so
that
 the
student
knows
everything
has
been
done •providing
time
to
check
off
the
list •allowing
students
to
practice
the
routine
each
day •creating
 special 
 places 
 for
 books 
 to
 be 
 stored
 so
 they
 are 
 not
 mixed
up
in
the
student’s 
drawer
or
 locker
 e.g.
make
a 
permanent
 space 
at
the 
front
of
the
class 
for
each
subject’s 
books
and
appoint
 monitors
to
hand
out
and
collect
the
books providing
fewer
books
to
by
including
two
subjects
in
the
one
book checking
student
diaries
and
ensuring
that
enough
information
has 
been
included
for
a 
student
to
complete
 their
homework writing
‘NONE’
in
the
diary
if
there
is
no
homework
set
(to
help
parents!) making
homework
due
dates
the
same
day
each
week giving
students 
you
know
 have
memory
 problems 
their
 homework
 list
 at
 the
end
of
the
day
 and
having
 them
show
you
they
have
placed
the
books
needed
in
their
bag breaking
down
large
tasks
into
mini
tasks
that
will
be
completed
and
handed
up
in
stages Planning
the
homework
and
lesson
requirements 
for
the
term
in
advance,
and
communicating
with
parents
 so
they
can
plan
the
home
routines
around
the
time
table
(see
Google
Calendar)

Communication
between
school
and
home There
 are
 many
 ways
 of
 sharing
 lesson
 requirements,
 homework
 due 
 dates
 and
 details
of
special
events. For
the
teacher
to
communicate
with
students
 and
parents
they
have
the
choice
of:‐ • • • •

sending
out
a
printed
calendar
that
has
 been
colour
coded school
diary using
 the 
 mobile
 text
 messaging
 systems
many
schools
now
have emailing
each
parent
and
student
with
 the
assignment
outlines
due
during
the
 term © Churchill
Education
Pty
Ltd
2012


CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012

Activity
Space

CHURCHILL EDUCATION

EDUCATION SUPPORT NEWSLETTER MAY 2012

Profile: Angie Jones

Building
Anchor
Charts Angie 
Jones
 was
 ready
 to
 give
 up
 her
 dream
 of
 becoming
 a 
qualified
 Education
 Support
Worker.
Despite
working
as 
a 
teacher
aide,
 
Angie 
was 
not
given
the 
option
 of
 having
 her
experience
and
skills
recognised
by
 her
 TAFE
 through
Recognition
 of
 Prior��� Learning,
 (RPL).
 Instead
 she
 was 
 forced
 to
 study
 the
 full 
 Certificate
 III
 in
 Education
Support
 qualification
and
as
a
working
mother,
 finding
 the
time
for
 this
 was
difficult.
 
Combined
with
the
frustration
of
studying
units 
that
she 
was 
already
 competent
 in,
 Angie
gave
 up
 her
 Teacher
 Aide
 studies
and
 disillusioned,
 she
 was
 almost
ready
to
walk
away
…

We’ve
 all 
 seen
 classroom
 charts 
 and
 there
 is 
 no
 doubt,
 they
 are
 valuable
 learning
 aids.
 An
 anchor
 chart
 is
 a
 chart
 that
 you
 create 
 as 
a 
class,
 or
 as
 a
 working
group,
even
if
that
group
is
a
pair.
They
are
a
 fun
 way
 to
 help
 your
 students 
 retain
 information.
 Anchor
 charts
 can
 be 
 on
 any
 topic
 and
 should
 be
 visually
 interesting.
You
can
do
some 
of
the
pre‐work
 on
 the
anchor
 chart,
 for
 example,
 you
 might
 have
a
 heading
 and
 a 
 basic
 picture
 ready.
 Filling
 in
 the
 learning,
 though,
 is 
 part
 of
 the
 magic
 …
 you
 talk
 together
 and
 work
 out
 the
 answers 
 and
 then
 complete 
the
anchor
chart.
And
don’t
be
afraid
to
add
 texture
 to
 your
 anchor
 charts
 …
 stick
 pictures
 and
 objects 
to
them,
anything
that
will
help
your
students
 visualize,
 learn
 and
 remember
 strategies 
 and
 knowledge.
 
 
Extension
Inspiration:
 take
a 
photo
or
 a
 copy
of
your
anchor
charts
and
form
them
into
a 
book
 that
 can
go
 home 
with
 your
 students
to
 help
 them
 (and
 their
 parents)
 with
 their
 homework.
 Anchor
 charts
 from
 one
 year
 could
 form
 the 
 basis
 of
 a
 homework
aid
book
for
the
following
year.

A
web
search
saw
Angie
find
Churchill 
Education
and
we 
were
able
to
match
her
work
experience,
(including
her
 previous 
employment
history
in
an
administrative
and
managerial 
role),
skills 
and
knowledge 
with
the 
units 
in
the
 Certificate
 III 
 qualification.
 Angie 
 was
 overjoyed
 to
 discover
 that
 she
 could
 use 
 RPL
 to
 complete
 the 
 whole
 qualification
and
this
was
issued
to
her
within
28
days
of
her
enrolment. Angie’s 
luck
was 
changing
and
within
the
next
 few
months 
she 
found
a 
permanent
 job
as 
an
Education
Support
 Worker.
Angie
continues
to
go
from
strength
to
strength
and
is
greatly
appreciated
by
her
school
community!
 “Hi
Ruth,
I
hope
you
are
well.
My
job
is
going
 great
and
I
now
work
 every
 day
 except
for
Fridays.

I
got
an
 email
 from
the
principal
saying
what
a
great
job
I
was
doing
and
what
an
asset
I
was
to
the
school.
Thank
you
for
all
you
 have
done
for
me
I
will
never
forget
it.
Angie
Jones” If
you
are
looking
to
gain
an
Education
Support
qualification,
make 
sure 
you
talk
about
the
possibility
of
RPL,
even
 if
you
are
a 
volunteer
in
a 
school.
Completing
courses
such
as 
“Support‐a‐Reader”,
combined
with
in
class 
reading
 support,
could
make
you
eligible!

Here
are
some
tips
to
help
fast
track
the
RPL
process:

Quick
Tips Sometimes,
 getting
 organised
 can
 be
 about
 giving
 the
 mind
a
clear
space
to
think
about
the
task
at
hand.
These
 handy
 Brain
 Break
 sticks 
 can
 be
 great
 for
 behavior
 management
(and
are 
worth
including
in
your
 tool 
box).
 When
you
think
your
students 
are
drifting,
or
it
is 
one 
of
 those
 very
 hot
 Queensland
 afternoons,
 then
 call
 Brain
 Break
 and
 delve 
 into
 this
 low
 cost
 activity
 centre 
 …
 a
 disposable
cup
with
some
coloured
popsicle
sticks,
 each
 bearing
a 
different
 activity.
 The
range 
of
activities 
can
be
 tailored
to
age
groups.
Have
a 
loud
kitchen
timer,
set
it
for
 1
 minute
 and
 let
 the 
Brain
 Break
 begin.
 Our
 favourites
 were
doing
the
Macarena,
10
push‐ups,
beach
ball
fun,
or
 Rock/Paper/Scissors.

Have you attended any professional development activities that will assist you in gaining Recognition of Prior Learning? Following the steps below will help fast track the process for you: • retain the Statement of Attendance/Participation from any programs you have

attended • wherever possible apply the knowledge and skills from the program in your school

setting • write a brief statement on school letterhead detailing how you have used the

knowledge and skills over time • request a supervising teacher/s to sign and date the statement to verify the

information • provide a copy of the statement and Statement of Attendance/Participation to the RPL

assessor


© Churchill
Education
Pty
Ltd
2012

© Churchill
Education
Pty
Ltd
2012


May 2012 Education Support Resources for Teacher Aides