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E LLE D ECO R ATI O N

THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME

N O 297 M AY 2 017

MAY 2017 £ 4.50

THE NEW PRETTY MODERN PASTELS FOR SPRING HOW TO GET THE LOOK

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TH E N EW PRE T T Y

The world’s most beautiful homes Stairways from heaven Simple to spiral – all you need to know

B AT H R O O M S Soak up inspiration from the latest looks

D E C O R AT I N G Update your home today Simple ideas for every room


MAY 2017 Style 29 Shopping This month’s wish list of pieces big and small that #EDloves 33 News The latest launches, hot new finds and our guide to making the most of London Craft Week 49 Decorating Interior designer Alexander Evangelou on using metal. Plus, six ways to revamp your stairs

THE BIG

D E C O R AT I N G HOTLIST

Ideas and inspiration for every room, from this season’s hottest colour combination to easy updates and top tips from the experts. Plus, the tile brands you need to know

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59 The pottery throwdown Are you an earthenware or porcelain person? Here’s all you need to know and buy 65 Design The story of the lightbulb and the history of furniture brand Knoll 71 In conversation with Lee Broom As the British designer’s brand turns ten, he talks past, present and future 77 Architecture London’s newest landmark. Plus, landscape architect Neil Porter on his inspirations 80 Technology The ultimate wardrobe, plus how to breathe more easily 83 Colour How big brands predict next year’s must-have hues. And why teal is our pick for 2017

COVER IMAGE: ANDREA PAPINI (PHOTOGRAPHY), SAŠA ANTIC (STYLING) SUBS COVER IMAGE: A SLICE OF SWISS CHEESE PRINT BY CLAIRE HALIFAX

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ON THE COVER The dusky pink velvet sofa in this Swedish apartment, see p122, is the perfect colour for spring and an example of the ‘New Pretty’ look in interiors.

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122 Amazing grace Soft pinks and velvet bring subtle hits of colour and texture to this Swedish apartment 132 The new pastels Get set for spring with sugary shades of yellow and blue 138 Natural instinct The neutral scheme in this Danish home is enlivened by fresh pops of green 150 The Midas touch A Florentine apartment decorated with striking embellishments. We delve into the design of its super-shiny feature wall 160 Beyond the foothills This South African villa’s architecture is inspired by its views of the mountains and sea 168 Back to the future Modernism is the inspiration for this Turin home, from terrazzo to 1980s pastel hues 176 Beyond retro Love the Turin home’s style? Here’s how to get the look 178 Light & shade The monochrome interior of this Australian holiday house has a Scandinavian feel 188 Labour of love This now-beautiful Belgian villa has undergone an astonishing four-year renovation

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201 B AT H R O O M T R E N D S Soak up some inspiration from our definitive edit of the 12 hottest looks in bathrooms right now

Escape 225 News Design maestro Jaime Hayòn shows us around his first hotel. Plus, four things to try in Paris this April; and London’s best new restaurant 232 Gardens Meet contemporary garden designer Cali Rand. Plus, what to see at Chelsea Flower Show, and where to find 250,000 peonies in bloom 235 Getaway Head to Stockholm to discover our two favourite districts, Vasastan and Södermalm

Finally 26 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 238 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 250 The last word Projects and products that #TeamED have been tackling and testing this month 20 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017


SPRING THINKING By the time you read this, the clocks will have gone forward in Britain and it will officially be spring. Even if the sun is not yet shining, this is the season that fills my heart with the most joy. Not only do the empty flowerbeds of our gardens burst into life, but I think we as human beings physically uncurl too. We come out of hibernation and become more sociable (or perhaps that’s just me). Those lighter mornings and longer days help to propel us out of bed, and stay out to play. And yet we could not have spring without winter, the season where it’s all happening behind the scenes; the earth protecting its plants, nourishing from within to give them the strength to bust out when called by the sun. And I like to think that we’re doing the same at home, stoking our stores with warming stews and hearty casseroles, and sleeping longer to ready ourselves for the more active months ahead. Historically, when the only measure of time was the rising and setting of the sun, and activity was limited to how many candles you could afford to burn, the dawn of spring naturally encouraged more

‘Spring is a time for action and optimism. A time when the world around us is the visible embodiment of nature’s sheer, unbridled enthusiasm for life’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

productivity. The time for planning and prep was over. Spring cleaning was tied into this too. Households literally sweeping away the stagnancy of the still season; furiously polishing windows to let light in, and flinging open doors to welcome fresh air. I feel that natural pull to action continues today. Perhaps it’s less about zealous spring cleaning, but certainly these months tend to automatically prompt a seasonal review of one’s surroundings. It’s traditionally a popular time to move house; it’s also when many begin major renovations or extensions, with fingers crossed that the weather holds for their builders. The push is on to get things done so that they can be enjoyed by the summer. Perhaps that’s why I like this season so much. It’s a time of action and optimism. A time when the world around us is the visible embodiment of nature’s sheer, unbridled enthusiasm for life. In my own garden everything is already green, the birds are back, noisily squabbling for attention around the bird feeder, and the last of the surrounding trees are threatening buds, if not blossom. It reminds us that no matter how harsh the last few months may have been, paraphrasing the words of the utterly brilliant cartoonist Robert Crumb, we got to keep on truckin’, for spring always follows winter.

Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Instagram: @michelleogundehin

Twitter: @ELLEDecoMO

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A RT • A RCHITECTUR E • SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING

STYLE FACE OFF

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

Now’s your chance to have a celebrity hold your coat. Becky Kemp, aka Sketch Inc, has given her amusing, mini hand-painted kokeshi doll sculptures (first featured in our February 2017 issue) of famous figures a practical purpose. Her portraits now grace beech wood wall hooks and include the faces of Karl Lagerfeld, Salvador Dalí, Ziggy Stardust and more. £17.40 each, Lucie Kaas (luciekaas.com).


Style | S H O P P I N G

WISH LIST From affordable treats to investment buys, there’s so much that #EDLoves. Here’s this month’s pick… 2

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COMPILED BY: MOLLY HUTCHINSON PICTURES: CHRISTIAN B/YELLOWS

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1 Light up a room with these ‘Kuu’ reversible pendant lights by Elina Ulvio. From £275, Nordic Hysteria (nordichysteria.fi). 2 Add subtly tropical pattern to your walls with the ‘Willy’ wallcovering. £119 per metre, Casamance (casamance.com). 3 We love this A Piece of Swiss Cheese print by Clare Halifax in our favourite colour combo. From £70, Print Club London (printclublondon.com). 4With its clean lines and scooped handle the ‘Conran Clayton’ sideboard is effortlessly stylish. £799, Marks & Spencer (mands.com). 5 This delicate olive-green ‘Urna’ vase by Carina Seth-Andersson is elegant and modern. £170, Marimekko (marimekko.com). 6 A perfect partner for the ‘Urna’, the ‘Aurora’ vase by Dartington Crystal is a high-street hit. £39, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). 7 The dusky pink of the ‘Carol’ box with lid is wonderfully on trend. £13.60, Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com). 8 Use the ‘TOTA’ jar in forest green by AYTM to store your most treasured trinkets. From £22, Aria Shop (ariashop.co.uk). 9 The ‘Silje’ rug in Jade and Pink is a soft and sophisticated take on geometric pattern. £469, Heal’s (heals.com). 10 Snuggle up in style with the ‘Thankster’ love seat in ‘Sea Blue’ vintage velvet. £1,265, Loaf (loaf.com). 11 Bring the beauty of the outdoors into your living room, with this leaf print cushion cover. £8.99, H&M (hm.com). 12 Pronounced ‘weight’, the ‘W8’ side table by Alain Gilles for Ligne Roset has a solid stone base. £508 (ligne-roset.com). 13 Artfully place single stems in these ‘Nuage’ vases by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra. From £115 each, Aram Store (aram.co.uk).

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Style | N E W S

TROPICALIA Prints of exotic plants and animals are making us feel spring-like. Liberty’s ‘The Merchant Adventurer’ range is our fave. From £110 for a cushion (liberty.co.uk). BLOOMSBURY GROUP Two exhibitions in London – Vanessa Bell at Dulwich Picture Gallery and ‘Sussex Modernism: Retreat & Rebellion’ at 2 Temple Place – have renewed our obsession with this artistic clique. JADEITE GLASS This opaque green glass was pioneered by American firm Anchor Hocking in the 1940s. Now it’s been revamped by Paola Navone for Serax. From £7, Selfridges (selfridges.com).

UP AND DOWN

SPRING INTO ACTION Fashion and homeware designer Jasper Conran’s new glassware collection for Debenhams is further proof – if it were needed – that Conran is a hero of the high street. Elegant, artful, and available in a range of shapes and sizes, the vases are perfect for displaying everything from small wildflower buds to bunches of new-season blooms. Choose from a spring-like palette of blues and yellows, or subtle smokey grey. From £15 for the ‘Amber’ bud vase (debenhams.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: DAMIAN RUSSELL

GLAZED EXPRESSIONISM New from Stoke-on-Trent pottery 1882 Ltd is this speckled ‘The Accidental Expressionist’ tea set. The company worked with New York-based photographer Martyn Thompson, whose interest in ceramics stems from his own heritage – he is descended from the English ceramicist Susie Cooper, who established her own Stoke-on-Trent studio in the early 20th Century. Thompson has embraced the happy accidents that are part of the joy of handglazed ceramics – and also inspired the collection’s name – while also creating a mix-and-match set of pieces that complement each other. From £45 for a cup and saucer (1882ltd.com). Turn to p59 to learn how to spot your stoneware from your bone china.

MILITARY FASHION We’re giving this design a court marshal. ‘Vintage US Military Parade’ lounge chair, £4,490, Rhubarb London (rhubarblondon.com).

FAKE HEDGEROWS We may be fans of artificial grass (well, it just makes practical sense), but faux box hedges and topiary is a step too far.

WEDDING LISTS This nuptials season go rogue and get something a bit more personal – think an experience that the couple will both love rather than an everyday item.

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Style | N E W S

PERFECT YOUR PATIO It’s time to get outdoors, or at the very least, start thinking about it. Conveniently, the newest crop of garden furniture designs has just arrived. We take a look at the best in show 1 SKAGERAK The Danish brand’s ‘Overlap’ (right) by Swedish design studio TAF Architects is a fresh take on the picnic table. Made of powdercoated steel and topped with red cedar, it’s a sturdy and longlasting choice. From £1,099 for a bench (skagerak.dk). 2 PA L O F O R M Newly arrived in the UK, Canadian company Paloform’s handmade steel and concrete fire pits will warm up your summer evenings. The ‘Bol’ (far right) comes in rust -coloured Corten steel. From £2,300 for the woodburning version (paloform.com).

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7 DEDON Dedon has several punchy new collections out this year. One of our favourites is the ‘Brixx’ (above), a playful, geometric modular lounging set. Pick and mix sofa segments, cushions and perfectly fitting tables by Italian designer Lorenza Bozzoli. From £1,082 for a side table (dedon.com).

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4 GLOSTER Teak is American company Gloster’s speciality, and it is now exploring the material with a new-found appreciation for its imperfections. The ‘Raw’ table (above) celebrates teak’s natural variation. From £8,888 for a 2.8-metre table (gloster.com).

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5 ETHIMO The new ‘Agave’ collection designed by Mattia Albicini for Italian garden furniture firm Ethimo features sculpted teak chairs and a round table (right) that recall the forms of the agave plant, while also invoking the tenets of mid-century design. From £390 for a dining chair (ethimo.com). 6 B & B I TA L I A Designed by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, the ‘Erica’ armchair (right) is made of lightweight aluminium (perfect for moving into a sunny spot). Its inviting upholstery comes in a range of bright, contemporary colourways. From £848 (bebitalia.com). 34 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

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8 K E T TA L Spanish brand Kettal has asked London-based design duo Doshi Levien to create a new garden chair. With its high-back and thick rope weaving, the ‘Cala’ (left) will add instant elegance to any outdoor space. £1,831 (kettal.com). 9 GO MODERN To celebrate its 50th birthday, Belgian garden furniture specialist Tribù has released a bevvy of new designs including the ‘Forum’ sun lounger (below). It’s perfect for a little poolside relaxation. £850 (gomodern.co.uk). 9

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: SALVA LOPEZ, ALESSANDRA MURAN

3 MINOTTI Italian brand Minotti’s 3 ‘Virginia’ collection (chair, above) in solid iroko wood has a large leafy print that’s ideal for a terrace or a city roof garden. From £4,386 for an armchair (minotti.com).


Style | N E W S

HOME SCENT ICON ‘ L A B O U L E D ’ A M B R E ’ B Y L’ A R T I S A N PA R F U M E U R

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY BRADFORD ILLUSTRATION: BABETH LAFON PICTURES: JEPPE SØRENSEN

Candles and incense burn away to nothing, but with L’Artisan Parfumeur’s ‘Boule d’Ambre’ spheres, you’ll have a home scent for life. Created in 1977 by the company’s founder Jean Laporte, these hand-carved hollow globes are filled with a resinous amber scent composed of vanilla, patchouli, tonka bean, benzoin and incense. This aroma comes in the form of perfumed crystals, which are wrapped in red tissue paper and used to stuff the boules. Thus, each one has an almost everlasting lifespan: once the crystals eventually lose their potency, you simply buy a refill and start again. There are other ways to reactivate them, too: placing a boule in a warm or humid room, or on a radiator – not too hot, or the crystals will melt – quickly fills a space with fragrance. The boules are as wonderfully mysterious as they are long-lasting. L’Artisan Parfumeur will not disclose the details of its mahogany-brown finish (although they are made of terracotta, they resemble wood). Nor will it reveal the names of the only two artisans – mother and daughter – who know how to make them, but tantalising glimpses of the makers’ hands remain: carved into each boule is a unique flower or leaf pattern and an enigmatic set of initials. From £60; refills from £40 (artisanparfumeur.com).

CAP TAINS OF INDUSTRY As its name implies, ‘Warehouse Home: Industrial Inspiration for Twenty-FirstCentury Living’ (Thames & Hudson, £24.95), the new book by Sophie Bush, focuses on homes built inside exindustrial spaces, warehouses and factories. Crammed with images and top ideas from New York, London, Sydney and beyond, it’s a handy guide to mastering industrial chic.

SUPER EIGHT Just when we thought the trend for marble accessories was losing pace, out comes Danish designer Louise Roe with ‘Eight Over Eight’, an enticing marble table lamp. Its solid marble octagonal base is topped by a matching octagonal shade, with several vintage-inspired colour options for each. Alone or as a mismatched pair, they make a sculptural vignette for a bookshelf or coffee table. £922 (louiseroe.dk).

PARISIAN PERFECTION Interior designer Sarah Lavoine is adding to her growing furniture and home accessories range for her namesake store with a brand new collection of wallpapers. Designed for French brand Nobilis, the ‘Apostrophe’ range includes four designs in vivid colourways – her trademark blue does make an appearance. The papers offer the perfect backdrop to Lavoine’s elegant furnishings. We love the colour-blocking brilliance of ‘L’Aurore’ (left) – these simple sweeps of dark blue and pristine white joined by a soft black border are pure Parisian chic. From £303 for a ten-metre roll (nobilis.fr).

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Style | N E W S

R E V I S I T I N G T H E C L A S S IC S With our enduring obsession for all things mid-century, it’s no wonder that many companies continue to release new editions of designs from their 1950s and 60s archives. Here are four iconic pieces that are getting a reboot this year

‘CH22’ and ‘CH26’ chairs by Hans J Wegner Over the course of his lifetime, this Danish furniture maker designed more than 500 chairs for Carl Hansen & Søn. Now, the company is reissuing the ‘CH22’ lounge chair (£1,667) and the ‘CH26’ chair (£833), both bearing the hallmarks of Wegner’s work in their exacting craftsmanship and ergonomic form. Available May (carlhansen.com).

Lounge chair and ottoman by Charles and Ray Eames This classic design, originally created as a gift for Some Like it Hot film director Billy Wilder, is having a revamp courtesy of Vitra and The Conran Shop. Made as a limited edition of just 25 in a brand new colourway – a white pigmented walnut shell with ‘dark sand’ aniline leather upholstery – it is sure to be in high demand. £6,546 (conranshop.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: NICOLA ZOCCHI

T O G ET H E R N OW The spirit of collaboration is alive at London’s luxury superstore Harrods. Its new ‘Art Partner’ series proves just how innovative brand mashups can be. Among the standouts are BeatWoven x Warner Music, a bespoke piece of textile art that brings David Bowie’s Let’s Dance to life (right) and Israeli designer Arik Levy’s ‘Shift’ bed (below, from £21,405) – created with Savoir Beds, it features a headboard made of moving parts. Meanwhile, Italian furniture-maker Poltrona Frau has covered its ‘Vanity Fair’ chairs in fabric designed by children from Tolentino, the brand’s home town (right, from £470), and French porcelain brand Gien has made pieces with artist Brigitte de Bazelaire (bottom and top right, from £115; harrods.com).

‘Result’ chair by Friso Kramer and Wim Rietveld This design from 1958 was the Dutch school chair of choice during the 1960s and 70s. Now, Danish brand Hay has collaborated with Dutch office furniture specialists Ahrend on its re-release. Lightweight in its cut-out sheet steel construction and pared down in its design, it has vast appeal beyond the schoolroom. Available summer 2017 (hay.dk).

‘699 Superleggera’ chair by Gio Ponti This year marks the 60th anniversary of the release of this masterpiece from the 1950s. To celebrate the milestone, Cassina has released special versions, including a black-and-white edition for exhibition only, and a run of 60 chairs featuring a woven seat covered in ‘Boxblocks’ fabric by Dutch artist Bertjan Pot. From £890 (cassina.com).

N AT U R A L W I N N E R S Italian brand Porada, along with a panel of judges, has announced the winner of its fifth annual design award. The brief: reinvent the coathanger. The result: Ukrainian duo Bogdan Bondarenko and Yuliia Fedorenko’s ‘The Swaying Bamboo’. It’s already prototyped, so we hope to see it on sale soon (porada.it).

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Style | N E W S

HEAD-TO-TOE PATTERN Known for its exquisite hand-painted chinoiserie wallpapers and textiles, silk damask, and delicate porcelain, de Gournay is loved by the fashion world’s elite. This is proved by a pair of recent haute collaborations. First up, luxury Italian footwear brand Aquazzura’s new home in Milan is now covered in de Gournay panels by the label’s creative director Edgardo Osorio. The zany patterns (left) feature a menagerie of tropical toucans, parrots and monkeys and, as well as being available for purchase (£1,425 per panel; degournay.com), they will also be applied to a capsule collection of shoes (below, from £204, Matches Fashion; matchesfashion.com). Meanwhile, across the pond in New York, online luxury fashion retailer Moda Operandi’s showroom is decorated in de Gournay’s popular ‘Earlham’ chinoiserie and ‘Pineapple Damask’. So taken was the brand with de Gournay’s style, it has collaborated on a collection of silk dressing gowns (right, £1,938) featuring a selection of the English firm’s most coveted patterns, (modaoperandi.com).

Shop here Online lifestyle store La Gent is quickly becoming a go-to for beautiful objects that are hard to get hold of in the UK. From Hasami porcelain teapots from Japan to American brand Appointed’s elegant stationery, we’re hooked on its selection of overseas brands – no need to organise shipping (la-gent.com). STRANGER THINGS

When you think of Surrealism, what springs to mind? Melting clocks? Lobster telephone? It remains one of the most fascinating movements of the 20th century, but its influence extended beyond art. Here are three other ways to embrace the surreal A R C H I T E C T U R E Architecture and Surrealism: A Blistering Romance (Thames

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, CHARLOTTE BROOK

& Hudson, £38) explores Salvador Dalí’s discovery of Art Nouveau. He wrote a love letter to the style in a 1933 essay entitled ‘Concerning the Terrifying and Edible Beauty of Art Nouveau Architecture.’ In this mind-bending book Neil Spiller, the University of Greenwich’s Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory, picks up where Dalí left off, arguing that in a world where 3D guns can be printed, Surrealism often seems more appropriate than ‘architectural Modernism’. F O O D ‘Les Dîners de Gala is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of taste… If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you,’ Dalí said of the cookbook he wrote with his wife and muse, Gala, in 1973, which has just been republished (Taschen, £44.99). Their dinner parties were legendary, and this mad book provides practical recipes for the exotic dishes they cooked up. F I L M Alfred Hitchcock’s 1945 thriller Spellbound is the perfect complement to these new books. Dalí

masterminded the scene of the lead character’s dream, a sequence which involves bulging eyes, a game of blackjack and a masked man in a bowtie; it resembles a Dalí painting in motion. A must-watch.

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F E AT H E R S TA K E F L I G H T

From wallpapers and tiles to cushions and lighting, feathers are cropping up everywhere in interiors. Their delicate form gives an ethereal lightness to any space. Here are five brands that are working the look

SOFT LAUNCH Longtime fans of Danish brand Aiayu, known for its luxurious llama wool throws, pillows and crisp cotton sheets in a dreamy palette, will be thrilled to hear news of its first UK outing as a pop-up at Nordic superstore Skandium on London’s Brompton Road. Expect to find hand-knitted clutch bags made by a cooperative of Bolivian women that Aiayu supports, as well as its deliciously soft ‘Puffy’ cushion (right, £294) and smartly striped ‘Herringbone’ cushion (far right, £73). The most perfect of home comforts (aiayu.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: DITTE ISAGER

S H I N E O N, M O N D R I A N To celebrate the centenary of the Dutch De Stijl art movement, known for its abstract and geometric style, Anglepoise and Paul Smith have come together on a third collaboration for the ‘Type 75’ desk lamp. Inspired by artist Piet Mondrian, one of the movement’s main proponents, Smith’s new light comes in bright primary colours and elegantly distils Mondrian’s aesthetic. Find it at the Dutch Gemeente Museum in the Netherlands, which hosts a permanent exhibition of De Stijl work, or online. £170 (anglepoise.com).

1 Vita Copenhagen Its plumed ‘Silvia’ lampshades are pretty as floor, pendant or table versions. From £85 (vitacopenhagen.com). 2 Cole & Son Inspired by the feathers of its namesake South African bird, the ‘Narina’ wallpaper is a striking print that can be hung either way up. £75 for a ten-metre roll (cole-and-son.com). 3 Bottega Nove This Italian tile innovator takes a similar pattern a step further with its ‘Plumage’ series. The overlapping tactile tiles are alluring in ceramic or Limoges porcelain. From £345 per square metre (botteganove.it). 4 Rockett St George Made from real, gilded feathers against an inky black backdrop, this framed artwork makes a vampy addition to any room. £345 (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). 5 Andrew Martin The brand’s beautiful linen cushions have luxurious feather trims for a natural touch of glamour. From £109 (andrewmartin.com).

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Style | N E W S

HOW TO BUY ART NOW Whether you want to find a piece by the art world’s next big name or simply something beautiful and affordable to fill a gap on your wall, here are the best new and noteworthy ways to buy original sculptures, canvases and curios

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Affordable Art Fair If you prefer to see and compare pieces before you buy, head to the Affordable Art Fair (top), which returns to Hampstead Heath on 11–14 May. Expect to view original pieces from more than 100 galleries, including Imogen Parry’s Sex Love & Money (3; affordableartfair.com). London Print Fair From 4–7 May The Royal Academy will host purveyors of etchings, lithographs, woodcuts (including The Winter at Lianghe Village by Yu Chengyou, 4) and more. On Friday 5 May there will be a ‘Young Collectors’ evening of talks, encouraging youthful art fans to buy their first print (londonprintfair.com). Printfest This Cumbrian festival takes place on 29–30 April – we love the look of British landscape artist Jason Hicklin’s dusky etchings and Jamie Barnes’ screen prints of buildings (printfest.uk).

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Take mealtimes to new heights with cutlery that looks like functional art. High-street store Anthropologie has taken the trend for brass cutlery a step further with a handmade set in brass and bone featuring pretty, feminine detailing (above, £38 for a five-piece set; anthropologie.com). Topping the list in terms of luxury is Italian designer and architect Roberto Baciocchi’s gem-like ‘Meteorite’ range (above), available at Nilufar Gallery, with semi-precious stone handles (price upon request; nilufar.com). Finally, Valerie Objects worked with a host of designers on its new cutlery ranges. We love Muller Van Severen’s colourful set (above) and the simple pieces by Maarten Baas (right, £211 for a 16-piece set; valerieobjects.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

The Edition Shop British artist and art historian Sarah Borrett set up this beautifully curated art-selling website after taking a sabbatical from pattern designing. The premise was simple: ‘Every work would be exclusive to The Edition and would be sold unframed, raw, in its pure state – possibly with a few artists’ splodges on the reverse!’ All had to retail at less than £200; and The Edition would take a 25 per cent commission, meaning the artist receives the majority. This criteria arose from Borrett’s experiences of selling her own work: ‘I didn’t enjoy that, when buying through a gallery, the customer was paying more than I would sell it to them for myself. Often paying extra for a frame.’ Current highlights on the website include the Chasing the Silver Dawn linocut by Melvyn Evans (1, £175) and Bottles by Kate Borrett (2, £75; theeditionshop.co.uk).


Style | N E W S

INSIDER GUIDE LONDON CRAFT WEEK THREE MORE REASONS TO VISIT LONDON CRAFT WEEK G O B E H I N D T H E S C E N E S Mulberry’s

craftspeople will be bringing tools from their Somerset leatherworking factories to its Kensington showroom, while haute jeweller Asprey is hosting a porcelain painter and glass carver Jonathan Harris in its flagship London store. See a Danish master silversmith on the Georg Jensen shop floor on Mount Street and watch weavers work their magic at Carl Hansen & Søn’s Clerkenwell showroom.

The New Craftsmen, a shop and gallery in London’s Mayfair best known for bringing fresh design talent to the fore, will host the first solo show for young artist Leah Jensen, who makes intricate hand-carved ceramic and burnt wood vessels. Jensen has spent the past year preparing a set of six new pieces in stoneware, terracotta, porcelain and burnt wood. The collection references Renaissance works from the National Portrait Gallery, including Jan van Eyck’s captivating The Arnolfini Portrait

T RY B E F O R E Y O U B U Y Book dinner at Spring

Leah Jensen’s vessels are intricate and abstract versions of treasured artworks

restaurant at Somerset House, London, which will offer a Nordic menu during Craft Week served on stoneware and porcelain plates by Danish designermaker Christine Roland. Or head to new Veniceinspired restaurant Veneta in London’s St James’s to sip out of specially crafted Murano glass vessels.

and masterpieces by Botticelli and da Rimini. The technique Jensen has developed to make the vessels is incredibly intricate: she applies small reproductions of chosen paintings to the unfired clay vessel, pinning the focal points of the artwork into the clay, and then carving around the patterns left behind by the pin points. The result, which can take up to 40 hours to achieve, is a rich translation of the paintings in an abstracted 3D form. Visit the show to get a closer look at this detailed work. 3 May–16 June (thenewcraftsmen.com). 46 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

TA L K I T U P Listen to interior designer Rose

Uniacke, the doyenne of mixing antique pieces with contemporary, talk to wallpaper historian Allyson McDermott about the reasons for reviving some of the most iconic hand-printed wallpapers from the 20th century; or hear about the making of the Shard with Renzo Piano Buildings architect Joost Moolhuijzen. Finally, clever curtain maker Nest Design will be talking an audience through the blinds, curtains and wall-hangings it has created for Blacks club in Soho: book now to secure your place. Head to londoncraftweek.com for all the details

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

Now in its third year, London Craft Week is a feast of talks, events and exhibitions highlighting the vanguard of the maker scene today. We take a closer look at one show not to be missed (3–7 May; londoncraftweek.com)


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

STAIRWAYS Ascend to new style heights with a statement staircase. Here are six ideas and all the know-how you need 1 PA I N T I N G A N D S TA I N I N G The most straightforward way to update stairs ‘Preparation is key to a great finish,’ says John Hague at Holman Specialist Paints (holmanpaints.co.uk). First use a cleaner or degreaser, then fill any cracks in the woodwork with good-quality filler and sand to a level finish. If the existing paint is peeling, it’s best to sand back to bare wood and start again. Floor stains (used on these treads, right, by Studio Niels) will enhance the natural grain of timber; a second coat will darken the shade. Always seal with a protective lacquer. Alternatively, use a primer then cover with a specialist floor paint, as in this pale-blue project by stylist Tessa Hop (below). Semi-gloss is easier to keep clean, while a satin finish is perfect for a low-key look.

2 L AY I N G C A R P E T WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: SERGE TECHNAU, TESSA HOP

Carpet helps to create a warm welcome, as well as a strong visual impact ‘The staircase is the ultimate high traffic area, so choose a quality 80 per cent wool, 20 per cent nylon blend, which is hardwearing and also stain resistant,’ says Rupert Anton at The Carpet Foundation (carpetfoundation.com). ‘Opt for a twist pile rather than a loop, which is more slippery and can open up when it’s bent over the nose of the stair. Also, be sure to use a good underlay over both the tread and the riser to reduce wear.’ In terms of colour, darker shades will be more forgiving, but bear in mind that a hallway is somewhere you can use a bold pattern that might overwhelm in other parts of the home – such as this ‘Cube’ design by Ben Pentreath (right; £98 per square metre, Alternative Flooring; alternativeflooring.com). It’s also possible to have carpet bound to create a runner, or choose a readymade flat weave design. These tend to be supple, so are easy to fit. When buying a runner, purchase a few more inches in length than you require and tuck the excess under at the bottom – when it starts to wear, shift it up to help prolong its life. ➤

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DESIGN DETAILS: STAIRWAYS 3 S TA R T I N G F R O M S C R AT C H Completely replacing a staircase is a big job, similar to knocking down a structural wall. Do your research before you start If your existing stairs are unsound, badly positioned, or they hinder the flow of light through the house, a new flight may be the best option. Remember that unless you have a very modern or open-plan home, you will almost certainly be constrained to the footprint of the original stairs. Always consult an architect or a specialist company before making any changes, as it’s critical that the flight fits both proportionally and stylistically. Wood is the most commonly used material for stairs as it’s good looking and flexible: even a very inexpensive plywood can be used to great effect, as shown in this project (right) in London by architect Larissa Johnston. Metal is strong and, with perforated and mesh versions available, it has the potential to allow light in. It does create a hard, industrial aesthetic, though, which may or may not suit the rest of your home. A combination of the two – wood and metal – is a very common approach. Glass stairs are beautiful, and will flood your home with light, but they are expensive to build. If budget is an issue, a glass balustrade with minimal fixings may be a better option.

4 S P I R A L S TA I R C A S E S Helix-like staircases make a great design feature; their small footprint means they are useful for accessing loft rooms

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: RORY GARDINER, TOM FALLON/RETROUVIUS

‘Traditionally made from cast iron, these days many spiral stairways are cast aluminium, which offers the same strength but is one third of the weight,’ says Antonia Harding at British Spirals and Castings (britishsc.co.uk). ‘This means they require no additional supports or structural engineering costs.’ Spiral stairways can also be made using timber (below).

5 C A N T I L E V E R E D S TA I RWAY S Appearing to hang in mid-air without support, these can look stunning, but are a feat of engineering Cantilevered stairways like this one by Super Future Design (above) require an incredibly strong supporting wall. You will need a balustrade in order to comply with UK regulations (see Follow the Rules, overleaf), but using glass can help to maintain the weightless look. ➤

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DESIGN DETAILS: STAIRWAYS

The most visible and tactile parts of a staircase are the treads and handrails. Replacing them is an inexpensive way to give your stairs a lift ‘Matching treads to an existing floor can look really smart and gives a lot of bang for your buck,’ says Vanessa Garrett at Broadleaf Timber (broadleaftimber.com). ‘From an installation perspective it’s straightforward, and can be done by most carpenters rather than an expert joiner.’ Oak (used in this house by Lithuanian architecture firm Dizaino Virtuve, right) is a good choice as it is hardwearing. For a more contemporary look, spindles can be replaced with metal tubing, as in this project by Taktik Design (below). It’s also possible to update stairs with cladding; most modern homes have concrete stairs, which are ideal for resurfacing. Try timber, tiles or a material such as Trespa, a laminate board available in many finishes.

FOLLOW THE RULES The regulations you need to know to make your staircase legal and safe ● Stairs must comply with Part K building regulations, which state that in a domestic property, the pitch of a staircase can be no more than 42 degrees. The only exception to this rule is if the flight is an original staircase in a listed building, or if you are installing an alternate-tread staircase – their pitch can be up to 65 degrees, but there are restrictions as to where you can use them. ● The minimum height that a ceiling can be above a staircase is two metres, and the maximum number of steps in a new flight is 16 before the staircase needs to change direction. Original period staircases can be longer than this.

● Flights should have a handrail on at least one side if they are less than one metre wide (example by architecture firm Edgley Design, above), and on both sides if they are wider. ● Spindles should be no more than ten centimetres apart, or the balustrade can be made from a solid material. If the risers (the vertical part of each step) are open, the maximum the gap can be between each is also ten centimetres. E D

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WORDS: CLAUDI BAILLIE PICTURES: CATHERINE CANAC-MARQUIS, KERNIUS ULIUKONIS, JACK HOBHOUSE

6 REPLACING TREADS AND HANDRAILS


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D E C O R AT O R I N D E X ALEXANDER E VA N G E L O U

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their work and ask them to share their styling tips

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURE: EMILY ANDREWS

Who is he? A talented product design graduate from Middlesex University, Alexander Evangelou began his career concentrating on bespoke joinery and furniture, before being snapped up by Martin Brudnizki Design Studio. There he met James Waterworth and in 2011, when approached to design modern fish-and-chip shop Kerbisher & Malt in London, the duo set up Alexander Waterworth Interiors (Waterworth has since left the firm). The studio has garnered a reputation for residential and commercial projects, counts the Soho House Group and Selfridges as previous clients, and has offices in London and New York. What’s his style? One fundamental element to any project, says Evangelou, is the integration of natural materials with reclaimed, vintage pieces (see his design for a private home in Italy, right) to bring ‘depth, warmth and a story to a space’. Influences include Christian Liaigre and Axel Vervoordt for their ‘clean meets vintage’ look. ‘I love sharp design, but we’re equally fond of rustic, classic styles too. I think we combine the two very well. There was a period when projects favoured mid-century Danish furniture, but more recently I’ve been exploring ‘sleek industrial and contemporary modern routes’ and mixing metal finishes – read Evangelou’s expert tips on using metallic finishes overleaf. Key projects? The award-winning, Michelin-starred The Musket Room restaurant in New York (below), which has an interior that combines raw materials, exposed brick and walnut timber, cemented the studio’s presence in the US.

‘I love sharp design, but we’re equally fond of rustic, classic styles too. I think we combine the two well. Clean meets vintage’ This year, it has completed stunning new London restaurant Luca (step inside on p228) and Gunter Seeger’s eponymous restaurant in New York, where traditional architectural details form the backdrop to elegant furniture and personal art pieces. ‘We proposed a concept of luxury with a sense of honesty and comfort,’ he says. Evangelou has also been working on a number of private commissions, including a house in Cornwall (left). What is he currently working on? A new tapas wine bar in London, plus a bakery and cocktail bar in Paris. He says ‘The product designer in me absolutely loves bespoke tailored pieces and I work really hard to find craftspeople that share my approach.’ (alexanderwaterworthinteriors.com; @aw_interiors). Turn over for Alexander Evangelou’s advice on metallics ➤ MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 55


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PUSH THE BOUNDARIES Three off-beat art exhibitions that will inspire you to play with colour, shape and pattern at home

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E ALEXANDER EVANGELOU’S GUIDE TO METAL FINISHES

Follow the interior designer’s top tips to add some instant shimmer and shine to your home What metal to pick? There is a so-called rule that you shouldn’t mix metal finishes in a single space, but I challenge this idea. To me, a creative combination produces depth and interest and a real wow-factor. How you combine the metals can really define a space. Bronze, copper and brass will deliver a cosy feel, whereas chrome and polished stainless steel are sleeker and more contemporary. For example, putting polished chrome in a living room is, in my opinion, a clash. In New York restaurant The Musket Room (see previous page), we used aged brass to add warmth to a space that was dominated by exposed brick and concrete walls. How much is too much? For residential projects, I tend to advise using metals sparingly. Keep the effect contained to a piece of furniture or a statement chandelier. Within commercial projects metals can take centre stage, whether that be a metal-clad bar (Kensington Hotel, London, right), a wall, or industrial lighting (Home Slice, London, below right).

C O L O U R ‘Colour in Contextual Play’ is coming to London’s Mazzoleni gallery. Curated by American conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth, it explores a rainbow of colours though the work of modern artists, from Yves Klein to Enrico Castellani (Superficie Gialla, right). 19 May– 28 July (mazzoleniart.com). PAT T E R N Get a fix

of unpredictable pattern at Tate Modern’s exhibition of the late Turkish artist Princess Fahrelnissa Zeid, whose kaleidoscopic graphic paintings resemble a blend of abstract movement graphics and Byzantine mosaics (Resolved Problems, right). 13 June– 8 October (tate.org).

Who do I call for help? A good metal worker is hard to find: when you do, make sure you keep hold of them (search ratedpeople.com for recommended craftspeople in your area). If you want to blow the budget, London studio Based Upon (basedupon.com) produces amazing pieces. I haven’t used it as yet – budgets permitting I will one day – but it has a reputation for real artistry. 56 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum’s enormously cheerful current exhibition, ‘Degas to Picasso: Creating Modernism in France’, charts the stratospheric rise of Modernism. Thanks to Cubist canvasses, Manet’s sage green and violet Mirabelle Plum, and copious colour-saturated graphic compositions (Jacques Villon’s portait of Monsieur Duchamp, above), you are sure to leave with a spring in your step and possibly ideas for clashing prints and ways to be bold with colour at home. Until 7 May (ashmolean.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK, EMMA LOVE PICTURES: SIMON BROWN, DAMIAN RUSSELL

GRAPHICS

Are there any clever alternatives? Yes. I’m a fan of Metall-FX in Hungerford (metall-fx.com), which produces metallic spray paints that can be applied to a huge range of surfaces, including plaster, glass, concrete and plastic – they were used to create the Harrods shop front. The firm specialises in bespoke finishes, so the price is high, but I have used them to create metallic bar fronts and feature walls.


THE POT TERY THROWDOWN Ceramic is the only choice for tableware. It’s beautiful, tactile and – unlike plastic – all natural. But which of the many types is best for you? We take a closer look at what to buy now Words AMY BRADFORD Illustration BABETH LAFON

E A R T H E N WA R E From terracotta tagines to homely pots, this material creates pieces with a sense of tradition and history What is it? Earthenware is made from fine-grained clay that is fired at a low temperature, so it remains porous. ‘The clay is found on river beds,’ explains Dik Delaney, design director at Wedgwood. ‘Wind and water break down rock into clay, adding impurities like iron, which is what makes it brown, orange, or red.’ Earthenware

made from red clay is terracotta; that made from white clay is known as creamware (see Emma Bridgewater’s pottery). When was it invented? It is the earliest form of pottery. ‘Red earthenware has been used in places such as Africa, India and South America for at least 10,000 years,’ says ceramicist Linda Bloomfield, famed for her charming, pastel-coloured pots. How is it made? Clay is dug straight from the ground and is popular with potters as it’s so easy to throw on a wheel. It

requires two firings and glazing to make it waterproof. What about its appearance? Earthenware pots appear sturdy, but are lightweight and prone to chipping. ‘Earthenware is weaker than stoneware and porcelain, so pots are usually made with thicker walls to compensate,’ says Bloomfield. Terracotta is often left plain, but white earthenware is ‘perfect for hand painting,’ says Delaney. What is it best used for? Its porosity makes earthenware the most fragile type of pottery, so it’s not ideal

for anything that gets hard use. ‘It’s not the best choice for tableware – it’s cheap but will chip easily and can look clunky,’ says Richard Brendon, designer of modern British teaware. ‘Traditionally, earthenware was used to make heatproof pots such as Moroccan tagines,’ adds Bloomfield. ‘It’s often used today to make flameproof pieces, but it’s not always dishwasher or microwave safe. That said, it’s insulating and resistant to thermal shock, which is why it’s still used to make Brown Betty teapots.’ ➤

E A RT H E N WA R E

From left Burgundy tagine, £104, Emile Henry (emilehenry.com). ‘Mr & Mrs’ teapot, £80, Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). ‘Indigo Storm’ mug by Faye Toogood, £14.95, 1882 Ltd (1882ltd.com). ‘Blue Italian’ dinner plate, £16.50, Spode (spode.co.uk). ‘Brown Betty’ teapot, £10, David Mellor (davidmellordesign.com). ‘Blue Splatter’ large dish, £79.95; plate, £17.95, both Emma Bridgewater (emmabridgewater.co.uk)

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PORCELAIN Ideal for dinner services, this is delicate yet incredibly practical. An everyday luxury

S T O N E WA R E Simple, but effortlessly charming, this is perfect for serving dishes. Look out for inventive glazes What is it? Coarse-grained clay fired at high heats to make it non-porous. It’s stronger than earthenware, and is vitreous or vitrified, meaning it has a glazed finish (the word vitreous simply means ‘glassy’). Much like earthenware, it is relatively cheap to make. When was it invented? ‘It was developed in China 2,000 years ago when kiln technology improved and higher firing temperatures became possible,’ says ceramicist Linda Bloomfield. ‘Stoneware was also used in 15th-century Germany to make salt-glazed wares, where salt is thrown into the kiln to form a glaze. This technique spread to England, where brown salt-glazed pots became popular.’

PICTURE: GITA PUSNOVAITE

S T O N E WA R E

How is it made? It’s made from clay dug from the ground, and is easy to throw and form by hand. ‘Famed mid-century potter Bernard Leach used it in his pottery in St Ives,’ says Bloomfield. What about its appearance? It’s usually a buff or dark brown colour, and looks rugged and speckled. ‘It is less good for decorating because there is not a white canvas for colour and pattern to sit on,’ says modern British ceramicist Richard Brendon. Instead, it often features reactive glazes: these include speckling agents that react at a high temperature in the kiln, producing mottled effects. What is it best used for? Stoneware withstands thermal shock, which makes it ideal for oven-to-tableware. Its high resistance to breakage makes it a sensible choice for everyday use – Denby crockery, for instance, is famed for its durability.

What is it? We associate porcelain with delicacy, but in fact it is one of the strongest forms of ceramic. Made of white kaolin clay, it is fired at a high temperature and vitrified to make it tough and stain-resistant. When was it invented? ‘In China around 1,000 years ago,’ says potter Linda Bloomfield. ‘Europeans were desperate to discover the formula and German firm Meissen first developed it in the 18th century.’ How is it made? ‘You combine clay washed out from granite rock with the mineral feldspar, flint and water,’ says Bloomfield.

GUIDE

Porcelain is difficult to work with, so tends to be massproduced by slipcasting (where liquid clay is formed in moulds). ‘Since kaolin is the purest form of clay, it lacks some of the impurities that make it malleable and stretchy for studio potters,’ explains Dik Delaney, design director at Wedgwood. What about its appearance? Porcelain has a paste-like quality with a white/grey or white/bluish finish. ‘It can be made very fine for delicate teaware or heavier for casual tableware,’ says Delaney. ‘It’s often decorated, as you can use a variety of glazes, embossing techniques and transfers.’ What is it best used for? Its combination of strength with delicate looks makes it good for tableware. ➤

PORCELAIN

From left ‘Halo’ pie dish, £30; ‘Heritage Pavillion’ mug, £12, both Denby (denby.co.uk). ‘Poeme’ dinner plate, £24; ‘Tourron’ salad bowl, £16, both by Jars Céramistes, Amara (amara.com). ‘Blue Fluted Full Lace’ dish by Arnold Krog, £258.60, Royal Copenhagen (royalcopenhagen.com). ‘TAC’ teapot, £168, Rosenthal (rosenthal.co.uk). ‘1815’ casserole dish, £70, Royal Doulton (royaldoulton.co.uk). ‘Berlin’ mug, £106, Meissen (meissen.com)

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GUIDE

W H AT A B O U T MELAMINE? Love the durability of this material but worried about recent news articles talking about the dangers of plastic? Here, we share the key facts

BONE CHINA Top of wedding gift lists and the most prized of heirlooms, bone china pieces are to be treasured What is it? This type of porcelain is the whitest and strongest of all ceramics. It is made from clay containing 50 per cent bone ash – cow or pig bones are burned to ash and ground to a powder, which is mixed with the clay. The bone makes the china more translucent and less brittle – bone china is 30 per cent stronger than porcelain. When was it invented? ‘It was perfected by Josiah Spode in Stoke-on-Trent in the late

BONE CHINA

18th century,’ says ceramicist Linda Broomfield. ‘Potteries there still use it today.’ How is it made? The manufacturing process is labour intensive. At high firing temperatures the china becomes soft, so each piece requires a setting framework to ensure it retains its shape. These take up a lot of space in the kiln, meaning that bone china is more expensive to make and to buy. What about its appearance? It’s thin and translucent, and, because it is more expensive, often features delicate hand-painted decorations. Wedgwood’s traditional

hand-painted bone china tea sets and Richard Brendon’s contemporary versions are prime examples of this. What is it best used for? Plates and tea sets. ‘I always advise buying bone china or porcelain plates,’ says Bloomfield. ‘They are more resistant to chips and cracks.’ It’s worth noting, though, that glazes on bone china are fired at a lower temperature than with porcelain, which means they are less tough and more easily scratched. For this reason, bone china is likely to be kept for best, but Brendon says it is an investment. ‘If you look after it, it will last forever.’

What is melamine? It is a type of plastic that became widely used for dinnerware and utensils during the late 1950s and 60s. Why should I be concerned? When heated, melamine can release toxins – including BPA (Bisphenol-A), which has possible links to cancer and kidney problems. For this reason melamine dishes are not microwave safe and it’s best to avoid putting them in the dishwasher. Should I stop using it? Not necessarily. Just stick to using it for serving cold food – it’s ideal for picnics. If you’re still worried, switch to using glass or metal bottles and ceramic plates. E D

MELAMINE

From left ‘Willow’ charger, £90, Richard Brendon (richardbrendon.com). ‘Arctic’ jug by Reiko Kaneko, from £19, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Palladian’ cup and saucer, £46; plate, £59, Custhom (custhom.co.uk). ‘White Pearl’ coffee pot by Villeroy & Boch, £99, Harrods (harrods.com).‘Byzance’ plate, £40.83, Wedgwood (wedgwood.com). ‘Vineyard Whale’ tray, £28; ‘Metamorphosis’ plate, £27 for four, both by Thomas Paul Melamine, Magpie (magpieline.com)

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T H E S T O RY O F T H E L I G H T B U L B

Next in our series examining the history of humble household objects, it’s the illuminating tale of the lightbulb We take it as a given, but household lighting has come a long way since families would gather around a single rushlight (a rush stalk coated in flammable grease, which burned for just 20 minutes), a pungent tallow candle (a wick placed in sheeps’ fat), or a precious beeswax candle (the preserve of wealthier households). Here, we track how the lightbulb became a beacon of elegant efficiency.

1 8 0 0 S OIL LAMP, Britain Oil lamps took over from candles in British households. They burnt much brighter, but at a cost: smoke. Chief curator at Historic Royal Palaces Lucy Worsley says the deep hues of Victorian décor replaced light Georgian interiors to help hide the soot stains produced by oil lamps.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: BETTMAN ARCHIVE

1 8 7 9 ELECTRIC BULB, USA It was American inventor Thomas Edison who patented the world’s first successful lightbulb. It was made of a carbonised bamboo filament within a domeshaped glass orb. It started off as the preserve of the rich, as electricity was new and expensive.

2 0 1 4 PLUMEN ‘002’, London The winner of the ELLE Decoration British Design Award for sustainable design upped the style stakes of the eco bulb. One of the world’s first designer low-energy lightbulbs, it’s dimmable and uses 80 per cent less energy than Edison’s original. 2 0 1 4 WOODEN LIGHTBULB, Austria Japanese designer Ryosuke Fukusada created this surreal take on the traditional fixture with Austrian LED specialist Ledon using rokuro, a traditional Japanese lathe-turning technique, to sculpt the super-fine shell from pine.

1 9 0 0 S INCANDESCENT BULB, Britain

2 0 1 6 TALA LED FILAMENT BULB,

The arrival of the National Grid in the 1930s meant there was electric light for all! The common bulb in the 20th century was low-cost and adaptable, yet heinously inefficient – less than 10 per cent of power became light, the rest was released as heat.

Edinburgh Run by a group of Edinburgh University graduates, Tala is a design-led bulb brand that fills the black hole between soonto-be-illegal incandescent filament lightbulbs, whose design we love, and the low-energy LED substitutes, which aren’t as attractive. Tala bulbs emit a 2,200 Kelvin glow, the same as warm candlelight, and for every 200 bulbs sold, ten trees will be planted in England.

2 0 1 2 CRYSTAL BULB, London British designer Lee Broom’s individually hand-blown bulbs are inspired by cut-glass whiskey decanters; they bring the bulb’s form in line with its stellar function. So beautiful that a lampshade is not necessary.

Find out more about these lights, plus where to buy them and more at elledecoration.co.uk MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 65


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H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D K N O L L

The firm that brought Bauhaus style to America, and beyond

From Saarinen’s ‘Womb’ chair to Bertoia’s ‘Diamond’, Knoll has produced many classics 1940s and 50s, the Hans G Knoll Furniture Company produced many innovative, now classic, designs – from Eero Saarinen’s enveloping ‘Womb’ chair to Harry Bertoia’s ‘Diamond’ (read the stories of both at elledecoration.co.uk). In 1948, Mies van der Rohe granted Knoll the exclusive rights to manufacture his ‘Barcelona’ collection. Hans’s tragic death in a car crash in 1955 might have stymied Knoll’s progress. But ever formidable, Florence ran the company until 1965. In 1977, Knoll was bought by Marshall Cogan and Steven Swid and, in 1990, by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Its reputation for creating experimental designs remains key to the brand today (knoll.com). From top ‘Platner’ armchairs by Warren Platner, a ‘Florence Knoll’ sofa and tables by Eero Saarinen. Hans and Florence Knoll. The Knoll store on Madison Avenue, New York. ‘Diamond’ chair by Harry Bertoia. ‘Barcelona’ chairs by Mies van der Rohe

SIX THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT KNOLL

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Florence Knoll studied at the Cranbrook Academy of Art under architect Eliel Saarinen, and became friends with his son Eero. She was also taught by Mies van der Rohe.

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Knoll attracted new fans by placing ads in Vogue and The New Yorker.

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Created by Swiss graphic designer Herbert Matter, one of the brand’s most arresting ads shows a soot-covered chimney sweep lounging in a pristine ‘Womb’ chair (right).

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Knoll’s bestselling designs include Saarinen’s ‘Pedestal’ table, van der Rohe’s ‘Barcelona’ chair and Florence Knoll’s ‘Lounge’ collection.

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Today, Knoll’s CEO is Andrew Cogan (Marshall’s son) and its design director is Benjamin Pardo.

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The firm’s factory in Foligno, Italy, was designed by brothers Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni.

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WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURES: EZIO PRANDINI, KRAUSE JOHANSEN

The success of US furniture brand Knoll can be traced back to the vision of entrepreneur Hans Knoll, who founded it in 1938, and the design flair of his wife Florence, an architect. Hans was the scion of a Stuttgart-based furniture-making family. His forward-looking father Walter espoused the Bauhaus’s love of stripped-down forms, which Hans also embraced. Arriving in New York aged 23, Hans had the brainwave of introducing this look to America, whose taste for modernity had, up until then, been restricted to Art Deco style. During the


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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E ANNA SUI

We ask a style icon to share what they are reading, watching, listening to and more The technicolour rock star of 1990s fashion, American Anna Sui (@annasui) is renowned for her supremely imaginative collections: inspirations range from Victorian cowboys and Mod rockers to surfers and Finnish fabrics. ‘The World of Anna Sui’, a psychedelic celebration of her life and work opens at the Fashion and Textile Museum this month (26 May–1 October; ftm.org). The very first rock song I was conscious of calling my favourite was Wild Horses by The Rolling Stones (5). The band has remained one of my style icons – I invariably incorporate elements of their look into my personal wardrobe, and into my designs. At the moment I’m listening to all of the new psychedelic bands, such as Tame Impala (2). They sound like Cream, or The Beatles, which I love; their song Let It Happen is a current favourite. I used Volcano by psych-rock band Temples at the end of my last fashion show.  2 My go-to song while working on a new collection has, for years, been Just Like Heaven by The Cure. When I’m designing, I like to listen to music that puts me in the right mood, and this track always gets the creative juices flowing.   The book that inspires me is The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis (3). I have an ornate Louis XV style armoire nailed to a wall in my bedroom, and the central door opens to reveal a secret passageway leading to a walk-in closet that is bursting with my collections – like Ali Baba’s cave! Recently I’ve been reading Elsa Schiaparelli: A Biography by Meryle Secrest, and Elsie de Wolfe’s Paris by Charlie Scheips. My latest collection was inspired by their worlds and circle of friends – Christian Bérard, Raoul Dufy, Cecil Beaton, Jean Cocteau, 4 Noël Coward, Marcel Vertès. They truly were the tastemakers of the 20th century. I love how 5

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY

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these personalities all collaborated and supported each other. I wanted to capture the glamour, creative spirit, and camaraderie of that period. The last exhibition I saw was ‘You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970’ at the Victoria and Albert Museum. It captured an enchanted period when everything seemed possible; when there was a feeling of change on the wind. I loved all the rock posters – they are something I personally collect. If I had a free day in London I would revisit Leighton House Museum, which has one of my all-time favourite interiors 3 – especially the shimmering iridescent tile-covered Arab Hall (1). Scenes from the beautiful film The Wings of the Dove starring Helena Bonham Carter were shot there. I can hardly imagine a more inspirational setting. When travelling I always make a beeline for the flea markets. A visit to a flea market is like taking a trip on a magic carpet to an exotic place and time. Recent favourites were those in Moscow and Jakarta (4), and the Ghost Market in Beijing. My next destination? London! I’m in town in May for the opening of the retrospective of my work at the Fashion and Textile Museum (6). I’m very excited about it.  

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In conversation with

Lee Broom As the British boy wonder’s eponymous label turns ten, he talks business, breakthrough moments and why he’ll always remember the advice of his first mentor, Dame Vivienne Westwood Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

Lee Broom’s new collaboration with Wedgwood includes these striking limited-edition monochrome vases

‘I wouldn’t personally describe it like that,’ says Lee Broom, pondering whether he agrees with a newspaper article that introduces his brand’s vibe as ‘Glam Rock’. His answer is a midpoint between twinkle-in-the-eye amusement and PR-perfection – which is much like his designs. They are commercially successful but still manage to contain elements of surprise and, often, wit. ‘That term just conjures up pure 70s to me! Certainly, there is a touch of glamour to my work... but there’s also an edge to it. A rebellious, rocky edge.’ Brand Broom is on a roll: after ten years in business, the 41-yearold can now add a clutch of design gongs, a 25-strong team, his own factory in east London and a box-fresh New York flagship store to his list of creative and commercial achievements. Not to mention masterminding interiors from cosy dives (Soho’s Arts Theatre Club) to Selfridges’ uber-luxe Wonder Room. At the moment he is busy putting together ‘Time Machine’ – a collection of his ‘greatest hits’ from the past decade, all reimagined in pure white and available in limited editions of ten – to be launched in Milan this spring, and a pottery collection created in collaboration with Wedgwood’s archive has just hit the shelves at Harrods. We caught him at his Shoreditch studio for a moment’s reflection before it all kicks off. ➤ MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 71


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LEE BROOM

PICTURES: LUKE HAYES

The brand turning ten has made me look at its life cycle – you notice how the style has developed with each season and year. None of my collections have ever been shy and retiring. I still draw on the lessons I learnt from Dame Vivienne Westwood. She was very kind. I asked for her autograph, after she’d been a judge on the Young Fashion Designer of the Year panel, the year I won, but instead of signing the piece of paper, she wrote her number on it ‘My style has and asked if I’d like to come to see the studio and how the industry works. Hearing her talk developed with in meetings about her passion for the history each season and of art and literature, I was inspired by how she referenced the past to create contemporary year. None of my patterns and designs. collections have My plan had always been to start my own fashion label but, on leaving Central St Martin’s ever been shy college, I could barely afford to eat let alone and retiring’ start a fashion empire. That’s how I ended up in interiors. To get myself through university I went into restaurants asking if they wanted décor advice and offered to make mirror frames, sew curtains or do bits of upholstery. I was into making: my own flat was… well, I look back on it now and Top ‘Crystal’ lights it was probably hideous. I had lots of decoupage, drapes, chandeliers Above Broom with his and vintage pieces. Plus, as a child, I was always drawing pictures ‘Grandfather Clock’ of my dream house. It was usually a John Lautner-style Modernist thing, on a cliff in Los Angeles. Getting the Lee Broom product design business going initially Britain is known for brilliant ideas, but we aren’t so good was a struggle. I self-funded it using the money from four years’ at marketing them and getting the word out internationally. of interior design commissions [with MakiLee, the partnership he For that reason I’m proud of being given the Queen’s Award formed with Japanese college friend Maki Aoki]. It is tough when for Enterprise, specifically for international growth, because I hope we are helping to promote British design [ just 25 per you are unknown. You do have to have a lot of tenacity. Working professionally with my partner [Broom’s long-time cent of Lee Broom sales are to the UK]. Both I as a designer partner Charles Rudgard is the brand’s CEO] is really good, because and the business have a global outlook, but I’m proud of we both play to our strengths. He has his things (finances, distribution, my heritage: I love living in London, this is my home. And we production) and I have mine (the creative side), but we make all manufacture in Britain whenever we can. decisions together. I am not involved with number crunching, but The design industry has changed in that there’s now more it is really important that I understand what’s happening from cross-pollination of ideas. People are more multi-disciplinary a sales perspective – what is selling informs what to produce. than they once were – there are fewer rules, less, ‘you’re a designer, you’re in fashion, you’re an artist.’ Sometimes it’s nice not to have a blank canvas, because I’m so used to that. That’s why I enjoy being commissioned for an interior design project or a collaboration where you receive a brief, such as with Wedgwood. I had fun delving into the Wedgwood archive. Everyone should go – it’s open to the public. ➤

Left The Broom-designed interior of Old Tom & English bar in London’s Soho (now closed) Right Broom’s gallery and retail space in east London, named Electra House

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THE FUTURE CLASSICS Our highlights from the designer’s archive 20 07 ‘E LECTR I C LO U IS’ C HAI R

Broom’s debut collection ‘Neo Neon’ brought traditional furniture up to date using neon lighting. This baroque piece, carved from mahogany, was part of a limited edition of 25 (no longer on sale). 20 09 ‘C A R PETRY’ S I D E BOA R D

‘The Broom Suite’ in The Thief Hotel, Oslo, designed using Broom pieces

‘This earnt us our first ELLE Decoration British Design Award for Product of the Year. I was interested in adapting a Persian rug – a sign of wealth in the West, despite being a Middle Eastern design – to be completely British’ (£8,775).

LEE BROOM

‘I enjoy creating interiors because if products are like instruments, then a room is a symphony’ say, ‘Lee, you’ve got to chill out, you’re not at work’. I am a perfectionist, but I’ve realised you can’t be 100 per cent happy all of the time. The team actually wanted to put the Latin for ‘Never 100% happy’ in neon above my office, as my motto. I think it’s healthy to strive, but you will never get anything done if you expect everything to be perfect all the time. I still aim for 99 per cent, though. My New York store is located in Soho. The Flos, Artemide, Kartell and Foscarini showrooms are all neighbours, so it’s a cool, very interior-design area. The shop is a gorgeous cast-iron building – when it’s dusk the windows glow like a light box on Broome Street, which is the street’s actual name, believe it or not. We’ve been here in our Shoreditch headquarters since 2010, and we’ll stay a while longer – we are growing and happy here. The building has a design history: it’s called Electra House because it was an electro-plating warehouse where they used to plate Corbusier furniture, and then Conran pieces too. Its original owner, now in his 90s, was delighted when he learnt it was a furnituremaker moving in. I do think perhaps us being here was meant to be. leebroom.com; @leebroom E D 74 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

20 09 ‘TI LE’ TABLE L A M P

Broom took British production techniques – in this case, Victorian tiling – and applied them to a new cause. These tiles are from the same factory that produces the London Underground’s (no longer on sale). 2012 ‘C RYSTAL BU LB’

‘This follows my recurring design principle of presenting something familiar in a different way. We combined an industrial lightbulb with a very decorative cut-crystal whisky glass’ (from £135). 2014 ‘G LO BE’ LI G HT

‘We really pushed the boundaries of Carrara marble and found a method to make it fine enough to be luminous in the way that alabaster has been used for centuries. It was a technical achievement’ (£4,850). 2015 ‘HAN G I N G HOOP’ CHAIR

The picture of perfectly balanced simplicity, this design is available in brushed brass or black powder-coated steel; and you can have the cushions covered in Danish brand Kvadrat’s wool (£3,950). 2017 G R AN D FATH E R C LO C K

‘We knew nothing about clocks, but one of my production guys found a retired enthusiast who got excited about this project and helped with the brass cogs and weighted mechanisms. That kind of expertise is like gold dust’ (£40,000).

PICTURE: ARTHUR WOODCROFT

I love surrealism. Not so much paintings, but sculpture and installations. I try to throw a bit of the unexpected into my work where I can. The ‘Carpetry’ sideboard (right) is a bit Surrealist and very modern – interestingly, my mother really loves that piece. She’s got one in her house. She doesn’t like all of my work though! My home is a converted 19th-century fire station in south London, with big doors and original steel girders. The palette is quite muted, because I’m moving prototypes in and out all the time to see how they work in the space and how the light levels affect them; and then the team here are always nicking pieces to go to shoots. Someone nabbed my ‘Hoop’ chair (bottom right) this morning! I enjoy creating interiors because if products are like instruments, a room is a symphony. My dream project is definitely a hotel… That’s the thing I’d still like to tackle. If and when I find myself in a space I’ve designed, my first instinct will be to critique what’s not quite right. It’s an instinct that doesn’t generally make for a comfortable evening. But I am getting better – it used to kind of consume me and my partner would


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

LONDON’S NEW LANDMARK Spanish starchitect Santiago Calatrava, known for his sculptural designs including the recently completed wing-shaped World Trade Centre Transportation Hub in New York City (above right), is to create his first ever UK building. The proposed landmark will be the major star of Greenwich Peninsula, London’s newest district, which is currently being developed by Knight Dragon. Named Peninsula Place, Calatrava’s design will consist of three curved towers housing workspaces, apartments and a hotel, as well as a conservatory and an arcade with a retractable roof. The site will also feature one of the architect’s signature bridges – a latticed steel structure that will connect the complex to a new tube station, The O2 and the River Thames (greenwichpeninsula.co.uk).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: RADU PALICICA, UNIFORM, ALAMY

TIME TO UPGRADE Launched in 2010 by city forum New London Architecture, ‘Don’t Move, Improve!’ is an initiative that rewards the capital’s most innovative home improvements. This year’s winner, Studio 304 Architecture (studio-304.com), was chosen for its Sunken Bath project (left and right) in east London. Referencing the serenity of a Japanese bathhouse, this Victorian property’s side extension consists of a tinted glass cube shaded by larch timber slats. Cement surfaces and elegant brass fixtures give the space a spa feel (newlondonarchitecture.org). Looking for inspiration for your own home improvements? New book Upgrade (£40, Gestalten) can point you in the right direction. The helpful tome explores the architectural tricks for extending and transforming underused spaces. Featured projects include a derelict barn turned into a cosy family living space and an abandoned chapel that’s become a wonderful writer’s nook. Detailed project profiles, pictures and insider tips will give you plenty of ideas.

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ASK AN ARCHITECT NEIL PORTER

This month, we talk to landscape architect Neil Porter. Co-founder of award-winning practice Gustafson Porter + Bowman, he has worked on projects ranging from the innovative Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial fountain in London to the reimagined Cultuurpark Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam

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What inspired you to become a landscape architect? I have always been interested in the connections between art, fashion, products, buildings, people and the spaces they inhabit. As a child I loved visiting old mansions filled with extraordinary objects, or gardens arranged so as to take me on a journey. In hindsight, architecture and then landscape became the vehicles by which I could create and curate those things. How important are green spaces in cities? They’re essential. It’s so important for the public to have places in a hectic urban environment where they can leave their daily lives and routines behind to escape and imagine new possibilities. What does the word ‘home’ mean to you? A home is a sanctuary – a place where one can detach from society, regain energy, reflect and think. It allows you to choose when to engage with the demands of a busy life. What is your favourite room in your house? Our living room early in the morning, watching the sky as the sun rises over our garden. We have managed to make the room and garden one space, with a minimal glass screen and a stone floor that extends through to a fishpond and plants. What has been your favourite project? I have fond memories of working in Paris on the Parc de la Villette with architect Bernard Tschumi in the 1980s. That was when I met Kathryn Gustafson: we set up our joint office in 1997. Of our own body of work, my favourite design is the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain in Hyde Park (1). The project was pioneering: a ring of stone

that comes to life when water enters its textured surface. And it would be great to work on another 4 project like Cultuurpark Westergasfabriek (3 and 5). We turned a polluted site into a place for people. What’s your working process? Mapping, sketching, and making models is all part of my process. I start with a block of clay, shaping it to the topography of the site and then making incisions, hollows and mounds, blending their forms and reworking them as the image of the landscape becomes clear. Is there a building or landscape design in the world that you wish you had created? I loved Peter Zumthor’s 2011 Serpentine pavilion(4). Its minimal dark courtyard was filled with Piet Oudolf’s rich tapestry of plants and lit by the sun.

‘It’s so important in a hectic urban environment that you have places to escape to’ What are you working on now? A new design district in Beijing and cultural buildings and parks in Amsterdam and Rotterdam. I am also designing the interior for a new 56-storey office tower in Hong Kong. The building’s look corresponds to the adjacent public plaza, also designed by us. What is the biggest challenge for landscape architects today? So much is written about the formula for designing sustainable landscapes, but often we find ourselves missing the point and just ticking boxes to satisfy legislation. This distracts from solving real problems. At New Ludgate in London (2), we responded to this challenge by creating a drought-tolerant planting scheme that attracts wildlife on a roof terrace. What’s your favourite plant? I love magnolias. Their characterful branches and green leaves have a subtle exoticism (gp-b.com).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: JASON HAWKES, GUSTAFSON PORTER AND FRANCES CHRISTIE, GETTY, ELLA PORTER, TIMOTHY SOAR

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YOUR NEW SPRING WARDROBE This high-tech device by Swiss appliance manufacturer V-Zug steam-cleans your clothes, meaning they will be perfectly organised and beautifully fresh. Named the ‘Refresh Butler’, it’s essentially a steam chamber that can be elegantly installed into any wardrobe (provided it’s big enough – the unit measures 196x78 centimetres) and gently gets rid of creases and sanitises, killing 99.9 per cent of bacteria while neutralising odours. There’s no need for detergent – just fresh water. Within hours of hanging items in this marvellous machine, they’ll smell like the Alps. No more trips to the dry cleaners. From £14,000 (vzug.co.uk).

CRAFT COFFEE The Nespresso ‘Creatista Plus’ by Sage is a capsule coffee machine that delivers barista-quality results. It makes eight types of coffee, each of which can be adjusted, with settings that even control the texture of the milk froth. Good news for the morning rush – it heats up in just three seconds. £449, AO (ao.com).

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B R E AT H E E A SY With air pollution on the rise – London breached its annual limit for 2017 just five days into the year – it’s no surprise that smart air purifiers are a piece of tech in high demand. The ‘Awair’ collates info on your room’s dust, carbon dioxide and humidity levels, and provides personalised recommendations to help you stay healthy. Made from toxin-free materials, its elegant design features a walnut case. £180, Harrods ( harrods.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: JEPPE SØRENSEN

Buy this Bang & Olufsen’s ‘Beoplay M5’ is a top-quality wireless speaker that looks super stylish, with invisible touch-sensitive controls and a Kvadrat wool-blend cover that can be colour-matched to any interior. It’s well-connected, too, with built-in Bluetooth, Apple AirPlay and Google Chromecast compatibility. £529 (beoplay.com).


And now the colour forecast… ‘Greenery’ is Pantone’s controversial choice for the 2017 colour of the year. But how did that decision come about? We investigate how brands develop their colour trends Words AMY BRADFORD Illustration NICOLA REW

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ast autumn, when international colour authority Pantone announced ‘Greenery’ as its colour of the year for 2017, it was greeted with mixed reactions. Some thought this eye-popping shade, the colour of young leaves, on point: a gesture of optimism in a world director Leatrice Eiseman. New technologies, that looks, for the moment, a little dark. Others materials and even social media help drive the were more circumspect. Yes, green has featured in trend reports for some seasons, but this selection. ‘Greenery’, says Eiseman, was chosen particular green? ELLE Decoration Editor-inas an antidote to modern life and a ‘complex Chief Michelle Ogundehin recently tweeted social and political landscape’. It symbolises that it reminded her of Kermit the frog, and it’s hope and a desire to reconnect with nature. hard to imagine many people wanting to paint Like Pantone, paint company Dulux casts the their walls in amphibiannet wide in its 18-month inspired fluoro brights. process of selecting a new ‘“Denim Drift” is Wouldn’t you rather have colour. A 20-strong panel a more restful shade of pale a calming colour. It’s of ‘international design mint or deep forest? and trend watchers’ the ink we write with; experts The hubbub made us from fields such as graphics, wonder: what prompted the textiles, product design and the jeans we wear’ choice in the first place? architecture gather to debate Colour predictions like Pantone’s are themselves a host of social and visual trends. ‘Design fairs a growing trend, with paint companies including are always a rich source of inspiration,’ says Dulux and Valspar serving up colours of the Rebecca Williamson, the brand’s colour and year in the hope of getting us to redecorate our design trend expert. ‘But the core ingredient is homes. Which colour they choose to back is being able to join the dots, so there’s no substitute determined by various influences. Pantone has for the eyes and ears of our experts.’ The panel’s its own Color Institute that combs the world choice for 2017 is ‘Denim Drift’, a grey-blue that surveying ‘films, art collections and new artists, Williamson describes as ‘timeless and soothing. fashion, all areas of design and popular travel It’s the ink that we write with, the jeans that we destinations, as well as lifestyle trends and wear, the sky that we gaze at and the water that socio-economic conditions,’ says its executive revitalises us. It encourages us to take a fresh look at the foundations of everyday life.’ American paint brand Valspar followed a similar train of thought, but with a very different result. Its colour of the moment, terracotta, is on the spectrum of earthy browns that we looked at last month (see our April 2017 issue). It’s ‘an ancient shade’ that makes us feel ‘warm and ➤

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THE COLOUR FORECAST comforted,’ says brand manager Kasia Wiktorowicz. ‘When the future is uncertain, home becomes a sanctuary. Terracotta is a security blanket for our homes.’ In troubling times, we go back to the basics. It’s not just paint companies that recognise the power of colour in marketing their products. Furniture manufacturers and retailers go through a similar process: John Lewis, for instance, has already chosen its palette for autumn/winter 2018. ‘Colour is the foundation of our collections,’ says head of design Philippa Prinsloo, who explains that the store also has its own colour expert. At Heal’s, palettes are more likely to be driven by in-house research, although upholstery buyer Kris Manalo says he’s ‘fundamentally inspired by nature, fashion, working with the architect Patricia Urquiola, art and travel.’ A sofa designed by Russell Pinch and every one of us has a real belief in colour in the latest spring collection is covered in a healing,’ says Ridolfo. This year’s colours will moss-green velvet that looks like fresh-cut grass be firmly under wraps until the fair opens, but – similar to ‘Greenery’, but the 2016 palette – dark arguably less harsh in tone. mustard yellows and ‘Teal connotes depth greens, And what of the design browns – anticipated the fairs that these retailers and warmth; solace almost universal presence study so closely? Italian nature-inspired shades and calm. It’s a colour of brand Moroso is one of the we’re seeing now. to be drawn towards’ most forward-thinking in As for ELLE Decoration, this arena, showcasing Editor-in-Chief Michelle a focused palette when it launches its collection Ogundehin tipped teal for the top in the at the Milan Furniture Fair each April. Its coming months in her weekly online trend resident colour expert Giulio Ridolfo explains bulletin (elledecoration.co.uk). ‘As an inky that this starts life in a series of workshops held blue-green, this is a hue that connotes both each September when ‘visual arts and the depth and warmth; solace and calm, mixed with general zeitgeist’ are discussed. ‘For many authority. It’s a colour to be drawn towards, years, founder Patrizia Moroso and I have been even enveloped by, and yet it lacks any shouty sense of ‘look-at-me’ pretence. It is elegant, yet strong. In short, it embodies the qualities that we need to see this year from those in positions of power, our supposed leaders.’ Turn the page to learn more about the history of teal. E D

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TEAL PANTONE ® 7715C

This classic, but never staid, blue-green hue is having an interiors moment

It is one of many linguistic oddities that the teal duck is definitely not teal, but chestnut brown. In fact, the bolt of colour to which the species has lent its name is usually hidden away beneath folded wings, only revealed during flight. It is an extraordinary colour though, when it is out for all to see: a rich, iridescent blue green. As a colour term, teal is around a century old. An early reference appeared in the Daily Mail in 1923 advertising jersey frocks in this exotic new shade, and teal has been a quiet success story in fashion ever since. Like navy, it is refined and a little formal, but it lacks the former’s institutional underpinnings. If you’re not careful, navy can make you look like security; in teal, the same suit pushes you to the foreground. Small wonder then that it has been a favourite of women in the public eye, including Michelle Obama and the Duchess of Cambridge.

Teal carries many of these people-pleasing virtues into interiors. It is a classic Art Deco shade, often contrasted with subtle tones of Champagne, orange and metallics. It works in older period spaces too: it has the gravitas to stand up to high Victorian and Georgian ceilings. The architect Eric Parry used it to great effect in the lauded extension he created for the Holburne Museum in Bath: the exterior is clad with blue-green ceramic tiles that recall the verdigris of corroded copper. Those wanting to use teal in their own homes won’t be short on paint options (see below), but if you’re unsure about making a wallsized commitment, it makes for a good accent colour too. It’s popular in ceramics – you can see it in the work of Silvia K, for example – despite the difficulties of mixing the precise ratios of cobalt and chrome to get a teal glaze. And it looks wonderful in fabric form, particularly lightreflecting silks, which recall the feathers for which the colour is named. Paints to try ‘Inchyra Blue’, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com). ‘Maritime Teal’, £19.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk). ‘Owen’s Teal’, £36 for 2.5 litres, V&A Paint (vandapaint.com)

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WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURED: ‘PETAL WATER WALL’ SCULPTURE BY DAVID HARBER PHOTOGRAPHY: CLIVE NICHOLS

Teal is a classic Art Deco shade, modern, but with the gravitas to work in period homes


THE BIG

D E C O R AT I N G HOTLIST

I D E A S A N D I N S P I R AT I O N F O R E V E RY R O O M

#1

THINK PINK AND GREEN This is the hottest colour combination in interiors. But it’s got to be the right shade of dusty pink meets almost-aqua blue-green. Read on for more inspiring ways to work this colour scheme.

PICTURE: MAGNUS MARDING

‘Fiber’ swivel chairs by Muuto, £349 each, Clippings (clippings.com). ‘AAT20’ dining table, £955, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Elevated’ glass vase by Muuto, £89, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Kaleido’ hexagonal tray, from £12, Hay (hay.dk) ➤


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#1 THINK PINK AND GREEN Be inspired to take this colour combo to new heights. Architect Guillermo Santoma threads pinks and greens throughout this Barcelona townhouse (above), applying it to cutouts and ceilings. Try our pick of paints (below) for a similar scheme, or get the look using tiles, as Swedish architect Tekla Evelina Severin has done in this pastel-hued apartment (below). We recommend ‘Prismatics’ tiles by Johnson Tiles in the ‘Willow’ colourway (£26.95 per square metre, Walls and Floors; wallsandfloors.co.uk).

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PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS, TEKLA EVELINA

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1 ‘Bandol Sky’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Konig Colours (konigcolours.co.uk) 2 ‘Provence’ chalk paint, £18.95 for one litre, Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com) 3 ‘French Rose’ emulsion, £40 for 2.5 litres, Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com) 4 ‘Proud Peacock’ emulsion, £24.49 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk)

#2 TOP TIPS FROM T H E DECORATORS MARTIN BRUDNIZKI London-based designer Brudnizki has a wealth of projects under his belt, from luxury homes to exciting new hotel and restaurant openings. In London, check out new restaurant Aquavit, and in New York, stop by The Beekman hotel (mbds.com). 1 Context is king. You have to consider the history of the building, neighbourhood or city the space is located in so that you don’t create a design that stands out for the wrong reasons. 2 The interior has to flow. User experience is the true measure of a design’s success. You need to start with a layout and work down to the most meticulous details: for instance, where the plug socket to charge your phone will be (ensuring that the cable won’t need to stretch). 3 Speaking to tradespeople and suppliers as early as possible is key. Good ones are in high demand. Be as open with them as possible; they are specialists and will guide you through the design and building process. It’s so important to have a good relationship with them. Also, if you’re including bespoke items, be aware that lead times can be long – a beautifully crafted piece of furniture can’t be made overnight. 4 Incorporate hidden and useable storage. For example, a niche in your bathroom shower wall is always handy for storing shampoo and shower gels. 5 Use light on many levels. Elegant lighting always helps to lift a scheme. I would advise having lights at different heights, from table lamps to floor lamps, wall sconces and chandeliers. 6 Don’t be afraid to mix pieces from different periods or design styles. If one person chooses all of the objects, they will still share a design language. 7 Display art in every room, including kitchens and bathrooms. It’s an important and often overlooked component. 8 Invest in materiality. Take care of your materials; an interior should be designed to the last detail. Favourite decorating trend for 2017? I have enjoyed seeing the rise of maximalism. It’s great to see a bolder use of colour and rich, varied selections of fabrics and finishes.

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#3 HANG IT ALL Love a little bedtime reading, but hate a cluttered bedside table? This DIY storage trick, spotted in the home of Swedish stylist Josefin Hååg, offers an elegant solution. You can buy imitation leather straps (which are easier to sew together into a loop) from MacCulloch & Wallis (£2 per metre; macculloch-wallis.co.uk). Secure through a ring – this is the ‘Gym’ hook by Hay (£23, Nest; nest.co.uk) – and fix to the wall. Alternatively, try one of these hip hooks and hang a handsome bag up for instant storage. Brass hooks, £29 for two, Ferm Living (fermliving.com)

‘Stropp’ wall hooks by By Lassen, £45 for two, Amara (amara.co.uk)

‘Curve’ hooks, £14.90 each, Normann Copenhagen (normann-copenhagen.com)

‘Hub’ mirror hook by Umbra, £15, Made in Design (madeindesign.co.uk)

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS, EMILY LAYE/ JOSEFIN HÅÅG, ANDERS HVIID, BJARNI B JACOBSEN

#4 C R A C K

THE COLOUR CODE

Use colour-blocking to clearly categorise your storage – it’s decorating with a practical purpose! An easy start is to paint your wardrobe or cabinet doors in different hues. We love this sugary spectrum by Dulux, created using its (see below, from right) 1 ‘Sicilian Lime’, 2 ‘Pale Peony’, 3 ‘Tea Story’, 4 ‘Chic Lilac’ and 5 ‘Wise Diamond’ paints. All £24.49 for 2.5 litres (dulux.co.uk). 1

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CASE STUDY

CLAY HOUSE, LONDON This inspirational house by Simon Astridge Architecture Workshop is a vision in clay, concrete and plywood. Here, we take a closer look at some of its clever design tricks that you can use in your home (simonastridge.com)

#5 PLAY WITH SCALE One way to add instant impact is to experiment with proportion. In this home, large WBP (water and boil proof ) plywood floorboards accentuate the feeling of spaciousness. You can pick up similar ones from all good builder’s merchants (try builderdepot.co.uk). To create a contrast, the skirting boards are kept short (at just six centimetres high), creating the illusion that the pitched ceiling has extra height.

#6 ADD NOVEL HANDLES Design and make your own cupboard door

#7 PAINT A FRAME Use this smart geometric paint effect to draw attention to a certain part of the room, highlighting a sculptural vignette or even a humble houseplant. Here, the large muted grey circle is painted using a mixture of Clayworks’ ‘Moon’ and ‘Cacao’ top coats (both £20 per square metre; clay-works.com). 94 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

PICTURES: NICHOLAS WORLEY

handles using everyday plumber’s fittings. They can look absolutely refined and brilliantly industrial when added to the right cupboard doors. Head to your nearest hardware store for brass fixings and screws, or check out the vast selection at B&Q (diy.com).


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#8

MIX YOUR MARBLES

We’ve seen it on shop floors and restaurant interiors, and now colourful marble marquetry is the new dream flooring for homes. Lithos Design Primes makes tiles featuring an intricate pattern of triangles in a spectrum of coloured stones (below, £1,202 per square metre; lithosdesign.com). Meanwhile, Italian company Budri produces Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Papiro’ collection, which can be applied to floors, walls and furniture (right, £2,604 per square metre; budri.com). Mimic the look for a fraction of the price with our pick of marble tiles, below.

‘Jet Set’ tile, £12 per sheet, Artisans of Devizes (artisans ofdevizes.com)

#9

‘Beau Monde Audrey’ tiles; £1,854 per sq m, Ann Sacks (annsacks.com)

‘Modello Select Marmi’ tile, from £343 per square metre, Domus (domusgroup.com)

‘Shelter Island’ tiles, £13 per sq m, Fired Earth (firedearth.com)

T H E P LY W O O D U P D AT E

PICTURES: WEDLAKE DIGITAL STUDIO, HERVÉ GOLUZA

Use plywood to create a simple room divider. In this example (right), the new wall doubles as a headboard and hides wardrobe space behind it. A partition wall like this requires building a hollow frame from solid wooden battens and then nailing large sheets of structural plywood to it: you can pick up all necessary supplies from Homebase for around £200 (homebase.co.uk). Want to add some colour? Bright stains are a fantastic way to give this minimal look a fun update (below). Liberon’s ‘Water Based Concentrate Dye’ comes in a range of primary colours (£21.91 for 15ml). Add it to the brand’s ‘Palette Wood Dye’ (from £6.32 for 250ml). Apply the mixture along the grain and, before drying, wipe with a cloth to remove any excess and ensure an even finish (liberon.co.uk).

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#10 MAKE DOORS DISAPPEAR

PICTURES: MICHAEL DE PASQUALE AND MARTINA MAFFINI/CORA VOHWINKEL, PHOTOFOYER, CHRISTOPHER MORRISON

The secret to a room with a sleek, modern look is to treat your doors as part of the walls. Simply extend whatever paint treatment, wallpaper or panelling is on the walls across your doors. And, importantly, do away with any sort of casing or architrave so that the outline of the door is precisely flush with the rest of the wall – no more fussy painted woodwork! We love this camouflaged look and trust us, it will make your rooms feel bigger.

#11 FOUR OF THE BEST HANDLES Concealing your doors doesn’t mean you have to do away with all ornamentation. Add one of these high-street knobs and handles to yours. They are an easy way to update existing doors, too.

‘Octagonal Knob’, £8, Anthropologie (anthropologie.co.uk)

‘Mini Balls’ ball, £13, Superfront (superfront.com)

‘Tosterup’ handles, £11 for two, Ikea (ikea.com)

Leather and gold drawer pulls, £5 for two, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com)

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#12

#13 C R E AT E

Give your home an instant pattern hit with these ‘peel-and-stick’ tiles by Aussie brand Quercus & Co (right, from £13.59 for 16 tiles; quercusandco.com). An even easier option – because you don’t have to apply the tiles individually – is Limelace’s heat- and water-resistant wallpaper, which is perfect for splashbacks (above, £110 for a roll; limelace.co.uk).

Take inspiration from these tiled shower shelves and turn an alcove or cubby hole into a design feature. We love the contrast of the black hexagonal tiles – try ‘Geometric’ by Fired Earth for similar (£129 per square metre; firedearth.com) – against the wall of white. If your shelves are attracting attention, make sure you keep clutter to a minimum – only display your most prized possessions.

THE EASY TILE ALTERNATIVE

CONTRAST

#14 Superb news: this dark and sultry flooring is the easyto-purchase result of a collaboration between Diesel Living and Italian flooring specialist Berti. Named ‘Shadow’, the parquet oak has been carefully stained to achieve a faded ombré effect. We adore how the edges appear to almost glow. £87 per square metre (berti.net).

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PICTURES: ADAM JONES, BRITTANY WHEELER

FA L L I N L O V E WITH OMBRÉ FLOORING


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#16 TOP TIPS FROM T H E DECORATORS DANIEL HOPWOOD

#15

HANG LIGHTING LOW

PICTURES: ANDREW BEASLEY, PHIL SHARP, ALEXANDER DZIVNEL/NORDES DESIGN

Desire low-hung pendant lights, but not keen on making permanent wiring adjustments? Wire your fitting into an existing ceiling rose then sling the flex across the ceiling to create an artful display, using hooks to hold the lights in position. To do this, you’ll need a ceiling rose with multiple outlets, long lighting flex – no need to stick to black! – and a pair of hooks. You can buy screw-in cup hooks for around £1, but it’s important to check the maximum weight they can hold: if you’re planning to hang a heavy shade, a stronger hook with a metal plate is a safer option. Here are three places that sell all the kit.

Nook London Its neat ‘Industrial Ceiling Hooks’ (above, from £8) can hold up to ten kilograms. Nook also sells colourful cabling by the metre (nooklondon.com).

Urban Cottage Industries Stylish multiple-outlet ceiling roses (above, from £26) and pick-and-mix fixtures and flexes (urbancottage industries.com).

Screwfix Perfect for a low-cost look – a pack of ten cup hooks costs £1.19 and there are plenty of budget-friendly cable options, too (screwfix.com).

With a thriving interior design practice since 1993, Hopwood draws on the skills of a wide range of craftspeople to achieve his highoctane, colour-soaked interiors (danielhopwood.com). 1 Mood is a must. The first thing that should be evident when entering a completed room is its mood, be it bright and sparkling or sombre and plush. Defining what the room is used for and when it is used helps in getting that feeling right. 2 Find your style. Many people rely on themes when putting a room scheme together, but doing so will never achieve anything that is individualistic. Instead, start by having a look at what you like to wear. Studying how you dress will send you in the right direction for designing your home in a suitable style. 3 The space should tell a story. Display collections, introduce old pieces and don’t be obsessed with having everything matching. Individual rooms should have their intrinsic personality, but do ensure that there are links between your spaces, such as a colour palette that is turned up or down throughout the house. 4 Get out there. Go and have a look at beautiful shops, hotels, theatres, art galleries, fashion. It’s out there for you. By being inspired, you will create something more special. 5 Have at least three reasons why each decision has been made. Also, avoid asking too many people their opinion, as it will only dilute your concept. 6 The fashion designer Coco Chanel once said, ‘Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take at least one thing off’ It’s the same with interiors, overdressing a room shows a lack of confidence and is even a sign of panic. Less is more. 7 Be strategic. When placing objects such as paintings or vases, use them to distract from an ugly corner or to stretch the eye to make a room feel bigger. 8 Bring in an element of surprise. Stylish rooms are never boring because they have something that is unexpected, be it a little kitsch or some bright colours in an otherwise neutral room. Favourite decorating trend for 2017? A 1970s disco look is on its way. There will be onyx, gold, high lacquers. We’ll also see aqua, emerald green and dusty pink. The disco diva of this trend is French fashion maestro Emanuel Ungaro, but he doesn’t come cheap.

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#17

THE STRIPE IS RIGHT

PICTURE: ANDERS BERGSTEDT/ENTRANCE

This daring decorating trick can make a bold impact, if you’re brave enough. The key is to opt for wide stripes, though – less pin stripe, more graphic maximalism. Of course, when creating a look like this, precision is key! All of those lines must be poker straight. Or cheat and use a wallpaper like ‘Spalding Stripe’ by Ralph Lauren Home (£54 for a ten-metre roll, John Lewis; johnlewis.com).

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CASE STUDY

URBAN JUNGLE, STOCKHOLM This Swedish apartment is the ideal decorating inspiration for spring, festooned as it is with bold prints and pattern. Here’s how you can imitate its charms at home

#18 SAY IT WITH FLOWERS Splash out on a big, uplifting print in your entrance hall. The one in this apartment is Cole & Son’s ‘Secret Garden’ (£78 for a ten-metre roll, John Lewis; johnlewis.com). It will make arriving home even more of a joy. Plus, using a bold wallpaper such as this in a hallway means you will catch glimpses of it from every other nearby room.

#19 GET GREENHOUSE STYLE Rattan furnishings give this

dining room the feel of a spring garden. Maisons du Monde’s ‘Pitaya’ has a similar look to these chairs (£158; maisonsdumonde.com). Or, splash out on the handmade rattan ‘Salvador’ armchair by Spanish designer Miguel Milá for Aoo Barcelona (£274; aoobarcelona.com).

PICTURES: ANNA FOXOLA/BJURFORS

#20 MIX YOUR PATTERNS Choose mismatched tiles. The muted grey selection on this kitchen splashback adds interest, but doesn’t fight for attention with the statement wallpaper in the corridor. For a similar look try Fired Earth’s ‘Patisserie’ range (from £2.99 per tile; firedearth.com). MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 107


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#22 ROUGH WITH THE SMOOTH Play with texture in your home. We are enchanted by the combination of rugged, exposed brickwork and glossy, white metro tiles in this home. It’s a mix of rough and smooth; order and chaos. And it is incredibly on trend. Pick up simple metro tiles at Topps Tiles (£18.50 per square metre; toppstiles.co.uk). Don’t have an exposed brick wall to play with? Find a selection of 3D wallcoverings that give the illusion of real brickwork at Panel Piedra (stone-panel.co.uk).

#21 TOP TIPS FROM T H E DECORATORS

PICTURES: KRISTOFER JOHNSSON, STEPHAN JULLIARD

JEAN-LOUIS DENIOT The Parisian interior architect and designer creates superbly elegant yet completely liveable interiors. Whether in New York or New Delhi, restrained glamour is his signature style (deniot.com). 1 Paint doors black. For a neutral space, I’d recommend going for grey walls, white trim and black doors. 2 Opt for XXL. Use extra-large rugs not just to cover the floors, but to emphasise the footprint of the room and tie even the most disparate furnishings together. 3 Line your long curtains and drapes. The padding will add sound-proofing, plus if the curtains are nice and long, that will accentuate ceiling height. 4 Use multiple lighting sources. Choose sculptural chandeliers plus reading and floor lamps as accents. Don’t forget table lights, picture lamps and spotlights. Ensuring that one lighting source isn’t stronger than the other makes the room more mysterious. 5 Go large on art. Sculptures and paintings should be disproportionately big to make them appear all the more stately. 6 Use gold accessories generously. Gold catches the light and brings a glimmer into the room. 7 Go dark to emphasise the light. Paint walls in dark shades such as slate grey, emerald green, dark chocolate brown or deep khaki. Next to these hues, everything else will appear much lighter. 8 When in doubt, wallpaper. It will bring personality and texture to the room, not to mention a backdrop for an extra-large mirror. 9 Accessorise in pastel. Add pale touches of colour with cushions and side seating. They’re the easiest things to change if you tire of the shade in time. Favourite decorating trend for 2017? I’m seeing dark finishes with a lot of black and dark brown statement furniture. Also I like the idea of ‘Neo Art Deco’: deep, lush hues of green, yellow and salmon mixed with touches of grey and antique silver and pewter finishes.

#23 T R E AT Y O U R P O O C H Turn empty under-stairs space into a haven for your four-legged friend. It’s a great way to give your pet their own room in the house without compromising on space for you – no promises that the toys will stay in there, though! This classic doghouse look, with a bespoke doorway made from salvaged wood (find a local carpenter at ratedpeople.com), is an especially lovely example. MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 109


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#24 BRING THE OUTSIDE IN

PICTURES: ROBERTO RUIZ/COLOMBOSER BOLI, TOM FALLON

Blur the boundary between inside and out by using a trick as simple as continuing interior tiling out to the terrace, as seen in this project (right) by Barcelona-based Italian architects CaSA (colomboserboli.com) – for similar terracotta tiles try Topps Tiles (toppstiles.co.uk). Or, flip the idea and take exterior features indoors. This cabin by salvage expert Retrouvius (above) is clad in wooden shingles, which also make an appearance on the interior walls (below; retrouvius.com).

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#25 BRIGHT IDEA

PICTURE: ANDY MATTHEWS

Don’t hide the architectural features that make your home special; show them off! Instead of concealing the structural support in their home’s rear extension, architects David Tigg and Rachel Coll of Tigg+Coll (tiggcollarchitects.com) painted it electric red. ‘We exposed the steel beam to form a seam that playfully highlights the width of the room,’ says Tigg. This hue is ‘RAL 3001’, which is actually more typically used as an industrial machinery paint. From £13.99 for a 300ml spray can (ralcolours.co.uk).

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#26

AND FINALLY... EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TILES

To complete our hotlist, we’re shining a spotlight on tiles. They’re a decorating essential, but finding exactly what you’re after can be tricky. Follow our simple guide to the best brands and top buys

BOTTEGA NOVE

SICIS

This Italian company (it’s situated about 40 miles from Venice) is renowned for traditional ceramic and porcelain mosaic tiles in unusual, contemporary styles. Our favourite is ‘Plumage’ (below), a range of beautifully detailed feather-shaped tiles that create a textured effect and can be used both indoors and out. They look especially striking in this verdigris finish. botteganove.it

What’s its USP? Breathtaking innovation with mosaics, whether you’re after wall-to-wall glistening tiles for a wet room, a tiled floor with a built-in pattern, or even a mosaic artwork that recreates a Klimt painting. Did you know? Founded in 1987 by Maurizio Leo Placuzzi, Sicis is the only company to use 80 per cent fine minerals in its mosaics, which enhances their strength, luminosity and colour. The Sicis factory is capable of producing more than 600 shades of tile and works in various materials: glass, marble, semi-precious stones and metals such as gold, silver and platinum. Our top pick ‘Briquet’ (pictured below, from £275 per square metre), an elegant range of white marble designs that allow you to combine mosaics with larger tiles to create a stylish grid pattern. sicis.com

Pictured below ‘Plumage’ tiles, from £345 per square metre

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: MATTEO BALSAMINI

BISAZZA What’s its USP? Glass mosaic tiles for walls and floors, which come in everything from plain colours to ornate mural-style patterns. But more recently it’s branched out into wood. Created in collaboration with Dutch duo Studio Job, and fellow Dutch designers Kiki van Eijk and Edward van Vliet, its wooden parquet comes in many patterns. Our top pick The ‘Cannage’ tiles in ‘Rouge’ (pictured left, £418 per square metre) by Studio Job are a modern take on a classic. bisazza.it MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 115


MUTINA What’s its USP? Modern and minimal textural ceramic tiles featuring innovative graphic patterns that can be combined in different ways to create completely original looks. We’re fans of its beautiful colour combinations. Our top pick London designers Edward Barber & Jay Osgerby’s ‘Puzzle’ tiles (pictured below, from £160 per square metre). Mutina’s website includes an area where you can play around with the tiles to create virtual compositions for your wall or floor. mutina.it

H&E SMITH What’s its USP? H&E Smith is known for Victorian-style tiles with shiny, syrupy glazes and relief patterns. It’s the place to look for tiles that will work on corners – perfect for skirting or dado rails. Our top pick The ‘Period Embossed’ collection (pictured, from £1.87 for a 15-centimetresquare tile in ‘Victorian Grey’), which combines plain coloured tiles with a series of embossed cornices and mouldings. hesmith.co.uk

JOHNSON TILES MADE A MANO Handmade using lavastone from Sicily’s Mount Etna region, this brand’s wall and floor tiles are incredibly tough – they can withstand extremes of both heat and cold. That makes them ideal for fireplace surrounds and outdoor use, as well as in bathrooms and kitchens. madeamano.com Pictured below Mixture of ‘Komon’ and ‘Cristalli’ tiles, from £693 per square metre

What’s its USP? Plain ceramic tiles in all colours, shapes and sizes, including glossy bricks, simple squares and complex parquet-style patterns. Our top pick ‘Prismatics’ (pictured below, from £18.79 per square metre), its signature collection of square, rectangular and hexagonal tiles in a choice of 60 colours. Use its online tool to search for tiles matching your colour scheme. johnson-tiles.co.uk


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B E R T & M AY This British brand made a name for itself selling reclaimed cement tiles from Spain and Morocco, plus its own line of handmade encaustic cement tiles from southern Spain. Even its own contemporary designs, decorated with geometric patterns, are made using traditional methods – pigmented liquid cement is placed into sectioned metal moulds and pressed flat, rather than decoration being applied on top. bertandmay.com Pictured below Reclaimed tiles, from £115 per square metre

PORCELANOSA This Valencian company makes natural wood and stone flooring as well as tiles, but it understands that some customers want the luxurious look without the maintenance. That’s why it created its collections of ceramic and porcelain tiles that are dead ringers for marble and timber, but are much easier to look after. Its ‘PAR-KER’ ceramic parquet tiles mimic the grain of wood, but can be used in bathrooms and kitchens – even in showers and on splashbacks. porcelanosa.com Pictured above ‘PAR-KER Oxford’ tiles, from £108.99 per square metre

FIRED EARTH

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: PIA ULIN

FLORIM What’s its USP? Gloriously large and luxurious porcelain tiles that mimic the look of surfaces from precious marble to rough industrial plaster. The company has six tile brands under its umbrella – including Cedit, which is renowned for its experimentation with materials and its collaborations with design greats, from founder of the Memphis collective Ettore Sottsass to Italian designers Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. Our top pick The beautifully rough finish of Cedit’s ‘Storie’ tiles (above, £92.25 per square metre), designed by Italian design duo Giorgia Zanellato and Daniele Bortotto aka Studio Zanellato Bortotto. The tiles recall the elegance of time-worn plaster walls. florim.it

What’s its USP? It sells everything! From Arts & Crafts tiles designed by Edwardian architect Leslie Green to Dutch delftware tiles, stone and marble floor tiles and a huge range of kitchen and bathroom tiles. It even sells underfloor heating so that perfect marble floor won’t chill your toes. These are our three favourite designs from the current range: 1 ‘Georgica Pond’ marble floor tiles (pictured left, £89.75 per square metre). A striking and unusual white marble with black veins in a scribble-like pattern. 2 ‘Deco Glass’ mirror wall tiles in Pewter (£174.60 per square metre). Art Deco-style rectangular tiles that resemble antiqued (or foxed) glass. Ultra-glam in bathrooms. 3 ‘Pine Flower’ from the ‘Atlas’ collection by Neisha Crosland (from £24.95 per tile). This tile brings Arabian-style opulence to your home and comes in three colourways, including teal with hand-applied gold leaf. firedearth.com MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 117


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E M E RY & C I E What’s its USP? Zelliges: hand-cut tiles made from local earth in Fez, Morocco, that is dried in the sun and glazed in a choice of 41 colours, from neutrals to black. Where can I find its designs? The brand has stores in Brussels and Paris, but Brits in search of Emery & Cie designs should head to reclamation firm Retrouvius in north London, its official UK dealer (retrouvius.com). Did you know? Emery & Cie also sells ironmongery, fabrics, paints and wallpaper. Plus it can make tiles in bespoke colours and sizes. emeryetcie.com Pictured below Zelliges tiles in black, from £112 per square metre

TOP OF THE SHOPS

These do-it-all tile suppliers offer endless choice at a huge range of price points DOMUS This 52-year-old brand has four shops around London and one in Surrey, all stocking a huge variety of tiles by firms from around the world. Ceramic, stone, glass and mosaic tiles are all on offer, as well as its own-brand ‘Modello’ patterned stone tiles. domustiles.co.uk

TOPPS A great all-rounder if you’re on a budget, this retailer has easily searchable online ranges of wall, floor, kitchen and bathroom tiles, as well as all the tools you’ll need for your tiling job. An online tile calculator and room visualiser tool are handy extras. toppstiles.co.uk

WORLD’S END TILES

This Swedish brand not only works with top Scandinavian designers Claesson Koivisto Rune and Mats Theselius on new cement tile patterns, but also updates traditional French and Arabic designs with its distinctively chalky colour palette. All of Marrakech Design’s tiles are individually made from a mix of Portland cement, sand, marble powder and colour pigments, with their slight irregularities part of their charm. marrakechdesign.co.uk Pictured below ‘Angels’ tiles from the ‘Raval’ collection by Mats Theselius, £145 per square metre

WA L L S A N D F L O O R S Everything from traditional hallway tiles to Moroccan styles and natural stone are on offer here. There are also useful blog posts for DIYers, such as ‘how to remove old tiles’ and ‘how to tile around fixtures and fittings’. For bargains, check the clearance section, too. wallsandfloors.co.uk

CRITERION TILES This Fulham showroom is a great place to find reproduction vintage styles, such as Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts tiles and 1970s-style Op Art patterns. Classic flagstones, modern glass bricks and mosaics are also among the highlights. criterion-tiles.co.uk

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WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURE: FELIX FOREST/LIVING INSIDE

MARRAKECH DESIGN

This Battersea tile specialist excels at realistic wood-effect ceramic tiles, concrete designs and unusual mosaics. Of particular note is the ‘Statale 9’ floor range, which contrasts reclaimed concrete with wood-effect porcelain. worldsendtiles.co.uk


Colour abounds in this interior designer’s Stockholm apartment, which eschews a vivid, bold approach in favour of more subtle shades

Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography ANDREA PAPINI Styling SAŠA ANTIC


esigner Amelia Widell’s apartment in Stockholm is a masterclass in introducing layers of colour into the home. In many ways its interior is typically Swedish, with huge windows, wooden floors and white woodwork. But look closer and you’ll see that colour sings throughout, from shots of petrol blue in Amelia’s bedroom to a pale pink velvet sofa and a burgundy armchair in the living room (see previous page). ‘I like saturated colours, but it’s important that they don’t take over,’ says Amelia, who owns furniture brand Melimeli and lives here with her five-year-old daughter Luca. The trick to Amelia’s colour-confident style is that it is set against a neutral backdrop: in the living room, a glass coffee table and a monochrome Berber rug allow the brighter colours to draw the eye. The designer likes to weave her favourite hues into both furnishings and artworks. ‘At the moment I’m totally in love with pink and dark red,’ she says – hence, the pink of the centrepiece sofa is mirrored in the picture above it (which was painted by her grandmother using lipstick and mascara) and on a cushion on the

‘I like saturated colours, but it is important that they don’t take over’ other side of the room. There are injections of red on plants, books, drawings and velvet cushions in the same port wine shade, plus a couple of dark, moody paintings placed on a sideboard. Amelia recently redecorated her bedroom in a strong petrol blue. ‘It’s such a calming colour, and it looks good with the white pieces of furniture,’ she says. Luca’s bedroom and the kitchen are decorated in an earthy shade, a custom-mixed mushroomy hue – Farrow & Ball’s ‘Brassica’ is a perfect match. Dark walls, Amelia explains, also ensure that her pictures and artworks stand out. Most of her art is from friends and family. ‘My advice is to not be scared of arranging them randomly,’ she says. ‘Just put them up there – if they don’t work, it’s not the end of the world.’ Amelia’s style is a charming mix of vintage and contemporary. ‘I love that feeling of not quite being able to place where in the world a home is,’ she enthuses. ‘It’s a sort of international look. And for me, the best thing about my apartment is the wonderful light.’ All the better to show of those elegant colours. melimelihome.se Living area ‘Painted walls can be changed easily to refresh a look, and artwork moved around if it’s not working. Nothing needs to be forever,’ says Amelia. The sideboard behind the sofa (try Ikea for similar) is topped with framed paintings, drawings and photographs, alongside objects such as deer antlers and figurines. These pieces infuse the space with subtle shots of colour Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘Using a simple palette means that you are never overpowered by colour’

Kitchen This muted brown/grey shade – Farrow & Ball’s ‘Brassica’ is a good match – was custom-mixed for the owner. ‘I’ve added an elaborately patterned tiled floor to bring a shock to the scheme [find similar tiles at Otto Tiles]’. The simple table is from Ikea and teamed with two Thonet ‘209’ chairs (available from SCP) and an antique chandelier Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘Consider how neighbouring rooms complement each other, particularly in a small apartment’

This page ‘Earthy, muddy shades are conducive to sleep,’ says Amelia Opposite A vintage sideboard (try The Old Cinema) is used to store shoes Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘Dont be afraid to use strong colour on walls, but ensure it is offset with neutral accessories’

Bedroom ‘I’ve painted my bedroom in Farrow & Ball’s “Stone Blue” and added accents of velvet: the headboard, pouf and bench are upholstered in the same petrol shade,’ says Amelia. The coloured elements are balanced by crisp white bedlinen and an elegant chaise longue Stockist details on p238 E D

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THE NEW PA S T E L S Get set for spring with sugary shades of yellow and blue. Add some contemporary edge with strong shapes and graphic patterns

From left ‘Gradient’ rug, £1,050 per square metre, Front (frontrugs.com). ‘#80’ sofa, from £6,000, Aggestrup (aggestrup.com). ‘Crinkle’ throw, £89, Hay (hay.dk). Grey cushion and white cushion both covered in ‘Cloud’ fabric, £125 per metre, Kirkby Design (kirkbydesign.co.uk). Yellow cushion, from £39, Hay (hay.dk). Artworks from £600 each, Liza Giles (lizagiles.com). ‘Split Light’ rug, £940 per square metre, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com). ‘Stupa’ table, £11,400, Rose Uniacke (roseuniacke.com).

STYLING ASSISTANT: CLAIRE SPIRIT SET BUILDS: LONDON ART MAKERS

Photography JAKE CURTIS Styling LOUISA GREY


Table lamp, £574; ‘Marble Circles’ object, £360, both Kristina Dam (kristinadamstudio.dk). Mirror, £1,900, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Broken Line’ rug, £2,060, Matter (mattermatters.com). ‘Pompidou’ chair, £1,450, Jonathan Adler (uk.jonathanadler.com). Side table, £1,028, Side Gallery Barcelona (side-gallery.com). ‘Mini Crescent’ chandelier, £1,495, Lee Broom (leebroom.com). Walls painted in ‘Ice V’ emulsion, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint and Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Lemon Spirit’ emulsion, £21.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) ➤


THE NEW PASTELS From left ‘Primo Terrazzo Tavolini’ side table, £245, Another Brand (anotherbrand.co.uk). ‘Tulip’ tumbler by Paola C, £22, Elementary (elementarystore.co.uk). ‘Utrecht’ chair, £2,946, Cassina (cassina.com). Cushions by Hay, from £39 each, Bentall’s Kingston (fenwick.co.uk). ‘Contemporary Kilim’ rug, £695, London House Rugs (londonhouserugs.co.uk). Artworks, £700 each, Liza Giles (lizagiles.com). ‘Jacob’ coffee table, £6,415, Minotti (minotti.com). ‘Stargazer’ candleholders, £420 each, Lapicida (lapicida.com). ‘Omaggio a Morandi’ marble object, from £350, Salvatori (salvatori.it). ‘Brixx’ modular sofa system and cushions, from £8,263, Dedon (dedon.de). ‘Bianca’ floor lamp, £594, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Rocket 431’ fabric (as throw), £53 per metre, Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk). ‘Perf’ sideboard by Diesel Living, £1,176, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Le Morandine’ ceramics (four pictured), from £94 each, Sonia Pedrazzini (soniapedrazzini.it). ‘Swoon’ pouf, £504, Lacaze London (lacaze.co.uk). Walls painted in ‘Ice V’ emulsion, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint and Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Lemon Spirit’ emulsion, £21.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) ➤


THE NEW PASTELS From left ‘Pop 3816’ bench, from£573, Vestre (vestre.co.uk). ‘Arc’ dining table, £1,400, Olivia Aspinall Studio (olivia-aspinall.com). ‘Papier Mache’ plate and bowl by Serax, from £18; ‘Blue Lagoon’ plate by Da Terra, £20, all Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). ‘Dimma’ chair, £273, Tingest (tingest.se). ‘Amelia Truss’ grey rug, £5,400, Vanderhurd (vanderhurd.com). ‘Uchiwa’ lounge chair, from £1,039, Hay (hay.dk). Grey cushion covered in ‘Cloud’ fabric, £125 per metre, Kirkby Design (kirkbydesign.co.uk). ‘Mini Clay’ yellow side table by Desalto Spa, from £899, Staffan Tollgärd (tollgard.co.uk). Ceramics, from £320 each, Jode Pankhurst (jodepankhurst.co.uk). ‘Pitch’ pendant lights, £160 each, Vitamin (vitaminliving.com). ‘Swoon’ pouf, £504, Lacaze London (lacaze.co.uk). ‘Jardin Intérieur’ yellow rug, £24,406, La Manufacture Cogolin (manufacturecogolin.com). ‘Stony Point 1972’ wallpaper by The Granchester Pottery, £95 per ten-metre roll, Common Room (commonroom.co). At Sea artworks, £790 each, Zsofia Schweger (zsofiaschweger.com). ‘Quaderna’ bench by Zanotta, £1,806, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). ‘Herringbone’ vase, £225, Phil Cuttance (philcuttance.com). Tote bag, £520, Bao Bao Issey Miyake (isseymiyake.com). Vintage light by Domani Designs, £800, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). Shoes, £350, Issey Miyake x United Nude (isseymiyake.com). Walls painted in ‘Ice V’ emulsion, £42.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint and Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Lemon Spirit’ emulsion, £21.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk) E D


Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography ANDERS SCHØNNEMANN/LIVING INSIDE Styling LENE OSTENFELDT

N AT U R A L INSTINCT

Warm woods, tactile fabrics and dashes of deep green enrich this simple Danish apartment with personality


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he interior of this bright apartment in the Danish town of Holbæk, 65 kilometres from Copenhagen, teams monochromatic simplicity with accent colours inspired by nature – browns, greys and greens. With its warm, natural and highly personal feel, it’s far from the typically sparse Scandinavian style. Take the small, sheltered roof terrace outside the bedroom – an urban oasis that overflows with greenery, and is connected to the home as if it were another room. ‘Nature means a lot to me,’ says the apartment’s owner Lene Ostenfeldt, an all-round creative – stylist, artist, art director, writer and photographer – who bought it a decade ago. She was attracted by the area’s local foodie scene and quiet pace of life. The building is just 200 metres from the town’s harbour – a gateway to surrounding islands, which are home to city dwellers’ summerhouses. The 15-square-metre terrace overlooks Holbæk’s timbered rooftops and a peaceful courtyard. ‘I recharge out there,’ says Lene. ‘I pot plants or read a book, enjoy the sun with a coffee,

THE INTERIOR TEAMS MONOCHROMATIC SIMPLICITY WITH ACCENTS INSPIRED BY NATURE. WITH ITS WARM, PERSONAL FEEL, IT’S FAR FROM TYPICALLY SPARSE SCANDINAVIAN STYLE and the stars at night. It’s a sanctuary.’ She grows bamboo, ferns, ivy, herbs and hydrangeas; there is even a tobacco plant that climbs the brick wall. Inside, Lene has used deep colours to bring some of that calm indoors. In the hall, grey paint stops short of the ceiling to artificially lower it, lending the space more intimacy. In Lene’s spacious office, the lower half of the wall is dark grey to break up the expanses of white, as if it were wood panelling. ‘It highlights the floor and the white woodwork of the doors and windows,’ she says. In the living room she has painted the large bay window in the same shade. It gives it a cosy, cocoon-like feel and, as a result, is Lene’s favourite spot in the house. An adjacent wall is a deep emerald green colour. ‘It’s a north-facing room, with quite a cold light. This shade warms it up nicely,’ says Lene. Throughout the apartment, the furniture is vintage and the worn wood injects a sense of warmth. Lene’s own artworks fill the walls, and her favourite fabric, velvet, covers a number of accessories. There’s a grey velvet daybed in the office (the fabric was once a pair of curtains) and a brown velvet armchair and throw in her bedroom. ‘I love velvet – it’s soft and unpatterned, but so luxurious,’ she says. lenaostenfeldt.dk

Left On the piano sit candlesticks and ceramic vases, with porcelain, wood and marble objects. Find the ‘Claudia’ table light by Dab at Richard’s Lighting Dining area Lena designed the table, which is made from solid oak and has a glass top. The mix of chairs includes Piero Lissoni’s ‘Lizz’ for Kartell, which also produces the white ‘Fly’ pendant light above the table Stockist details on p238 ➤


‘THE LIVING ROOM IS NORTH-FACING, SO PAINTING IT WHITE WOULD ACCENTUATE ITS COLD LIGHT. THE EMERALD GREEN WARMS IT UP NICELY’

Living area The main wall is painted a deep green (Fired Earth’s ‘Malachite’ is similar). The huge artwork is by the homeowner and the wooden display cabinet is an heirloom filled with curiosities such as pinecones collected on holiday. Try Chase & Sorensen for vintage furniture and Ikea for a similar simple coffee table Stockist details on p238 ➤

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D E S I G N D E TA I L MELLOW MONOCHROME

Love black and white, but worried it might look too austere? Follow these tips to warm things up Inject shots of deep colour. Here, there’s an emerald green wall in the living room and pattern behind the kitchen shelves. Use plenty of natural materials, from exposed floorboards to worn vintage wooden furniture. Upholster furniture and accessories in velvet. Use plain fabrics in earthy tones such as burnt orange and hazel brown. Break up tall walls by painting the lower half in a darker shade of paint. This will make a room feel intimate, especially if the ceiling is high. Fill your home with textiles, from sheepskins flung over chairs and sofas to old curtains and tapestry used for upholstery. Add greenery with indoor plants and, where possible, fill available outdoor spaces with as many varieties as you can. A north-facing room needs deep colours to stop it from feeling too bright. Keep lighting cosy.Use table lights and task lamps where possible; only use overhead pendants over a table, to pool the light beneath.

Kitchen The room is light and airy with a simple chequered floor (try Harvey Maria). One wall is coated in blackboard paint (find it at your local DIY store) and the inside of the crockery cabinet is covered in a damask print paper by Designers Guild. For a similar fisherman light, try Original BTC Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘PAINTING THE LOWER HALF OF THE WALLS IN THE OFFICE A DARK GREY HIGHLIGHTS THE FLOOR AND THE WHITE WOODWORK OF THE DOORS AND WINDOWS’

Office In one corner of the room sits a daybed covered in grey velvet (above). The grey task lamp is from Ikea. An industrial shelf (right) displays a collection of Danish pottery, including pieces by Lyngby and Holmegaard. The white pendant light is from a local secondhand store (try SkinflintDesign for similar) and the large task light is Jac Jacobosen’s 1937 ‘L1’ design, available at Glamox Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘I RECHARGE OUT ON THE TERRACE. I POT PLANTS OR READ A BOOK, ENJOY THE MORNING SUN WITH A COFFEE, AND THE STARS AT NIGHT. IT’S A SANCTUARY’

Bedroom Facing the terrace, this is a simply furnished space. The bedspread is covered in velvet Terrace The roof garden is filled with potted plants and herbs. The folding table and chairs are from Ikea Stockist details on p238 E D

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S CH A D OU I M T E

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A bespoke bronze table by Berlin-based designer Stefan Leo is surrounded by original 1950s chairs by Hans J Wegner (try Twentytwentyone for new ones). The wall is clad in brass panels that stand out against the dark parquet oor Stockist details on p238 ➤


et on the banks of the Arno River, this sophisticated Florentine apartment resides in a grand 19th-century former government ministry designed by renowned architect Giuseppe Poggi. Owners Alessandra Tabacchi and Franco Mariotti discovered their new home less than a year ago and spent five months transforming it. They have created a fluid series of spaces that brim with intriguing objects and opulent touches, which are all set against a soft grey backdrop. ‘The mix of modern and vintage is similar in style to that of our gallery,’ says Alessandra, referencing Flair Firenze, the couple’s ‘store-gallery’ located in a 15th-century palazzo nearby. Founded in 1998, the shop showcases a collection of designs from the 1940s through to the 1980s, as well as limited-edition pieces created in collaboration with master artisans. ‘We like to honour the quirks and imperfections of refurbished objects, which bear the marks of human touch over time,’ Alessandra says. This ethos is evident throughout the 140-square-metre apartment, where antique finds and contemporary designs sit side-by-side, and are curated with an appreciation for intricate workmanship, as well as what the couple term ‘noble materials’, such as brass, marble, alabaster and crystal. It is evident from the moment you step into the hallway, where the bespoke parquet floor in dark-stained oak flows directly into the living room. Sleek velvet sofas, an entire wall clad in smoked glass and a striking midcentury cabinet lend luxury to the space. The pièce de résistance? A huge golden wall spanning the length of the dining area. Its angular set of brass panels stretch from floor to ceiling, and conceal double doors that lead into the minimalist kitchen. The brass-clad wall frames a custom-made bronze table by German designer Stefan Leo – the focal point of the dining area – and blue silk drapes the windows, adding a hit of jewel-toned colour. This palette extends to the small sitting room across the corridor, where a topaz-blue velvet armchair sits beside a fireplace clad in jade-green marble. The paint colour used throughout the living spaces was custom-made to match a dark grey hue that the couple had seen used in a Dior store. The restful palette also cocoons the bedroom, where linen wallpaper, plush Italian carpet and an upholstered silk headboard provide softness. ‘We wanted these rooms to be really relaxing, a contrast to the brightness of the living areas,’ says Alessandra. ‘As well as having a sense of individuality, a home has to be easy to live in. The trick is balancing comfort with character.’ flair.it

The custom-made brass wall conceals cupboards (where the couple stash china and glassware), as well as a set of doors that lead into the kitchen beyond: its sleek, dark zebrano wood cabinets are teamed with black gold marble (try Lapicida in the UK) Stockist details on p238 ➤

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D E S I G N D E TA I L W O N D E R WA L L

Alessandra and Franco tell us how they created their home’s golden panelling We had the idea for the brass wall in mind for some time. It lends luxury to the house, but also serves as a large cabinet for our dishes and glassware, and conceals the door that leads through to the kitchen. The wall is made from panels of brass fitted onto wooden doors. It is a bespoke piece that was created by a Florentine artisan. The panels were fixed in place with a special adhesive. They were quite heavy; it was a feat to hold them in place. The brass is untreated. It will develop a patina that will become more beautiful over time.

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The restful grey colour used in the living room was custom-made to match a dark hue spotted in a Dior store

Living room An original ‘Platner’ chair by Knoll marks the entrance to the space from the dining room. A stunning 1967 cabinet by Nerone Patuzzi is the focal point. The sofas are covered in velvet by Dedar Stockist details on p238 ➤


Hallway Olimpia Benini’s abstract artwork from her ‘Russian Roots’ series hangs on a wall of smoked glass. The alabaster lamp and brass console are both part of Flair’s ‘Edition’ range Living room Key pieces in this room include a cosy sofa by Flair covered in Dedar fabric and a soft Turkish rug Stockist details on p238 ➤


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Bathroom ‘Kanawa’ wallpaper by Pierre Frey adds a decorative flourish Bedroom The walls are lined with linen paper by the late textile designer Fanny Aronsen, and the headboard is upholstered in a bright ‘Silk Bird’ fabric by Dedar Stockist details on p238 E D


‘We wanted the bedroom to be really relaxing, a contrast to the brightness of the living areas. The trick is balancing comfort with character’


B E YO N D T H E FO O T H I L L S Crouched beneath the towering hills of Table Mountain National Park, this sleek home’s mix of glass and local wood helps it become part of the landscape

Photography WARREN HEATH Styling SVEN ALBERDING Production ROBYN ALEXANDER/BUREAUX.CO.ZA


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esigned to make the most of its picturesque setting, this South African house is perfect for indoor/outdoor living. Its owners, Niki and Sebastian Prinz, enjoy views of Table Mountain National Park from one vantage point and Camps Bay from the other. The couple, who live with their dogs Tiga and Pepa, bought the house in 2009 and renovated it in 2013 with the aid of architectural practice The Planet Thing. They retained the basic footprint of the building – ‘We didn’t want to cut into the landscape any more than had already been done,’ Niki explains – and created a series of

COMPRISING A SERIES OF FLEXIBLE ROOMS AND LARGE TERRACES, THIS HOME IS PERFECT FOR ITS OWNERS’ OUTDOORSY LIFESTYLE flexible rooms and large terraces that are perfect for their laid-back outdoorsy lifestyle. Sebastian is a dedicated surfer and Niki practices yoga and meditation. A palette of pale wood, glass and concrete lends the space its sense of modernity. The interior balustrades, shutters, decks and wall cladding are constructed using wood from the gum tree (an invasive species that is being culled in the Cape). The living areas are open plan, with high ceilings that create an airy feel. Adding to the sense of spaciousness is the glass wall at the back, through which you can see the mountains. Niki designed the iroko wood kitchen herself: its rawness is cleverly countered with stainless-steel and concrete worktops. The same wood appears upstairs in the bedroom, which has a wraparound private balcony to take in those beautiful views of the coastline.

Kitchen The homeowner designed this iroko wood kitchen herself. She added stainless-steel and concrete worktops to give the room a more functional, industrial feel Living room A knitted pouf (find similar at Habitat) sits beside the red sofa Stockist details on p238 ➤

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A MATERIALS PALETTE OF WOOD, GLASS AND CONCRETE LENDS THE HOUSE ITS SENSE OF MODERNITY


Exterior This house fits beautifully into its surroundings, with wood and concrete blending in with the mountain ranges in the distance. Plus, vast expanses of glass make the most of those views ➤

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THE TIMBER CLADDING IN THE BATHROOM EXTENDS THROUGH THE BEDROOM AND OUT ONTO THE BALCONY


Bedroom The wood cladding in this room and the adjoining en suite bathroom is made from gum tree, an invasive species being culled in the Cape E D

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Entrance Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Vertigo’ wallpaper for Boråstapeter lines one wall, while blue glass panels built into a steel frame hide part of the living room from view Stockist details on p238 ➤


From an 80s-inspired pastel colour scheme to 1950s terrazzo flooring, this recently revamped Turin apartment showcases Modernism at its best Words ALI MORRIS Photography HELENIO BARBETTA/LIVING INSIDE


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sweeping terrazzo floor hints at 1950s modernism, pastel colours on the walls evoke the sprit of the 1980s, and the graphic metal framework that snakes through the entire apartment has a decidedly futuristic feel. This newly renovated Turin home, belonging to Assunta Filareto and Andrea Poli, represents the perfect balance of past, present and future design. The couple commissioned Andrea Marcante and Adelaide Testa of Marcante-Testa/UdA Architects to design the house for them. ‘The palazzo building has an impressive façade, but completely lacked character inside,’ Andrea says. ‘As the apartment had lost its distinctive period features, we had to rewrite its story from scratch.’ The brief was to create a large open-plan living area, two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a laundry, study and a dressing room, all fitted within the 160-square-metre floorplan. The first thing the architects did was to flip the typical arrangement of the rooms. ‘The living room and kitchen are now located in the double-height space that faces the tree-lined courtyard – local building regulations permitted us to enlarge the windows and put in French doors that flood the space with natural light. We moved the bedrooms and bathrooms to the front of the building, facing the street.’ The walls are coloured in a palette of soft pastels. A combination of matt plaster hues and cool greenblue shades accented by brass creates warmth in the BLOCKS OF PASTEL COLOUR AND north-facing living room, while, above the kitchen, A SYSTEM OF LACQUERED STEEL a soft taupe panel is punctuated by a circular blue window that looks through to the laundry FRAMES BREAK UP THE OPEN-PLAN glass room. This colour-blocking is one of several tricks SPACE, CREATING INTIMATE devised by the architects to delineate the space; is the use of lacquered steel frames, which ROOMS AND A VISUAL PATHWAY another are embedded with LED lights and extend along the walls and across the ceiling, morphing into doorways, windows and railings to create pathways through the interior. ‘These devices divide areas and create new perspectives,’ says Andrea. Around the entrance, a series of blue panes of glass are set within the framework to shield the living room from view. The two-toned terrazzo floor further highlights the different zones within the apartment. Its curved design mimics the recurring Dining area The bespoke teak circular geometry found in the form of light fixtures, rugs, mirrors kitchen is inspired by the ‘TL22’ and the pattern on wallpaper. ‘The details that reference the past, table by Franco Albini and Franca such as the terrazzo flooring and plaster frames, appear as if they Helg for Poggi and the ‘Superleggera’ have always been here,’ says Adelaide of the finished design. ‘Other chairs by Gio Ponti for Cassina. elements, like the custom-designed teak kitchen, draw upon the The ‘Saint Louis’ pendant lights are textures and materials of the owner’s existing furnishings – it all a Jaime Hayón design for Ceccotti Stockist details on p238 comes together beautifully.’ marcante-testa.it; uda.it ➤ MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 171


A 1970s console table by Alain Delon for Maison Jansen sits below a maze-like artwork by Italian abstract painter Mario Radice Stockist details on p238 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L PA S T E L PA L E T T E

Architects Andrea and Adelaide tell us about the colour choices and tricks that define this home ● Inspired by the owners’ diverse collection of modern furniture, we chose a palette of mostly pastel colours – the shades are a specific reference to the 1980s aesthetic. ● The paler colours help to reflect light around the north-facing living room. This same trick works in the bedrooms, where daylight is restricted due to the small windows. ● We used a matt finish for the living room and bedrooms, while the bathroom called for a glossy look. ● The paint was applied in blocks of colour as a way of defining each area’s specific function, or to frame an arrangement of furniture. ● All of the paints are from Farrow & Ball. See below for a full list of the colours used (farrow-ball.com).

‘Brinjal’

‘Setting Plaster’

‘Strong White’

‘Cromarty’

‘Oval Room Blue’

‘Dix Blue’

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‘AS THE APARTMENT HAD LOST ITS DISTINCTIVE PERIOD FEATURES, WE HAD TO REWRITE ITS STORY FROM SCRATCH’

Bedroom The bespoke bed is upholstered using Kvadrat fabric and topped with a cover by Italian artist Sergio Perrero (try Caravane for similar). The table is the ‘Cicognino’ by Franco Albini for Cassina Stockist details on p238


Bathroom A‘Shui Comfort’ basin by Ceramica Cielo and tap from Bellosta sit on top of the bespoke MDF cabinet. The ‘Fresnel’ ceiling lights are by Joe Colombo for Oluce Stockist details on p238 E D


B E YO N D R E T R O Love the 80s-inspired colours and Modernist furniture in the Turin apartment? Here’s how to get the look with pieces by our favourite contemporary designers

From left Metal screen by Eileen Gray, £3,316, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘Visioni A’ rug by Patricia Urquiola for CC Tapis, £5,100, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Rimm’ flowerpot by By Lassen, £25, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). Pot plant, £45, N1 Garden Centre (n1gardencentre.co.uk). ‘LC1’ chair by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, £1,776, Cassina (cassina.com). ‘Zig Zag’ marble and onyx coffee table by Patricia Urquiola for Budri, £1,700, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). Rose Peaks print, £80, Lane By Post (lanebypost.com). ‘Perf’ sideboard by Diesel Living, £1,272, Moroso (moroso.it).

STYLING ASSISTANT: GEORGIA LOVERIDGE

Photography OLI DOUGLAS Styling AMANDA SMITH-CORSTON


‘Nyhavn’ vase by Normann Copenhagen, £40, Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). ‘Colour’ tall vase by Scholten & Baijings, £59, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Why Not’ blue box by OYOY, £24; ‘Sculpt’ pink vase by Ferm Living, £49; bowl by Louise Roe, £65, all Couverture & The Garbstore (couvertureandthegarbstore.com). ‘A810’ floor light by Alvar Aalto for Artek, £1,756, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). ‘699 Superleggera’ chair by Giò Ponti, £1,056, Cassina (cassina.com). Walls painted in ‘Pink Ground’, ‘Dix Blue’, ‘Oval Room Blue’ and ‘Dead Salmon’, all £43.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) E D


LIGHT

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Inspired by Instagram, this sleek monochrome interior would not look out of place in Denmark or Norway. In fact, it’s on the other side of the world Words CLAIR OLIVIA WAYMAN Photography COLIN DOSWELL Styling DEB MCLEAN


Dining room Pale woods punctuate the scheme and soften the graphic aesthetic. The ‘4-Dots’ table is by Nomess Copenhagen and the black beech ‘Family’ chairs are by Lina Nordqvist for Design House Stockholm. For similar tableware, try Trouva Stockist details on p238 ➤


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oss Sampieri’s relaxing holiday home has a monochromatic look that is as impactful as any imbued with sweeps of print and paint. The scheme catches the eye, and yet instils a sense of calm that reflects the building’s quiet surroundings in Red Hill, a leafy neighbourhood of Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia. Poss works in a corporate environment and has no creative training, so she researched extensively online before approaching the renovation of this property. ‘I’d often sit up all night until I found what I liked,’ she says. Many of her ideas were gleaned from Scandinavian feeds on Instagram, or interior and travel blogs. ‘I was also inspired by the designs of the retreats created by Danish company Vipp,’ she explains. Poss showed the images to builder George Onnis and they worked out a plan. ‘The design had to be practical. Minimalism is all about functionality and relaxation – clutter is not,’ she says. ‘When you’re on holiday, you don’t want all of the usual paraphernalia around you. A pared-back space creates a sense of serenity.’

‘THE NORDIC MONOTONE LOOK REALLY RESONATES WITH ME. FOR THIS PALETTE TO WORK YOU HAVE TO BALANCE LIGHT AND DARK’ Deb McLean, a local interior designer and stylist, was commissioned to help Poss turn her style choices into a coherent design. The final layout centres around an open-plan living space that includes the kitchen; beyond, there is a hallway that leads to three bedrooms, a laundry room, powder room and bathroom. The crisp white walls and floors are punctuated by blocks of black: the kitchen cabinetry, the partial dividing wall that doubles as log storage, and the sliding stable door leading to the bedrooms. ‘The Nordic monotone look is beautiful and really resonates with me,’ Poss says. ‘For this palette to work, it’s important to balance light with dark. It’s all about proportion.’ Consequently, the interior is predominantly white, with black used as an accent shade. ‘Black is a strong statement, so you don’t need much of it to make an impact.’ Poss and her husband Mark have aptly named their bolthole ‘Nord House’ and they now rent it out to paying guests. But the simple scheme also remains a personal haven for them to retreat to – an antidote to the strains of modern living. nordhouse.com.au; doswellandmclean.com


Living area The central storage wall is painted in ‘Domino’ emulsion by Dulux. Standing beside it is a Corten steel log-storage unit that lends the space a rustic touch of warmth. Steel for Gardens sells similar designs Stockist details on p238 ➤

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Kitchen Matt black tiles by Johnson Tiles give this space a graphic look. British Standard can create similar black cabinetry. In the corner sits Ilse Crawford’s ‘Sinnerlig’ daybed for Ikea. The plant boxes are from Ferm Living Stockist details on p238 ➤


‘BLACK IS A STRONG STATEMENT, SO YOU DON’T NEED MUCH OF IT TO MAKE AN IMPACT’

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D E S I G N D E TA I L NORDIC CHARM

We take a closer look at the finishing touches that channel Scandinavian style into this Australian home Narrative thinking Poss wanted to create an experience inside her home. Consequently, the décor evokes a feeling of stepping inside a Nordic country cabin. She researched her ideas extensively, and created a narrative that was used to brief both her builder and interior designer. Soft not stark The interior is layered with texture, which helps to soften the strong monochromatic aesthetic. Faux furs, draped linen, chunky knits, scatter cushions, rugs and accents of pale woods warm the space. ‘I wanted to make sure the house had character and soul, so I added tongue-and-groove wood panelling to some of the walls – it’s a nod to the modern countrycabin style,’ Poss says. Punctuation marks The black kitchen cabinetry creates a focal point in a predominantly white, open-plan home. To this, Poss has added stainless steel and more wood, which helps to break up any uniformity. The open shelving also creates display areas for ceramics and glassware, which add further colour and interest to the scheme. The final edit Poss loves simplicity, and only introduced furnishings into her home that were deemed essential. The sparse arrangements in each zone of the house add to the feeling of spaciousness throughout, with relaxation key to the aesthetic. ‘I’ve chosen classic, simple pieces that quietly enhance the space rather than demand attention – the overall feel is effortless and unassuming,’ she says.

Living area The walls are painted using ‘White on White’ by Dulux. The ‘Visu’ lounge chair is by Mika Tolvanen for Muuto (available from Skandium). The ‘Drift’ hemp rug by Armadillo & Co is available from Northwood Home Stockist details on p238 ➤


‘THE DESIGN HAD TO BE PRACTICAL. MINIMALISM IS ALL ABOUT FUNCTIONALITY AND RELAXATION’

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Bathroom Black hexagonal tiles are juxtaposed with white ‘Masia’ tiles, both by Equipe Ceramicas (available from Tiles-Direct in the UK). The white ‘Vogue’ bath is available from Living House Bedroom For a similar side table, try Rockett St George. The pendant light references the monochromatic theme (try Heal’s for similar) Stockist details on p238 E D


‘WHEN YOU’RE ON HOLIDAY, YOU DON’T WANT ALL THE USUAL PARAPHERNALIA AROUND YOU. A PAREDBACK SPACE CREATES A SENSE OF SERENITY’


Labourof The restoration of this house in Belgium took four years and plenty of hard work, but the result is the perfect family home

love

Words/styling MARI STRENGHIELM Photography LINA ÖSTLING


This handsome Belgian villa is furnished with a wonderful mix of family heirlooms and ea-market ďŹ nds


Living room A huge sofa (Ikea’s ‘Kivik’ is similar) sits below casement windows in the living room. A faux fur and a throw from South Africa add extra cosiness. Above, the Maria Theresa chandelier injects an air of romanticism (try Classical Chandeliers in the UK). The candlesticks and vase are by Hübsch Stockist details on p238 ➤


T

his handsome century-old house in Brussels is the ideal family abode, surrounded by large gardens that lead to a lofty treehouse and artist’s studio. Home to Alexandra and Maxime Flament, and their three children (Noah, Nina and Enya), it is an astonishing achievement, given that the couple completed much of the renovation work themselves. In just four years they installed a new roof, replaced windows, built their dream kitchen, restored the floorboards and decorated throughout. Each of the four floors in this 400-square-metre villa is tailored to the family’s lifestyle. The basement has a laundry and a playroom; the ground level is a social space where they all hang out and entertain friends, and the kitchen leads directly into the garden, with an outdoor cooking and dining area. Upstairs, the first floor affords the couple breathing space: Alexandra has a sewing room, Maxime an office, and the main bedroom leads to an outdoor terrace. The attic is devoted to Noah, Nina and Enya. Each has their own room, decorated to match their personality. As a florist and interior decorator-turned-painter, who also hosts art workshops for children in her garden studio, Alexandra’s

Each of the four floors in this 400-square-metre villa is tailored to the family’s lifestyle. The ground level is a social space where they hang out and entertain inexhaustible creativity was key to the renovation. ‘I designed the kitchen myself,’ she says. ‘It was impossible to find one that would fit around the crooked walls and strange angles of the room.’ A good friend of the family, Denis Margot, built the cabinetry and Alexandra sourced the tiles for the floor from the Netherlands, after spotting them in a magazine. ‘There are times when you set your heart on something, and you should not give up until you have it,’ she says. Her efforts have proved worthwhile: the patterned design elevates the all-white scheme. The same flooring flows through the hall, and breaks up the expanses of wood that the couple meticulously restored, sanding and oiling the boards to bring them back to life. The home’s furnishings are a wonderful mix of heirlooms and flea-market finds. ‘I can point to every piece and say where it originated from. That’s grandpa’s armchair and there is grandmother’s lamp, the blanket was crocheted by my father’s cousin, Noah’s boat was built by his great-grandfather and so on…’ Alexandra says. ‘It means a lot to me.’ madeby4you.blogspot.com

Opposite An old carpenter’s bench is used as a sideboard and adds a rugged accent to the room (try Original House for similar pieces). The table lamp is Ferruccio Laviani’s ‘Bourgie’ design for Kartell (available from Heal’s in the UK), and Alexandra’s own paintings are arranged above Stockist details on p238 ➤

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‘There are times when you set your heart on something, and you should not give up until you have it’


Kitchen Light floods the room thanks to large windows that wrap around the space’s crooked angles. The light above the island is embellished with bamboo: try Cox & Cox for similar shades. The island is complemented by a clutch of bar stools (John Lewis sells a good selection). Try Tons of Tiles for similar flooring Stockist details on p238 ➤


The patterned floor tiles flow through the hallway, breaking up the expanse of restored wooden floorboards

Hallway The bright white-walled space is enlivened by a swathe of monochrome patterned tiles Bathroom The suite has a vintage feel thanks to dark wooden floors and a pale pink tub. The vintage cabinet is an antique find (try Design Vintage for similar), while the chair is an heirloom Stockist details on p238 ➤


Main bedroom Homeowner Alexandra made the drapes, which complement the restored terrace doors. The ‘Frandsen Ball’ brass pendant light by Benny Frandsen is similar to the light over the bed Stockist details on p238 E D


The ďŹ rst oor affords the homeowners breathing space. Large balcony doors open onto a sunny terrace, away from the busy living areas below


BA T H R O O M TRENDS

INKY DEPTHS Modernise the Art Deco look with black, white and blue, as Italian design duo Dimore Studio has in this bathroom at the Hotel St Marc in Paris. The wall tiles are British brand Fired Earth’s ‘Cinema’ design (£1 per tile; firedearth.com) and the tub is the ‘Diva’ from Devon & Devon (£7,276; devon-devon.com). ➤

Spa-like haven or contemporary wetroom? Bright and bold or clean and crisp? Whatever your style, you’ll find inspiration with our edit of the 12 hottest trends in bathrooms right now

PICTURE: PHILIPPE SERVENT

Words ELIZA HONEY

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

PICTURE: GATKOWSKA KASIA

SPIRIT OF THE FIFTIES The fluted glass walls and brass details in this apartment by interior designer Massimo Adario (massimoadario.com) recall the glamour of the 1950s. Dip into the look with a brass-edged ‘Arcade Three Fold Mirror’ from Victorian Plumbing (£475; victorianplumbing.com) and ‘Rivuletta’ glass from Pearsons Glass (£10.57 for a 30cm-square panel; pearsons-glass.co.uk). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

PICTURE: RICHARD LEWISOHN

WAT E R T I G H T Even the most awkward of spaces can be converted into a serene shower with some clever design tricks. Architecture firm Michaelis Boyd (michaelisboyd.com) created this perfectly fitting cubicle. To get the look, UK-based company Matki makes bespoke glass enclosures (matki.co.uk); keep tiling white to maximise light. ‘Chisai Mosaic’ tiles by Ann Sacks are similar (£157 per square metre; annsacks.com). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

REGAL SPLENDOUR Gold, antiques and traditional wooden panelling make for a most luxurious bathroom. The stand-out item in this space is the ‘Peace’ basin by Corian (£250; corian.uk), which has been mounted in a slab of gem-like stone. The walls are painted in semi-gloss ‘Stonecutter’ by Benjamin Moore (£25 for 940 millilitres; benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

TROPICAL SHOWER

PICTURE: SEAN FENNESSY

How’s this for a view? This bathroom in Cairns, Australia, designed by local studio Jesse Bennett, overlooks the treetops. The interior has been inspired by rainforests – from its custommade rosewood grating to the raindrop-shaped ‘Goccia’ showerhead by Gessi (from £1,356, CP Hart; cphart.com). Curved ‘Dot’ tiles by Kaleseramik continue the natural look (£144 per square metre, Solus Ceramics; solusceramics.com). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

PICTURE: SHANNON MCGRATH

GR APHIC DESIGN The geometric metallic edging of this statement mirror – ‘Haynes’ by Egg Collective (try 1st Dibs; 1stdibs.com) – is reflected in the pattern of these bright ‘Geo_UN_45’ tiles from Entic Designs (£111 per square metre; enticdesigns.com). To add extra drama, interior design studio Hecker Guthrie (heckerguthrie.com) has continued the tiling up onto the skirting. The light pictured here is the ‘Mass’ brass design by &Tradition (£146, Made in Design; madeindesign.co.uk), and the ‘Latis’ basin is by Omvivo (£1,890, 23 Degrees; 23degrees.co.uk) ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

C A L L O F N AT U R E

PICTURE: DIDIER DELMAS

A small space can make a big statement. Designer Rodolphe Parente has covered the walls in this Parisian bathroom with Hermès’ enchanting ‘Jardin D’Osier’ wallpaper for Dedar (£66 per 60-centimetre repeat; homefabricshermes.dedar.com), and then placed fragments of the pattern into a gold frame by French interior designer Élisabeth Garouste. The bronze ‘Milo 360’ tap, ‘Mensola’ shelf and ‘Giotto’ wall hooks are all by CEA (from £297 for wall hooks; ceadesign.it) ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

STE A MY M E TA L L I C S

PICTURE: MARK WILLIAMS, ALAMY

Looking for a more romantic alternative to stainless steel and brass? London design studio Muza Lab (muzalab.com) has used warmer metallic details (think copper and rose gold) in this room at the Belmond Eagle Island Lodge, Botswana. The ‘Brooklyn’ range by The Watermark Collection is similar (thewatermarkcollection.eu). For an equally textural wall finish choose tadelakt – a traditional Moroccan lime plaster that is applied in thick coats and treated with soap to make it completely waterproof. Tadelakt London is a UK supplier (tadelaktlondon.co.uk). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

B E R B E R B AT H I N G

PICTURE: CHRIS WARNES

Bring a softer feel to your bathroom, as shown here, with tactile accessories. Kilim rugs – available at Tigmi Trading (tigmitrading.com) – will add both colour and comfort underfoot, and weathered wood lends a space warmth and character. Find a selection of timber furniture at Driftwood Interiors (driftwoodinteriors.co.uk); Corian’s ‘Delight’ tub is similar to this one (£4,200; corian.uk). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

INDUSTRIAL S TA N D A R D S

PICTURE: JO CHAMBERS

Copper gives a utilitarian look a luxurious glow – and it’s antimicrobial, too, so naturally kills bacteria! Created for a cottage near Bath, Stonewood Design’s (stonewooddesign.co.uk) copper-clad bathroom features bespoke details including perforated pipes that serve as a tap and showerhead. The cement sink is also bespoke, made by Concreative (concreativefloors.co.uk). ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

DA R K A N D STO R MY

PICTURE: KATTY SCHIEBECK

Loosen up a tight grid with a hit of naturally swirling pattern. Here, interior architect Katty Schiebeck has placed a sheet of marbled paper by artist Andere Monjo (£250 per square metre; anderemonjo.com) between two panels of glass to create a unique shower screen. For a similarly graphic effect, use black grouting around ceramic white tiles on the floors and walls. ➤

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Sourcebook | B A T H R O O M S

REFRESHED PA R Q U E T

PICTURE: HEIDI LERKENFELDT/CPH EDITORIAL

Parquet isn’t just for floors. Grey lavastone tiles by Danish brand File Under Pop, arranged in a chevron design, add a subtle elegance to the floors and walls in this bathroom (£415 per square metre; fileunderpop.com). This chalky shade works perfectly with light woods. E D

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HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: KLUNDERBIE

ESCAPE

HOTEL HAYÓN In the lobby of Hotel Barceló Torre de Madrid, the first hotel project designed entirely by Spanish creative Jaime Hayón, stands a four-metre-tall black-and-white bear (here, you can see just his legs!). This sets the tone for the quirky yet luxurious style that continues throughout the five-star, ten-storey hotel. Read on for a grand tour by Hayón himself. ➤


Escape | N E W S

HO T E L H AYÓN Design maestro and native Madrileño Jaime Hayón takes us on an exclusive whistlestop tour of his first ever hotel ‘I’ve never designed a hotel before, and jumped straight in at the deep end by doing one in my home city,’ says Spanish designer Jaime Hayón, who has created the sublime new Hotel Barceló Torre de Madrid. ‘I liked the idea of forming a team with other Spanish architects and I was impressed by their enthusiasm, so I couldn’t say no.’ Here, he talks about his inspiration, Spanish stereotypes and his sense of identity in Madrid. The bear in the middle of the hotel lobby represents Madrid. We’re located in the centre of the city, and the bear is its symbol: it’s striped like a zebra, so it’s surreal and fun. I’m happy and proud of the project. It was a great honour but also a huge challenge, because we’re talking about a 22,000-square-metre five-star hotel with nearly 300 rooms, a pool, bars... it’s got it all. I love Madrid – it’s my city – and this building is an icon. It was the perfect opportunity, although

PICTURES: KLUNDERBIE

‘The hotel owner said to me: “It has to be something else, Jaime. I want to be surprised”’

hugely difficult – but then things that seem perfect usually are. The hotel owner said to me: ‘It has to be something else, Jaime; when I walk in I want to be surprised.’ There was a lot of enthusiasm for doing a hotel with its own style: elegant, clean and different, not at all retro – there are so many of those already. I love being Spanish. The English play around with their stereotypes, so do the French. But here no one uses the flamenco dancer or the bullfighter. And when they do try, yuck! It looks really tacky. Since what I hate tends to inspire me, I said to myself, let’s see if we can do something

stylish with the Spanish identity. If Spain’s value is in its culture, its folklore, let’s interpret it in a fun, interesting, artistic way. That’s why I commissioned the Dutch design duo KlunderBie to create portraits of Spanish archetypes (above and left). I think I have created a true design hotel that has not copied anything, in the same way that Arne Jacobsen built Copenhagen’s SAS Royal Hotel [now called Radisson Blu Royal] in the 1950s. Everything – the lamps, the mirrors, the tables, the rugs – was created for the hotel. It’s one thing to decorate with other people’s furniture and another to design, and to make the furniture to fit the space. I like elegant interiors that really make you feel comfortable. All the bedrooms have soft lighting, a decent table, well-cushioned beds and spacious bathrooms. To achieve that, I went to the experts: brands like Arflex, Parachilna, Cassina, Fritz Hansen, and BD Barcelona. I remember my first EDIDA [ELLE Decoration International Design Award] in 2006 like it was yesterday. I’ve learned a lot since then and I continue learning every day. What really makes me happy, seeing this hotel is that it’s Jaime now, and I like this Jaime more than Jaime a few years ago: he’s more mature, more stable, much more daring. Hotel Barceló Torre de Madrid, Plaza de España 18, 28008 Madrid; double rooms from £144 per night (barcelo.com) MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 227


FIVE-STAR DINING We believe that Luca, a new venture from the team behind Shoreditch’s The Clove Club, might be London’s most beautiful new restaurant. Fans of mid-century design and fresh Italian fare will be jostling one another in pursuit of a reservation at this new jewel in Clerkenwell’s crown, which is located within a Grade II-listed building restored by Alexander Waterworth Interiors (see Decorator Index, p59). We love the dusty pink plaster walls, 1950s Italian-style lights and bar area with dining-carriage style seating booths. There’s also an olive-tree filled orangery, a farmhouse-style kitchen that doubles as a private dining room, and a beautiful garden. Come summer, book a table on the terrace surrounded by lush Virginia creeper (luca.restaurant).


Escape | N E W S

A P R I L I N PA R I S Follow Frank Sinatra’s sage advice and head to the city of lights in spring. Here are four new things to try T R AV E L Making travelling by train more appealing than ever, Eurostar has just unveiled its gorgeous new business-class lounge (top right) at Gare du Nord which, designed by cool architects Softroom on the top floor of the station’s original 19th-century building, is more Parisian apartment than waiting room. The marble fireplaces, luxe velvets and tropical plants cleverly camouflage the mod cons: a copious number of plug sockets and free-to-use wireless chargers. We enjoy the British touches: available-to-buy artworks are curated by London’s Hospital Club; a custom-made tea produced in Cornwall is served by day and evening cocktails dreamed up by the famous London Cocktail Club by night (eurostar.com). S TAY Those seeking out-of-the-ordinary accommodation should look no further than KOTI. Conceived by designer Linda Bergroth, six wooden sleeping cabins have been constructed inside Paris’s Institut Finlandais for guests to enjoy a sense of togetherness and peaceful simplicity after days spent exploring the Parisian streets (kotisleepover.com). R E L A X Not to be missed if you’re visiting the city in April is

the new pop-up treatment rooms from Aussie skincare brand Aesop. The super-tranquil space has stunning interiors by Benjamin Paulin, son of eminent mid-century interior designer Pierre Paulin. Furnishings include both archive pieces and reproduced designs specially created for the project; and the facials are out of this world. 205 rue Saint Honoré (aesop.com). V I S I T See if you can fit in a visit to the Musée Rodin,

which is celebrating 100 years since the sculptor’s death by granting major contemporary artists a carte blanche on which to respond to the figurative master’s body of work. Anselm Kiefer’s striking, never-seen-before creations are on show until 22 October (musee-rodin.fr).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: EMMANUELLE BLANC, GUY MONTAGU-POLLOCK/ARCAID, ANTONIA REEVE, HELEN CATHCART

ARTISTIC REFRESHMENT

The Whitechapel Gallery is an east London jewel – did you know Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ was shown there in 1939 on its first and only trip to Britain? – and this month there are two compelling reasons to visit. Firstly, a retrospective of 20th-century Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi – aka ‘the godfather of Pop Art’ – which includes collages, sculptures (‘Portrait of Richard Rogers’, right) and prints expressing his anti-establishment inclinations (until 14 May). Secondly, the gallery has a new refectory! Run by the founders of Soho restaurant 10 Greek Street, it will be a café serving sandwiches by day and a bar dubbed ‘After Hours’ by night, offering affordable wines, craft beers and charcuterie platters (whitechapel gallery.org). MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 229


Escape | N E W S

L A D OL C E V I T R A

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Alexander von Vegesack, founder of the Vitra Design Museum, invites you to become an artist-in-residence for a week this summer at Domaine de Boisbuchet, a wonderfully romantic 18th-century turretted château in southwest France that he bought 25 years ago. It is here that his non-profit organisation for cultural and agricultural research, CIRECA, runs interdisciplinary workshops that are all about the joy of trialling, testing and making in an unrestricted environment, away from the distractions of city life. Each week, a designer, maker or architect leads a hands-on course in experimenting and building something in the house and grounds. Previous tutors have included Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto and innovative British designer Max Lamb. Highlights of this summer’s programme are British studio Glithero, which is hosting a perfume and vial-making workshop called ‘Ol-Factory’ (19–29 July) in collaboration with New York’s Corning Museum of Glass; and later Austrian duo Mischer’Traxler will lead ‘Motion Made’, an experiment in making art, furniture and installations from human movement (20–26 August). After a long day’s work and play, dinner is served on trestle tables on the lawn under the Pays de la Loire’s starry sky. The £1,103 price includes accommodation in the castle’s outbuildings and all meals, tools and materials (boisbuchet.org).

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GARDENER TO WATCH CALI RAND

This London-based garden designer creates contemporary spaces that extend home comforts into the great outdoors What’s her style? ‘Wild and free’ is how Rand likes to describe the gardens she designs. Indeed, this city gardener’s wild roots come from her upbringing on a farm near Cambridge. Favourite plants Rand’s countrified aesthetic features cottage garden-like mixes of colourful annuals, perennials and shrubs, all heavily layered and none too tidy. Among her favourite varieties – many of them ‘bombproof’, she says – are Geranium Patricia, Fennel, Geum, Thalictrum and Nepeta, not only for their colour, but for their feminine and free character. Rand also has a penchant for box hedges to offer a sense of structure, but even these she prefers slightly overgrown and ‘a little fluffy, like you could go and give them a cuddle’. Inspiration Rand spent years working for London fashion brand Temperley as a textile designer, and she has carried those skills into her gardening: in the end, her work is all a question of layering pattern and colour. Rand’s spaces resemble rooms, Moroccan rugs included. A growing part of her practice is in custom furnishings, designed by Rand and made by local craftspeople. Currently, she’s busy perfecting the design of some new colourful Perspex window boxes for a London shop. Fun fact Rand was once a successful model, walking the runway for brands like Alexander McQueen. Her transformation from model to textile designer to garden designer is inspiring. Having taken an intensive, yearlong course at the English Gardening School, she’s never looked back – a true career-change success story. cali-rand.com

FIVE OF THE BEST BRANDS FOR GARDEN ACCESSORIES

Cali Rand reveals her go-to garden shops and craftspeople Best for antique furniture Garden Art Plus is a source for everything from antique garden benches to old troughs that double as perfect planters (gardenartplus.com). Best for benches Andrew Crace makes benches in a variety of styles from modern to Edwardian at his Hertfordshire shop. From £890 for a chair (andrewcrace.com). Best for textiles Interior designer Peter Dunham makes a weather-resistant version of his ‘Fig Leaf’ pattern (right). £242 per metre, Tissus d’Hélène (tissusdhelene.co.uk). Best for rugs My picks are Sunbury Antiques Market (sunburyantiques.com) and Fez, a shop on Golborne Road, London. Best for pots Belgian studio Atelier Vierkant makes the stunning ‘DM’ pot (right, £450; ateliervierkant.com).


Escape | G A R D E N S

H O U S E H O L D H O R T I C U LT U R E Don’t have a garden, balcony or allotment to tend to? Learn to love the plants in your home (and keep them alive) with Living with Plants (Hardie Grant, £15), a beautiful new book by Sophie Lee, founder of London gardening emporium Geo Fleur. There are chapters on picking the right plants for both your home (according to what light it receives and humidity levels) and life (how often are you home? Would you like herbs to pick or foliage to soften acoustics?). There is also information on tools and techniques, plus step-by-step guides. Want more inspiration? Head to the Royal Horticultural Society’s headquarters on Vincent Square in London for ‘Potted’, an exhibition about beautiful plant pots, past and present. Until 19 May (rhs.org).

WHERE THE PEONIES GROW Visit the world’s biggest collection of peonies in north Lazio, Italy. Centro Botanico Moutan (its name comes from ‘Mu Dan’, the Chinese name for the peony) houses over 650 different varieties – including rare types native to high-altitude Tibet and the Paeonia Suffruticosa, which has been known as ‘the king of flowers’ in China since the Qing Dynasty. Book now, as it’s only open during April and May, when the 250,000 peony stems are in full bloom (centrobotanicomoutan.it).

CHELSEA IN BLOOM There’s no better place in the UK to discover the latest garden trends than the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Head down to see the cream of the crop of the country’s best garden designers and specialist plant nurseries. Here are four not to be missed (23–27 May; rhs.org.uk). ‘ I N L A N D H O M E S : B E N E AT H A M E X I C A N S K Y ’ Garden design newcomer

Manoj Malde of Couture Gardens has created a space inspired by Mexican Pritzker Prizewinning architect Luis Barragán. With walls painted in bright pink and orange, and a bronze wire sculpture of a horse by artist Rupert Till – horses were one the architect’s great obsessions – Malde shows just how lush and vibrant drought-tolerant plants can be. There are plenty of varieties of agaves on display, along with erigeron, cosmos and cleome – many of which can survive in UK gardens. THE SEEDLIP GARDEN

British brand Seedlip, which distils the world’s first herb-derived, calorie-free, nonalcoholic spirits, has called on seasoned designer Dr Catherine MacDonald to create a garden that evokes 17th-century apothecaries. It’s filled with botanicals used in both the new aperitif and ancient medicines.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BRROK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: NAME

‘ A G A R D E N F O R M A G G I E ’ S ’ Sponsored

by law firm Linklaters and designed by Cornwall-based landscape gardener Darren Hawkes, this is a calm sanctuary. Inspired by the belief of Maggie Keswick – co-founder of Maggie’s cancer care centres – that patients need a space to be at ease in, the garden has been designed to be soft and scented. G R E AT PAV I L I O N This venue feels like a walk-in flower encyclopaedia and is a perennial joy, with pedigree plant breeds going head-to-head to win the best-in-class gongs. A highlight is the ‘Delight in the Dark’ display, focusing on plants that excel in shade.

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LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

VASASTAN AND SÖDERMALM, STOCKHOLM Planning a trip to the Swedish capital? Visit our favourite districts – quirky Vasastan and supercool Södermalm Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

PICTURE: GETTY/ISTOCK

THE NEIGHBOURHOODS: VASASTAN AND SÖDERMALM Vasastan is a 35-minute walk from the centre of Stockholm, just beyond the high-end shops and embassies of affluent Östermalm, and is home to the city’s most glorious new hotel as well as its striking public library. Forests, fashion and trendy snacks await you in Södermalm, a large island with a low-key atmosphere just south of Gamla Stan’s 16th-century streets. ➤

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 235


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LIVE LIKE A LOCAL WHERE TO STAY Arts & Crafts townhouse hotel Ett Hem (1) has interiors by Ilse Crawford. Its name means ‘at home’ in Swedish and with only 12 bedrooms, shelves of books and a well-stocked wine cellar to which guests are encouraged to help themselves, honesty box-style, it makes visitors feel more like houseguests. Rooms from £338 per night (Skoldungagatun 2; etthem.se). For a taste of proper Scandi chic, Miss Clara (2), further south, is housed in a former school for girls (hence the name) – note the classic Art Nouveau windows in the bedrooms. Double rooms from £182 per night (Sveavägen 48; missclarahotel.com).

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WINE AND DINE For something special head to Portal (5), a new contemporary, airy tavern dotted with sprigs of eucalyptus (Sankt Eriksplan 1; portalrestaurant.se). Over in Södermalm, Woodstockholm (6) is a furniture shop and bistro that’s extremely popular with locals (Mosebacketorg 9; woodstockholm.com). Follow dinner with a digestif of pumpkin-infused tequila at Haktet (7), a restaurant and bar in a former prison, open until 3am (Hornsgatan 82; haktet.se).

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BREAKFAST AND LUNCH Find excellent toasted pumpkinseed porridge at Café Pascal (3) in Vasastan, which has a stylish interior incorporating unpainted plaster and tabletop ferns (Norrtullsgatan 4; cafepascal.se). Breakfast to go? Take your treats to Södermalm park Lilla Blecktornsparken, where you can enjoy a stroll followed by lunch of pilgrim scallop risotto at Bleck (4) restaurant (Katarina Bangata 68; restaurangbleck.se).

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PICTURES: ALAMY, KRISTOFER JOHNSSON, SPEJA STUDIO

8 CULTURE AND ART The rotund public library (8), designed by Swedish architect Gunnar Asplund, welcomes visitors and is a fine example of the 20th-century ‘Swedish Grace’ style – a stripped-back take on Neoclassicism (biblioteket.stockholm.se). Further north is the former studio and gallery of Swedish figurative sculptor Carl Eldh (9) – a wooden, greenhousestyle building with a garden and café (eldhsatelje.se). SHOP Near Vasastan, head to Carl Malmsten (10) for Swedish folk handicrafts (Strandvägen 5b; malmsten.se) and Design House Stockholm (11) for Stig Lindberg fabrics (Hamngatan 18–20; designhousestockholm.com). On Hornsgaten in Södermalm there’s Blås & Knåda (12), Sweden’s biggest contemporary glass and pottery studio (Hornsgatan 26; blasknada.com) and Brandstationen (13) (The Fire Station), a thoroughly modern-looking antiques shop brimming with succulents (Hornsgatan 64; herrjudit.se). E D

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection BRITISH MADE SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS Are you on a furniture hunt this Easter? Look no further than Willow & Hall's handmade British designs. Ranging from stylish sofa beds with 14cm deep mattress options, to chaises with hidden storage and beautiful, cosy beds. All furniture is made to order by skilled craftsmen in Wiltshire with over 35 years' experience. Designs are available in over 100 fabrics and delivered for free to most of the UK Mainland within around 4-5 weeks. Plus, they offer 14-day free returns on all orders. To explore their range, visit their London showroom, shop online at www. willowandhall.co.uk or call 0845 468 0577. Use code ELLE1617 by 1st June to save an extra 5% off prices already 30% lower than the high street.

Product featured: The Foxham shown in Cotton Pigeon from ÂŁ867 and ÂŁ1,053

BALASAGUN Balasagun, metal solution partner of interior designers and DIY lovers, produces high quality handmade custom table legs, table bases and metal furniture accessories made from steel, brass or stainless steel over 200 in different styles. Since 2013, starting with a little Etsy Store, now they are glad to contribute to projects in over 40 countries. Retail or wholesale, all products are made carefully by hand. Worldwide shipping is available. For more information visit www.balasagun.com.tr or call +90-324-2346719 or mobile +90-5336321989.


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT

EVERY INTERIOR TELLS A STORY Located within sight of Buckingham Palace, Mayfair and Knightsbridge, Belgravia interior boutique hosts unique fabrics, exclusive furnishing and finishes, amazing lights, art pieces and more. Showcasing British and European excellence, our venue is the ideal place to find stylish contemporary collections for both interior and outdoor spaces. Exclusive to the Boutique is Hamilton Conte Paris, a furniture and home accessories brand that draws inspiration from diverse cultural backgrounds and complementary talents. Combining pragmatism and passionate creativity, they do their best to approach craft with originality and warmth. Devoted to artisanal production and attention to detail, the artistic approach takes inspiration from a variety of styles and cultures. Hamilton Conte likes to merge design movements from the 1950s and 1970s, the Americas and Scandinavia, and add a touch of Parisian flair. Each piece in the collection tells a story, and through their ensemble try to create a universe that is distinct to the brand. You can view the collection in London at Belgravia interior boutique, 19 Grosvenor Place, SW1X 7HT. Tel. +44 (0)20 7235 7599. www.bib-london.co.uk

This Spring, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint brings your home to life with a collection of 72 beautiful and wholly natural paints. The colours work as well in modern spaces as period homes, with a palette of unique and unrivalled colours they create extraordinary depth and a response to light which synthetic paints just cannot replicate. Call 01544 388535 or order your complimentary colour chart www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk

J&S RECLAIMED WOOD J&S Reclaimed Wood Custom Furniture of Vancouver, Canada rescues antique lumber from heritage building demolitions and derelict old barns to build quality handmade furniture. The coffee table pictured is made from 101 year old oak timbers with a hand-tooled brass base. www.jsreclaimedwood.com email: contact@jsreclaimedwood.com Call: 778 317 3027.

ARROW & WILD Arrow & Wild, an independent London based studio brings you the Flora Skull Collection. Carefully decorated by hand, these beautiful bones are the perfect addition to your rustic country or bohemian inspired wall decor. For more information visit www.arrowandwild.com or email info@arrowandwild.com


Advertising Feature | S P R I N G

EDIT

RUTH HOLLY

OPEN PLAN LIVING

NEPTUNE WEYBRIDGE

Timeless and perennially popular, Ruth Holly’s distinctive designs take inspiration from the raw beauty outdoors. Featuring earthy tones and organic markings, her designs are flexible in adapting to both traditional and modern interiors, and are a perfect fit for interior trend Hygge.

Bespoke and designer furniture. We specialise in sourcing the finest handcrafted Portuguese furniture from a range of cutting-edge designer brands. High End Bespoke Service by the most skilled craftsmen. London based.

Spring/Summer 2017 - The Collection. Green is the colour that we associate the most with spring. It speaks of new beginnings. It tells us nature is waking up from its winter slumber. It breathes freshness and vitality. We’ve called our new collection The Green Houses. Every design is a crystal clear reflection of the sentiments above.

www.ruthholly.co.uk

ALDGATE HOME Architectural Window Mirrors for display in the Home and Garden. Delivery and Installation service available. We ship Worldwide. View our largest collection by appointment at our Kent showroom.

Tel: 07785 296830 aldgatehome.com shop@aldgatehome.com

NELSON & FORBES Delight someone with a limited edition foundry bronze sculpture from Nelson & Forbes. Choose from a wide range of children and animals, with free express delivery. (Horses shown: £495 each). Call 01442 256290 for your free 120 page colour brochure.

www.nelsonandforbes.co.uk

www.openplanliving.net info@openplanliving.net 07941091352

EXCLUSIVE LIGHTING

www.neptuneweybridge.com info@neptuneweybridge.com

HOLI COW HOME

Exclusive to Tindle, this glass and nickel chandelier is a contemporary spin on a classic style. Its clean and elegant lines make it both simple and stunningly sophisticated. It is also available in smaller and larger versions and as complementary wall lights.

Our stunning, vibrant, minimal-care fabrics & seating are perfect for all aspects of contemporary living. Our fabric is waterproof, fadeproof and ultra resilient - ideal for wherever you want luxury without the fuss. For domestic & contract use. Made In Britain.

www.tindle-lighting.co.uk

holicowhome.com

MAROC TRIBAL The leading online shop for cool and chic vintage Moroccan rugs. Our collection is always authentic and original, and our rare and covetable tribal carpets and textiles are sourced by us in Morocco’s remote Berber villages.

www.maroctribal.com tel 01621782090 info@maroctribal.com

DAVID VILLAGE LIGHTING The new Light Attack Mono 16 Watt LED, warm white with copper finish now available at David Village lighting. All the best lighting brands on line and in our showroom. Artemide, Flos, Foscarini, Louis Poulsen, Moooi, Muuto and many more. Lighting Design Service available.

info@davidvillagelighting.co.uk www.davidvillagelighting.co.uk

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 241


Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

“We bring you the mystique of the East” 07838 142008

www.ottotiles.co.uk

DORGLAZE ® VISION PANEL KITS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

Unique

V I N TAG E RUGS New collection EMILY´S

HOUSE

L O N D O N

Since 2009

E M I LY S H O U S E L O N D O N. C O M 242 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z

* a v a i l a b l e in p o l is h ed wh i te m a r b l e a n d h o n ed b la ck g r a n i t e pre-order now from busterandpunch.com

INTERIORS

STONED TABLE LIGHT* £345 BUSTERANDPUNCH.COM

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 243


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

INTERIORS & LIGHTING

www.casabotelho.com

TIMELESS BESPOKE LIGHTING

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

244 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z INTERIORS & DANISH FURNITURE

Frosted Window Film: Wallpaper Design II

Powered by

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 245


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

FLOORING & GIFTS

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

  

Unique and luxurious homeware and gifts

020 8876 0131 Designers and Makers of Bespoke Kitchens and Living Spaces

www.curatedliving .co.uk

246 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

view the range at: www.barnbydesign.co.uk

furniture design handmade in HAY.

SEE US AT STAND L163

barnby design

29 APR - 7 MAY • EXCEL

wake up to natural sleep

NEW LONDON SHOWRO OM NOW OPE

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naturalmat.co.uk 0208 090 2845 The Old Dairy 66a Paddenswick Rd London W6 0UB

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 247


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

BATHROOMS

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath material creates a difference you can feel. With over 50 models available, we’ll have a size for bathrooms big and small.

Request your brochure on:

01255 831605

or go to: www.albionbathco.com Geminus Plinth free standing bath shown. Finished in Burnished Iron.

TOSCA & WILLOUGHBY

CELEBRATING 40 YEARS MAKING THE FINEST WOODEN LOO SEATS SINCE 1977 During that time they have grown the business and supplied some of the most prestigious homes and hotels in the world. All parts of all our seats are hand made in England to the very highest standard.

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.co.uk Made in England

248 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

We are a small family business specialising solely in wooden loo seats. We aim to give a very personal level of service. For full details call 01844 353477, email sales@looseats.com or browse our website at www.looseats.com TOSCA & WILLOUGHBY Ltd Home Farm, The Green, Aston Rowant, Watlington, Oxford OX49 5ST


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

OUTDOOR FURNITURE, FABRICS & ART

Where contemporary meets classic... For distinguished homes, luxury hotels, restaurants, museums, parks & gardens...

Corido design and manufacture unique pieces of grade A teak furniture, ethically sourced, ergonomically sound, using time honoured woodworking techniques. From concept to completion, our bespoke manufacturing service is also available on request.

D E S I G N E R | M A N U FA C T U R E R | D I S T R I B U T O R

www.extex.co.uk

0.93m

0.45m

corido.co.uk | 020 8655 6242 SHOWROOM UNIT 7 & 8 GATEWAY BUSINESS PARK COULSDON CR5 2NS

+44 (0)1634 718871

MAY 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 249


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions, plus the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month Features writer Charlotte Brook finds pattern paradise at the Fashion and Textile Museum On a recent visit to the ‘Josef Frank: Patterns-FurniturePainting’ exhibition I blended in almost perfectly with the designer’s ‘Mille Fleur’ wallpaper – a riot of clover, stems and sprightly blooms. This serendipitous moment has inspired me to use more pattern in my home. I’ll be browsing Frank’s timeless designs for Swedish homeware brand Svenskt Tenn online (svenskttenn.se).

Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs is bringing hotel style home

I recently stayed at hotel SP34 in Copenhagen, and fell in love with the dove grey curtains in my room. They are dim-out – lighter than blackout ones, they block 80 per cent of light. The fabric is by JAB Anstoetz, so I’m going to source some for my own home (jab.de).

Photography Editor James Williams on why Sir Norman Foster is an Instagram legend I suggest that everyone follows the ‘Starchitect’ @norman_foster who has joined Instagram at the age of 81! Hopefully Sir Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano will follow suit soon…

250 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK MAY 2017

PICTURES: JONAH SAMYN, INSTAGRAM/@NORMAN_FOSTER

The new passion ‘Overjoyed that I have managed to keep the succulents in my first ever terrarium alive, I am expanding my collection with help from florist Geo Fleur. Its #PlantPostClub subscription service delivers a new unusual indoor plant every month. Let’s hope my green-fingered run continues!’ – Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin


Elle decoration uk may 2017  

Stairways from heaven Simple to spiral – all you need to know

Elle decoration uk may 2017  

Stairways from heaven Simple to spiral – all you need to know

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