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Wrangler club builds spirit

Students dressed in full body suits build school spirit at all activites/ Page 6 and 7

“It’s not just for fun. it’s a way of life.� Connor Martens Freshman

www.chspylon.com Salina High School Central

Vol. 88, Iss. 1 September 9, 2011

Inside

Feathers in hair current fashion trend /Page 2

“In the music room at Oakdale. My teacher told me about it. It was second grade I think.� Aaron Giron Senior

“I was in my dorm room at K-State. I watched the planes hit and fell off my bed.� Mrs. Hoeme Counselor

“I had a morning class in college and was on my way to it when I heard about it.� Mr. Hair Teacher

Shadowbox ready for production/Page 5

Sports preview: who 2 watch 4/Page 8-9

“I was at my grandmas. My parents were in Vegas at a hotel called New York, New York so I was really nervous.� Gunnar Sullivan Senior “I was in the office here at Central and my daughter called and told me to watch what was happening.� Mrs. Nelson Teacher “I was working for a welding supply company in Manhattan. I heard it on sports radio.� Mr. Modin Teacher

“I was a junior in high school at Greeley County getting ready for a cross country meet.� Mr. Gooch Teacher

“I was in the South High commons watching it on the big screen.� Mr. Morris Teacher

10 year anniversary

9/11 Where were

YOU

“I was here at Central. I don’t think I even found out until I got home after school.� Mr. Meagher Teacher

“I was on my way to a friends house. I found out when I saw it on the TV there.� Matt Rowe Sophomore

“I was in Washington D.C. for a funeral when the pentagon was hit.� Chandler Bryan Junior

“I was playing basketball at recess at Oakdale. My teacher told us what happened.� Diabllo McFarland Senior “I actually stayed at home sick that day. I was getting ready for a trip to Virginia Beach. It got cancelled.� Mrs. Rouletter Teacher

“In Philadephia at home. My Dad was among the military called to help.� Nick Goldsmith Sophomore

“I was a middle school aide in the South Middle library. I watched it on the TV there.� Mr. Blake Teacher

“I was at LAX airport. They were showing the news on the screens. Our flight got delayed 10 hours.� Kiarra Skinner Sophomore

10 years later memories still remain By Sarah Gage

Photo Spread: Yearbook Distribution Party/Page 12

15

days until

Homecoming

105 days until

Christmas September Calendar

Staff Reporter

Junior Chandler Bryan was MXVWDČ´UVWJUDGHUDWWKHWLPH

EXWKLVIDPLO\ZDVLQ:DVKLQJWRQ'&IRUDPLOLWDU\EXULDO IRUKLVJUDQGIDWKHU:KHQ they heard the news about the 3HQWDJRQSHRSOHDURXQGWKHP

went crazy. ČŠ3HRSOHZHUHGULYLQJIDVW DQGUXQQLQJ$FDEGURYHRYHU DPHGLDQČ‹VDLG%U\DQ:KHQ KLVIDPLO\ZDVLQIRUPHGRI

what KDGKDSSHQHGWKH\ZHUH WROGWROHDYHDQGČ´QGVKHOWHU Bryan was as confused as any RWKHUČ´UVWJUDGHUZRXOGKDYH

See 9/11 / Page 4

New principal; new responsibilities By Trent Bigler

She has walked down these KDOOZD\VPDQ\WLPHVEXWQRW ZLWKWKHVDPHSRLQWRIYLHZ .QRZLQJWKDWVKHLVQRZLQ FKDUJHRIWKHEXLOGLQJRIZKLFK VKHKDVZRUNHGLQIRUVRPDQ\ \HDUVLVDQDPD]LQJIHHOLQJ ČŠ,ZDVHFVWDWLFDERXWKDYLQJ WKHRSSRUWXQLW\WRHYHQDSSO\WR EHWKHSULQFLSDOČ‹QHZSULQFLSDO 0UV6KDQQD5HFWRUVDLGČŠ$QG WKHIDFWWKDW,JRWWKHSRVLWLRQ MXVWPDGHLWHYHQEHWWHUČ‹

,QWKHČ´UVWIHZZHHNVRI VFKRRO5HFWRUKDVEHHQYHU\ EXV\EXWVKHVD\VHYHU\WKLQJLV JRLQJVPRRWKO\ ČŠ,WKLQNWKHČ´UVWIHZZHHNV KDYHJRQHYHU\ZHOOČ‹5HFWRU VD\VČŠ7KHVWXGHQWVVHHPWR EHHQMR\LQJWKHLUFODVVHVDQG HYHU\WKLQJLVJRLQJ2.Č‹ +RZHYHUWKHUHLVRQHEXPS in the road that Rector is aware of. Students reactions to the new SROLFLHVEHLQJHQIRUFHGGXULQJ OXQFKDQGLQWKHKDOOZD\VKDYH EHHQH[WUHPHO\QHJDWLYH ČŠ7KLVLVVXSSRVHGWREHDKLJK

VFKRROQRWDSUHVFKRROȋMXQLRU Sydney Dauer said. But the EODPHVKRXOGQRWEHSXWDOORQWR 5HFWRUȇVVKRXOGHUV,QIDFWWKHVH UXOHVDUHQRWHYHQQHZ Ȋ,ZLVK,ZRXOGKDYH H[SODLQHGDOLWWOHELWWRWKH students of why we went to KDYLQJWHDFKHUVSLFNWKHPXS IURPOXQFKȋ5HFWRUVDLGȊ,W ZDVQHYHUDQ\LQGLFDWLRQRI XVVD\LQJWKDWVWXGHQWVZHUH EDG,WZDVMXVWWRSURYLGHD OLWWOHPRUHVWUXFWXUHWRWKH OHDUQLQJHQYLURQPHQWGXULQJ OXQFKWLPHȋ5HFWRUDOVRVD\VWKDW

LWLVQRWVXSSRVHGWREHDQ\W\SH RISXQLVKPHQW,QVWHDGLWMXVW TXLHWVWKHKDOOVGXULQJOXQFK DQGPDNHVLWPXFKHDVLHUIRU teachers to teach. :LWKDOOWKHQHZSROLFLHV DVLGH5HFWRUKDVWDFNOHGWKLV QHZMREKHDGRQ$IWHUEHLQJ in the USD305 school district DVDWHDFKHU'LUHFWRURI6WDII 'HYHORSPHQWDQGDQ$VVLVWDQW 3ULQFLSDOVKHORRNVIRUZDUGWR the task ahead.

September 9 Football at Andover Central

September 11 10th anniversery of 9/11

September 13 Scooby Doo’s birthday

September 16 Football at Campus

September 19 National talk like a pirate day

September 20 Boys’ soccer vs South Girls’ golf vs South

September 23 Football vs Hutchinson, homecoming game

September 24 Homecoming dance

Editor-In-Chief

See Rector / Page 4


Page 2

Student Life

09.09.11

New kids on the block

Foreign exchange students hope to remove new student stigma

From: Frankfort, Germany

From: Karot, Thailand

From: Hannover, Germany

From: Bangkok, Thailand

From: Cologne, Germany

Why she’s here: “I wanted to improve my english.�

Why she’s here: “I can choose which country, but then my organization decides.� Hair color: Blonde Height: 5’7

Why she’s here: “I have family that are here.�

Why he’s here: “My organization placed me here.�

Hair color: Brown Height: 5’7

Why she’s here: “I wanted to improve my english and learn a different culture.� Hair color: Brown Height: 5’5

Hair color: Black Height: 5’1

Hair color: Brown Height: 5’10

Age: 17

Age: 17

Age: 15

Age: 15

Age: 16

Grade: Senior

Grade: Senior

Grade: Sophomore

Grade: Freshman

Grade: Junior

After moving from a boarding school in Utah, Delila Rollo is new at school with a story to tell By MacKenzie Morris Student Life Editor

Originally from Utah, junior Delila Rollo attended an innocent weekend party that changed her life. During that night, an altercation began with another girl. A baseball bat was involved in the Č´JKWDQGEURNHVL[RI Rollo’s ribs, but the other girl did not have a clean escape. Rollo’s repeated hits to her stomach broke three of the girl’s ribs, a shot to the face that knocked three of her teeth out, and another great force from KHUČ´VWUXSWXULQJWKHJLUOȇV lung. Rollo sent the girl to the hospital with life threatening conditions. “I almost killed her,â€? said Rollo. From then on it was HLWKHUVL[PRQWKVLQMDLORU a year in boarding school. The choice was made

Visit for videos, pictures, and more stories

and she was headed to boarding school. Looking back, Rollo feels she made the wrong decision. “I would have rather gone to jail. It seems pretty chill to me than compared to what I went through,� said Rollo. Boarding school was

“I would have rather gone to jail...� Delila Rollo Junior

a new world for Rollo. It was run by Mormans and in her words, “It was torture.� Days would consist of school, the “essay room,� then bed; repeat. The essay room was where Rollo and other teenagers spent hours writing essays as a consequence for their misbehaving. Misbehaving

had a different meaning to this school though. “We couldn’t smile, talk, or laugh. Everything was strict and we pretty much got in trouble for anything,� said Rollo. )RUH[DPSOHLIRQHRI the students made their bed wrong or even burped DQGVDLGH[FXVHme, that would receive an essay. There were four levels of consequences the boarding school followed and not one day went by that Rollo wasn’t writing about her mistakes. Even though she was sentenced to only a year in boarding school, she was left there by her dad for over a year and a half. “My dad was gonna try to keep me in there till I was 18,� said Rollo. Luckily, her mom who lives here came to her rescue and brought her back to Salina where she has begun a new life.

Rollo shows off her tattoo after one of her classes.

The Pylon


09.09.11

Student Life

Page 3

Students catch bird flu Featherlocks seen flying through the hair of female students By David Weiner

vultures, and peacocks. “The feathers have a lot of gliding DELOLW\Č‹.HOO\VDLGDVVKHČľDXQWHGKHU single, thin, purplish feather. “My mom is OK with me turning into a bird.â€?

Lead Reporter

Students have been struck with the Bird )OXIHDWKHUVDUHČľ\LQJDQGDFFRUGLQJWR senior Courtney Kelly, young and innocent girls are turning into birds. “I like being a girl, but I’d rather be a bird,â€? Kelly said. Long, thin and colorful feathers can be seen glued into the scalps of fashionforward teen girls emulating rock legend, Steven Tyler. First seen in the wild mane of Tyler, the IDGTXLFNO\FDXJKWZLQGDQGČľHZRIILQWR the mainstream, hitting home with teens ZKRKRSHWRRQHGD\Čľ\ The feathers come from all sorts of birds according to students; roosters, turkey

“I like being a girl, but I’d rather be a bird.� Courtney Kelly Senior

According to sophomore K-lee Jones, ČľLJKWLVXQDWWDLQDEOHZLWKWKHIHDWKHUVGXH to their slenderness and problems with

shedding; A thicker feather that is properly secured would prove to be more effective. While some girls go to a salon to start their bird transformation, junior Brianna Chora has witnessed a friend, skip the middle-man and try to weave a feather from off of the street into her hair. “I thought she was crazy,’ Chora said as she brushed her thick white feather ZLWKKHUČ´QJHUVČŠ,JHWPDGHIXQRIE\P\ friends who say that I got my feather after getting attacked by an eagle.â€? Many have been struck with the feathery epidemic, but others have been selfvaccinated by their feelings towards the trend. “I just dont think they’re cute,â€? senior Courtney Koch said.

Fall fashion By Mackenzie Morris Student Life Editor

Top 5 Women’s Fashion: 1)Velvet 2) Graphic Print 3) Capes and Ponchos 4) Menswear 5) Sheer Shoulders

Top 5 Men’s Fashion:

1) Cardigans 2) Double Breasted Jackets 3) Camel Coats 4) Plaid Ties 5) Monkstrap shoes

Lexi Beedy

Gabe Guiterrez

Senior

Senior

Buttondown Shirt $80 J CREW

Striped Buttondown $85 RALPH LAUREN

Gold bracelets $10 TARGET White T-shirt $10 HAINES Belt $30 J CREW

Watch $115 FOSSIL

Black skinny jeans $60 EXPRESS

Khaki shorts $60 GAP SPERRYS $85 www.sperrytopsider.com

Wedges $20 TARGET

Courtesy of www.collegefashion.net and www.gw.com

Freshman, Forbes to focus on studies By Sarah Gage Reporter

THE VOICE OF SALINA CENTRAL

Freshman Jerome Forbes sat in Earth and Space Science, towering over all the other students in his class. Forbes listened to Mrs. Shaffer, some things came easy to him; others did not. In December of 2009, Forbes stopped going to a normal school. He was going through placements at St. Francis. They tried to teach the boys, but “they taught what we already knew�. So, during this time, they weren’t learning what they

needed to be taught. Early in middle school, Forbes played football. He pushed school aside, and let his favorite sport become more important. “I just wanted to play sports,� said Forbes. Football was what he lived for, but he decided that if he was going to be successful, he needed to set it aside. He entered high school this year, and football rested in the backseat. “High school really counts,� he said. Forbes decided to focus more intently on his academics this year more than he ever has. He still has a little trouble in some

classes, but it’s nothing he can’t handle. But, as football season rolls around, Forbes has itchy feet. Just because he put football aside, doesn’t mean he’s going to stop playing it forever. “I think I can handle it now,â€? said Forbes. He has decided to play football this year. He LVFRQČ´GHQWLQKLPVHOI and Forbes believes that he can play and keep up with his school work. He plans on getting all of his homework done after practice each day, and is he sets his mind to it, he will succeed.


Page 4

News

09.09.11

Candidates must have certain quality In order to be homecoming queen candidate one must have 2.5 GPA By David Weiner Lead Reporter

Mouth wide open and spread from ear to ear her eyes shot up towards the ceiling as homecoming queen candidate, senior Carolyn Exline, gave her “surprised face.� Exline, along with fellow

seniors Casey Leister, Shelby Dinkel, Lexi Beedy and Rachel Norris will represent the student body as the elected homecoming queen candidates of this year. “I cried when I found out I was nominated as a Homecoming Queen Candidate,� Leister said. To be homecoming queen

“I think that the GPA requirement is a good idea.� Lexi Beedy Senior

one needs more than just the support of her friends in the voting booth, a GPA requirement of 2.5 is the key to even getting on the ballot. “I think that the GPA requirement is a good idea because it gives people an incentive to work hard in school,� homecoming queen candidate, senior Lexi Beedy.

2011 Candidates Lexi Beedy Shelby Dinkel Carolyn Exline Casey Leister Rachel Norris

10 years later/ A decade after 9/11, memories still remain Continued from page 1 had happened, they were told to OHDYHDQGČ´QGVKHOWHU%U\DQ was as confused as any other Č´UVWJUDGHUZRXOGKDYHEHHQ Nothing was being explained in detail to them, which upset his parents. They quickly got to their hotel and gathered their things before leaving our nation’s FDSLWRO$OOČľLJKWVZHUHFDQFHOOHG so they couldn’t go home. Bryan and his family were over 1200 miles away from their home, and they needed somewhere to stay, so they drove to his great aunt’s house in Maryland. She had food and it was more convenient and safer than staying in a hotel room for how long, they GLGQȇWNQRZ7KH\Č´UVZWJRWD description of what had actually happened from a paper. They had to stay at his great aunt’s for about one week before they were DOORZHGWRČľ\KRPH “It’s more real since I was there,â€? said Bryan. When most high school students think back to the 9/11 attacks, it’s mostly a blur. But, for Bryan he remembers more about it since he got to experience more of it. Now, go back ten years and imagine being a high school student when the tragedy happened. Mrs. Leech was a sophomore at Central when the Twin Towers collapsed. She remembered leaving her house for school, and the news on TV was still not clear on the attack. When she got to school, there was no announcement made and rumors were being spread about what had happened, though no

one really knew. When she went to P.E. that morning, “two boys were jumping and celebrating in the hallways saying, ‘Yea! We’re going to war!’.� They were celebrating the fact that America had just been attacked. Maybe they didn’t realize quite yet what was going on, maybe they did, but why would anyone wish that on our country? Leech was curious what had actually happened, since all of the rumors were misinforming. When she got to her third hour, English, they showed the live

“I was pretty scared. My father was retired military.� Mrs. Leech Teacher

footage of the attack. The student body slowly understood what had happened that morning. Leech stayed calm, but some of the students around her were freaking out and “overreacting�. Though, she was one of the students that probably had the right to have extreme emotions. “I was pretty scared. My father was retired military,� said Leech. He was a ready reserve, which meant that if the United States was in need of more military, he could be called up. Leech and her family were scared that he would be needed

after the terrorist attack had happened. Leech was also good friends with Amber Siddiqui. Siddiqui came from a practicing Muslim family, and so she wore a head garb. Some students stereotyped and misjudged her, but Leech didn’t change the way she treated Siddiqui. It’s unnerving how some people, like the boys who cheered about the 9/11 attacks, didn’t think much of the terrorist attack or the collapse of the Twin Towers. Was it the fact that they were misinformed? Or was it that they were not really affected by it, unlike Chandler Bryan. The date September 11, 2001 probably means more to Bryan than it does for those boys. The thing is, Bryan was only a ȴUVWJUDGHUZKLOHWKHER\VZHUH in high school. It was easier for them to understand and process what had just happened, yet it affected Bryan more. But, the difference is, Bryan got to witness the terror and ruckus that was caused. Only three of the four planes made it to their destinations. One went down in Pennsylvania before it made it to its target—The White House, which just so happens to be located in D.C, where Bryan was. September 11, 2001, started out as a day like any other. Men and women got out of bed to get ready for work. Children were dropped off at school. No one knew what was coming. No one knew that there was the slightest possibility that the world around us was going to change like it did in less than three hours.

Rector/ New principal takes control Continued from page 1 “It’s a big responsibility,� Rector says. “But I believe in education and it really gives students the power they need to do anything they want to do.� Rector is not new around the school. She started her career as a teacher at Wichita Northwest High School is 1994 were she taught Chemistry, Biology, and other science classes for seven years. After that she moved to Salina and taught a multitude of science classes at Central for four years. After that she became the Director of Staff Development and Accredidation for the USD305

VFKRROGLVWULFWERDUGRÉšFH here in Salina. Upon realizing

“Education gives students the power they need to do anything they want to do.� Shanna Rector Principal

that she missed the school and expeciallt the direct contact with kids, she applied for and became the assistant principle at Central in 2008 and held that

job until this year when she got hired as the head principal. Rector is an advocate for kids and she works under a Č´WWLQJPLVVLRQVWDWHPHQW “To develop and support the best learning enviroment that is possible here at Salina Central High School.â€? As the year goes on there is no doubt Rector will have her work cut out for her. But after years of experience leading up to this job there is no doubt in her mind that she will be able to step-up to the plate and make this school the best learning friendly enviroment that it can be.

JD Garber / The Pylon

Red, white and blue still stand proud.

Photo courtesy of Mrs. Rouletter

“The Freedom Tower� is being built in place of the Twin Towers.

Laura Jannusch / The Pylon Officer Plank wears his police badge proud.

Liz Laffere / The Pylon

Three Salina firefighters stand proud while at work.


Arts

09.09.11

Page 5

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Juniors TeeJay Johnson and Jackson Mattek rehearse their lines.

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Senior Monica Burch and Freshman Tanji Lewis audition for The Shadow Box.

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Sophomore Shekhinah Jones, Juniors Joe McKenna and Jackson Mattek audition.

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Junior Sammy Jordan poses for a picture for the Shadow Box poster.

Shadow Box brings serious act to the main stage By Trent Brown Staff Reporter

Death is a subject we usually would like to avoid, but for nine actors, they have to act through the realities of death on stage as though it were real. The emotionally charged play The Shadow Box will be performed this September as one of two plays Central is performing this fall. Juniors Jackson Mattek, Joe McKenna, and Sammy Jordan take audiences to the edge of

death. The Shadow Box is the Č´UVWRIWKHWZRVKRZVDQGLV about three characters that are dying and the impact it has on those close to them. “There are three stories happening in the show,â€? says junior TeeJay Johnson. “Its a touching story about the difČ´FXOWLHVRIGHDOLQJZLWKGHDWKČ‹ Students acting in the play know the types of roles they have to play in the show are not easy to master. The actors explain that the emotion they need to bring to rehearsals can

“It’s a touching story about the difficulties of dealing with death.� TeeJay Johnson Junior

be intense. Some students such as junior Katie Keleman face steep challenges when acting out their character. ČŠ,WȇVP\Č´UVWVHULRXVUROOLQ a play,â€? explains Keleman. “It’s really pushed me to the limit on my acting ability.â€? Bill Weaver is taking the directing role of The Shadow Box. Weaver has worked on many of Central’s past shows especially in set design. In addition to this year’s drama, he directed last year’s Diary of Anne Frank.

Audiences wanting to see the show can expect to see a lot of emotion displayed on stage. The Shadow Box offers an intense story according to freshman Daniel Lorentz. “The show has a deep underlying story, there are a lot of struggles happening within the play.� The Shadow Box starts September 15, 16, and 17 at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium. Tickets are $6.00 for adults and $5.00 for students.

Female drumline members break free of gender bias By Logan Maltbie Entertainment Editor

When people think of drumline, they generally think of men. This year’s drumline is making a change with four female members. Junior Beth Cash said she joined drumline because “Rohrer asked, he was short on drummers.� Being among a generally male centered group can SRWHQWLDOO\EHGLɚFXOW “The guys treat us better than they treat each other,� Cash said. “We are closer to our sections [bass drum section], which has boys and girls.� Cash enjoys one thing more than most though. “Putting the cadences together,� Cash said. “They sound awesome as a whole.� Cash hopes to move to a different drum next year.

“I hope for it to be more acceptable for girls to be in drumline.� While the men of the drumline accept them, and

“The guys treat us better than they treat each other.� Beth Cash Junior

people do not have anything against women in drumline, maybe some day, the perception of drums and drumline will follow in the footsteps of rock guitar, and break free of the ERQGVRIJHQGHUVSHFLČ´FLW\ Members of the drumline prepare for a performance during freshmen orientation.

Visit for videos, pictures and more stories

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon


Page 6

Feature

09.09.11

09.09.11

Feature

Page 7

(The Wranglers)

“It’s not just for fun, it’s a way of life.�

A Wrangler: Does more than just go to the big games; a wrangler supports all school activities.

Connor Martens Freshman

The Wrangler Club Mission...

No

Are you satisfied with our student section’s Students school spirit?

67 122

...Promote attendance at school functions ...raise level of S.P.I.R.I.T.

ELO Survey

Yes

Students

  

The pylon surveyed 186 students about the level of spirit at games and events. The following graph shows the results from the survey.

 !      

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Senior Kayley Hemmy cheers next to several Wrangler club members in the student section Friday night at the Derby football game.

Rachel hodges / The Pylon

Two Wrangler club members lead the student section in cheers during Friday’s game against Derby.

S.P.I.R.I.T. found

Different view for freshman

Wrangler club underclassmen treated as equals By Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor

For years it has been custom for freshman to sit hidden from view at sporting events at the very top of the bleachers. They crane their necks to peek through windows of semi spirited upperclassmen, catching glimpses of Mark Vaughn making a tackle or Casey Leister scoring a goal for the girls soccer team Fortunately (or unfortunately) for the freshman, they will be at the center of central’s student spirit, thanks to “The Wranglers.� The Wranglers are a new group of Central’s most spirited students full of zeal, clad from head to toe in a silver and maroon body suit, determined to support their fellow mustangs. All classes are encouraged to participate in the Wranglers operation towards school spirit, even the freshmen. They will be the heart and soul of the student section, standing together and pumping up the crowd with their ridiculous apparel. Their purpose as stated by freshman Wrangler, Collin Blackim is “to create a college atmosphere at athletics and also recognize other events such as orchestra.� Although many upperclassmen show angst

towards freshmen being shown in the limelight of the stands, senior Max Wellbrock-Talley seems supportive. “I think it’s a fantastic show of equality by the school system. It forces off the caste system of class men-ship and allows the usually down trodden to be among their former superiors as equals,� said Wellbrock-Talley in a surprisingly realistic British accent. Freshman Conner Martens is without fear when it comes to being intimidated by the upperclassmen. “(The Wranglers) It’s not just for fun; it’s a way of life,� Martens said. “I do it not just because it’s fun, I do it for the guy standing next to me in the skin tight suit because I know he wants the same thing I do, to be the best group of high school supporters in Kansas,� Blackim said. Despite the threat of upperclassmen, these freshmen are fearlessly showing their support for not only athletics but several other usually forgotten activities. Without discrimination, they will stand with their upperclassmen counterparts, hidden behind their skin tight costumes.

Long time teacher finds missing link to S.P.I.R.I.T. puzzle By Gabrielle Briggs Feature Editor

Rachel Hodges/ The Pylon

Seniors Gabe Gutierrez, Shelby Dinkel and Maddy Shetlar show their SPIRIT during the first half of last Friday’s game.

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

A member of the Wrangler club points out a great play by one of the Mustang football players during Friday’s game.

There is a face in the crowd that many people know; Latin teacher Cindy Ramsey. She works to create pep rallies, develope game themes and spreads school spirit throughout the school and community. Her previous attempts such as a the S.P.I.R.I.T. dance party last year and other attempts to get students involved, have not been the most successful. “When I grew up my dad was the football coach. I just grew up realizing the importance of the fans and a spirited crowd,� Ramsey said. She is hoping for enthusiastic participation to be spread through the school and always looks for ways to pump up the school spirit. “She is always there as an encouraging person,� sophomore Brittani Thompson said.

Ramsey, who has tried for years to achieve this level of spirited participation thinks she has found the missing link, The Wrangler Club. As to why these attempts of elevating school spirit have failed: “We’ve never had a David Weiner before,� senior Wrangler Brenton Hilbig said. Weiner schemed up the idea of the Wrangler Club this summer. “What one does, it builds off of the others, that builds off the others,� sponsor of the Wrangler Club Ramsey said, commenting on Weiner’s idea. Ramsey sees the most important aspect of school spirit is respectful consideration for the school and one another. This newly formed group, ZKLFKLVQRQVFKRRODɚOLDWHG focuses on every aspect of the school. From plays to forensics tournaments, vocal concerts to

the Friday night games. “They (smaller clubs and organizations) have a spot in the school too,â€? Hilbig said. The goals of the Wrangler &OXEDUHWRČ´QGVFKRROOHDGHUV and promote school spirit, focus on getting the smaller sports and clubs more support and promote attendance at school sanctioned events. The turn out for he try-outs of the Wrangler Club were triple of what was expected. As of now there are about 40 Wranglers. These Wranglers are working out schedules as to what events they will be attending. They make the commitment to attend and wear the group attire to a minimum of one sporting or arts event per week throughout the school year, along with all home Varsity football and basketball games. Rachel Hodges/ The Pylon

Senior Mitchell Arpin and junior Taylor Hanson lead the student section through one of their cheers during the football game.


Page 6

Feature

09.09.11

09.09.11

Feature

Page 7

(The Wranglers)

“It’s not just for fun, it’s a way of life.�

A Wrangler: Does more than just go to the big games; a wrangler supports all school activities.

Connor Martens Freshman

The Wrangler Club Mission...

No

Are you satisfied with our student section’s Students school spirit?

67 122

...Promote attendance at school functions ...raise level of S.P.I.R.I.T.

ELO Survey

Yes

Students

  

The pylon surveyed 186 students about the level of spirit at games and events. The following graph shows the results from the survey.

 !      

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Senior Kayley Hemmy cheers next to several Wrangler club members in the student section Friday night at the Derby football game.

Rachel hodges / The Pylon

Two Wrangler club members lead the student section in cheers during Friday’s game against Derby.

S.P.I.R.I.T. found

Different view for freshman

Wrangler club underclassmen treated as equals By Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor

For years it has been custom for freshman to sit hidden from view at sporting events at the very top of the bleachers. They crane their necks to peek through windows of semi spirited upperclassmen, catching glimpses of Mark Vaughn making a tackle or Casey Leister scoring a goal for the girls soccer team Fortunately (or unfortunately) for the freshman, they will be at the center of central’s student spirit, thanks to “The Wranglers.� The Wranglers are a new group of Central’s most spirited students full of zeal, clad from head to toe in a silver and maroon body suit, determined to support their fellow mustangs. All classes are encouraged to participate in the Wranglers operation towards school spirit, even the freshmen. They will be the heart and soul of the student section, standing together and pumping up the crowd with their ridiculous apparel. Their purpose as stated by freshman Wrangler, Collin Blackim is “to create a college atmosphere at athletics and also recognize other events such as orchestra.� Although many upperclassmen show angst

towards freshmen being shown in the limelight of the stands, senior Max Wellbrock-Talley seems supportive. “I think it’s a fantastic show of equality by the school system. It forces off the caste system of class men-ship and allows the usually down trodden to be among their former superiors as equals,� said Wellbrock-Talley in a surprisingly realistic British accent. Freshman Conner Martens is without fear when it comes to being intimidated by the upperclassmen. “(The Wranglers) It’s not just for fun; it’s a way of life,� Martens said. “I do it not just because it’s fun, I do it for the guy standing next to me in the skin tight suit because I know he wants the same thing I do, to be the best group of high school supporters in Kansas,� Blackim said. Despite the threat of upperclassmen, these freshmen are fearlessly showing their support for not only athletics but several other usually forgotten activities. Without discrimination, they will stand with their upperclassmen counterparts, hidden behind their skin tight costumes.

Long time teacher finds missing link to S.P.I.R.I.T. puzzle By Gabrielle Briggs Feature Editor

Rachel Hodges/ The Pylon

Seniors Gabe Gutierrez, Shelby Dinkel and Maddy Shetlar show their SPIRIT during the first half of last Friday’s game.

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

A member of the Wrangler club points out a great play by one of the Mustang football players during Friday’s game.

There is a face in the crowd that many people know; Latin teacher Cindy Ramsey. She works to create pep rallies, develope game themes and spreads school spirit throughout the school and community. Her previous attempts such as a the S.P.I.R.I.T. dance party last year and other attempts to get students involved, have not been the most successful. “When I grew up my dad was the football coach. I just grew up realizing the importance of the fans and a spirited crowd,� Ramsey said. She is hoping for enthusiastic participation to be spread through the school and always looks for ways to pump up the school spirit. “She is always there as an encouraging person,� sophomore Brittani Thompson said.

Ramsey, who has tried for years to achieve this level of spirited participation thinks she has found the missing link, The Wrangler Club. As to why these attempts of elevating school spirit have failed: “We’ve never had a David Weiner before,� senior Wrangler Brenton Hilbig said. Weiner schemed up the idea of the Wrangler Club this summer. “What one does, it builds off of the others, that builds off the others,� sponsor of the Wrangler Club Ramsey said, commenting on Weiner’s idea. Ramsey sees the most important aspect of school spirit is respectful consideration for the school and one another. This newly formed group, ZKLFKLVQRQVFKRRODɚOLDWHG focuses on every aspect of the school. From plays to forensics tournaments, vocal concerts to

the Friday night games. “They (smaller clubs and organizations) have a spot in the school too,â€? Hilbig said. The goals of the Wrangler &OXEDUHWRČ´QGVFKRROOHDGHUV and promote school spirit, focus on getting the smaller sports and clubs more support and promote attendance at school sanctioned events. The turn out for he try-outs of the Wrangler Club were triple of what was expected. As of now there are about 40 Wranglers. These Wranglers are working out schedules as to what events they will be attending. They make the commitment to attend and wear the group attire to a minimum of one sporting or arts event per week throughout the school year, along with all home Varsity football and basketball games. Rachel Hodges/ The Pylon

Senior Mitchell Arpin and junior Taylor Hanson lead the student section through one of their cheers during the football game.


Page 8

Sports

Who 2 Watch4

09.09.11

An inside look at players to watch for this Fall sports season

(or whom)

Shelby Dinkel / The Pylon

Junior Jacob Martin fights for the ball during a home soccer game against Hays.

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Cross Country

Football

Jackson Rolfs & Kade True 'HVSLWHPLVVLQJPRVWRIWKH JDPHVODVW\HDUIRRWEDOOFRDFK +DOOLVH[SHFWLQJELJWKLQJVIURP VHQLRUTXDUWHUEDFN-DFNVRQ 5ROIV

Courtney Olson & Mitch Wilson

Kate Martens / The Pylon

Sophomores Allie Nowlin and Shaelyn Martin celebrate with teammates after getting a kill during the gatorade scrimmage. By Emily Wood Sports Editor

Tennis

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Soccer

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Golf

Emily Ewing & Callie Winholtz &DOOLH:LQKROW]DQG(PLO\ (ZLQJVSHQWPXFKRIWKHLUVXPPHUSUHSDULQJIRUWKLVVHDVRQȊ, SUDFWLFHGDOPRVWHYHU\GD\DQG SOD\HGLQDFRXSOHWRXUQDPHQWVȋ VDLG(ZLQJ:LQKROW]DJUHHG DGGLQJWKDWVKHȴQLVKHGDVKLJK DVVHFRQGSODFHLQDWRXUQDPHQW 0XFKRIWKHIRFXVIRUWKLV \HDUȇVJROIWHDPLVWRJHWWR UHJLRQDOVDQGSRWHQWLDOO\EH\RQG WKDWȊ$VDWHDP,ZDQWWRVHQG SHRSOHWRVWDWHDQGDJRDOIRUP\VHOILVWRLPSURYHIURPODVW\HDUȋ :LQKROW]VDLG Ȋ&DOOLHEULQJVSRVLWLYHVSLULW DQGLVYHU\FRDFKDEOHȋVDLGKHDG JLUOVJROIFRDFK6WHYH(ZLQJ Ȋ(PLO\WULHVWREHSHUIHFWDQG ZRUNVKDUGKHURZQDQGDKHDG RIWLPHȋ6WHYHH[SHFWVERWK JLUOVWRLPSURYHWKLVVHDVRQDQG KHOSWKHWHDPȴQLVKWRSWKUHHLQ UHJLRQDOV

“He brings good leadership, savvy, and is an accurate passer.” Mike Hall

Head Football Coach

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Volleyball

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Shelby Dinkel / The Pylon

Senior quarterback, Jackson Rolfs, runs the ball during the preseason gator bowl.

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09.09.11

Sports

Page 9

Concussion testing for everyone unnecessary Emily’s Extra Point Emily Wood Sports Editor

Rachel Hodges / The Pylon

Sophomore running back, Malik Veal, runs the ball during the home opener against Derby which the Mustangs won 30-27.

Upcoming home varsity events

Football: Sept. 23- vs. Hutch 7:00pm Sept. 30- vs. Maize 7:00pm Tennis: Sept. 10- Salina Central Invitational 9:00am Volleyball: Sept. 13- vs. Hays 6:00pm

Kate Martens / The Pylon

Junior Damion Cooper passes to a teammate during a soccer game.

Athletes in the mix

Meg Johnson Tennis

Boys Soccer: Sept. 13- vs. McPherson 6:15pm Sept. 15- vs. Maize 6:15pm Sept. 20- vs. South 7:00pm

On the Spot If you had one day to live what would you do?

“Spend it with friends and

Favorite cereal:

If I were Harry Potter, I would...

“Fruit Loops”

“Fly around”

“Tell my family I love them”

“Fruit Loops”

“Fly away”

Molly Dallas Volleyball

“Go cage diving with sharks”

“Coco Pebbles”

“Make myself invisible”

Zach Martin Soccer

“Go sky diving and/or Bungi jumping”

“Wheaties”

“Save the polar bears”

“I would spend it with my family”

“Frosted Flakes”

“Make the world a better place”

Kyle McQuaige Football

Alissa Kim Golf

family”

Recently, the Salina Regional Health Center allowed student-athletes to take a free ImPACT concussion test. The test was a baseline test that is taken on the computer that can be used to measure the degree of a concussion, should an athlete get one in the future. I took the test, and it mainly measured memory and speed. The test is not required by the state and is completely optional, however, KSHAA has added a new form to the release forms that have to be filled out in order to participate in a school sport. The form lists the symptoms of concussions and must be signed by the student-athlete and their parent before participation. ImPACT stands for Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing and is used by the NFL and other professional sports leagues. According to the Concussion Resource Center, approximately 300,000 people get a sports-related concussion a year. However, as a volleyball player, I am not planning on getting a concussion. I know its possible, but it is definitely not a likely event. Other sports, like football or soccer, should be required to take the test because it is a much more common occurrence in their game. When taking the test, I noticed other athletes in the room who are probably not getting concussions based on the sports they play. For example, a golfer was taking the Impact test. I have no idea how she or any other golfer is going to get a concussion while playing. Why are they taking the test? That being said, I think it is a great resource and opportunity that students have been provided. In the event of a concussion, it can be used to help show the difference in reaction time and attention span.

Advertising (785) 309-3578


Page 10 By Trent Brown Staff Reporter

US

Entertainment

MUSIC

Music is something that goes hand in hand with the high school student. Whether we have a song stuck in our heads or we are jammin’ to a song in the middle of class, music is something that makes each of us unique. “I listen to a bunch of music,” sophomore Barret Koch said. “Right now I like the band’s The Higher, Relient K, Foals,

MAKES

Halie Graybeal said. She, like other students are turning to some of the rising stars in music. This is an exciting month for rap fans as JayZ and Kanye West release their collaboration album “Watch The Throne.” Also, with “Tha Carter IV” in stores, Lil Wayne and rap IDQVDOLNHZLOOEHȵRFNLQJ to iTunes or heaven forbid, illegal downloading cites to get a taste of the rappers new album.

What students are listening to right now... and Franz Ferdinand.” Music is something that never remains constant,

and rising alternative bands such as Mumford & Sons and Foster the People are gaining

popularity among students. “I really like Timshel by Mumford and Sons,” senior

Sky ScraperDemi Lovato Tashayla Francois

TimshelMumford & Sons Halie Graybeal

WalkFoo Fighters Barret Koch

How to LoveLil Wayne Louis Jimenez

LightersBad Meets Evil ft Bruno Mars Ryan Emme

Dust in the WindKansas Chase Howard

09.09.11

Sudoku

Randomz

By Brenton Hillbig

Difficulty: Hard

5 8

4 6

6 1

3

7

2 7

Sham Wows Sham wows are positive and negative words or phrases that describe the month. These were chosen by the Pylon staff for September. If you have a sham or a wow for the October issue, go to and leave a comment to submit your suggestion.

Shams

- Planking - Too hot outside, too cold in school - New school rules - Swag - Hallway congestion - London Riots - Wiz not Best New Artist

Wows

- Stocked fridges - Summer-end clearance sales - Start of football season - Emma Stone - Yogurtini - Soccer team

Itunes top ten 1. 6. 2. 7. 8. 3. 4. 9. 5. 10. Someone Like You

You Make Me Feel...

Pumped Up Kicks

Cheers

ADELE

Foster the People

Rihanna

Stereo Hearts

Maroon 5

Gym Class Heroes

Yoü and I

Love On Top

Mirror

Party Rock Anthem

Lil Wayne

5

Beyoncé

LMFAO

4

6

3

9

7

9

1 6

6

8 7

Cobra Starship

Moves Like Jagger

Katy Perry

4

5

3

8

4 5

9 4

*The solution to this sudoku puzzle will be posted @Chspylon.com, as well as the next issue of the Pylon*


09.09.11

Opinion

Page 11

The blame game- The world doesn’t owe you The Inciteful Lioness Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor

There are two kinds of people in this world (not really, I’m just using this as a vehicle for comparison...bear with me) people who think they owe the world something, and those who think the world owes them. Our generation has been playing Madden, Black Ops, and...the blame game (ominous, right?). Nothing is ever our fault. This sense of entitlement can most likely be attributed to the initial blame put onto our parents’ generation for putting the unsurmountable debt onto our hands. Don’t worry, I will not be ranting about the domestic policies of the U.S. instead, I will be spending the next 393 words of your time ranting about the domestic politics that run our

school and the mindset of the average teenager. Most commonly, the blame game is demonstrated in athletics. So often in my sad and unfortunate tennis career have I seen doubles players put the fault of a lost point on their partner. If a shot is missed by the parter at the base line, they will blame the other for not aiding them by poaching the net. Not only is this blame unfair and false, it’s about as attractive as Kristin Stewart’s acting in Twilight. This wrongful blame is most commonly used by the

The Pylon wants to hear our opinion! Email your letters, preferably limited to 500 words, to editor@chspylon.com. Submissions must contain a full name for inclusion, and we will contact you to confirm that you are the author of your letter. Letters may be edited for clarity.

Trent Bigler, Editor in Chief editor@chspylon.com

Carson Jett and Casey Leister, Business Managers business@chspylon.com

Student Life MacKenzie Morris, editor

Opinion Sammy Jordan, editor

Sports Emily Wood, editor

Entertainment Logan Maltbie, editors

studentlife@chspylon.com

sports@chspylon.com

opinion@chspylon.com

entertainment@chspylon.com

Photography Rachel Hodges, photo editor

Videography Dakota Rowlison, editor

chsPylon.com Eric Luce, webmaster

Feature Gabrielle Brigs, editor

photos@chspylon.com

webmaster@chspylon.com

video@chspylon.com

feature@chspylon.com

Copy Editor Cartoons David Weiner, also lead reporter Brenton Hillbig and Joe copyedits@chspylon.com Mckenna, cartoonist

carpentoonist@chspylon.com

Staff reporters: Nathan Garlow, Trent Brown, Sarah Gage The Pylon gladly accepts contributions from guest writers on any subject. Please email your submissions to editor@chspylon.com. Instructions for submitting letters to the editor are on page 7. The Pylon is the official student newspaper of Salina High School Central. It is produced entirely by students of the newspaper production class daily on chsPylon.com and monthly in print.

J.D. Garber, Adviser jd.garber@usd305.com (785) 309-3578

insecure and the incompetent to develop a reason for their suckish skills. My advice to those unfortunate, sucky people: be a singles player. Every obstacle a singles player surmounts is purely on their own ability. There is no room to blame a partner mostly because...they don’t have one. Because the game is based only on their abilities and how they can adapt to obstacles such as wind, poorly kept courts, or those stupid players that are a freaking wall and lob everything back and call points out when they

are just on the line (Psh, I’m not bitter), it makes winning that much sweeter. If this idea is transferred to doubles, both doubles partners will be more relaxed and not feel the pressure of living up to expectations and to be an overall better pair. Although I’m sure most of the student body who is not an athlete has already given up on this article by now, this singles playing mindset will aid you in all aspects of your pitiful life, not just sports. To help my little nerdy friends out who can not understand my sports analogy

(I’m surprised I did), here is a quote that might make this more clear: “Ask not what your country can do you for you, but ask what you can do for your country.� This quote by former President Kennedy is a concept to mold character by. Instead of believing that the earth spins simply for your entertainment and every glitch in the imperfections of the world can be attributed to others who make up the movie that is your life, realize that its all on you. So in short, I blame you for blaming others instead of blaming yourself.

Staff Editorial- Preschool to prison Lower levels of schooling play an important role in the process RIȴQGLQJ\RXUVHOIEXWWKHKLJK school experience traditionally allows for more maturity and independence which is important in developing teens into the autonomous individuals they must be when they leave home. That tradition is being broken this year. You can’t learn to ride a bike if your father never lets go of the handles, and if our administration will not let go of the new school rules, many of us may never learn critical lessons in self-discipline and responsibility. High school is not just a time to learn life lessons like you hate drama class but love the girls in it, numbers in math class are sometimes imaginary, or that it is immature to laugh in health class every time a reproductive organ is mentioned. High school is a time to

conceive future aspirations and receive guidance in the process of becoming an adult. Many of the new rules are similar to what would be enforced in elementary school... or prison. Students should be able to hold themselves

You can’t learn to ride a bike if your father never lets go of the handles...

accountable for being in class. The student body does not EHQHČ´WZKHQWKHVHUXOHVDUH forced upon everyone. Once these students are no longer in high school they will have to either continue their education in college, go to a trade school or... apply for a job. In these places they will have to be

accountable for themselves and for colleagues in order to be successful in their pursuits. With the new policies some VWXGHQWVPD\Č´QGLWGLÉšFXOWWR transition into accountability after being held under close supervision throughout their adolescence. The slow transition to independence from pre-school to adulthood, which is what this school has traditionally supported, is what prepares students for later life. &HUWDLQWHHQDJHUVGREHQHČ´W from the new school rules. Some students have abused their freedom in the past by cutting class or wandering the halls during school hours, but the one who is truly affected is not the student’s classmates or teachers; it is the student who is DEVHQWIURPFODVV7KDWVSHFLČ´F student is the one who receives the negative effects of skipping class. It would be ideal if everyone in the school could realize the importance of their education and be in class, but in some cases that does not happen. This is when certain policies should come into place to encourage those particular students to get back to class and to “do what is right.â€? The new school policies will be encouraging to students such as these by keeping them under supervision and holding them accountable through the staff. This is not the end goal though because students must at some point in their education become accountable for themselves. A few people may lack the responsibility that high schoolers should possess, but the mistakes of a few should not lead to the privileges of many being taken away. Students need to prove to the administration that they have the self-discipline required to make the right choice at school, but in order to prove this the administration needs to let go of the handles and let them develop into the mature adults they must be to succeed in their future endeavors.


Page 12

Photo Story

09.09.11

U nveiling the ‘Unwritten’ story

Trail Staff hosts party to reveal yearbook to students

Rachel Hodges/The Pylon

Senior Savanah Bolby flips through the pages of the yearbook and laughs.

Rachel Hodges/The Pylon

Sophomore Kylie Mauch enjoys the Urinetown article in the yearbook.

Rachel Hodges/The Pylon

Senior Monica Burch points out a friend.

Rachel Hodges/The Pylon

Sophomores Brooke Peters and Shaelyn Martin read pages together.


September 2011