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THE

PYLON

Vol. 93, Iss. 3

Salina Central High School

650 E. Crawford St.

Salina KS, 67401 February 7, 2017

the perfect

pill prescription drugs are used for everything from injuries to anxiety. But what may seem to be harmless little pills could be addiciting and

the results can be deadly.

PGS 16-19 photo by chloe guillot


CONTENT PAGE

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PYLON February 7, 2017

n e w s up d ate P g 14

spo rts Pg 26

Senior Eldon Taskinen dives into the water. Photo by: Keaton Beach

IN THIS ISSUE NEWS 4 THE BRAINS BEHIND THE BOT 6 FALSE ALARM

FEATURE 16 A HARD PILL TO SWALLOW

INFOGRAPHIC 29 SOCIAL MEDIA ADDICTION

ARTS

OPINION 20 SO MUCH FOR SADIE’S 22 LETTER TO THE EDITOR ON OPEN LUNCH

IN DEPTH 8 LENDING A HAND

10 MAGIC BEHIND THE MUSIC

STUDENT LIFE 14 FOOT FETISH

SPORTS 26 ONE LAST SPLASH 28 SPORTS BRIEFS

12 24

STUDENTS STAND UP FOR ABKER WHY TIME FLIES

The Pylon wants to hear your opinion T h e P y l o n g l a d l y a cce pts contributions f rom gue st w riters on any subject. Please e- mail your submissions to b u si n e s s @ c hs p y l o nco m . T h e P y l o n is t he o ff icial stude nt ne w spape r of Sal ina High School Central. It is produced entirely by students of the news p a p e r p rod u ct io n c l a s s , w e ekl y on chspyl on.com and five issues annually in print. E- m ai l y o ur l et t e r s , p re f e rabl y l im ite d to 500 w ords, to business@chspylon.com. Submissions must contain a full name fo r i n c lu sio n , a nd w e w il l contact you to conf irm you are the author of the letter. Letters may be edited for clarity.


PYLON February 7, 2017

Students at the monthly board meeting. Photo by: Emma Norris

CONTENT PAGE

I n D e p th Pg 12

Junior Bailee Steinle, senior Maria Putzier and sophomore Annie Taggart singing in Big Fish. Photo by: Ellie Cobb

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art s Pg 10

Stay Updated Check out our website, chspylon.com and follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat.

@chspylon chspylon

@chspylon16 www.chspylon.com

Pylon Staff 2016-2017 EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Chloe Guillot Morgan Dolton

FEATURE EDITOR Chloe Guillot

STUDENT LIFE EDITOR Morgan Dolton

PHOTO EDITOR Ellie Cobb

ARTS EDITOR Annie Hayes

SPORTS EDITORS Caroline Donatell Holly Sanderson

NEWS EDITORS Umar Sandhu Will Hayes

OPINION EDITOR Karley Benson

VIDEO EDITOR Keaton Beach

COPY EDITOR Bailee Steinle

BUSINESS MANAGERS Audrey Burgoon Ryan Dix Peyton Kavanagh

REPORTERS Ryan Dix

ADVISER J.D. Garber

Volume 93 of the Pylon was created by 12 staffers using Adobe Creative Suite 5.5. Our fonts this year include GoBold and Gravity. Special thanks to Sedalia Democrat for making the printing of our publication possible.


news updates

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PYLON february 7, 2017

Hardware

To build the robot, many different materials are needed. The computer and game controller are used to program the bot’s brain. Car-window batteries, and leaf-blower batteries are used to power the robot and all of its many components. The wooden board is temporary. Once the body of the bot is ready, the electronics will be taken off of the board and mounted in the bot. Hundreds of mathematical calculations are needed to determine the size, weight, ect of the bot.


news updates

PYLON february 7, 2017

~The Brains~ Behind the Bot _________ Robotics looking to win this year’s games after last year’s third place finish

______

The 2017 build season is in progress, and the journey to a FIRST Robotics title has begun. Last year, the team took home a third place title and this next six weeks of the season are vital. photo by Junior Reece Mathews

Objective

The FIRST Robotics competition game objective varies from year to year. This year, each robot collects fuel, represented by green Wiffle balls. The balls must be picked up and transported to a rocket ship. The robot then must collect and arrange gears on the ship in the correct order. The robot must then board the airship and prepare for takeoff. For the first 15 seconds of the race, the bot must be programmed to operate autonomously and complete as much of the tasks as possible. For the rest of two minutes a student-operator takes reins of the bot.

Team

The team is split up into four seperate divisions. First, is “drive.” This group is tasked with learning to operate the bot, to complete the tasks quickly and efficiently. Next is “Build.” This group constructs the robot. The “Marketing” group raises money and takes pictures of the bot and the competitions. Finally, the “Programming” group uses computers to write the code and make the bot run.

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NEWS UPDATES

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PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

Junior Ryan Dix reaches towards the fire alarm | photo by Umar Sandhu


NEWS UPDATES

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

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FALSE ALARM BY RYAN DIX | PYLON REPORTER

F

or sophomore Migc Aiyanyor, what started as a fun game turned into something much more. Little did Aiyanyor know that a fire alarm epidemic would break out and he would be at the heart of it all. It all started in mid-October when Aiyanyor was peer pressured into making a decision he’d soon regret. “Don’t give into the peer pressure because it’s not worth it,” said Aiyanyor. Many students think these false alarms are unnecessary. Sophomore Sam Hieger is an advocate of this. “The whole thing is just stupid. I don’t want to go stand outside in the cold,” said Heiger. These false alarms take time away from valuable learning opportunities and time to do school work. Other students love the break they get from class. It’s a new way for them to leave the classroom and get away from any work. Junior Maximo Guzman shares this same opinion. “I kind of liked them because I got time out of class,” said Guzman. They are the perfect way to get away from the classroom for a little while to

talk to some friends; but is it really worth it? Some students may think that pulling the fire alarm is a harmless joke. The administration can’t express enough that it is not. Students that are caught face severe punishment such as a school suspension and trouble with law enforcement as well. Assistant Principal Scott Lee, head of emergency drills, explains what happens to students who are caught. “Per the student handbook, we assign a fiveday suspension and hold a discipline hearing to determine whether a student will return to school. We also work closely with Resource Officer Shawn Moreland who handles the situation from the law enforcement side.” said Lee Since the breakout started we have been consumed by confusion every time that alarm goes off but it is important to understand that there are times when these false alarms are not caused by students. There were two times when the alarm was just a drill or it was triggered by the construction.

“I love the fire alarms because I get a break from class. Being outside in the cold is better than sitting in class any day.”

“I think the fire alarms got really annoying. They were just so random and interruptive. But hey, they got me out of class so it’s fine.”

Junior Malik Novotony-Carter

Sophomore Destiny Jackson


In Depth

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PYLON February 7, 2017

Freshman Ashlee Britt signs “mom” in American Sign Language. Britt communicates with her mother through sign language.


In Depth

PYLON February 7, 2017

9

LENDING A HAND

Freshman Ashlee Britt, brother, translate for community, deaf mother by Morgan Dolton pylon Editor The bond freshmen Ashlee and Orville Britt have with their mother is unlike any other. In fact, it would be safe to say none of us can relate. Ashlee and Orville have learned to communicate with their mom through sign language - never having a chance to speak with her. They have worked hard from a young age to learn how to communicate efficiently with their mom. Sign language is a very unique and distinctive way of communicating. Sign language does not utilize prefixes, suffixes or words like is or as. Many signs are complex, having different meanings based upon the location and culture. Ashlee and Orville’s mother began teaching them ASL at a very young age, around the same time children begin to learn to manipulate sound and start forming words. “It’s very easy to teach babies sign language because it is very visual. My mom started teaching us to sign at eight months,” said Ashlee. Today, the twins apply their gift by interpreting for community events and for their mother, who is completely deaf. To their mother, they are her voice and ears. It can be very rewarding to be able to connect two cultures together; however, interpreting does not always provoke feelings of humility and gratification. It is especially hard for Orville when people use sign language as a way to mock his family by mimicking their hand gestures. “The most difficult thing about translating is when people disrespect our mother and the deaf culture,” said Orville. Their mother isn’t the only one in the family that suf-

fers from hearing loss. Ashlee is hard of hearing in both ears, requiring her to use a hearing aide, while Orville is completely deaf in one ear and has normal hearing in the other. The Britt’s are carriers of a mutated gene that influences hearing, hair, eye and skin color. “My great grandpa has one percent of Waardenburg Syndrome. The syndrome causes people to become 25 percent albino, have black hair with white highlights, white skin, different colored eyes and deafness,” said Ashlee. Waardenburg Syndrome has caused Orville and Ashlee to suffer hearing loss and premature grey hair. The mutation was passed through autosomal dominant inheritance, meaning that the Britt’s inherited the gene even though their mother was the only carrier of the mutation. Since Waardenburg Syndrome is so aggressive, the twin’s children will most likely inherit the gene as well. Even though both siblings primarily converse through speech, they sometimes face problems communicating with others in loud atmospheres. “In certain places, it can be very challenging to hear correctly. I’ll have to ask people to either shout or speak louder,” said Orville. Despite facing some repercussions, the twins are very proud of their family and the vast amount of support received in the deaf community. If anything, Waardenburg Syndrome has brought them closer together and created a significant bond. “In every way, we are a unique family. It has been hard, but we have made it out okay,” said Orville.

By the Numbers Noise is the number one cause of hearing loss.

12% of the U.S. population has significant hearing loss

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1 in 40,000 people have waardenburg syndrome. 2-5% of these cases have congenital hearing loss.

million people affected by hearing loss are children under the age of 15.

Statistics from Starkey Hearing Technologies and Genetics Home Reference.


fine arts

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PYLON february 7, 2017

magic behind Junior Carolyn Gutsch looks into her crystal ball as The Witch in “Big Fish.” photo by ellie cobb

Students work to give an exceptional performance Due to their recent recognition by the International Thespian Society, there is no question that Troupe 639 puts high-power products on the stage. What people don’t see is all the work that happens behind the curtain. For junior Sean Rahman, putting on a show isn’t just about the singing and acting. He plays one of the most difficult roles which is running the show from behind the scenes by making sure that the lights are at the perfect angle and the microphones don’t cut out. At rehearsal, he is all over the auditorium, running wires through the house and across the stage and in the sound booth checking to make sure that everything is going well. “You’re not going to have a show without the people behind the scenes. You can put on a small show with a few people on stage, but if you don’t have those people grabbing the props and making your set, it’s going to be very abstract. If you want it to be good, you want people running the lights, sound, and playing music for the actors to sing to,” said Rahman.

by annie hayes

pylon editor

the music

Junior Payden Cox agrees. As a chorus member, she works just as hard. “I’ve been practicing my music everyday. I do dance practice. I also try to participate in some activities that other people might not go to, like being there when they picked out costumes,” said Cox. Hard work from people like Cox help the show go from good to great. “With the crew and chorus, you can add all these interesting things that just make the show explode,” said Cox. To ensure a great outcome, students from the orchestra and band play in the pit to give the chorus and main characters a beat to sing to. “We have been practicing nonstop for the past few weeks. We’ve had long rehearsals at school and often on the weekends. We also practice a lot separate from school,” said freshman Gabriella Fischer, who plays in the pit. Fischer enjoys playing for the musical because of the people who participate.

“Even though some of us are not really seen that much, we all want to make sure we put on a great show” said Fischer. As all the elements of the show come together, the crew, chorus and pit are becoming ecstatic. “I really like playing the music, but when we put it together with the theatre kids, it’s a whole entire new experience,” said senior Mayela Campa. Students may be putting on smiling faces for the show, but they can’t help but smile back stage as well. “I didn’t really understand the big deal about theatre, but when you are up on stage, dancing and singing, with all these people who love what they are doing, it is just a really great feeling,” said Cox. In the final days before the show, all their hard work is really coming to light. “The rehearsals can be tough. They are really lengthy, but I think it’ll all be worth it in the end,” said Campa.


IN DEPTH

PYLON february 7, 2017

11

big fish

by the numbers Junior Bailee Steinle and freshman Madeline Paradis dance at the USO show. photo by ellie cobb

The cast poses at the end of the opening song, “Be the Hero.� photo by ellie cobb

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orchestra members

8

directors and managers

14

band members

43

Junior Kaleb Wood stands ready to shoot a poison dart. photo by ellie cobb

actors and singers

12

parent helpers

17

techies


in depth

12

student

PYLON february 7, 2017

stand up

Hundreds of students sign petition, defend teacher at board meeting by annie hayes

pylon reporter

Although it often does not seem like it, students care about their education. However, they recognize that the biggest tool in getting an education stands in front of a Promethean board. The teacher is the root of it all. In January, when a fan-favorite teacher had her job threatened, students’ passion started to show. Mrs. Abker teaches English Three and AP Literature. She sees hundreds of students every day, who agree that she is an exceptional teacher. “I was absolutely appalled when I heard that Mrs. Abker might not be renewed. She is one of the best teachers in this school, and I have learned so much from her. The possibility of future students not getting the opportunity to learn from her made me both sad and furious,” said senior Riley Rundell. Many students had similar feelings to Rundell. Discussions surged through the school and across social media where students expressed their fury or remorse. Several voiced that Mrs. Abker had changed their life, not just their education. “Students of this school are not willing to just lay down and accept things that they are unhappy about. We will stand up for what we believe is right and will have each other’s backs,” said Rundell.

Eventually, students decided they had to do something about the situation. Petitions were drawn up and circulated the school receiving over 300 signatures to save the beloved teacher. “She was the best English teacher I ever had. I just didn’t understand why they would consider not renewing her contract,” said junior Hannah Dye.

Rundell. Students piled in, along with teachers and other Salinans, to see what would happen to Mrs. Abker. “I had work on the day of the meeting, but I made sure my friends kept me updated,” said Dye. When it finally came time for people to speak for the teacher, the mass of Abker advocates in the room stood in support of what was being said. Dr. Cynthia Reed and former student, Jamie Hawley, STUDENTS OF THIS SCHOOL gave speeches about why they believed Mrs. Abker was ARE NOT WILLING TO JUST an extraordinary teacher that LAY DOWN AND ACCEPT should be allowed to continue the work she does. THINGS THAT THEY ARE The weight of Mrs. Abker’s fate was heavy, but when it UNHAPPY ABOUT. WE WILL was finally announced that she STAND UP FOR WHAT WE would be returning to work, cheers filled the room. BELIEVE IS RIGHT AND WILL “I was so happy and relieved HAVE EACH OTHER’S BACKS. that I cried. I was super grateful to everyone who went to that - SENIOR RILEY RUNDELL board meeting with me too,” said Rundell. In the midst of all the drama, students Students are regularly viewed as not found a chance to show their support. caring about their education, let alone A board meeting that addressed Mrs. the teachers who provide it for them. Abker’s employment was held in midHowever, this recent uprising proves January. that they are wiling to fight to save “It was important for students to go someone that they believe has a major to the board meeting because it shows impact in our school. that we care about our education and “All of us coming together for Mrs. what happens to it. It also shows that Abker really showed school pride, we support our Mustang family,” said support and unity” said Dye.


PYLON february 7, 2017

Students wanted to keep Mrs. Abker because she is not only an exceptional teacher, but truly cares for her students and impacts them beyond the classroom. We asked students to share stories about their favorite teachers and what they have done to effect students. In my years of schooling, I have definitely had some motivational and inspirational teachers. If I had to bring it down to one, it would have to be my geometry teacher, Mrs. Owen. She has been the only math teacher to truly explain all of the topics I don’t understand, but she still doesn’t get frustrated with me. It’s really great. She motivates me to become a better student and try my hardest in math class. -Freshman Isaac Morris

IN DEPTH

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One teacher that has changed my life? I was asked this question a few days ago, and I have to say, I had to think about that for a while. But, I’d have to say that Mrs. Hoff, my awesome AP U.S. History teacher, is who really changed my perspective in the classroom.

History is a subject that can tend to be very boring for the average student, but Mrs. Hoff makes it entertaining. I never struggle to pay attention in her class because she always has my attention. We’re never just sitting around reading from a textbook in her class. All around, Hoff is just an amazing teacher. -Junior Ezekiel Edson Senior Riley Rundell celebrates the school board’s decision on Mrs. Abker’s contract. photo by emma norris


Student Life

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PYLON February 7, 2017

Foot Fetish I’D DESCRIBE MY SHOE COLLECTION AS A HOBBY NOT AS AN ADDICTION. I BUY JUST WHAT I LIKE, NOT JUST TO BUY. - JUNIOR TYLER OLMSTED

Name brand shoes are an expensive yet iconic trend, especially when stars like Kanye West produce Yeezy’s or Kobe Bryant releases a basketball shoe line. Along with Olmsted, 63 percent of students feel buying expensive shoes is not a waste of money. 180 students were surveyed during maroon day classes on Jan. 24, 2017. by Morgan Dolton pylon Editor


PYLON February 7, 2017

Student Life

Q: Why did you switch from buying off-brand shoes to buying authentic-brand shoes? A: When I was first interested in sneakers, I did get fakes. However, I look back, and that disgusts me. I look to only buy authentic shoes because I have so much pride in the shoes I wear. I especially hate when people buy fake shoes and say they are real. I think it ruins it for those who do spend the money tobuy real ones.

Q: Why do you feel like you need to spend so much money on your shoes? A: In my eyes, I don’t need to spend money on shoes, I want to. I also don’t think of it as just spending money. It’s more of an investment. I take extremely good care of my shoes as many know because I can sell them and get my money back. Many don’t realize the sneaker market is nuts. For example, if I were to wait about a year to sell my Yeezy’s, their selling price would increase and I would make a profit.

Q: What is the most expesive pair of shoes you own? A: The most expensive sneaker is my Adidas Yeezy 350 Boosts. I bought them for $515, and the market value is around $600. I was able to afford them because I make enough money mowing lawns during the summer that I had a good amount of extra money. I’m now looking to reduce quantity and have better quality shoes. I initially bought Yeezy’s because I wanted a shoe no one around here would have, I’m trying to push my collection that way. Some people thought it was cool, some could care less and others tried anything they could to take away the fact that I had them.

Q: What is your favorite shoe and favorite shoe brand? A: I don’t have a definite favorite shoe. However, the Adidas Ultra Boost and Adidas Yeezy 350 are by far my favorite models. My favorite brand of course is Adidas due to the fact they are continuously innovating and creating new looks that keep sneakers “fresh” for me.

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FEATURE STORY

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PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

HARD

PILL TO SWALLOW

CODEINE Use: Treats pain and coughing If abused: Causes excessive drowsiness, drop in heart rate, drop in blood pressure

For a high percentage of the country, prescription medications are used by doctors to treat their pain, depression, anxiety, sickness or even growth defects. However, these pills can have negative consequences if they are abused or taken without prescriptions from health professionals. And unfortunately, abuse of prescription pills has become a frequent occurrence. In fact, the CDC has officially declared that prescription drug abuse in the United States has become an epidemic. This abuse is not just seen in adults but also in teenagers. With deaths resulting from drug overdose on the rise, understanding the dangers of abuse is more important now than ever. by chloe guillot pylon editor facts from drugabuse.com


FEATURE STORY

M362

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

VYVANSE

Use: Treats pain If abused: Causes extreme drownsiness, slurred speech, vomiting, depression

ADDERALL Use: Treats ADHD If abused: Causes panic, hallucinations, fatigue, tremors, seizures, fainting

X ANA X

Use: Treats ADHD and BED If abused: Causes fainting, hives, swelling, numbness, diziness, seizures

OXYCONTIN

HYDROCODONE Use: Treats pain and coughing If abused: Causes increased anxiety, loss of consciousness, uncontrollable vomiting

XANAX

ZOLOFT

Use: Treats anxiety and panic If abused: Causes seizures, blurry vision, depression, headaches, forgetfullness

Use: Treats depression If abused: Causes hallucinations, muscle contractions, vertigo, seizures

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FEATURE STORY

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When learning about drug abuse, high schoolers are usually taught the basics: marijuana can lower your IQ and meth can kill you. But the threat that isn’t always taught to high schoolers is the danger of prescription pills. This isn’t because prescription pill abuse isn’t common. According to the National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA), after marijuana, prescription and over-the-counter medications are the most commonly abused drugs by high school seniors. These pills, such as Xanax and Adarral, can be just as dangerous as street drugs if abused. According to the Center for Lawful Access and Abuse Deterrence (CLAAD), medical emergencies resulting from prescription drug abuse have increased by 132 percent in the last seven years. This could be because of a lack of education. “I think a lot of teenagers don’t recognize the danger of prescription medication if they aren’t taken as prescribed. When they are abused, they can be just as risky and dangerous as other drugs,” said Central drug counselor, Kristin Menzies. Examples of abuse include taking medication not prescribed to you, using medications in a way other than how it is prescribed, taking more than prescribed, or taking it just to get high. If these medications are not taken as prescribed, they can lead to addiction, withdrawal, overdose and even death. According to drugfree.org, 90 percent of prescription drug addiction starts in teenage years, and according to NIDA, 25 percent of those who begin abusing prescription pills before the age of 13 end up struggling with addiction at some point in their life. “I do think it’s easy for younger kids to get addicted, especially if they start using at a young age. The chance of abuse and addiction are higher than if you start later in life,” said Menzies. Addiction, however, isn’t black and white. There is a lot of grey area when it comes to prescription pill abuse. Once someone becomes addicted to using these pills, the battle to stop isn’t an easy task. “Addiction is like Russian roulette. You never know what pill will be the one that sends you over the edge into full-fledged addiction. I don’t believe there’s a real cure for addiction, but there’s recovery. And it’s a full-fledged recovery,” said Menzies. Junior Jackson Leister witnessed the effect of prescription pill abuse and addiction firsthand. As a sophomore, he was arrested for selling prescription pills to students. Xanax, a prescribed antidepressant, was the most popular drug Leister dealth with. “People would just hit me up and ask me if I knew where to find something. It was people you wouldn’t expect who wanted them every time I had them. Most people come back with Xanax,” said Leister. Leister, who took the pills himself, understood why Xanax was such a popular drug among high schoolers.

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

THE UNITED STATES ACCOUNTS FOR 5% OF THE WORLD’S POPULATION

“ADDICTION IS LIKE YOU NEVER KNOW WH ONE THAT SENDS YOU FULL FLEDGED

- KRISTIN M

40%

OF PRESCRIPTION DRUG USERS AT CENTRAL TAKE PILLS FOR MENTAL HEALTH

39%

*statistics from drugabuse.com | 180 stude


PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

BUT CONSUMES 75% OF THE WORLD’S PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

RUSSIAN ROULETTE. HAT PILL WILL BE THE U OVER THE EDGE INTO D ADDICTION.”

MENZIES

33%

OF PRESCRIPTION DRUG USERS AT CENTRAL HAVE BEEN TAKING PILLS FOR OVER FIVE YEARS

of students think that prescription drugs are safer than street drugs

ents were surveyed during maroon day classes on Jan. 24, 2017

FEATURE STORY

19

“It was easy to just pop a pill or snort a pill, and you’re straight. It was like drinking half a bottle. You can still function, but you black out on Xanax overtime. When I told people the daily amount I took, they would say I should be dead.,” said Leister. Leister has been clean since his arrest in May, but it’s not always easy for people to stop. Taking a pill can seem less dangerous than smoking a joint, and it’s also less expensive. That drives many students to seek out what they see as an easy high. “It was either that they didn’t feel like they were doing anything wrong by taking a pill or they just liked it because it was easy and cheap,” said Leister. However, prescription pills can also be used for good. Their purpose is to treat things such as depression, anxiety or illness. In sophomore Blake Olmsted’s case, he has been taking prescription growth hormones for three years to help stimulate his growth. “I am very glad I am taking growth hormones because they give me a chance to get as much growth in as I can,” said Olmsted. With nearly 40 percent of students in our school currently taking some form of prescription pills, it’s easy to see why prescription pill abuse has become a problem. It also seems like prescription pills are more commonly prescribed by doctors. With depression and anxiety common in high schoolers, prescription medication could seem like a “quick fix.” “I think doctors get into that field because they truly care about people and they don’t want people to be in pain. I think sometimes prescription medications can be prescribed as the first line of defense because it’s pretty easy to prescribe, it’s accessible and it’s cheap. It can be seen for some as a kind of quick fix,” said Menzies. However, Menzies does not think that doctors have ill intentions. “I would like to believe that there aren’t doctors out there that intentionally prescribe medication just to make money. They are compassionate and they care about their patients. I feel that there are some doctors out there that prescribe antidepressants or pain relievers, but also suggest a counselor or support group. I think it takes a combination of medication, counseling and support groups,” said Menzies. With prescription medications becoming increasingly common and easier to access, addiction levels could continue to rise. And although they provide a quick high, abuse can be deadly. There is not a high that is worth a person’s life. “There may be some positive consequences of drug use, but the negative consequences highly outweigh that five or ten minute high that may lead to a lifetime of drug abuse,” said Menzies. If you have any questions about drug abuse or addicition, you can visit Mrs. Menzies in room 217 for more information.


Editorials opinion

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PYLON February 7, 2017

SO MUCH FOR SADIES

Between the ACT the next morning and conflicting schedules with basketball games, the Sadie Hawkin’s dance is not something students should look forward to By Karley Benson PYLON OPINION EDITOR

T

he Sadie Hawkin’s dance: that dance that fills the space between prom and homecoming. It’s kind of a Valentine’s dance, but not really. Sadie’s is when the girl is in charge of asking the guy. But what happens when your significant other goes to a different school and has a basketball game on the night of Sadie’s? Or you have to be home at midnight because you are taking the ACT the morning after? Unfortunately, this is the situation for a few students at our school. People are going to end up asking someone they barely know, spending hours worth of minimum wage work on a mediocre dress and dance the night away while the stress of the upcoming ACT is gnawing at them the whole time. We waste hundreds of dollars on a DJ every dance, yet students

84%

of students plan to spend $40 or less on shoes for the dance

People are going to end up asking someone they barely know...and dance the night away while the stress of the upcoming ACT is gnawing at them the whole time. always find something wrong with their music. Too much slow dancing or too little slow dancing is often the complaint. Some students prefer to relax and hold onto their significant other while a few students would prefer to avoid their date for the majority of the night and avoid touching them at all costs. Even if you do have a boo, they might attend a different school and the application process to bring an out of school date is tricky. You have to get the signature of an administrator at your dates school, the schools address and phone number, your dates signature and phone number, and a picture ID of your date all to bring them to a two-hour dance that you most likely won’t stay at the whole time. Not to mention that if you don’t get this lengthy application done a week before the dance you and your date will be denied access into Sadies. I value the security of our school dances during vulnerable times like school dances, but this new policy seems excessive.

67%

of students plan to spend under $30 on a dress to wear to the dance 180 students were randomly surveyed during maroon day classes on January 24, 2017.


PYLON February 7, 2017

Sadie’s is on a Friday night which is inconvenient for students from our school and other schools. Southeast of Saline, Sacred Heart and Salina South all have basketball games the same time of Sadie’s, so unless your date will skip their basketball game for you, you’re either going stag or asking someone who is not your first choice. If you are a senior, you may be kind of upset that your last school dance that’s not prom is spent with a boy friend or girl friend instead of your boyfriend or girlfriend. If going with someone you don’t like and listening to bad pop songs for two hours doesn’t sound bad enough, some students are taking the ACT 10 hours after Sadie’s ends. Seniors trying to get serious scholarship money from a 28 or better on the ACT are going to have to figure out how to do it on seven and a half or less hours of sleep. If they go to an after party following the dance, they may not get home until midnight or two o’ clock in the morning which would leave them with even less sleep than before. Students may be so exhausted from the dance and

Editorials opinion

the stress of the night before that they literally sleep through the ACT which would cost them, or their parents, the $40 or $56 sign up fee for the test that is non-refundable whether you show up or not. Now if you are a senior, you are short $50, and you missed your last chance to take the ACT and submit it to colleges for scholarship money all because of a poorly scheduled school dance. The ACT dates have been out for over a year, so how the Sadie’s accidently got scheduled the night before the big test that most students would prefer to do good on is beyond me. A solution to all of these problems would’ve been to schedule the dance a Saturday later or earlier than the current date. The ACT will definitely be something to consider in the future when Student Council and administration is scheduling dances because by the time they realized the date had several conflicts, it was already too late. So whether none of these conflicts or all of these conflicts apply to you, just know you the only one suffering through another extremely mediocre school dance.

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65%

of students believe fast-paced music leads to more provocative dancing than slow music.

155 out of 180 students believe that taking the ACT sleep deprived results in lower test scores.

50%

of students plan on attending an “afterparty” later in the night after the dance.

Cartoon by Kegan England


Editorials opinion

22

Kudos & Callouts Kudos:

-Boy’s and Girl’s basketball for putting in work and getting those W’s. -Chick-Fil-A for opening soon. I’ll be there for breakfast, lunch and dinner. -”Big Fish” for being a wonderfully entertaining show. Good job thespians. -Spring sports for being just around the corner. Time to grind athletes. -All of the students that are juggling a part-time job. You are not alone. - Dry shampoo. Now I only have to shower occasionally -Caffeine. I would not be where I am without you.

PYLON February 7, 2017

Letter to the Editor: let us leave for lunch Dear Editor: As a student at Salina Central, I urge the School Board to change the schedule of the school day and allow us to have 30-45 minutes of open lunch where we can leave the school and eat lunch wherever, or however we please. Currently at Salina Central, lunch is our only break during the day. As of right now the we only get to sit down for 20-25 minutes to eat our lunch and are forced to eat the same food every day. If the school board took 15 extra minutes out of ELO on

white days and took 5 minutes out of each hour throughout the day on Maroon days, that frees up extra time during the day for students to have a longer lunch. With this new schedule we will be able to choose what we eat, not have to wait in the long lunch lines, not get in trouble for leaving the school to get lunch, and the school will not have to spend near as much money on lunches. The school can set up a system that will make sure all students are back within 45 minutes and if not they will get a tardy.

All students will have to get a permission slip signed by their parents to leave the school for lunch, and students that do not get the slip signed will still eat at the school. I urge all students to talk to their teachers about this matter and have the teachers approach the administration. If we get all of our teachers and administration on board, they can take it to the school board and try to get the schedule changed. Sincerely, Sophomore Brett Norris

The Secret Behind Sonic Sodas Here are a few secret-menu drinks to test out on your next late-night sonic run

Callouts:

-Valentine’s day for existing. Thanks for reminding me that I’m not only poor, but eternally single. -Me for still writing “2016” on all of my papers, sorry 2017. -My new year’s resolution for being entirely dead and gone. I am part of the statistic that gave up. -Sadie’s for being on a Friday. What even is this? - Donald Trump’s inauguration for being empty. C’mon America. -Coconut oil for healing my dry hair but not my sad life. -Weathermen. Pretty sure I’m more qualified than these buffoons.

Sonic Sunrise A regular Cherry Limeade with orange juice.

3 out of 5 stars

Purple-O A purple Powerade and Sprite base with added lemonade and cranberry.

5 out of 5 stars

Pink Flamingo A Sprite with added orange, pineapple and cherry flavors.

4 out of 5 stars


STATUS QUOTES

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

“I’M ABOUT FIVE SECONDS AWAY FROM CONVINCING MYSELF THAT MY LIFE IS JUST A DREAM.”

“IF I’M NOT IN JAIL, I’LL BE THERE.”

“ALL OF THESE WINDOWS IN THE SCIENCE WING MAKE FOR SOME GREAT SELFIE LIGHTING.”

“DO YOU HEAR THAT CRACKING SOUND? THAT’S THE SOUND OF MY LIFE FALLING APART.”

STATUS QUOTES

The following quotes were heard around the school during random times of the month by Pylon staff members.

“MY MOM’S BREAST MILK WAS SPICY SO I DON’T LIKE HOT TAMALES.”

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“IF MASHED POTATOES WERE A PERSON, I WOULD MARRY THEM.”

“I’M SO HOT I’M GOING TO SWEAT MY EYEBROWS OFF.”


in depth

24

PYLON February 7, 2017

WHY TIME FLIES THE EXPLANATION FOR THE ILLUSION THAT SPEEDS UP OR SLOWS DOWN THE DAY BY UMAR SANDHU | PYLON EDITOR Everyone remembers their first day of high school. The thoughts of getting to see all your friends in the same building again are accompanied by the realization that you have to go through four more years of treacherous prison. But in what seems like the blink of an eye, senior homecoming is nothing but a memory and you’re preparing for your last Sadie Hawkin’s dance at Central and 4 months away from walking the podium out. Why does your brain register all those days, each one seeming like an eternity, into what seems like just a moment? In order to understand why the brain blends hundreds of days into one fading memory, you have to first understand what areas of the brain are responsible for registering your perception of time. Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee have concluded that the two areas that keep time are the basal ganglia and the right parietal cortex; meanwhile, the region that retains memory is the limbic system. According to Linda Jones, Central’s Psychology teacher, “the way these regions record memories are the reason behind why we remember so little of our past.” The Huffington Post writes that the brain sees no use in storing information it already possesses therefore it only retains new information and events. While you go through your average school day, you don’t usually witness any new footage for your mind, leading to you not being able to remember anything when you try and look back on that day a week later.

The brain’s strategy of only keeping what it needs is the reason behind the saying, For example, during the course of a school year, the average student will spend about 2.5 when we asked students, such as senior Dustin Morgan, he commented, “I can only remember standing in traffic for about 10 minutes.” These 10 minutes the average person does remember were only kept by the brain because they were special in some way, be it realizing how turnt a song was, noticing that you’re backed up all the way to

having fun is because, “The brain measures time in a constant series of pulses, about 100 pulses equals a minute. Whenever your brain is focused on something it enjoys, it doesn’t keep track of the pulses emitted by our mental stopwatch”. Even while most of school goes by slow, Miller says, “Time goes by really fast when I’m talking to friends in class and getting in trouble… a.k.a. Zoie Counts.” Even simple activities like talking that require little focus can make time fly. For those who want to remember their youthful years when they’re older, there is no need A SCHOOL DAY to worry because in Claudia COMPARED TO A Hammond’s new book, Time SUMMER DAY SEEMS TO Warped: Unlocking the Mysteries of Time Perception, she LAST SEVEN YEARS. uncovers the technique of how to get your brain to remember more. - JUNIOR ERICA MILLER Hammond writes, “Humans process the world in Billburg because of traffic, or almost three-second increments, when (or actually) crashing the car. more or less is processed in those On a larger scale, the same applies three seconds time either slows down to the average school day where we or passes without you noticing.” go through near identical schedules. So the solution to the flying-time The similar routines and boring ac- problem is simply to actively notice tivities contribute to the reason why new things. By trying to avoid going school seems to take so long. into autopilot mode during our daily The individual day seems to drag routine, we can keep time from flyon forever, but before you know it, ing past without us knowing and gain half the year is over and you can only the ability to look back. Using this remember a handful of projects. we will be able to remember more of Junior, Erica Miller, says, “A school our vibrant high school and college day compared to a summer day seems years that our old selves will be sure to last seven years.” to miss. If you can remember one The opposite occurs when you’re thing, remember this– Life is short. having fun. According to Jones, the Do things now! reason time goes by fast while you’re


IN DEPTH

PYLON February 7, 2017

The Time Proportion Theory No matter all the strategies we try and incorporate into our lives, our teenage years will always seem longer than the years of adulthood. This is caused by something called the “Time Proportion Theory” that states that the observational length of a time period is proportional to the total length of life itself. For example to a week

old baby a week seems like eternity since he/ she has only lived one week. Using the same idea to a 17-year-old, a week goes from seeming like eternity to .001 percent of your life. Over the years of someone’s life, each year is perceived as shorter than the last one, leading to years to go by quicker when you’re older.

Every different color shade represents one year This graph shows the how long a year will seem when compared to someone’s life at that point. As one can see, every year becomes a smaller slice in the person mind as they grow older. Graph from www.maximiliankiener.com

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Sports Story

26

PYLON February 7, 2017

I tried out for the swim team and have been in the pool ever since.” -SENIOR ELDON TASKINEN

Making

one last splash Senior Eldon Taskinen Dives Into the Pool For a Final swim

F

or senior Eldon Taskinen, his swimming career is coming to a close. From the time he was young, he went to the pool in the summer. “I tried out for the swim team and have been in the pool ever since,” said Taskinen. He has been dedicated to swimming for almost 12 years now, not only because of his friends participating in swim but because of his talent. Taskinen shows great character in and out of the pool, especially in school. Taskinen’s math teacher, Mrs. Cullins said, “Eldon is a person who is thoughtful in all of his actions. I see him think through all of his processes a hundred percent of the time before he speaks.” As Taskinen continues his last season of high school swimming, he is preparing to take on 5A state. Taskinen has already qualified for state in the butterfly, individual medley, backstroke, and medley relay. To prepare for these important events, Taskinen has a set routine for each meet saying, “For meet days, the two most important things to me are music and food. Gotta eat healthy and listen to my jams.” With these routines his competitive career is coming to a close. Taskinen hopes to bring home gold at state in February. Even though he plans to continue swimming for exercise as well as helping out with the local swim team. But as for furthering his swimming career, Taskinen will “wave” goodbye to the competitive side of swimming after state. What sets Taskinen apart from other swimmers is how much he cares for the sport. “He works very hard, doesn’t mess around during practice. Doesn’t get up to go to the bathroom just to get out of doing a set,” said swim manager Haley Gunelson. With his drive, tenacity and determination, Taskenin has really left a mark on the team. During his last season, he is going for the win not only for himself, but for his team.


Sports Story

PYLON February 7, 2017

27

Senior Eldon Taskinen sives into the pull during a meet. | Photo by Ellie Cobb

Swim to a Wish As Taskinen leads the team, they not only focus on getting the gold but on making a difference.This year, the team will be a second year participant in the “Swim to a Wish” fundraiser. This fundraiser is for the Make-A-Wish Kansas Foundation that many schools around the state participate in. Last year, Central and South teamed up in this fundraiser and raised $1,400. “Swim to a Wish is a 100 mile relay that the swim team does to raise money for the Make A Wish Foundation,” said Taskinen.

By Holly Sanderson and Caroline Donatell

teams 10 participate

in a 100 mile relay central and south raised

$1,400

last year


Sports Story

28

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

SPORTS BRIEFS AN UPDATE ON CURRENT WINTER SPORTS We are taking it one game at a time and not getting ahead of ourselves. Our biggest obstacle as a team has been rebounding since we are always undersized. JUNIOR SAM SHAFFER The boys basketball team recently placed third at the Salina Invitational Tournament. They now have a record of 11-1.

The girls basketball team recently took first at the Salina Invitational tournament. Their record is now 10-2.

“I would like to improve over all, but suit out varsity next year, and definitely try to make it to state my junior and senior year.” Freshman Peyton Griffin


sports story

PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

29

Two of the boys swimming teams relays have already qualified for state. The other relay is .02 seconds away from qualifying. Excluding the relays the swim team has qualified for state in seven other events.

“Every day, at the end of our hard and long practices, coach tells us to go home and eat something healthy, also to get plenty of rest to prepare for meets.” Freshman Stoughton Winholtz

The girls bowling team record is currently 0-6.

“As the last couple of weeks before state approaches, everybody on the team is working really hard on their strike and spares, so hopefully we’ll have a couple people qualify for state.” Sophomore Estefania Granado

The wrestling team placed in the top three in the last four Tournaments. Notable records: Drew Burgoon 18-2, Julion Falco 16-7, Donivyn Will 18-2, De’Riece Burse 16-6, Taylon Peters 21-3.

“I think our chances at state are good this year. We should get seven or eight people to state and overall have a successful season.” Sophomore Taylon Peters

The boys bowling team record is currently 1-5.

“Doing the best I can. By doing that I make strikes and by going to practice every day. Senior Shemar Hutchens

photos by ellie cobb


INFO GRAPHIC

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PYLON FEBRUARY 7, 2017

app addiction

today, social media has become an effective way to communicate ideas and thoughts with people around the world. However, social media has turned into an obession for many.

2.3 BILLION

1 MILLION

ACTIVE SOCIAL MEDIA USERS IN THE WORLD

62%

OF STUDENTS SPEND MORE THAN 3 HOURS A DAY ON SOCIAL MEDIA

80 MILLION INSTAGRAM PHOTOS EACH DAY

ABOUT 81 MILLION FAKE FACEBOOK ACCOUNTS

89% of students own a smart phone

500 MILLION TWEETS EVERY DAY

NEW SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS ADDED EVERY DAY

42% 6 BILLION SNAPCHAT VIDEOS WATCHED EACH DAY

OF STUDENTS COULD NOT GO A WHOLE WEEK WITHOUT SOCIAL MEDIA

3.25 HOURS OF YOUTUBE VIDEOS WATCHED A MONTH

statistics from brandwatch.com | 180 students were surveyed during maroon day classes on Jan. 24, 2017


“Committed to Eye Care Excellence” GO MUSTANGS

Mike Harvey Elizabeth MikeHarvey Harvey Elizabeth Harvey

721 West Diamond Dr. Salina, KS 67401 Bus: (785) 827-2287 Cell: (785) 577-3131 Fax: (785) 827-2289 Mike@bobcatofsalina.com

Cell: 785-577-3131 Cell: 785-577-3131 mike@bobcatofsalina.com mike@bobcatofsalina.com

Order a yearbook by MARCH 1 to get yours!


here we go

mustangs

Senior Kristen Labonte, Freshman Alora Pittenger, Sophomore Kyesha Thomas and Junior Kenzlea Martin prepare for a cheer. | PHOTO BY ELLIE COBB


February print edition