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Vol. 89, Iss. 1 • Salina Central High School www.chspylon.com • August 23, 2012

pg 9

pg 10

Glad to be back in pads

a star in the making

Central makes AYP for first time in two years By Sarah Gage Co-Editor in Chief After being put on improvement when Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) on state assessments wasn’t made two years in a row, the 2011-2012 school year proved to be a success when AYP was made. “(Making AYP) Rector shows that students have met state proficiency standards, and it judges how (the school) is doing,” principal Shanna Rector said. After not making AYP during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011

school years, changes were made in order to ensure that it was made this past year. If the case were that it was not met yet again, more severe measures and actions would have been taken. Thankfully, that was not the case because of the effort the teachers put into preparing for state assessments. They recognized the importance of it and took action. Their effort paid off and the school was successful. But just because AYP was met last year, it does not ensure that it will be met in the 2012-2013 school year. Because of this, plans have been made across the district. “Teachers will be working more strategically in professional

learning communities. They will learn more about common core curriculum and changes to state requirements,” Rector said.

“One measure of our success is the number of students walking across the stage and receiving a diploma.” Mrs. Rector Principal

At our school specifically, the teachers will be involved in staff development for Literacy First, a process focused on

is the number of students walking across the stage and receiving a diploma,” Rector said. To help raise that rate, they want to develop a support structure to help struggling students be more successful, therefore increasing the graduation rate. “Our efforts must be on increasing student daily success through effective instruction and taking action when students are not meeting expectations. With this as our focus, we can increase the number of credits earned by students, which will have a positive effect on our graduation rate,” Rector said.

effective instruction, and the math, science, social studies and English departments will have a common plan. The AYP calculations have changed this year, so if we fail to meet AYP this year, the consequences are not yet known. “The state of Kansas is given a waver to revamp how schools document and measure academic success, therefore we do not know what it means not to (make AYP). Decisions are still being made at the state level,” Rector said. In order to avoid not making AYP again, goals have been set for this year. One of the goals is to increase the graduation rate. “One measure of our success

Making connections 15 new staff members round out 2012 faculty By Hayley Hager

finding a medium between new and old ways,” Ewing said. As the administration set out to hire these new staff members they knew exactly what they were looking for. “When hiring, we look for someone who knows the curriculum and advocates for students,” assistant principal Mr. Montoy said. “We see the new teachers building strong relationships with the students. Along with Montoy, Ewing sees this new crop of teachers as a blessing, regardless of the learning curve we all might experience. “New teachers bring new ideas and more energy,” Ewing said. “We have some great staff.”

Arts Editor For science teacher Steve Ewing this school year will begin as it has for the last thirty-three years. For the 15 new faculty members it’s a different story. Luckily for them they, maybe unknowingly, have already made connections with the members of their “recruiting class.” Either way, this large group of newcomers will surely give the students a different experience when walking through the halls and attending classes. “It’s always good to have change. It’s about

Oldenettel

Pahls

Kilgore

Nelson

Lund

Kleiber

No info. for: Kleiber

Mrs. Bruner’s kids played basketball at McPherson High School.

Maresch

Jett

Bruner

Dechant

Mr. Nelson has been to 26/28 major league stadiums.

Mrs. Akers used to teach at South

Mrs. Delay’s son played baseball in Olathe (Kansas City).

Voth Not Pictured: Mrs. Akers Mrs. Walker

Nanney

Mr. Nelson used to teach at South.

Kansas City is in both KS and MO.

Delay

Ms. Voth loves men’s college basketball. Mr. Oldenettel graduated from KSU.

Mr. Oldenettel graduated from MO State .

Mrs.

Mr.

Maresch has

Pahls is

four kids.

expecting his first child.

Mr.

Mr.

MHS has played ial at the Bicentenn Center.

Mr. Lund has wrestled at the Bi-Center.

Lund used to

Kilgore is

do construction.

from Salina.

Mr. Kilgore worked at Harbin Construction.

Mrs. Walker went to Fort Hays State.

Mrs.

Mrs.

Shaffer coaches the VETS.

Ms. Nanney used to cheer.

Mrs. Maresch has lived in Salina for 26 years.

Mrs. Jett had science teacher Mrs. Shaffer as a student her first year of teaching.

Jett used to lifeguard.

Mrs. Walker used to be a lifeguard.

Mr. Pahls graduated from Fort Hays State.

Maggie Vernon / The Pylon


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August 23, 2012

the Pylon Cartoon

iTunes Top 10 1. 6. 2. 7. 3. 8. 4. 9. 5. 10.

Drawing by Brantley Straub.

Good Time

We Are Never Getting Back Together

Taylor Swift

Owl City & Carly Rae Jepsen

Whistle

Call Me Maybe

Flo Rida

Carly Rae Jepsen

Some Nights

Idea Submitted by Chandler Burris.

Sham Wows

Want U Back

F.U.N.

Cher Lloyd

Home

One More Night

Phillip Phillips

Maroon 5

Sham Wows are positive and negative words or phrases that describe the month. These were chosen by the Pylon staff for August. If you have a sham or a wow for the September issue, go to chsPylon.com and leave a comment to submit your suggestions.

Everybody Talks

As Long As You Love Me

Neon Trees

Justin Bieber

Shams Emily Wood and Sarah Gage, Editor in Chief

• Summer is over

editor@chspylon.com

• No longer allowed to change classes

Jorrie Dykes, Business Manager business@chspylon.com

Student Life

Opinion

MacKenzie Morris, Editor studentlife@chspylon.com

Sammy Jordan, Editor opinion@chspylon.com

Sports

Entertainment & Web

Carson Jett, Editor sports@chspylon.com

Brantley Straub, Editor webmaster@chspylon.com

Photography

Videography

Maggie Vernon, Brianna Chora, Paige Johnson, Eli Berner photography@chspylon.com

Dakota Rowlison, editor video@chspylon.com

Art & News

Feature

Hayley Hager arts@chspylon.com

Emily Wood feature@chspylon.com

Copy Editor

Cartoons

Anna McHenry

Brantley Straub

Staff reporters: Sydney Dauer, Chandler Burris, Bailey Driver, Austin Huynh, Genna Salstrom, Beth Cash J.D. Garber, Adviser

• Back to a normal sleep schedule • 83 days until new “Call of Duty” • Two-a-days

Wows • Being back with friends • Sports starting

Puzzle 1 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.70)

9 8

5 1

5

jd.garber@usd305.com (785) 309-3578

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The Pylon gladly accepts contributions from guest writers on any subject. Please email your submissions to editor@chspylon.com. The Pylon is the official student newspaper of Salina High School Central. It is produced entirely by students of the newspaper production class, daily on chsPylon.com and monthly in print.

The Pylon wants to hear your opinion Email your letters, preferably limited to 500 words, to editor@chspylon.com. Submissions must contain a full name for inclusion and we will contact you to confirm that you are the author of the letter. Letters may be edited for clarity. The purpose of the Pylon is to relay important and interesting information to the students and administration of Salina Central High School. Central’s newspaper, the Pylon, will cater to the interests and concerns of the student body. Outside concerns and activities will only be covered if they somehow affect the school or students. The Pylon is distributed once each month. We firmly support the First Amendment and oppose censorship. The content of the Pylon is determined by our staff and editors.

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• Fantasy football starts up again • First girls tennis meet today

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Sudoku

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The solution to this sudoku puzzle will be posted in the next issue of the Pylon.

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• chsPylon.com has a new look

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Difficulty: Hard

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/ on Fri Aug 17 19:41:18 2012 GMT. Enjoy!

Can’t wait a month? Check us out at:

chsPylon.com


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August 23, 2012

News Updates

Making a healthy change New federal school lunch rules have both pros and cons

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1

By Beth Cash Staff Reporter

3 4 1 2

Sandwiches from the sandwich line have been cut in size. Fruit is now necessary to get anything from the line, and chips are no longer available. In the salad line, it is no longer an option to get just one thing, such as cottage cheese or tomatoes.

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All the condiments are now in pre-filled cups, and only one cup per condiment is allowed per student to limit the amount used.

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In order to get through the hot lunch line, a fruit and/or vegetable is required to be on your tray.

After having the luxury of eating whatever feels necessary for almost three months, getting back into the routine of mediocre school lunches is not enjoyable for some students. Due to the recent changes of federal guidelines and the District Wellness Program, the new school lunches are not favorable among students. No longer can you drench your salad in ranch; the condiments bar containing ranch, ketchup, and the occasional BBQ sauce is gone, replaced with minuscule half empty cups and packets of sauce at the end of the lunch line. This is part of a goal to produce healthier lunches for students. “There are now upper calorie limits based on needs for specific age groups, grades 9-12. There is a need to control portions of condiments which can contribute extra calories and sodium to meals, but not much else nutritionally,” kitchen manager, Jan Ganzenmuller said. Not only is the amount of sauce available much less, but the tray section usually left empty to accommodate the lake of sauce students enjoy is now expected to be full of

fruits or vegetables instead. Without this, the meal is not considered a full meal. “We will continue to offer many student favorites, although portions of some of the items may be reduced,” Ganzenmuller said. These changes are just as confusing to lunch ladies as they are to us, as they now need to spend more time reviewing every ingredient and recipe to make sure they meet new requirements and include more whole grains and less sodium. Despite the many cons of the new lunches, there is one pro. At the snack bar, students receive five components of food in a meal compared to the three components distributed in previous years. After all of the eyes rolled and smart remarks made toward the lunch ladies, our health is the top priority. “We want the end result to be acceptable to students. If it isn’t eaten, then it cannot be nutritious” Ganzenmuller said. We all learn something from this: the cafeteria staff learn how to add more whole grains and less sodium to our diet, and students learn how to ration sauce amounts.

POLL: Which of the following best describes your feelings toward the

76%

I don’t like them, and I wish I could have more to eat.

I understand and think it makes me healthier.

9%

for pictures, videos, stories, and more! CityGo

• Public • Accessible Transportation Transportation

826-1583

follow us on Twitter

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“What do you think about the new lunch policies?” “Portion control and moderation are good to think about even if you don’t struggle with weight.” Jackson Mattek Senior

“I’m always hungry because the portions are small.” Tiana Leepers Junior

“It’s lame, because it’s too small.” Vince Johnson Junior

“I think it’s better for our students so they won’t all be savages.” Luis Jimenez Senior

new lunch regulations?

7%

I don’t care either way.

HOURS OF OPERATION Buses Run 6 am-9pm www.salinacitygo.com

It doesn’t matter. I’m going to buy more to eat.

8%

124 people responded in this lunchroom text message poll.

Check out

OR

Question:

CityGo

• Public • Accessible Transportation Transportation

826-1583

HOURS OF OPERATION Buses Run 6 am-9pm www.salinacitygo.com

“I think that its good the nations cutting back on all the fat food.” Kade True Senior


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Do ItYourself Pinterest and other online blogging sites have made do it yourself (DIY) very popular this year. Here are some examples of projects that teenagers can do to accessorize their own clothing.

T-shirt headband Cut up an old shirt into a strip to fit around your head and add studs and diamonds.

T-shirt tank top Cut the sleeves and back of an old Tshirt and tie the back to make a tank top.

August 23, 2012

Student Life

Homemade,

cheap & fashionable Two students become their own clothing designers by making high waisted shorts for a cheap price from ideas on the internet. By MacKenzie Morris Student Life Editor A new trend has arrived on the scene for young teenagers this past summer; high waisted shorts. Instead of paying $25-$30 at American Eagle or Forever 21 for a pair of pants to rock above the upper waist, several students started getting crafty by making their own original pairs of shorts. Senior Shakera Ross and sophomore Carniecia Robertson

experimented with being their own fashion designers this past summer after seeing ideas and pictures on Instagram of others creating high-waisted shorts with everyday materials. “I liked the idea,” Robertson said. “I really like clothes, and I think the style looks good on me.” Using a sewing machine, old Levi high-waisted pants, and scissors, Robertson and Ross were able to start

“I’ve added studs, lace and even bleached a pair of shorts.” Shakera Ross Senior personal creativity to these shorts is all the fun of making them. “I’ve added studs,

Ripped To add some flare, take scissors, a knife, or sandpaper to the material on the shorts to make rips and holes.

Patriotic Paint stars and stripes, or put on fabric, to make a pair of USA shorts. This type has become very popular this summer.

Bleached Make a duo tone pair of shorts by dipping in parts of the bottom of the shorts in bleach.

Take craft thread and braid pieces together to create little bracelets.

more options to their wardrobe. “I’m into vintage style,” Ross said. “I didn’t have many pairs of shorts, and I like the high waisted shorts instead of little booty shorts.” Robertson has also been asked to make several pairs for friends. This idea has developed into a hobby for Ross and Robertson while keeping the price cheap, but stylish and cute.

What are your favorite kind of shorts? “Nike running shorts.” Rashun Allen Sophomore

“White booty shorts.” Trenton Earley Senior

Make-up tips for girls http://www.youtube.com/user/makeupbymissolivia?feature=results_menu

Friendship bracelets

lace,and even bleached a pair of shorts,” Ross said. Adding to that, Robertson has also created a pair of tie dye, American flag, cheetah and dip dye shorts. Depending on what you use on the shorts, the price for a pair can range from $4-$20. Ross has kept the price cheap by using things she already has, including fabric from old shirts, to add to the shorts. This idea has not only saved money for the two girls, but has added

high waisted shorts Add jewels and studs to a pocket or full side of the shorts. Studs for making homemade shorts can be bought online.

Cut up old material into a long slit and curl the sides to make your own scarf.

the process of making their own clothes. Adding flare and

Different styles of Studded

(DIY) scarf

Paige Johnson / The Pylon

Senior Shakera Ross shows off her homemade shorts at school.

Sophomore Olivia Atherton has become the latest buzz lately with her YouTube make-up tutorial videos. Spending about $100-200 on new make-up each month, Atherton shows viewers current make-up trends and how to put it on in the appropriate way. Watch her videos at the link on the top of the picture.

“Make-up is a way to be creative and I enjoy doing it.” Olivia Atherton Sophomore


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August 23, 2012

Student Life Foreign

exchange

students

Umberto Rossetto Maggie Vernon / The Trail

Siblings Franklin, Dyllan, and Dyamone Smith pose outside of the school. They have had to learn to adapt to Salina after moving from Detroit, Michigan.

From Detroit to the plains Smith family moves from Detroit, Michigan, to Salina By Sydney Dauer Staff Reporter After living in a town with over 700,000 people, it can be hard to adjust to living in a town with close to 50,000 residents. Juniors Dyamone and Franklin Smith, along with their brother, sophomore Dyllan Smith, have had to adjust to life in Salina after moving from Detroit just weeks ago. “It’s a lot smaller here, but I like it,” Franklin said. “Salina has everything you need and

everything is really close. It’s convenient.” All of the siblings are in unison, saying that the people in Salina and the students here at Central are extremely welcoming. “Michigan is real violent. Y’all is real friendly here!” Dyamone said. Adjusting to the Kansas heat has been a challenge for the Smiths. However, Dyamone only has one complaint about the family’s move. “The biggest change here is the mall,”

Dyamone said. In Detroit, the siblings attended private all boys or all girls schools and are having to adjust to life in public school. Dyamone’s private

“Michigan is real violent. Y’all is real friendly here!” Dyamone Smith Junior school in Michigan only had 250 girls from kindergarten through

12th grade. In private school, Dyllan and Franklin had to dress in a white button up shirt, tie, blazer, khakis, an all black belt, and all black shoes. They had to follow a schedule of college preparatory classes. Private school may sound prestigious, but Franklin said that many of the teachers weren’t even qualified to teach. Franklin said that he visited a website that runs background checks on teachers and the results showed that

many of the teachers didn’t have college degrees. “I had to teach my entire math class one time. The teacher was the one asking me for help.” Franklin said. Their mother moved them to Salina in hope of attaining a better education for her children. “I think my mother made a good decision,” Franklin said.

Grade: Junior Home: Alessandria, Italy Sports: Soccer, tennis Food: Pizza Movie: “AMERICAN PIE” Class: Conditioning

Tatsuhiko Konomoto Grade: Junior Home: Tokyo, Japan Sports: Soccer, baseball Food: Sushi Movie: “James Bond” Class: Math

Leon Homann Grade: Sophomore Home: Cologne, Germany Sports: Soccer, tennis Food: Pizza Movie: “Project X” Class: P.E.

Going back to their roots

Garlow family takes summer trip to Ireland to learn about family heritage By Chandler Burris Staff Reporter Senior Nathan Garlow was sitting in math class, wondering what it would be like to explore his family heritage, so Garlow and his family decided to visit Ireland this summer and find out more about it. “I felt like I was in another world, it was just beautiful,” Garlow said. The Garlow family spent a total of eight days in Ireland. Two were spent in Dublin and the other six in various small towns. Their days consisted of waking up early, then visiting any tourist attractions they could. Afterwards, they drove to the next town to stay there for the night. They visited The Monasteries, The Cliffs

of Moher, Trinity College and various pubs. To Garlow’s surprise, the pubs were very family oriented. They were filled with families and almost always had a band playing. The bands would play a lot of classic American rock, which made Garlow feel at home. “The environment was homey and made the trip very enjoyable.” Garlow said. They also attended the All Irish Hurling Semi-Finals. Hurling is a sport that combines many different sports into one. The games typically last ninety minutes. The teams represent their own counties and are only allowed to play for the counties they were born in. “This was something they

do that I think is really cool. Playing for your home town instead of a state that you might not even live in is just an awesome thing.” Garlow said. The one thing that Garlow consistently witnessed was river dancing. Irish culture consists of a lot of river dancing. They take great pride in the dances and perform them all over the world. The dances are performed for tourist’s everyday. The Garlow family had a personal tour guide that took them from one coast of Ireland to the other. This allowed them to have a more personal experience on their vacation. Garlow hopes to return to Ireland again but for now he is happy to be home.

THIS TIME... IT’S ABOUT BUY YOUR YEARBOOK TODAY. $70 IN THE OFFICE.

Photo courtesy of Laurie Garlow

Senior Nathan Garlow and his sisters stand outside in the back of the Kilkenny Castle on their summer trip to Ireland.

Se e yo ur a d he re . Buy nine issues by September 7th and get a 20% discount. Contact business@chspylon.com or call (785) 309 3578.


6

August 23, 2012

In depth

In depth

Cheer

HOBY

Who: Junior Hannah Engling When: June 25June 29 Where: Emporia State University Cost: $285 Why: “Since our coach has been here, it has been the camp we have attended.” Favorite part: “Learning new stunts and dances and being able to bond with the girls.”

Who: Junior Brooke Peters When: June 14-June 17 Where: Kansas State University Cost: On scholarship

Summer provides new, unexpected adventures By Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor

Boys State Who: Senior Josh Gage When: June 3-June 11 Where: Manhattan, KS Cost: On scholarship Why: “It would educate me more, politically.” Favorite part: “The whole thing was amazing.”

Although only 11 days ago, summer has become a nostalgic memory of the past. Sandlot-like visions emerge: lounging at the Cove while Alisha Walters blows her whistle, navigating through the throngs of high quality Salinians at the River Festival, eating tiger’s blood Snowiz…and of course going to good ol’ rock climbing camp. For freshman Sam Beck, the last statement was not an oddity when describing summer 2012 (may she rest in peace). Unlike the summer camps of basketball and football players, young Beck had to travel to Fayetteville, West Virginia in order to accommodate his unusual hobby. “Having a hobby of rock climbing in Kansas is hard, because it’s so flat,” Beck said. “For my birthday, my uncle took me to Little Rock to this gym with rock climbing, where we found brochures about the camp.” Beck’s adventure began when he flew into Charleston, Virginia, about an hour’s drive from the rendezvous point at a local rock climbing store

owned by the founder of the camp. From there, the climbers drove to a remote camping location. Beck loaded up his gear into a jeep, including his personal tent, various ropes and his handy-dandy five gallon water jug. “There was a massive wind storm a few weeks before I went (to camp) so all of the water pumps were down. It wasn’t safe to drink the other water,” Beck explained. The-week long camp consisted of only 7 other climbers ranging from ages 13 to 16 from various parts of the country. A typical day consisted of waking up in a selfpitched tent, making breakfast and packing their lunches, helmet, shoes, harness and water. “Then they taught us a different thing in the morning every day, like different knots and different climbing techniques,” said Beck. “We would then load up and they would take us to a different rock climbing site.” Beck explained that each location would have about 10 climbs ranging from easy to hard. Similar to rafting, the measure of difficulty is set on a scale one to five, 1 at walking to 5.15, having to use ropes so “you don’t fall and die.” The hardest climb

Beck completed was 5.11. Beck left the flat environment of Kansas with aspirations of climbing. He returned home with expert climbing experience under his belt…along with some chalk, a harness and rope.

Who: Sam Beck When: July 7-July 14 Where: Fayetteville, West Virginia Cost: $1000 (including airfare) Favorite part: “When I was on top of a really tough climb.”

Pole Vaulting

Who: Sophomore Shane Davis When: June 26-June 28 Where: Salina Central Cost: $50 Why: “I have attended the camp in the past and I pole vault for Central.”

Favorite part: “Being able to vault after being out of school for a month.”

7

August 23, 2012

Why: “I was selected by my teachers.” Favorite part: “Meeting all the new people there and listening to the speakers.”

X-treme KS Who: Junior Kamen Kossow When: June 12-June 17 Where: Milford Lake Cost: $200 Why: “I had heard about it through the grapevine so I went and decided to return this year because I enjoyed it.” Favorite part: “Extreme tubing on the lake.”

Journalism Who: Senior Chandler Bryan

Poll: Did you attend a camp this summer?

25%

Yeah! I was required to attend by my coach or teacher.

No. I was having too much fun in Salina!

29%

20%

Yes! I love going to camps and meeting new people.

When: July 28-August 2

No! Why would I waste my time and money?

25%

Where: Salina Central Journalism room Cost: $75 Why: “Because it was mandatory and it sounded fun.” Favorite part: “Adventures with Maggie (Sport) and Eli (Champ).

118 students replied to a text message survey during lunch on Friday, August 17.

Diving

Who: Junior Kyler Bell When: June 10-June 15 Where: Austin, TX Cost: $600

Why: “I knew people who had gone to it and said it was amazing, and it lived up to my expectations.” Favorite part: “Diving off the 10 meter platform and getting coached by an olympian.”

Congress Who: Senior Ken Beck When: July 21-August 3 Where: Ft. Lauderdale, FL Cost: $2,853.96 Why: “To get amazing forensics skills.” Favorite part: “Meeting all my ‘friends.’”

Band

Who: Sophomore Lila Vaughn When: August 6August 9 Where: Salina Central Cost: Free

Why: “It was required to be eligible to go to the state fair contest.” Favorite part: “Being able to be a drum major.”

Engineering Who: Senior Anna McHenry When: June 10-June 14 Where: Rolla, MO Cost: $450 Why: “I want to major in chemical engineering and this helped us understand different types of engineering.” Favorite part: “I loved meeting new people and competing in the team flying machine competition.”

VETS Who: Junior Maggie Unruh When: June 11-June 14 Where: Emporia State University Cost: $280 Why: “The camp was mandatory for all VET squad members.” Favorite part: “My favorite part of the camp was our team bonding activities and working on our dance technique.”


6

August 23, 2012

In depth

In depth

Cheer

HOBY

Who: Junior Hannah Engling When: June 25June 29 Where: Emporia State University Cost: $285 Why: “Since our coach has been here, it has been the camp we have attended.” Favorite part: “Learning new stunts and dances and being able to bond with the girls.”

Who: Junior Brooke Peters When: June 14-June 17 Where: Kansas State University Cost: On scholarship

Summer provides new, unexpected adventures By Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor

Boys State Who: Senior Josh Gage When: June 3-June 11 Where: Manhattan, KS Cost: On scholarship Why: “It would educate me more, politically.” Favorite part: “The whole thing was amazing.”

Although only 11 days ago, summer has become a nostalgic memory of the past. Sandlot-like visions emerge: lounging at the Cove while Alisha Walters blows her whistle, navigating through the throngs of high quality Salinians at the River Festival, eating tiger’s blood Snowiz…and of course going to good ol’ rock climbing camp. For freshman Sam Beck, the last statement was not an oddity when describing summer 2012 (may she rest in peace). Unlike the summer camps of basketball and football players, young Beck had to travel to Fayetteville, West Virginia in order to accommodate his unusual hobby. “Having a hobby of rock climbing in Kansas is hard, because it’s so flat,” Beck said. “For my birthday, my uncle took me to Little Rock to this gym with rock climbing, where we found brochures about the camp.” Beck’s adventure began when he flew into Charleston, Virginia, about an hour’s drive from the rendezvous point at a local rock climbing store

owned by the founder of the camp. From there, the climbers drove to a remote camping location. Beck loaded up his gear into a jeep, including his personal tent, various ropes and his handy-dandy five gallon water jug. “There was a massive wind storm a few weeks before I went (to camp) so all of the water pumps were down. It wasn’t safe to drink the other water,” Beck explained. The-week long camp consisted of only 7 other climbers ranging from ages 13 to 16 from various parts of the country. A typical day consisted of waking up in a selfpitched tent, making breakfast and packing their lunches, helmet, shoes, harness and water. “Then they taught us a different thing in the morning every day, like different knots and different climbing techniques,” said Beck. “We would then load up and they would take us to a different rock climbing site.” Beck explained that each location would have about 10 climbs ranging from easy to hard. Similar to rafting, the measure of difficulty is set on a scale one to five, 1 at walking to 5.15, having to use ropes so “you don’t fall and die.” The hardest climb

Beck completed was 5.11. Beck left the flat environment of Kansas with aspirations of climbing. He returned home with expert climbing experience under his belt…along with some chalk, a harness and rope.

Who: Sam Beck When: July 7-July 14 Where: Fayetteville, West Virginia Cost: $1000 (including airfare) Favorite part: “When I was on top of a really tough climb.”

Pole Vaulting

Who: Sophomore Shane Davis When: June 26-June 28 Where: Salina Central Cost: $50 Why: “I have attended the camp in the past and I pole vault for Central.”

Favorite part: “Being able to vault after being out of school for a month.”

7

August 23, 2012

Why: “I was selected by my teachers.” Favorite part: “Meeting all the new people there and listening to the speakers.”

X-treme KS Who: Junior Kamen Kossow When: June 12-June 17 Where: Milford Lake Cost: $200 Why: “I had heard about it through the grapevine so I went and decided to return this year because I enjoyed it.” Favorite part: “Extreme tubing on the lake.”

Journalism Who: Senior Chandler Bryan

Poll: Did you attend a camp this summer?

25%

Yeah! I was required to attend by my coach or teacher.

No. I was having too much fun in Salina!

29%

20%

Yes! I love going to camps and meeting new people.

When: July 28-August 2

No! Why would I waste my time and money?

25%

Where: Salina Central Journalism room Cost: $75 Why: “Because it was mandatory and it sounded fun.” Favorite part: “Adventures with Maggie (Sport) and Eli (Champ).

118 students replied to a text message survey during lunch on Friday, August 17.

Diving

Who: Junior Kyler Bell When: June 10-June 15 Where: Austin, TX Cost: $600

Why: “I knew people who had gone to it and said it was amazing, and it lived up to my expectations.” Favorite part: “Diving off the 10 meter platform and getting coached by an olympian.”

Congress Who: Senior Ken Beck When: July 21-August 3 Where: Ft. Lauderdale, FL Cost: $2,853.96 Why: “To get amazing forensics skills.” Favorite part: “Meeting all my ‘friends.’”

Band

Who: Sophomore Lila Vaughn When: August 6August 9 Where: Salina Central Cost: Free

Why: “It was required to be eligible to go to the state fair contest.” Favorite part: “Being able to be a drum major.”

Engineering Who: Senior Anna McHenry When: June 10-June 14 Where: Rolla, MO Cost: $450 Why: “I want to major in chemical engineering and this helped us understand different types of engineering.” Favorite part: “I loved meeting new people and competing in the team flying machine competition.”

VETS Who: Junior Maggie Unruh When: June 11-June 14 Where: Emporia State University Cost: $280 Why: “The camp was mandatory for all VET squad members.” Favorite part: “My favorite part of the camp was our team bonding activities and working on our dance technique.”


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August 23, 2012

Athletes & Sports

File Photo / The Pylon

The boys’ soccer team comes together before the game to pray.

File Photo / The Pylon

The girls’ volleyball team celebrates after winning a tournament.

Expectations set high for fall sports season By Genna Salstrom Staff Reporter Soccer “We had a good season last year even though it didn’t end how we wanted it to. We didn’t lose too many players, and we’re closer as a team. If we want to achieve our goal of getting to and winning State, we’re going to need more leadership,” senior Erik Norris said. Last year’s season’s record was 17-2, so the team is making sure that all of the players are in great shape and ready to take on State. “Our senior players have a

new sense of urgency this year to win State, but we need to improve on our depth,” Coach Owen said. Football “We’re looking to make playoffs and State this season. We’ve improved on defense and offense since our letdown last year. This team has been together a long time, and we’re improving on running as a team,” senior Kade True said. “We were hurt by injuries last year, so now we’re focusing on getting stronger and in better shape,” Coach Hall said. Football is the largest team at the school, and always needs players on

the sidelines ready to go in if something happens to the starters. Because of this, the football team does not make cuts. They were second in their league, which is one of the toughest in Kansas, according to Hall. Tennis “Our goal this year is to go to State as a team. We were very successful last season, and this year I’m working on my backhand and my chemistry with my doubles partner, Gabby Briggs,” junior Mackenzie Morris said. Last year, the players that made it to state were Rachel

Norris in the #1 singles spot, Sammy Jordan in the #2 singles spot, and Morris and Briggs for doubles. Volleyball Last year, the volleyball team won 25 of their games, which is amazing considering the previous year they won 9 and the year before that they won just 4. “I expect to win 30 games and go to State this year. We’ve improved on passing and blocking over the summer,” Coach Pfeiffer said. “We need to communicate better, but we’ve definitely improved on serve receive,” junior Shaelyn Martin said.

Golf “This year, we’re mostly focusing on having fun. We had a really fun, no drama group last year. We would like to go to State as a team for the 5th repeating year and be the 2nd repeating team. They have played more golf and tournaments than ever over the summer, and we’ve improved on our scores since last year,” Coach Ewing said. “We did better than we expected to last year, and this year our goals are just to play the game and love the game,” junior Alyssa Kim said.

Maggie Vernon/ The Pylon Freshman, JV and Varsity football have time to bond at the beginning of practice while they stretch and warm-up together before they start practice and split up. Maggie Vernon / The Pylon Junior Audrey Augustine practices her jumps in the cafeteria during an after school VETS practice with her teammates.

Embracing the hard work Bradley one of few athletes who enjoys two-a-days By Austin Huyhn Staff Reporter The work ethic of athletes are measured precisely during two-a-days. Two-a-days are usually dreaded by the athletes of these teams, but one athlete thinks otherwise. Junior Tara Bradley embraces two-a-days and looks forward to getting better. Unfortunately for Bradley, two-a-days for volleyball only last two days. “I don’t think two-a-days should be all season long, but at least a week straight.” Bradley said. Her main goal is to make it to state, and the volleyball team has full potential to do that.

“Two-a-days will help our journey to state by working hard and being there for each other when times get tough,”

“Two-a-days will help our journey to state by working hard and being there for each other when times get tough.” Tara Bradley Junior Bradley said. Bradley started JV as a freshmen. Her sophomore year, she started varsity due to her hard work. Her contribution to the team,

as well as others, led the volleyball team to a 25-15 record, one of the best records set by the volleyball team since 1997. Bradley has a strong support system from her parents. “Both of my parents were student athletes in college. They both keep me motivated to go running and to be on time for practice.” Bradley’s mother played volleyball in Wyoming and her father played football in Minnesota. Fortunately, Bradley inherited her parent’s athletic traits. Eli Berner / The Pylon

Junior Tara Bradley dives to get a ball during two-a-day practices.


August 23, 2012

Athletes & Sports Maggie Vernon / The Pylon During the first week of tryouts, senior goalie, Ryan Emme, dives for a save. Maggie Vernon / The Pylon Senior linebacker, Kade True, stretches out before practice.

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By the

numbers a quick look at numbers and stats about the fall sports season

118

number of hours the football team practiced this summer

Working to make the cut

Volleyball, soccer only fall sports to narrow down their rosters By Genna Salstrom Staff Reporter

Eli Berner / The Pylon Sophomore middle blocker, Riley Gates, prepares to dive for a ball at volleyball practice.

Soccer is one of only two fall sports that makes cuts, due to a lack of funds and coaches. Even the players that started last year or did all the summer conditioning aren’t always immune to them. “There are different aspects as a coach. You never know how good a player will be in the future, and only about 10 percent of the kids who get cut actually come out again the next year. You don’t know how important the sport is to the kid. You may have an academically challenged kid who now isn’t going to graduate because they no longer have the sport to keep them focused. Sometimes, you have to cut kids who worked hard all summer to get better,” Coach Owens said. “I kept telling myself that I could make it, but I also knew there was a possibility of being cut. There is a lot of talent on the team,” junior Jose Esparza said. Jose’s friend, freshman Angel Esparza, also tried out for the team, but did not make it. “Even though it’s hard being cut when Jose wasn’t, I was okay with not making it. I just asked to be manager, and I’m going to try out again next year,” Angel said.

To get through the difficult tryouts, junior Ian Johnson used his mental toughness. Since he knew he did his best every day at tryouts, he was not worried about getting cut. On the other hand, junior Alex Dominguez was very nervous about cuts because of all the talented players trying out for the team. “It sucks because I have friends, like Taylor, that didn’t make it. It’s going to change the team because he just made it fun,” Dominguez said. “I started last year, and I’ve played for a long time, so getting cut this year was pretty savage. Owen told me I could come to practices, get better, and play next year, but I don’t know if I will. When I looked at the paper and saw that my name wasn’t on it, I was upset,” junior Taylor Hanson said. Sophomore Jaime Meraz was in the same boat as Hanson. He played last year, and found it very surprising when he didn’t make it after all of the summer conditioning he did. “I thought I would make it, and when I didn’t, I was definitely mad and disappointed. I also knew that my friends would tease me if I didn’t make it,” Meraz said.

On the Spot

Athletes in the mix Keisha Hamilton Volleyball Grant Dodge Football Morgan Hauserman Girls Tennis Taylor Knoth Girls Golf Jesse Lennon Boys Soccer

Real men don’t... “Disrespect women in any way (or wear mandex)” “Listen to Justin Beiber”

just cracks me up “When my friends say the most hilarious things during the most random times” “Vince Johnson’s laugh”

“Take shirtless photos of themselves in the mirror”

“Honey Boo-Boo Child”

“LOL”

“Callie Windholz”

“Snitch”

“Taylor Hanson”

Best childhood memory “When I started playing basketball in third grade” “Easter egg hunts” “Playing Indians in forts with my sisters” “Spending time with family in Maine” “Being born”

8 20

number of returning lettermen for the boys’ soccer team

number of seniors on the football team

4 10 7 the place Alyssa Kim got last year at state for girls’ golf

number of days the soccer team has two-a-days

number of years Coach Goll has been coaching girls’ tennis

196

number of tennis balls that fit into a tennis basket

number of years it has been since the volleyball team won substate

16


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August 23, 2012

Fine Arts

Up from the underground

RAP Earl Sweatshirt

A part of OFWGKTA, Earl is notable for his dark lyrical content, rhyme schemes and heavy word play, labeled as “mesmerizing.”

Hayley Hager / The Pylon

Senior Gabe Levinson grins as she messes around with nothing more than a familiar paintbrush.

Discovering the art of self expression By Hayley Hager Arts Editor

Das Racist

With humor, academic references, foreign allusions and unconventional style, Das Racist has been praised as a new voice in rap.

El-P

Using metaphors, science fiction and fantasy, he has been labeled as “one of the most technically gifted MC’s of his time.”

For senior Gabe Levinson, finding a way to honestly express herself has become no problem. “Art is a way to express yourself even if you aren’t good at it,” Levinson said. “There are no guidelines… It’s freedom.” Walking through the halls you may notice Levinsons colorful hair, piercings, and stretched earlobes, but art is in

Inspired by Jay-Z, SBQ has a new sound every time he raps. Using a little swag, it’s always a new flow.

Danny Brown A funny, inventive rapper who is driven to make outrageous, but brilliant rap.

succeed in something that is so free-reign, Mr. Cullins expects to see a lot from his advanced students this year, especially Levinson. “Gabe is dedicated to being unique and creative. I think anyone could agree with that,” Cullins said. “I’m inspired by random things,” Levinson said. “Any time I can just sit down and focus I get inspired.” Through high school we all have the opportunity to grow

as students and as people. We find what we like, and dislike, what we’re good at and what we aren’t so good at. Levinson has fortunately been able to find something she loves to do, and something she is great at. “The best thing about art is that you don’t have to know exactly what you want to do right away. You find and create your own style,” Levinson said.

Fall callbacks Students audition for ‘Boys Next Door’ and ‘Quilters’ By Sydney Dauer Staff Reporter

‘Boys Next Door’ shows

School Boy Q

her life in more ways than just her physical appearance. “Even though it may be a hobby, art will always be in my life,” Levinson said. “It’s a passion of mine.” Levinson is in AP studio art, which is taught by Mr. Cullins. There is more to this class than just being able to paint and draw well. Students must push themselves to meet deadlines and maintain a good grade to be able to even stay in the class. Even with the pressure to

the life of four men who live in a group home for the mentally challenged. The play explains their everyday lives and struggles.

‘Quilters’ is about a woman named Sarah and her “daughters” who are living a pioneer life. They make a giant quilt based on the stages of womanhood. Putting on two fall plays not only puts pressure on students that have to audition on the first day of school, but can also be a major cause of stress to the man that must direct two different plays in a short span of time. However, there’s a method to

Find us out online at

Mr. Nulik’s madness. “With auditions being held for both shows at once, it really gives everybody a chance at a major role.” Nulik said. The auditions being held will not only select the cast for the first fall play, ‘Boys Next Door,’ but also the second fall play, ‘Quilters’. Nulik is a step ahead in preparing for the fall shows, saying that the thespian troupe has both sets built already. “We really hit the ground running once school starts.” Nulik said. Even with more opportunities present to land a major role, senior Shannon Bradbury says that she is nervous for the first day of auditions. “It is brand new material in auditions, as opposed to when you’re actually performing the play, you’ve rehearsed it several times.” Bradbury said. Bradbury says that she mentally prepares herself and hopes that she gets to audition with someone that has good energy to feed off of.

Eli Berner / The Pylon

Junior Addie Justus and freshman Xan Mattek get into character.

Voted 2010 “Best Dance Studio” by Readers Choice

141 S. Santa Fe. (785) 823 2625 Next to Santa Fe Subs, and the Kanza Fencing Club.


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August 23, 2012

Editorials & Opinion Versus- Lunch Rules, hungry or healthy By Sammy Jordan Opinion Editor When I first became the opinion editor, I vowed never to write about stereotypical editorial topics such as global warming, recycling, and school lunches. However, after eating a handful of meals in the cafeteria, I have become so enraged, I need a creative output for my thoughts or I might do something dangerous. There are probably about seven people in the entire building that will disagree with me when I argue that the new rules regarding school lunch should be abolished. My job is easy, so I applaud my opponent for having a positive attitude toward the change of menu. I guess I’m just not one for “change.” Yes, that was a stab at the Obama Administration. I will not waste my time on statistics as to why these meals are healthier choices, seeing as I am still hungry after lunch and I’m just a 120 pound girl (yes, I just

advertised my weight). By Jackson Mattek Last January when Michelle Guest Reporter Obama and Ag Secretary, Tom Look around folks. I hate to Vilsack announced the new be the bearer of bad news-- but, lunch requirements, Michelle we are fat. America is fat. Salina noted that school lunch may be is fat. the only nutritious meal students According to the Organization who are struggling financially for Economic Co-operation and receive that day. Development 60 percent America of Kansas a 30.6% students qualify “...The health of an entire generation had obesity rate in for free and and the economic health and security 2010; ranking reduced lunches. us at number of our nation is at stake...” As stated by one, rolls and feedingamerica. cankles above org, nationwide Michelle Obama the rest of the there are about First Lady world. 20.6 million The silver children who medalists at qualify. Of these food stuffing are only at 24%. 20.6 million, around 16 million Doesn’t that just make you proud live in “food insecure homes”. to be an Amurrican? If this is the only nutritious Mississippi has reigned meal, let alone meal they supreme (pizza) for six years receive, they will be leaving in row. As for Kansas, we are lunch hungry, and going home still in the top quartile of fat to an empty kitchen. After an states, and (this may come as a unsatisfying meal, I have the surprise) Saline county has the ability to simply go back to the absolute highest obesity rate of snack line and get five baggies of all counties in Kansas, with over Fruit Gushers, but for those on one-third of us being obese and free and reduced lunches, this over half of us being overweight isn’t always the case. (Center for Disease Control and The federal student lunch Prevention). program currently costs $11 In January of this year, billion. This new “innovative” the fierce first lady with the plan will add an additional $3.2 arms of a goddess, Michelle billion. Apparently, produce is Obama, and Department of expensive. Agriculture Secretary Tom With a high increase of cost, Vilsack introduced new rules we should see a “change” of and regulations regarding public quality in our meals so that we school meals. The USDA updated can leave lunch full.

and implemented the Healthy Hunger-Free kids act of 2010, but most of what I hear in the hallway at school is how hungry everyone is. The USDA’s actions have directly affected us fatties, and we’re getting pretty ticked off! All crossed boundaries put aside, I truly do appreciate what the federal government is trying to do. I love that we have 25 calorie packets of dressing and whole wheat! Small changes can make a big difference. I used to be obese. At 5’11” and 243 pounds I was a statistic. I was part of that third of obese Saline county residents. By cutting calories, fat excessive carbohydrates, and increasing exercise, I sit at a computer typing an article before you at a slimmer, more muscular, and sexy 183 pounds, and I feel great. Yes, America is fat. Yes, Kansas is fat. Yes, Salina is fat. Yes, I was fat. However, there is a time for change. We can all make this positive change. Yes we can.

10% It hasn’t affected me at all.

24% I didn’t even know this was a policy.

don’t get the classes that they chose or they get thrown in classes to fill up their schedules. “Students are going to have to be more thoughtful when deciding the classes they are going to take,” couselor, Cindy Roets said. Central administration is not

66% The policy needs to be changed back, I enjoyed being able to change classes.

Justin Gaddy @MacDaddy1324 Pregnant people have to eat for 2, and they just give em’ one sandwich. #notenough Ben Lindgren @8rownpr1de I want cheese. Brynne Atherton@BrynneAtherton If they want to feed us right, the govn’t should buy us healthier food, instead of cutting portions. #starving shea-shea-o’lay @SheMye22 #20ThingsIDontLike @BarackObama this portioned food sucks. hope you’re happy when I die from being malnourished

Kudos & Call outs

The Pylon staff voted on whether or not the counselors decision to not allow class changes was the right thing to do.

The following are situations in which our students and faculty deserve praise for a job well done or to be called out for dropping the ball.

yes no

Students are no longer allowed to change their schedules. “The policy was changed because when students sign up for classes, that determines the staff we hire to accommodate for the number of students taking each subject,” head counselor Shelda Burger said.

According to Burger, the counselors could have just limited the number of changes each student could make because there are many reasons that a schedule may need to be changed. This change in policy in no way benefits anyone. Students have to deal with the choices they made three months prior. Many

Bobby Tech @Bobby.Tech2 Regulated lunches are a waste of my time, I’d rather be at McDonalds.

Should students be allowed to change their schedules?

16 out of 17 staffers voted yes

1 out of 17 staffers voted no

Counselors have reasons to not allow class changes Staff Reporter

Gabe Geisen @sciencesaves Small portion sizes, are a good stop toward a healthy country. #goMichele

Chandler Bryan @ cheddacheese12 @MichelleObama thanks for ruining school lunches my senior year.. Like they weren’t bad enough.

Staff Editorial: By Chandler Burris

Have an opinion? Tweet to @chspylon and we might feature your tweet in the next issue.

hitting the nail on the head this year. Taking the student opinion into consideration would be the best option when considering policy changes, as they are the ones directly affected by these policies.

How do you feel about not being able to change your class schedule this year? Taken from a lunchroom poll of 30.

Kudos: -Lunch ladies for listening to our various complaints about the new lunch rules. -The new art teacher’s righteous beard. -Mr. Jones for coming back after the rudest freshman english class of all time. -Football is ranked fifth in the state. -New office furniture and carpeting. It looks real nice. -Cell phone policy. Get your text on...during passing periods.

Call outs: -Hi, I would like more than one squirt of ketchup, Michelle. -Homecoming is too soon. At the rate we’re going, nobody will have a date. Except Meg Johnson. Go Max! -Boys taking selfies on public social networking sites. Stop it. -Baseball language. “truuuu” or “prolly not, k.” should stop soon. -The red ford truck that turned left on roach


August 2012  

Salina Central's Pylon Newspaper for August of 2012

August 2012  

Salina Central's Pylon Newspaper for August of 2012

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