Page 1

Our Answers Dec. 4, 2015


12.04

EDITOR IN CHIEF: STEPHANIE ZHANG

ASSOCIATE EDITORS:

REPORTERS: Christine Fernando, christinefernando@chsacumen.com Katie Long, katielong@chsacumen.com Laxmi Palde, laxmipalde@chsacumen.com Ellen Peng, ellenpeng@chsacumen.com Sitha Vallabhaneni, sithavallabhaneni@chsacumen.com Emily Worrell, emilyworrell@chsacumen.com

GRAPHICS ARTISTS: Matthew Han, matthewhan@chsacumen.com Jasmine Lam, jasminelam@chsacumen.com Akshar Patel, aksharpatel@chsacumen.com Tiffany Xie, tiffanyxie@chsacumen.com Lianne Yu, lianneyu@chsacumen.com Jenny Zhao, jennyzhao@chsacumen.com

stephaniezhang@chsacumen.com

Selena Qian, selenaqian@chsacumen.com Annika Wolff, annikawolff@chsacumen.com


Dearest reader, Before your eyes is the wall of awards outside of the room where Acumen and HiLite call home, Room C147. First impressions? You might be asking “Why does it looks so messy and unorganized?” We have an answer. It’s random. Mostly reserved for smaller awards, this wall of awards began with HiLite’s former advisor, Tony Willis who added the plaques to the wall as they came in, with no plan of organization. Our advisor overheard that very question from a student, which prompted us to dedicate this entire issue to answering popular questions about our school and the world around us. While one question sparked the manifestation of this issue, there are an infinite number of possible questions, even locally about CHS. What are some of your questions about CHS? About the world around us? -Stephanie Zhang, editor in chief OUR ANSWERS | 03 PHOTOGRAPHERS: Divya Annamalai, divyaannamalai@chsacumen.com Kyle Crawford, kylecrawford@chsacumen.com Sarah Liu, sarahliu@chsacumen.com Swetha Nakshatri, swethanakshatri@chsacumen.com Sara Yung, sarayung@chsacumen.com ONLINE // SOCIAL MEDIA: Danny Goldberg, dannygoldberg@chsacumen.com Swetha Nakshatri, swethanakshatri@chsacumen.com < COVERS AND PG 2-3 PHOTOS AND DESIGNS // STEPHANIE ZHANG AND SELENA QIAN

NON-STAFF CONTRIBUTORS: Alina Husain, ahusain@hilite.org Olivia Jacko, ojacko@hilite.org Rebecca Qin, rqin@hilite.org Rachael Tan, rtan@hilite.org HI@CHSACUMEN.COM CHSACUMEN.COM FACEBOOK.COM/CHSACUMEN @CHSACUMEN


IN THIS ISSUE

Part 1.

06 Our School 08 10 12 14

Tidbits & Easter Eggs The Chairs of CHS Second CHS Freshman Cafeteria Mural

08

12.04

16 18 21

Measurements Teacher Special Time Commitment

10


SELENA QIAN // DESIGN

Part 2.

Our World 22 Violence Teenage Love Word Origins What Makes A... Too Much

24 26 27 28 30

PHOTO CREDIT // KYLE CRAWFORD

OUR ANSWERS | 05

PHOTO CREDIT // SELENA QIAN

24

PHOTO CREDIT // ALEX YOM


1. Our School, Our Home, Ourselves. Who are we?

CARMEL

HIGH SCHOOL 12.04

?


>> THE GREENHOUSE IN A300

OUR ANSWERS | 07

KYLE CRAWFORD // PHOTO; STEPHANIE ZHANG // DESIGN


PART I: CHS

? PLACES YOU MIGHT HAVE NEVER SEEN

GREENHOUSE // A300

FRESHMAN POND // ACROSS FROM DOOR 12

12.04


CONTENT | SITHA VALLABHANENI PHOTOS | KYLE CRAWFORD & STEPHANIE ZHANG

ARTS GARDEN // H115

HISTORIC CLASSROOM // E221

OUR ANSWERS | 09

STEPHANIE ZHANG // DESIGN


PART I: CHS

?

HAVE YOU SEEN THESE CHAIRS?

WORDS AND PHOTOS | STEPHANIE ZHANG AND SELENA QIAN

>>

U.S. History teacher Allison Hargrove’s yellow chair

T

his chair was famous at Plymouth High School in Plymouth, IN where Hargrove formerly taught. “It was my first year teaching, and I didn’t have a chair, and so my student, who was kind of—let’s use the word obnoxious, but very sweet and endearing and special to me—he stole it from his parents’ basement … I didn’t know it was stolen. I thought it was a gift, until I had parent-teacher conferences, and his dad said, ‘Hey, that chair is missing from my basement,’ but he let me keep it anyway. The chair has become kind of famous. People take pictures of it; it’s been in

12.04 lots of different places, and it’s kind of like a recognized thing for when I taught at Plymouth. Everybody loved the chair. It was a really big deal.” Hargrove said she has had the chair for nine years now, and she uses it when she teaches. “I like the height, it’s really comfortable. It has a lot of sentimental value as well, so I use it a lot, and I talk about it a lot.”

>>

English teacher Allyson Wells-Podell’s beanbag and rocker chairs

W

ells-Podell said she drew inspiration for this space from innovative companies like Apple, Google and Facebook that all have spaces designed to foster brainstorming and invention. She said she allows students to use these chairs whenever they want. “I cannot imagine how uncomfortable it must be for students to sit in these desks four periods a day, eight hours a day. I think it would be miserable, so even if students are working independently, they’re always free to get up and move around … I even have students who come in maybe before or after school who I’ve never had in class before, so some friends of students who I have first period sometimes come in and use the spaces, so lots of positive feedback, and students really do use the spaces when they have the chance to collaborate and move around. “It’s all a slow work-inprogress. The beanbags were new this year, these chairs have been here for a few years now, so just whenever I have the chance to pick things up here and there I try to do that to make it a comfortable space.”


SELENA QIAN // DESIGN

>>

OUR ANSWERS | 11

The Jacksonian Couch of Deep Conversation

T

his chair can be found in the HiLite conference room. HiLite adviser Jim Streisel said the couch was relocated from the media center when there was a renovation in 2010. “It was just a place where my students enjoy some really good conversations with each other, and a former student of mine, Jackson Whittaker, was one of the ringleaders of that conversation. Every time I’d walk in, they’d always be talking about something really, really deep, so they decided to (name) this couch ‘The Jacksonian Couch of Deep Conversation.’ Once things get on the wall in the HiLite room, they tend to stay, so it’s been here for five years.”


PART I: CHS

?

WILL THERE BE A SECOND CHS?

This year, Carmel High School reached a total of 5,010 students, roughly the same number of a small college or university. The first graduating class of Carmel High School in 1890 consisted of six students, jumping to 28 students in 1963. After 52 years, the planned graduating class of 2016 has reached approximately 1,200. What will happen when Carmel reaches its capacity? Will there be a second high school? The current student teacher ratio at Carmel is 19:1. The national average is 16:1. Carmel this year reached a total of 5,010 students. As the numbers increase, classroom sizes are only growing larger. Currently for most standard classes, there must be over 40 students to split one class. Due to the massive number of students, each class will see approximately 25-35 students.

12.04

SOURCES: NICHE.COM CCS.K12.IN.US


Around 1995, there was no Freshman Center. Now the Carmel High School complex sits on 55 acres of land and has 1,046,572 square feet under roof. The entire Carmel Clay Schools system consists of 11 elementary schools, 3 middle schools, 1 high schools, 2 transportation facilities and 1 administration building. In total, all these buildings cover 2,858,808 square feet

1.

Carmel High School has one of the biggest high school populations in the United States, so there is a wide variety of classes available. In the language department, there are 24 teachers, with 8 available languages. In the English department, there are 40 English teachers. The science department has 40 science teachers.

2.

The counseling center is crucial to the success of Carmel High School. For the over 5,000 students at Carmel, there are 11, 10-12 grade counselors at the main offices. The freshman center has 4 freshman counselors. Each counselor is assigned to about 320-330 students. In addition, there are 3 social workers, 1 registrar, 3 secretarirs and 1 director.

3.

With 17 counselors, 2.5 media specialists, 3 nurses and 12 administrators, the professional staff at Carmel High School also includes over 300 classroom teachers. Over half the teachers have 10 or more years professional experience, and more than one in five have 20 or more years experience. Another 200 employees in a range of clerical, custodial, food service, technical and other support positions bring the total high school staff up to over 500. OUR ANSWERS | 13

locations of the largest public schools (top 20)

MATTHEW HAN // GRAPHIC

With all these factors, Carmel High School has managed to make itself number 15 in the top 20 largest public high schools in America. Despite this, Joe Schaller said that there are no current plans for a second high school, because demographists predict that there will be no major increase in the number of students at Carmel in the future.


PART I: CHS

?

WHAT IS THE MURAL IN THE FRESHMAN CAFETERIA? CONTENT | LAXMI PALDE PHOTO | KYLE CRAWFORD

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A

BOVE THE STEPS CONNECTING the freshman cafeteria and Freshman Center is a grand mural, an abstract art piece with bright colors and countless symbols. According to Principal John Williams, this mural was made when the Freshman Center was constructed. The school had a contract with an Indianapolis artist who brought in various samples and ideas. Although the art piece wasn’t vital to the construction of the freshman center, Williams said the school wanted something to fill in the big space in the freshman cafeteria.

Williams said that at the time, there was a poll for teachers and students asking what they thought represented CHS most. “That was the idea of the mural,” Williams said. Because of its location high up on the wall, the artist had to use scaffolding and built the mural in pieces. “I wasn’t sold on it at first,” Williams said. “Partly, and I still agree with this, some of the things that were in there were just things that were going on at that time. I’m sure there’s some stuff in there that happened maybe around that time with those kids that were in school at that time that wouldn’t necessarily mean anything to you guys. So it’s also a memorial to the time period.”


WHAT DO YOU THINK THE MURAL MEANS? ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL AMY SKEENS-BENTON How would you interpret this mural/ art piece? What do you think is its significance? It is a symbol of opportunity…it also has some hidden secrets. The two trees represent the two trees that have stood in the same place since the old high school was here called, Old north.  That is a little fun fact….

Considering your perspective and your experiences at Carmel High School, what does this piece of art mean to you? It is what greets every frosh as they enter the center and it is a representation of CHS and what a wonderful place this is. >>FOR MORE, GO TO CHSACUMEN.COM

OUR ANSWERS | 15 Williams said he thinks there might be some different symbols and objects in the mural if it were done today, but nonetheless, the art piece captures the spirit of CHS. “I think there’s just a lot going on at Carmel but it kind of all blends together, and it all results in, I think, I hope, pretty uplifting, positive experience for kids,” Williams said. “There’s a lot of stuff going on (in the mural too).” “If it does that, you know, a lot of kids are sitting there just reflecting on it, then it maybe served it purpose,” Williams said. “I mean, what’s art for if not to make us reflect and think, kind of fit our world into this (mural). It’s interesting.” A

STEPHANIE ZHANG // DESIGN

Williams said he likes the bright colors and the general positive vibe of the mural. During its construction, the artist went through each image on the art piece and explained some tie to the high school or the community, according to Williams. For example, the two trees in the mural represent the two trees outside the cafeteria. In fact, those trees are also pictured in the paintings of the 1958 renovations of the school. He said, “I think what I like about it is that it’s uplifting. And I think because of its clutter, it kind of represents (CHS).”


PART I: CHS

? HOW MUCH DO YOU WALK IN A DAY? FLOOR PLAN

upper level

Lower LEvel 3rd floor

N 200 ft

2nd floor

3rd floor

2nd floor

Lower LEvel

Main lEvel

a rooms b rooms c rooms d rooms e rooms F rooms

Key

g rooms h rooms p rooms rest rooms Stairs other

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SAMPLE SCHEDULE Arrival Natatorium Entrance

1,811 FT (0.34 mi)

period 1 finite math: room A325

1,351 FT (0.26 mi)

period 2 ib business: room f116

188 Ft (0.04 mi)

Departure Natatorium Entrance

1,705 Ft (0.32 mi)

period 4 Spanish: room A311

1,246 Ft (0.24 mi)

period 3b w131: room e127

1,122 Ft (0.21 mi)

Total distance: 8,545 ft (1.62 mi)

180 days per school year

x

x

4 years at CHS

1,166.4 Mi

period 3A w131: room e127 1,122 Ft (0.21 mi) c Lunch Main Cafeteria

in four years at chs, you will walk over 1100 miles; enough to get you to philadelphia and back.


TOTALS

1,451

402

5

3

3

RESTROOMS

10 8 6 4 11

1

8

8

0

6

1

3

60

26

84

56

17

98

8

ROOMS/OFFICES

53

100 80 60 40 20 0

2

2 0

Number of rooms

10

0

7

1

0

2

45

Number of restrooms

restrooms

2,079

1,689

347

2,501

4

12

Carmel High School has over 250 toliets. You could spend an entire school year using a different toliet each day and still not get to use all of them.

if we put the entire population of Carmel in Carmel High School, Each room would have around 180 people

290

6

0

rooms

951

8

2

stairwells

510

STAIRS

10

if put end-to-end, the stairs in carmel high school would reach over 50 stories high

47

982

0

1,611

500

2

33

1,000

7

if put end-to-end, the hallways in carmel high school would reach clay middle school

2,000 1,500

63

miles of hallways

2,500

Number of Stairwells

2.33

Total Hallway Length (Feet)

HALLWAYS

OUR ANSWERS | 17

200,000

333,501

31,095

130,054

224,846

19,241

137,431

0

10,514

50,000

72,415

100,000

61,319

150,000 93,857

Carmel high school is more than one-fifth the size of vatican city

250,000

AKSHAR PATEL // GRAPHIC

million square feet

300,000 Total Area (square Feet)

1.1

AREA

350,000


PART I: CHS

KATIE KELLY SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHHER For how long have you been teaching at CHS? This is my ninth year of teaching at CHS. What exactly is an Ironman? An Ironman triathlon is a triathlon that involves a 2.4-mile swim, followed by 112-mile bike ride and finished off with a 26.2-mile run that you have 17 hours to complete. How long does it take to train for an Ironman? Really it takes somewhere between 6-9 months of hard training, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on top of at least a year of base training. What made you decide that you wanted to do Iron Man Triathlons? On TV I saw the Ironman World Championship, and I thought that it was just almost this impossible accomplishment but then I had friends who did it, and I saw it as a great personal challenge that they undertook, and, for them and for me, as well, it represented setting a goal that seemed impossible and then being able to create a plan and execute it to make it a reality.

12.04


ANNIKA WOLFF // DESIGN

JERRY BRICKLEY ENGLISH TEACHER For how long have you been teaching at CHS? This is my 26th year. How did you get interested in reenacting? It’s actually because of school … when I started teaching here, the legend of King Arthur was in the English 10 curriculum, and I called out to Old Indiana Fun Park at the time because they had a Renaissance festival, and I got a phone number for a group, and two guys came out and did a demonstration, and I got hooked.

retired from that about four years ago. I also do Civil War (reenactment) …I rode Civil War cavalry for a number of years, and I do the French and Indian War (reenactment).

How long have you been reenacting? About 25 years.

What exactly is reenactment? Reenacting is a form of social history. The idea is to create the image of what life would have been like in the time period for the public to take a look at and be educated and to experience. As a reenactor, you are playing a role to a large extent so that you’re trying to show them what these people wore, how they spoke, the activities that they did.

You mentioned that you do two major time periods of reenactment; can you explain those? Originally I did medieval (reenactment). I was in a group that did full-contact jousting on horseback and fighting with steel weapons at Renaissance festivals. We

Do you have a favorite memory from reenacting? Oh dear, there’s too many in that many years. I remember getting knighted. I think that’s probably one of the most important ones when I was doing medieval (reenactment). Yeah, there’s way too many to list.

OUR ANSWERS | 19

?

WHAT ACTIVITES DO TEACHERS DO?

CONTENT | OLIVIA JACKO PHOTOS | SWETHA NAKSHATRI


GRAPHICS BY TIFFANY XIE // DESIGN BY ANNIKA WOLFF

PART I: CHS

12.04

JOHN BURLACE … well, right when I started CHOIR TEACHER

For how long have you been teaching at CHS? This is my second year.

teaching, so about 13, 14 years ago. Then I started branching out and writing for other people within the past six or seven years.

When did you start doing music arrangements for groups? I started arranging music for my own groups probably about

Why did you start doing your own arrangements? I had to do my own arrangements to solve issues that were there and not

everything that was written was written perfectly for the students that I had so I just kind of made some changes and it all started off by just sort of swapping some things around to make it better for my kids and then filling in some gaps that needed to be filled in and then I just started to do it from scratch myself.

What’s your favorite part about that process? Now my favorite part is being able to take the strengths of a group and write for that or take into account the weaknesses of a group and make sure to avoid those issues. So my favorite part (is that) it’s kind of like a big puzzle, figuring out how to make the group sound as good as they can possibly sound.


? HOW MUCH TIME DO WE SPEND ON OUR ACTIVITIES?

OUR ANSWERS | 21

SOURCE: PUBLICAGENDA.ORG // CENSUS.GOV


2. Our Society, Our Surroundings, Ourselves. What is the world around us?

THE WORLD

AROUND

US

12.04

?


OUR ANSWERS | 23

STEPHANIE ZHANG // DESIGN AND PHOTO


PART II

?

WHY ALL THE VIOLENCE?

Violence in the United States is rising, and CHS students attest to the immediacy of this issue.

A

ccording to a 2015 Forbes article, over 32,000 people in the United States are killed by gun violence each year, which means approximately 88 deaths per day. Although some students may see gun violence as a distant issue, for junior Ji Eun “Jane” Yu, gun violence struck close to home when it killed a close family friend. “He was trying to chase down this one guy who robbed a store,” Yu said. “He witnessed a group of young men robbing a store, and he tried to help the store owners by chasing them down, but he got shot.” Yu said the incident made her realize how prevalent gun violence actually was. “I was kind of shocked that this can happen to anyone,” Yu said. “It kind of hit me hard because it showed me that (gun violence) really wasn’t a light issue. It was a very serious issue that can really ruin a family and even a community.” Phil Hobson, school resource officer and sergeant, has also seen incidents of gun violence. “I have been in several situations involving guns, including bank robberies, a few shootings

12.04

>

Junior Ji Eun “Jane” Yu prays in church. Yu said she experienced gun violence when she saw a church member who was a close family friend get shot.

and suicides,” Hobson said. “A couple of the shootings I’ve been in have also been domestic. We had a wife shoot her husband in the chest when I was a younger officer, and we also had a husband shoot his wife and kill her at a bank here in Carmel.” Hobson said he believes violence has been increasing over the last several years. “It always seemed to me that our society as a whole has become more violent over the span of my lifetime and career,” Hobson said. “Watching the increase in overall violence in our society is saddening.” Junior Joseph Bloom has similarly witnessed violence throughout his entire life. Bloom grew up in Mechanicsville, VA, where he said gun violence was an ever-present part of his life. “It was always a factor of life, but I knew how to avoid it,” Bloom said. “I just sort of got acclimatized to it.” Bloom said that shootings would generally happen in bursts of three to four incidents every few weeks. “The worst part was that they would always clump up around Christmas,” Bloom said.

Despite growing up around this violence, Bloom said he does not believe guns should be banned. “I grew up in a place where there were hunters alongside gun violence, so I saw people using guns responsibly, and I saw people using them irresponsibly,” Bloom said. “My stance on (gun control) is that there should be stringent background checks and strict laws but not necessarily complete banning of anything.” Yu said she also believes strict background checks are needed. “I definitely feel like there must be stronger restrictions or regulation of guns,” Yu said. “I mean, it really can happen to anyone. You might feel like ‘Oh, it’s not going to happen to me, it’s not going to happen


SELENA QIAN // DESIGN

WORDS | EMILY WORRELL PHOTOS | SARA YUNG AND ALEX YOM anytime soon,’ but it really can happen. There really are people around us who can possess guns relatively easily, and one of them might have some terrible plan; they might just decide to come out and start shooting people.” However, Hobson said he thinks guns are not necessarily the problem. “I think for some reason the gun issue is a hot issue for people to really look at and say ‘Let’s take that away,’ when I don’t think that solves the issue that is lying underneath,” Hobson said. “I think sometimes the focus can go straight in on a weapon or a gun when the real issue is people’s willingness to commit violence and hurt other people whatever the means may be.” Yu believes that people need to understand how each incident of gun violence has a profound impact. “We don’t realize it because it doesn’t happen to us,” Yu said. “One victim of gun violence has a huge impact not only on that person but on his family, community and everywhere that he was involved in.” A

OUR ANSWERS | 25

>

Junior Ji Eun “Jane” Yu has witnessed gun violence in the past. She said this has made the issue much more immediate and real to her.


teenagelove love teenage love teenage ? HOW HOW DOWE WE DATE? HOW DO DATE? DO WE DATE? teenage love

PART II

HOW DO WE DATE?

*teens refers to ages 13 to 17

*teens refers to ages 13 17to 17 *teens refers to ages 13 to

HOW DO WE

65% of American 65% American 65% of American teens have not teens have teens have notnot been in aa relationship been relationship been in ainrelationship

35%35% of American 35%ofofAmerican American teensteens have have been been in a teens have been in ain a relationship relationship

65% of American teens have not been in a relationship

35% of American teens have been in a relationship

HOWDO DOWE WE HOW ASK SOMEONE OUT? ASKSOMEONE SOMEONEOUT? OUT?52% in person ASK wait for them to52% ask usin person HOW DO26%WE 52% in person 24% text them to ask 26%26% waitwait for for them to ask us us 15% call ASK SOMEONE OUT? 24%24% texttext *teens refers to ages 13 to 17

13% friend asks for us

15%15% callcall 9% message on social media 52% in person 13% friend asks for 13% usforusthem to ask us 26%for wait 6%friend other asks 9% message on social media 9% message on social 24% text media 6% other 6% other15% call

HOW CREEPY ARE WE? 13% friend asks for us

relationship

HOW OFTEN DO WE EXPECT TO COMMUNICATE?

HOWOFTEN OFTENDO DOWE WEEXPECT EXPECTTOTOCOMMUNICATE? COMMUNICATE? HOW 85% at least daily

85% at least daily 85% at least daily

HOW OFTEN DO WE EXPECT38%TO COMMUNICATE? 11% hourly 35% every few hours once a day 15% less often hourly 11%11% hourly

87% phone calls

92% texts

textsoutside of school 86%92% in person

87% phone calls phone HOW DO WE SPEND TIME TOGETHER? 70%87% social mediacalls

86% in person outside of school inchats person outside of school 55%86% video 92% texts

70% social media 37% 70% email social media

87% phone calls video chats 55%55% video chats 86% in person outside of school 37% email 37% email 70% social media

HOW DO WE BREAK UP?

10% have impersonated their partner in a message

4% have secretly downloaded a GPS or tracking program onto their partner’s device

least acceptable

1

55% video chats HOWDO DOWE WEBREAK BREAK UP? HOW 37% emailUP? 8.4 3.4 5.4

least least acceptable acceptable

text message

least acceptable

message texttext message

1 1

1

phone call

HOW3.4DO WE BREAK UP? 5.4 3.4

3.4

5.4

phone phone callcall

5.4

dating 5.69

most acceptable

10

in person

text message phone call HOW DO WE CLASSIFY OUR RELATIONSHIPS?

flirting 2

often 15%15% lessless often

HOWDO DO WE SPENDTIME TIME 92% textsaTOGETHER? 35%WE every few hours 38% once dayTOGETHER? 15% less often HOW SPEND

HOW CREEPY ARE WE?

10% have impersonated their partner 4% have secretly downloaded a GPS 4% secretly downloaded a GPS or or in tracking ahave message program onto their partner’s device tracking program onto their partner’s device

once a day 38%38% once a day

11% hourly

of teens have accessed a mobile 11%11% of teens have accessed a mobile or online account of their partner or online account of their partner

tracking program onto their partner’s device

85% at least daily

HOW DO WE SPEND TIME TOGETHER?

9% message on social media HOW CREEPY ARE WE? 11% of teensARE have accessed a mobile HOW CREEPY WE? 6% other or online account of their partner

11% of teens have accessed a mobile or online account of their partner have impersonated their partner 10%10% have impersonated their partner 4% have secretly downloaded a GPS or a message in ainmessage

every hours 35%35% every fewfew hours

8.48.4 in person in person

most most acceptable acceptable

1010

most acceptable

8.4 10 in person PEWINTERNET.ORG // SOURCE

HOWbae DO WE CLASSIFY OURofficial RELATIONSHIPS? other 7.58 HOW DO 6.25 2.32WE CLASSIFY OUR RELATIONSHIPS?

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5.69 dating flirting 2 WE CLASSIFY OUR HOW RELATIONSHIPS? 5.69 dating flirting 2DO significant significant

least serious 0

least serious least serious 00

least serious 0

TIFFANY XIE // GRAPHIC

significant

bae 2.32

baefling 2.32 friends 2 1.05 flirting 2.23 bae 2.32

friends friends 1.05 1.05

fling fling 2.23 2.23

friends 1.05

fling 2.23

most serious

7.58 other official 6.25 other 7.58

6.25 babe/baby official boyfriend/ high school 5.31dating 5.69 girlfriendsignificant sweetheart 8.25 6.85 most serious 7.58 other official 6.25 most serious honey *Data taken from a staff survey 6.12

babe/baby babe/baby 5.315.31

boyfriend/ high high school boyfriend/ school most serious girlfriend sweetheart girlfriend sweetheart 8.25 6.85 8.25 6.85 honey babe/baby honey boyfriend/ high school *Data taken from a staff survey 6.12girlfriend 5.31 6.12 sweetheart *Data taken from a staff survey 8.25 6.85 honey *Data taken from a staff survey 6.12


? WHERE DOES LANGUAGE COME FROM? Approximately 7,000 languages exist around the world today. How did these languages arise? Where did they come from? Here, we explore the different hypotheses along with how language has changed over time. LANGUAGE DIVERSITY HYPOTHESES:

ORIGIN IS AFFECTED BY LOCATION

Believers of monogenesis usually think the language of their region was the original

MONOGENESIS HYPOTHESIS States there was a single original language that could have developed from any source (gods, natural evolution, etc.)

CANDELABRA THEORY

Favored in East Asia; states language developed in multiple locations at the same time

MOTHER TONGUE THEORY

Is a type of monogenesis; states language came from a single group of Homo sapiens, as early as 150,000 years ago, and diverged over time

OUT OF AFRICA THEORY

Associated with Mother Tongue Theory; connected to belief that first modern humans originated from Africa; states first language from Africa BBC.CO.UK, NEWS-MEDICAL.NET, PANDORA.CII.WWU.EDU // SOURCES

OUR ANSWERS | 27

NATURAL EVOLUTION HYPOTHESIS

EVOLUTION OF LANGUAGE IN THE HILITE

States a more sophisticated human brain allowed learning and language invention BROCA’S AREA WERNICKE’S AREA Found in frontal lobe; Associated with speech; controls motor functions involved in written and involved with speech spoken language and helps with language comprehension AUDITORY CORTEX Part of hearing sensory system

VISUAL CORTEX Processes visual information

Here are some examples of how words from a 1937 issue of the HiLite compare to those in a recent issue. CARMEL HI-LIGHT NOVEMBER, 1937

CARMEL HI-LIGHT NOVEMBER, 1937

Wiener roast // Hot dog dance Hallowe’en // Halloween Basketeers // Basketball players JASMINE LAM // GRAPHIC CARMEL HI-LIGHT NOVEMBER, 1937


?

?

PART II

??

WHAT MAKES

93 p at C

93 percent o at CHS is on C

...A MOVIE OSCAR-WORTHY? Picture.” Here’s how to create the ideal Oscar winner, based on previous winners.

very year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences names a film “Best Every year, the Academy of Motion Arts and Sciences names film “Best winners. icture.” Here’s how to create the Picture ideal Oscar winner, based ona previous Every year,the theAcademy Academyofof Motion Picture Sciences names Every year, Motion Picture ArtsArts andand Sciences names a filma film “Best Picture.” Here’s howhow to create the the ideal Oscar winner, “Best Picture.” Here’s to create ideal Oscar winner,based basedon onprevious previous winners. winners.

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JENNY ZHAO // GRAPHIC

...FOOD TASTE GOOD?

93 percent of Americans eat pizza at least once a month, and Smart Mouth pizza

Ninety-three percent of Americans eat pizza at least once a month, and Smart at CHS is one of isthe menu choices. fewreasons reasons Mouth pizza at CHS onemost of thepopular most popular menu choices.Here Here are are aafew why.why. Cheese contains a very concentrated amount of casomorphins, which produce an opiate effect, explaining why many find cheese “addictive.” In fact, casomorphins have been coined “dairy crack” by Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

Carbohydrates, which are found in pizza crust, help the brain regulate serotonin, a chemical that helps control appetite and produces feelings of happiness.

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When pepperoni cooks in the oven, the Maillard reaction takes place. This threestep reaction most often occurs during cooking and involves a reaction between sugars and proteins. This reaction is responsible for the browning of meats as well as the production of roasted, meaty flavors.

Tomato sauce contains glutamate, which, like monosodium glutamate (MSG), creates a strong savory flavor and enhances other flavors. Tomatoes Potatoes Mushrooms Corn 0

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OUR ANSWERS | 29

ber This reaction produces hundreds of products that contribute to a variety of popular flavors. Here are a few common products and the foods they appear in.

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Furans and thiophenes taste meaty, roasted and even burnt, if too much forms.

Furanones taste sweet, like caramel.

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The flavors in popular foods such as cooked meats, roasted nuts and caramels are influenced by the Maillard reaction. SOURCES:GIZMOO, COMPOUNDCHEM, BLOOMBERG, HUFFINGTON POST, MSGFACTS


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PART II

We’re constantly told to drink more water, eat healthier and study more, but did know you that doing too much of these can have harmful effects? How much is too much?

WATER

Water keeps our bodies hydrated, but drinking too much water can cause “water intoxication,” which is most common among athletes who over-hydrate while training.

Drinking around six liters, which is equal to 12 standard water bottles, could kill a 165-pound person.

VEGETABLES

Eating too many vegetables to the extent that it’s unhealthy is rare, but doing so, especially when dieting, can be harmful for digestion and lead to malnutrition and diet imbalance.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends a maximum of nine daily vegetable servings.

FRUITS

The sweetness in fruit comes from fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. Too much fructose can spike blood sugar levels and increase risks of Type 2 diabetes.

No more than four daily servings of fruit are recommended.

STUDYING

In addition to general lethargy and partial consciousness, late-night studying has some serious long-term effects, including high-stress levels and physical health problems.

An experiment by Stanford Graduate School of Education showed that even three hours of studying is unhealthy.

SLEEP

Sleep deprivation is unhealthy, but oversleeping is just as harmful. It can cause problems with memory and higher risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and depression.

People who spend more than nine to 10 hours a night in bed often have poor sleep quality.

EXERCISE

Exercising too much can lead to “exercise addiction,” which includes harmful effects such as injuries, exhaustion, depression, suicide and other long-lasting physical damage.

Thirty minutes a day of moderate physical activity is enough to help prevent diabetes and high cholesterol and blood pressure.

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2

Too much water prevents the kidneys from flushing the water out well. Excess water can then enter cells, causing them to swell. This condition (hyponatremia) could lead to seizures, coma, respiratory arrest and death.

3

4

4

5

Vegetables are not rich in protein, calories or essential fatty acids, so excessive consumption could lead to diet imbalances. These imbalancescan hinder the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to absorb certain other nutrients.

Fructose has the same effect as other types of sugar on the liver (where it is metabolized). The liver takes excess fructose and stores them as triglycerides in fat cells. This buildup of fat is linked to type 2 diabetes.

Excessive studying causes extreme stress, which can lead to migraines, ulcers and other stomach problems, sleep deprivation and exhaustion, and weight loss.

5 Poor sleep results in more deposits of the protein, beta amyloid. More deposits are linked to declines in memory and thinking.

1

6 OUR ANSWERS | 31

3 6

SOURCES: NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV; LIVESTRONG.COM; DRWEIL.COM

2 LIANNE YU // GRAPHIC

During exercise, adrenal glands produce a limited amount of cortisol, a hormone. Too much exercise will cause cortisol shortages, leading to stress and low-level glucose.


IN THIS ISSUE:

- What can you find around CHS? - What do teachers do outside of school? - How has increased violence affected us? - How much is really too much?

Watch the “Our Answers” issue video at chsacumen.com

ACUMEN Dec. 4, 2015: Our Answers