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CHRYSLER the

THE MAGAZINE OF THE CHRYSLER MUSEUM OF ART

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

September/October 2009

p 5 Exhibitions • p 8 News • p 10 Daily Calendar • p 16 Public Programs • p 19 Member Programs


G E N E R A L

COVER Mummy Mask of a Man (detail) Roman Period, early 1st century A.D. Stucco, gilded and painted 20 1/4 x 13 x 7 7/8 in. (51.5 x 33 x 20 cm) place made: Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

I N F O R M A T I O N

Contact Us Chrysler Museum of Art 245 W. Olney Road Norfolk, VA 23510 Phone: (757) 664-6200 Fax: (757) 664-6201 E-mail: museum@chrysler.org Website: www.chrysler.org Museum Hours Wednesday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday, 12–5 p.m. The Museum galleries are closed each Monday and Tuesday, as well as on major holidays. Admission General admission to the Chrysler Museum of Art and its world-class permanent collection is free. Voluntary contributions are happily accepted and are tax-deductible. Modest admission charges will be announced in advance of each visiting exhibition. Museum Members and children 5 and younger will be admitted free to all exhibitions. Accessibility Free parking is available in two visitor lots or on nearby side streets. The Chrysler is wheelchair accessible via the ramp at the side entrance closest to the visitor parking lots. Complimentary wheelchairs and baby strollers are available near all entrances. Gallery Hosts are available to assist patrons with special needs. Jean Outland Chrysler Library Open Wednesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wednesday evening hours are also available by appointment only. (757) 965-2035 lchristiansen@chrysler.org

This publication is produced by the Communications Department; Cheryl Little, Publications and Public Relations Coordinator; Abigail Lee, Communications Intern. Unless otherwise noted, all Museum images are by Ed Pollard, Museum Photographer.

The Museum Shop Open during Museum hours (757) 333-6297

Membership (757) 333-6298 www.chrysler.org/membership.asp

Cuisine & Company at the Chrysler Wednesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Sunday, 12–3 p.m. (757) 333-6291

Group and School Tours (757) 333-6269 www.chrysler.org/programs.asp

Historic Houses Free Admission The Moses Myers House Corner of Bank and Freemason Sts., Norfolk Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sunday, 12–4 p.m. Tours are hourly through 3 p.m. (757) 333-1086 The Norfolk History Museum at the Willoughby-Baylor House 601 E. Freemason Street, Norfolk Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sunday, 12–4 p.m. (757) 333-1091 Tours start at the Freemason Street Reception Center 401 E. Freemason Street, Norfolk (757) 441-1526 Department Directory Office of the Director 333-6234 Development 333-6253 Communications 333-6295 Special Events 333-6233 Finance & Administration 333-6224 Education 333-6269 Historic Houses 333-1086 Security 333-6237 Curatorial 965-2033 Library 965-2035 Visitor Services 965-2039 Facility Rental (757) 333-6233 www.chrysler.org/rentals.asp events@chrysler.org

Volunteers (757) 333-6220 www.chrysler.org/membership Board of Trustees 2009–2010 Robert M. Boyd Carolyn K. Barry Nancy W. Branch Jerry A. Bridges Macon F. Brock, Vice Chairman Robert W. Carter E. John Field Andrew S. Fine David R. Goode Cyrus W. Grandy V Adrianne R. Joseph Linda H. Kaufman, Secretary Sandra W. Lewis Henry Light Edward L. Lilly Vincent J. Mastracco, Jr. Patterson N. McKinnon Charles W. (Wick) Moorman, Chairman Susan Nordlinger Richard D. Roberts Anne B. Shumadine Thomas L. Stokes, Jr. Josephine L. Turner Leah Waitzer Lewis W. Webb III Wayne F. Wilbanks The Chrysler Museum of Art is partially supported by grants from the City of Norfolk, READD the National Endowment for the Arts, the Virginia Commission for the Arts, the Business Consortium for Arts Support, and The Webster Foundation.

These exhibitions were very inspiring. Thank you! This was the first time bringing my sons to a museum. We will be back again.

A visitor to Art of Glass 2 at the Chrysler


D I R E C T O R ’ S

N O T E

WE’VE BEEN DREAMING OF THIS… …and for a long time. The Chrysler has always been serious about making its collections and programs truly accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds. Over the years we have worked hard to make the Museum a friendly and welcoming place, and to ensure that the works of art in our care are meaningful and relevant to the lives of our visitors. But in spite of these efforts, one formidable barrier has remained to achieving our mission of “bringing art and people together to enrich and transform lives”—the charge at the door. Of course, admission has always been free to our Members and, for a number of years, to the general public on Wednesdays. In fact, all of us here at the Chrysler look forward to Wednesdays. More than twice as many people come on that day than on any other day of the week, and the crowd is wonderfully diverse and enthusiastic. We want the Museum to be like that every day. So, in a difficult economic climate, when many cultural organizations are increasing their admission charges, the Museum’s Trustees have taken a bold step in the opposite direction. Believing that now, more than ever, the experience of original works of art can make a real and positive difference in the lives of the people of our community, they have voted to remove the Museum’s general admission charge. That means that all 62 of the Museum’s permanent collection galleries will be open and accessible to the public, without charge, whenever the Chrysler is open. Under our new policy, some special exhibitions will carry a modest admission fee (as usual, though, Members will be admitted free), but, as you’ll read in this magazine, we’re also launching a whole range of new programs to complement our new admission policy. There are new tours and gallery programs, special events for Members, new partnerships with performing arts groups, and a new schedule of programs for Wednesday evenings—all designed to make the Chrysler an even more lively and enjoyable place. We hope that free admission will open up the Museum to a whole new audience, that it will build a sense of shared community ownership of the Chrysler and its collections, and that it will make it easy for people to drop in and spend a few minutes in the galleries whenever they feel a need for some beauty, inspiration, or insight.

William J. Hennessey Director

A final note: Our new “free to all” policy has been made possible by special gifts from a number of generous local donors and foundations. We are deeply grateful to them, but we will need the continued support of our Members to sustain it. In addition to very real tangible rewards, Chrysler membership now also carries with it the satisfaction of knowing that your investment in the Museum is making the Chrysler’s resources available to others who might not otherwise be able to visit. Please help us keep the doors open for everyone in our community. Become a Member today!

FREE GENERAL ADMISSION Begins Wednesday, September 2 Admission to our permanent collection is free to everyone whenever the Museum galleries are open. The Chrysler is open to the public on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sundays from 12 to 5 p.m. The Museum galleries will remain closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Parking at the Chrysler Museum of Art is free. Special exhibitions will carry modest admissions charges, as noted. Admission to special exhibitions is ALWAYS FREE to Museum Members and children 5 and younger. All current coupons and free admission cards will be honored toward entry to special exhibitions. On Bunny and Perry Morgan Family Days, the entire Museum—including all special exhibitions—will be open free of charge!

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C O V E R

S T O R Y

Canopic Jar of Hor Depicting a Jackal Late Period, 664 – 525 B.C. or later Limestone; 11 9/16 (29.3 cm) height x 5 1/4 in. (13.4 cm) diameter place made: Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

TO LIVE FOREVER: EGYPTIAN TREASURES FROM THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM October 14, 2009 through January 3, 2010 in the Large Changing Gallery

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ctober 14 marks the public debut of one of the most extraordinary exhibitions ever hosted by the Chrysler Museum of Art—To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum. In its first-ever special exhibition of ancient Egyptian art, the Chrysler has drawn from the extensive holdings of the Brooklyn Museum, renowned as one of the richest collections of such art in the United States and, indeed, in the world outside of Egypt. The Chrysler is proud to be the only MidAtlantic venue for this remarkable display of age-old Egyptian artifacts related to their quest to achieve eternal life.

For ancient Egyptians, death was an enemy that could be defeated through proper preparation in life. The 120 objects in the exhibition—including mummies, coffins, sarcophagi, and funerary shrouds—trace the Egyptians’ all-consuming effort to outfit their tombs to please the gods, subdue death, and allow them to “live forever” in the afterlife. To Live Forever commences with an introduction to the Egyptians’ religious beliefs and the array of gods and legends that inspired them to spend a large part of their mortal lives preparing for immortality. The stories of Osiris and Isis, their son Horus, Osiris’s evil brother Seth, and the sun god Re unfold amid a rich display of golden coffins, funerary statues, papyri, stone reliefs, and amulets.

Anthropoid Coffin of the Servant of the Great Place, Teti (detail) New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, ca. 1339 B.C. – 1307 B.C. Wood, painted 33 1/4 x 18 13/16 x 81 1/2 in. (84.5 x 47.8 x 207 cm) place purchased: Thebes, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund


C O V E R

Image of a Ba-bird on a Footpiece from a Coffin Third Intermediate Period, Dynasty 22, 945 – 712 B.C. Wood and plaster, painted 11 x 2 1/16 x 12 5/8 in. (28 x 5.3 x 32 cm) place made: Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

Mummy of Demetri(o)s Roman Period, 30 B.C. – 395 A.D. Painted cloth, gold, human remains 13 3/8 x 15 3/8 x 74 13/16 in. (34 x 39 x 190 cm) place found: Roman Cemetery, Hawara, Egypt Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

Gaming Board Inscribed for Amenhotep III with Separate Sliding Drawer New Kingdom, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390 – 1353 B.C. Faience, glazed; 2 3/16 x 3 1/16 x 8 1/4 in. (5.5 x 7.7 x 21 cm) reportedly from: Thebes, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

The exhibition then moves through the practical process of preparing for death, beginning with mummification—the silk-shrouded mummy of Demetrios is featured here—and proceeding to the funeral and the tomb itself. Along the way, the exhibition focuses on the basic, practical realities that both rich and poor faced while outfitting themselves for death. Furnishing a tomb was, after all, the biggest expense in an ancient Egyptian’s life. The coffin alone could cost more than a year’s salary, encouraging the less affluent to find more inventive ways to furnish their eternal resting place with less costly materials. The exhibition’s emphasis on the economics of the process offers new insight into the daily thinking of the Egyptians and invites new respect for the sheer cost and even extravagance of reserving gold, limestone, jewels, and other precious materials not for the here and now, but for the hereafter. As To Live Forever unfolds, it offers rare examples of every sort of art object that would have been found in a tomb or temple: ka statues of the deceased to provide a resting place for the spirit; votive sculptures to placate the gods; household items such mirrors, vessels, and knives; canopic jars to hold the stomach, intestines, lungs, and liver of the deceased after extraction during mummification; golden mummy masks, headrests, foot pieces, and identification tags; as well as amulets and jewelry, gaming boards, and a small army of shabtys, the miniature servant figurines that were placed in the tomb to labor for the deceased in the eternal fields of Osiris. An exhibition of extraordinary rarity and quality, To Live Forever offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to experience the full range and wonder of ancient Egyptian art—right here in Hampton Roads.

ADMISSION TO THE EXHIBITION To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum $7 for Adults (18 and older) $5 for Seniors, Teachers, Military, and Students with Current ID $3 for Children 6-17 (and school tours) ALWAYS FREE for Museum Members and Children 5 and younger

To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum. Local presentation of the exhibition has been made possible through the generous support of the Business Exhibition Council of the Chrysler Museum of Art, For Art’s Sake, and an anonymous friend of the Museum.

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E X H I B I T I O N S

TO LIVE FOREVER HIGHLIGHT EVENTS Members’ Opening Weekend For an exhibition this big, the Chrysler expanded its Members’ Opening to a full weekend of exciting events. Come celebrate To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum with three days of special benefits designed exclusively for Museum Members.

Friday, October 9 Dance Like an Egyptian! 8–11 p.m. in Huber Court For Art’s Sake helps the Chrysler kick off its quest to live forever with a Sphinx-sized night of dancing to the undead. Cursed with the funk of 5,000 years (and the grave clothes to prove it), Here Come the Mummies promise to wake even the ancients in their search for the ultimate riff. This is one pharaonic party you won’t want to miss! Reservations are required for this free Members-only event. RSVP by Monday, October 5 to (757) 333-6253, www.chrysler.org, or RSVP@chrysler.org.

To Live Forever at the CMA Unless otherwise indicated, all programs are free for Museum Members and children 5 and younger, or are included with paid admission to the exhibition. Audio Tours by Edward Bleiberg Throughout the exhibition

To Live Forever Gallery Talks Wednesdays and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Sunk Relief of Queen Neferu Middle Kingdom, reign of Mentuhotep II, Dynasty 11, ca. 2008 B.C. – 1957 B.C. Limestone, painted 7 1/2 x 9 15/16 x 3/4 in. (19 x 23.6 x 1.9 cm) place made: (Theban Tomb no. 319), Tomb of Queen Neferu, Thebes (Deir el-Bahri), Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

School Tours Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, October 14 to December 18 Cost is only $3 per student. Call (757) 333-6269 or e-mail education@chrysler.org for scheduling. Sleep with the Mummies: A Masquerade for Families

Saturday, October 10 Members’ Exhibition Preview Day 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Enjoy a full day of advance access to To Live Forever before its October 14 public opening. Admission to the exhibition is always free to Members. Be sure to visit The Museum Shop for some souvenirs during the Members’ Opening Weekend Sale (see the back cover for limited To Live Forever sale bonuses and offers).

Friday, October 23 at 7 p.m. Catch mummy madness at this pre-Halloween sleepover for families with kids ages 6-12. It’s sure to sell out quickly, so reserve your spots today. For details, see page 16. Tickle My Ears: Walk Like an Egyptian Thursday, December 3 at 11 a.m. Bunny and Perry Morgan Family Day

Sunday, October 11 Members’ Exhibition Preview Special Lecture: Preparing to Live Forever Catalogue Signing 12–5 p.m. Peruse To Live Forever or discuss the exhibition with other Members over coffee and light refreshments in the Diamonstein Education Workshop from noon to 2 p.m. Then join us in the Kaufman Theatre where Edward Bleiberg, Curator of Egyptian, Classical, and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum, will detail the spiritual and material struggles that ancient Egyptians underwent in order to achieve immortality. A catalogue signing follows the lecture in Huber Court. To Live Forever catalogues are available for purchase in The Museum Shop for $24.95.

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Not a Member? It’s not too late to join the fun! Contact Brian Wells at (757) 333-6298 or bwells@chrysler.org.

Sunday, December 6 from 12–5 p.m. INCLUDING FREE ADMISSION FOR TO LIVE FOREVER! Egypt in Film Explore ancient Egypt through three free blockbuster movies. Cleopatra—Sunday, November 8 at 1 p.m. The Prince of Egypt—Wednesday, December 30 at 3 p.m. The Lion King—Sunday, January 3 at 3 p.m.

Block Statue of a High Official of the Ptolemaic Period Ptolemaic Period, 305 – 30 B.C. Diorite; 15 3/8 x 6 9/16 x 7 7/8 in. (39 x 16.7 x 20 cm) possible place made: Thebes (Karnak), Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund


E X H I B I T I O N S

CURRENTLY ON VIEW Dutch “Golden Age” Paintings June 25, 2009 – January 17, 2010 in the Kaufman Furniture Gallery

ABOVE Taji Patterson Gallery Host Holding On to What's Inside, 2008 Color pencil, pastel, and charcoal on paper CENTER Cheena Nicole Raiford Exhibitions Preparator NṒH, 2007 Woodcut RIGHT Anita Pope Exhibitions Preparator Stearns Creek, 2009 Inkjet print Untitled I, 1996 Charcoal on paper Untitled II, 1996 Charcoal and pastel on paper Photos by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler Museum of Art

Many of the Netherlands’ greatest 17th-century painters are represented in this intimate exhibition of privately held gems. Displayed among the fine antiques are portraits of a wealthy Calvinist couple by Rembrandt van Rijn Gerard Ter Borch, a candlelit Self-Portrait With Shaded Eyes, 1634 morality scene by Godfried Oil on panel, 27 7/8 x 21 3/4 in. ©IGRAT 2006 LLC Schalcken, and an expressive likeness of a Haarlem historian by Frans Hals. The highlight is a one-time genre painting of a Russian-garbed man; only recently, after the removal of layers of over-painting, has the work been acknowledged as a selfportrait by Rembrandt van Rijn. This fine assortment is on loan to the Chrysler from a generous collector in New York.

Norfolk and Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Through October 18, 2009 in the Kaufman Theatre Lobby This exhibition displays the power and majesty of the steampowered locomotive as seen through the remarkable eye of photographer O. Winston Link. The photographs are drawn from the collection of Susan and David Goode.

O. Winston Link (American, 1914–2001) Solitude Siding and Train No. 2, Near Arcadia, Virginia, 1957 Loan, with intent to give, from David and Susan Goode © O. Winston Link Trust

After Hours: Works by the Chrysler Museum Staff Through October 11, 2009 in the Waitzer Community Gallery Our first-ever staff exhibition echoes the range of mediums on display in the Museum’s permanent collection— paintings, sculptures, photographs, glass, porcelain, prints, and drawings. The pieces by these 23 employees truly demonstrate the creative energy and hidden talents of those who work here.

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E X H I B I T I O N S

Suzanne Opton (American, b. 1954) Soldier: Claxton – 120 Days in Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York, 2005, Museum purchase ©Suzanne Opton

CURRENTLY ON VIEW

Mathew B. Brady Studio (American, 1823–1896) General William Tecumseh Sherman, 1866/1869 Gift of David L. Hack and by exchange Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

Edward Steichen (American, 1879–1973) Infrared View of Officers Gathered on the Deck of USS Lexington, November, 1943 Museum purchase, in memory of Alice R. and Sol B. Frank

Photography at the Chrysler: Recent Acquisitions Ongoing

At the Front August 14, 2009 – January 17, 2010 in the Frank Photography Gallery Through photographs and paintings from the Museum collection, some very recently acquired, this small exhibition provides an opportunity to explore the interior emotional life of the professional soldier. Working in unexpected ways, some of the artists in this show work to take us inside the heads of those who are called upon to face death on a daily basis. Others give us unexpectedly revealing glimpses of historic personalities, or shine a light on military life off the battlefield.

Fifty Years Later: The Lessons of Massive Resistance Ongoing at the Norfolk History Museum at the Willoughby-Baylor House Held over from the Museum’s full exhibition last winter, this multimedia timeline highlights the desegregation of Norfolk’s public schools through the photographs, documents, and clippings of the people and places that forever changed public education in Norfolk.

Moses Myers, Merchant of Norfolk Ongoing at the Moses Myers House Supported by a generous gift from Mr. T. Parker Host, this permanent exhibition explores the business of maritime commerce through the life of Moses Myers.

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This exhibition features a changing selection of the most exciting historical and contemporary photographs added to the Museum’s collection in recent years.

Cameo Performances: Masterpieces of Cameo Glass from the Chrysler’s Collection Ongoing This show explores the history of cameo glass from ancient Roman examples through the popular resurgence of the technique in England during the late-19th century.

EXTENDED through Winter 2010

Green Eye of the Pyramid by Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová, in the Prints and Drawings Gallery

Semi-Reclining Dress Impression with Drapery by Karen LaMonte, in the Oval Gallery Thanks to the generosity of Lisa and Dudley Anderson, these two remarkable pieces from their private collection, both on display for Art of Glass 2, will enjoy an extended run here at the Museum.


E X H I B I T I O N S

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS Barton Myers: Norfolk Visionary September 30 at the Moses Myers House Mayor Barton Myers transformed his city from a prosperous coastal town into a thriving modern metropolis. Thanks to a generous gift from T. Parker Host, the Moses Myers House honors this “first citizen of Norfolk” with a display of objects and images highlighting his extraordinary life.

To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum October 14, 2009 – January 3, 2010 in the Large Changing Gallery For more information on this blockbuster exhibition, please see this issue’s cover story on pages 2-3.

Upper Part of a False Door of Sethew, Old Kingdom, ca. 2500-2350 B.C.E. Limestone, painted 22 1/16 x 20 1/2 x 4 15/16 in. (56 x 52 x 12.5 cm) place found: Giza, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

Photographs by Eliot Porter October 24, 2009 – February 28, 2010 in the Kaufman Theatre Lobby Continuing our downstairs series highlighting great photography from the Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition focuses on the striking color landscapes and nature images of Eliot Porter (1901–1990). Artist, chemist, physician, and naturalist Porter was among the first to adopt the newly developed dye transfer process. Beginning in 1939 Porter literally created a new way of presenting nature. His large-format prints combine precise observation with rich and resonant color.

Eliot Porter (American, 1901–1990) Aspens by Lake from Trees portfolio, 1988, Gift of Joseph C. French, Jr. and John Wawrzonek ©Amon Carter Museum Archive

Action Paintings at the Chrysler October 17, 2009 – April 11, 2010 in the Waitzer Community Gallery In the pivotal years around World War II, a group of American avant-garde artists centered in New York began to create a new form of painting that challenged both aesthetic tradition and public expectation. Their canvases no longer depicted recognizable subjects, but instead focused on the act of painting itself. Influenced by Freudian psychology and emerging notions of the subconscious, firebrands like Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline channeled their spontaneity and creative dictates into a vital form of abstraction. The canvas became “an arena in which to act,” their work, “action painting.” With pigment dripped, flung, stroked, and slashed across their canvases, these young rebels forged a radically new vocabulary of artistic gesture that helped birth Abstract Expressionism and dominated progressive American painting well into the 1960s. As an enthusiastic collector of Action Painting, Walter P. Chrysler, Jr. befriended many of the movement’s founders and purchased major examples of their work. Though many of these acquisitions (including canvases by Hans Hoffmann, Pollock, and Kline) are today on display in our McKinnon Galleries of Modern Art, many more have remained in our storage vaults—until this exhibition that encourages viewers to revel in the pure optical pleasure of paint applied to canvas and to survey a wide range of responses, from intensely emotional to the lyrical and serene.

Michael Goldberg (American, 1955-1956) Red Sunday Morning, 1955–56 Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

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BEC BRINGS THE NILE TO NORFOLK

A Pam Sasser (left) and Margaret Blackwell of Northrop Grumman (right) catch sight of the live glassblowing in Mary’s Garden.

Hank Boyd of BB&T (left) and his wife, Debbie (right), spend a few moments in conversation with Museum Trustee Dr. Ed Lilly (center).

David Embree of Williams Mullen (left) and Stephen White and Bob Sasser of Dollar Tree Stores, Inc. represent two of the longtime corporate Members of the BEC.

s the leading business support group for Hampton Roads’ premiere cultural institution, the Business Exhibition Council is critical to achieving the Chrysler’s mission of “bringing people and art together to enrich and transform lives.” In the past 10 years, the BEC has contributed more than $1,000,000 toward underwriting exhibitions that bring international masterpieces to the communities of Hampton Roads. Its generosity has helped to fund such fine shows as American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell, Rembrandt’s Etchings: The Embrace of Darkness and Light, and From Goya to Sorolla: Masterpieces from The Hispanic Society of America, to name but a few recent favorites.

At their annual Art Selection Dinner on May 21, BEC Members mixed in Mary’s Garden while Glass Curator Kelly Conway narrated a live glassblowing demonstration by Ed Francis. Members later enjoyed an evening of dining amid the Chrysler’s exceptional glass collection. After an informative exhibition presentation by Chief Curator Jeff Harrison, BEC Members also announced their 2009-2010 underwriting choice: To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum. For information on how your firm can benefit from membership in the Chrysler’s Business Exhibition Council, please contact the Museum’s Director of Development, Edwina Bell, at (757) 965-2032 or email her at ebell@chrysler.org.

2008 – 2009 American Funds Group Bank of America BB&T Dollar Tree Stores, Inc. Earl Industries, LLC Gannett Media Technologies International Honeywell International, Inc. Kaufman & Canoles KPMG, LLC Maersk Line, Limited Norfolk Southern Corporation Northrop Grumman—Newport News Rutter Mills, LLP Signature Financial Management, Inc. STIHL, Inc. Summer Land Development Company SunTrust Bank The Runnymede Corporation The Virginian-Pilot Virginia Natural Gas, Inc. VIRTEXCO Corporation Wachovia, NA Wall, Einhorn & Chernitzer, P.C. Williams Mullen Willis HRH

SunTrust Bank’s Ben Vanderberry and Museum Trustee Anne Shumadine anticipate the arrival of dinner in one of the Museum’s 19th-century glass galleries. Photos by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler Museum of Art

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N E W S Unknown (Egyptian) Sarcophagus of Psamtik-Seneb (detail), Late Period, Dynasty 26, ca. 664–525 B.C. Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

RENOVATED EGYPTIAN AND AFRICAN GALLERIES REOPEN

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n anticipation of October’s arrival of the special exhibition To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum, the Chrysler spent much of the summer refreshing and reinstalling our own galleries of Egyptian and African art. Each has been repainted, relighted, and recarpeted. More important, the works on view have been newly researched and are now accompanied by descriptive labels reflecting the findings of that scholarship. Despite their modest size, the Chrysler’s Egyptian and African galleries are among our visitors’ favorite spaces. They also contain remarkable works of art that we wanted to look their best when To Live Forever opens this fall. When you visit the exhibition, stop by and experience our renovated Egyptian and African galleries in a totally new light. Senufo peoples (Ivory Coast, Africa) Helmet Mask (Kponyugu), Early- to mid-20th century Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

THE CHRYSLER GOES GREEN

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he Museum has launched a comprehensive “green” initiative to conserve energy, lower operating costs, and ensure that we do our part to make more responsible use of our environment. Director of Facilities Tim Fink reports that so far his staff has added new energy-saving lighting controls and fixtures, and has equipped restrooms with new hand dryers. Each staff office now boasts its own waste paper recycling bin and the Museum’s expanded program will also be recycling glass, plastic, aluminum, and other metals. Landscaping and janitorial projects will include environmentally friendly products and efforts to conserve water. Even the new brown carpeting in our refurbished Egyptian, African, and Greco-Roman galleries is green—made with at least 15 percent recycled material and affixed with water-based glue to prevent fumes.

DILLARD SENT TO TIME OUT IN CHICAGO

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hannon Dillard hasn’t been naughty. To the contrary, she was one of only 20 museum educators chosen to participate in the 2009 Teaching Institute in Museum Education, or TIME, at the Art Institute of Chicago. Dillard, who coordinates the CMA’s children’s programs, attended the seminar specifically tailored for museum educators with an interest in gallery Photo by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler teaching this Museum of Art past August. The strenuous one-week program included an analytical study of the theory and practice of gallery teaching and a survey of the literature and history of teaching in American museums. It also included countless hours in the Institute’s galleries, experiencing the works of art and discussing them with colleagues and museum guests. Dillard was especially pleased to have studied under top-notch instructors in the field, including Rika Burnham, Head of Education at The Frick Collection, and Elliott Kai-Kee, Education Specialist at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The program was offered through the Teacher Institute in Contemporary Art, directed by Philip Baranowski at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and was generously supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

In addition, with support from a grant from The Norfolk Foundation, the Chrysler has commissioned a major engineering study of our HVAC plant to help us plan for the replacement of aging equipment with more energy-efficient models. Already, the Moses Myers House has been refitted with a highefficiency geothermal heating and cooling system. The Museum will keep you posted as the greening continues.

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Museum Milestone Gallery Talk The Art of Jazz / The Fine Art of Wine Art Riff! Tickle My Ears: Stories and Art at the Chrysler Senior Art Forum Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Museum Shop Event Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Gallery Talk Norfolk History Series Flower Guild Event Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Museum Shop Event Norfolk Society of Arts Lecture Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Historic Houses Weekend Program Gallery Talk Exhibition Opens Gallery Talk Art in Motion

FREE General Admission to the Chrysler Collection begins Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Reggie Gist Samson Bringing Honey to His Parents by Guercino Pinks, Purples, Blues, and Greens in Mary's Garden The Artistic Career of Exhibitions Designer Willis Potter Architour Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection Architour Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Fall Book Sale begins Baroque Art Ladies of Norfolk—The Myers Women Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection Ladies of Norfolk—The Myers Women Baroque Art Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Remembering George Tucker Flower Arranging Club …If You Lived During Slavery Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection …If You Lived During Slavery Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Fall Book Sale ends The Hidden Met by Phillippe de Montebello Baroque Art Divided City—Norfolk's Civil War Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection Divided City—Norfolk's Civil War Baroque Art Barton Myers: Norfolk Visionary at the Moses Myers House Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link Strangers on a Train

Kelly Conway Curator of Glass Stop, Caution, Go, 2009 Blown glass

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Eliot Porter (American, 1901–1990), Old Cottonwood Tree from Trees portfolio, 1988, Gift of Joseph C. French, Jr. and John Wawrzonek ©Amon Carter Museum Archive


C A L E N D A R Amulet Representing the Soul as a Human-Head Falcon Late Period, 664 – 332 B.C. Gold; 7/8 x 1 5/8 x 1/4 in. (2.2 x 4.2 x 0.6 cm) place found: Saqqara, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

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OCTOBER

Animals, Animals, Animals in the McKinnon Galleries of Modern Art 2 p.m. Senior Art Forum Through the Lens of Museum Photographer Ed Pollard 6 p.m. Friends of African-American Art Event 4th Annual Q-Down 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program The Myers: A Jewish-American Family 2 p.m. Gallery Talk Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program The Myers: A Jewish-American Family Historic Houses Special Event Sukkot: The Feast of Ingathering at the Moses Myers House 1 p.m. 2 p.m. Gallery Talk Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link 7 a.m. Friends of Historic Houses Event Annual Road Trip: James Madison's Montpelier 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk Baroque Art 6:15 p.m. The Art of Jazz / The Fine Art of Wine Latin Jazz Conspiracy 7:15 p.m. Art Riff! The Artist in His Studio by Nicolas de Largillierre 10 a.m. Museum Shop Event To Live Forever sales bonuses begin 8 p.m. To Live Forever Members' Opening Weekend Party Dance Like an Egyptian! (Museum membership and RSVPs required by 10/5/09) 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Members' Exhibition Preview Day To Live Forever open exclusively to Museum Members 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program Architour 2 p.m. Gallery Talk Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection noon–5 p.m. Members' Exhibition Preview Day/Refreshments To Live Forever open exclusively to Museum Members 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program Architour 2 p.m. Members' Special Lecture Preparing to Live Forever by Edward Bleiberg (Museum membership required) 2 p.m. Gallery Talk Baroque Art 3:30 p.m. Museum Shop Event To Live Forever catalogue signing with Edward Bleiberg 5 p.m. Exhibition Closes After Hours: Works by the Chrysler Museum Staff 5 p.m. Museum Shop Event To Live Forever sales bonuses end 10 a.m. Exhibition Opens To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 7 p.m. Norfolk History Series Witchcraft in Colonial Virginia 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Museum Shop Event The Island Pearl Jewelry Trunk Show 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 8 p.m. Music in the Museum Concert Tidewater Classical Guitar Society: Jason Vieaux 10 a.m.–noon Friends of African-American Art Event Art Class: The Quest to Live Forever 10 a.m. Exhibition Opens Action Painting at the Chrysler 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program Ladies of Norfolk—The Myers Women 2 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program Ladies of Norfolk—The Myers Women 2 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 5 p.m. Exhibition Closes Norfolk & Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 7 p.m.–8 a.m. Special Event Sleep with the Mummies: A Masquerade for Families (RSVP by 10/9/09) 10 a.m. Exhibition Opens Photographs by Eliot Porter 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program …If You Lived During Slavery 2 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program …If You Lived During Slavery 2 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 8 p.m. Music in the Museum Concert The Feldman Chamber Music Society: Stradivari String Quartet 11 a.m. Norfolk Society of Arts Mabel Brown Lecture The New Museum in the 21st Century by Mary Sue Sweeney Price 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 7 p.m. Art in Motion Rivers and Tides 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits 12:30 p.m. Gallery Talk To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum 1 p.m. Historic Houses Weekend Program Divided City: Norfolk's Civil War 2 p.m. Gallery Talk American Portraits

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Tickle My Ears: Stories and Art at the Chrysler

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N E W S

SPRING PROGRAMS AT THE CHRYSLER

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t was a busy Spring at the Chrysler with special events for Members, support groups, and visitors.

Mother’s Day LEFT: Mother’s Day Brunch was, again, a sold-out event as Hampton Roads families honored their Moms with a special meal and an Art of Glass 2 tour at the Chrysler. Photo by Jake Gillespie RIGHT: Todd Rosenlieb Dance performed a special choreography inspired by the “dance” of the hot glass studio on Mother’s Day afternoon. Photo by Scott Howe

Mowbray Arch Society ABOVE: Horticultural expert Gordon Hayward lectured on fine art as an inspiration for garden design, then personalized copies of his award-winning book.

Bunny And Perry Morgan Family Day ABOVE: Rain didn’t dampen the spirits of the more than 1,000 people who attended the May 17 Bunny and Perry Morgan Family Day at the Chrysler. Everyone enjoyed free admission, snow cones, and the special ingallery art projects. BELOW: In honor of Art of Glass 2, Family Day featured Dean Shostak playing the glass armonica, an instrument invented by Benjamin Franklin. The Williamsburg musician also played a glass violin and crystal handbells. Photos by Alexandra Hunter

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BELOW: Larry Goldrich and Dot Doumar mingle with Ben and Rachel Cottrell (left to right) in Huber Court during the May 14 Spring Program for the Mowbray Arch Society. Photos by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler Museum of Art


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A LANDMARK YEAR

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he Chrysler Museum saw an astounding increase—more than 33 percent—in its total number of guest visits over the last fiscal year. Attendance from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009 was 162,608, up from 119,098 in the previous year. The totals include visits by Members, school groups, and other patrons. The number of guests visiting on Wednesdays and special free-admission days were especially high.

Perhaps even more impressive is our Net Promoter Score—the measure of the enthusiasm with which visitors recommend the experience of the Chrysler to others. This prime metric of customer satisfaction already was high by business standards at 87.88 percent. In 2008-2009, it shot up to an unprecedented 94.74 percent! “Thanks to the success of exhibitions like Art of Glass 2 and American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell —coupled with the exciting range of Museum programs and the exceptional welcome that Visitor Services extends to every guest— this has been a record-setting year at the Chrysler,” says Director Bill Hennessey.

NORFOLK’S NATIONAL TREASURE

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he National Register of Historic Places has named our own Moses Myers House as a site of national significance, the Chrysler is proud to announce.

Since 1966, The National Register has formed America’s official list of buildings, sites, and objects worthy of preservation with the goal of protecting our country’s most valuable historic, archaeological, and cultural resources. Properties named nationally significant must possess exceptional value in illustrating or interpreting the intellectual and cultural heritage of the United States. Of the more than 85,000 listings on The National Register, fewer than 10 percent are listed as nationally significant. The Moses Myers House clearly fits that standard. Built in what was a very rural setting in the 1790s, it set a new standard of sophistication for the rapidly expanding city of Norfolk. The Federal-style home and its collection provide a rare example of early-American Jewish life, including five generations worth of records and artifacts, as well as uninterruped occupancy of the family home for nearly 150 years.

FRONT ROW (left to right): Emma Tisdale, Gabrielle Barr, Jessica Dame, Jodi DeBruyne, Sonia de Laforcade, Janelle Wilson. BACK ROW (left to right): Brendan Higgins, Michelle West, Nancy Reid, Madison Brennamen, Francheska Alcantara, Loren Shell, Abigail Lee, Caroline Chandler. Not pictured: Andrea Roehrs. Photo by Alexandra Hunter

INTERNS LIFT THE SUMMER WORKLOAD

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ver wonder what it’s like to work in a museum? Our summer interns now know first-hand. Each year, college and graduate students from across the Mid-Atlantic area gain hands-on vocational experience by working in departments of the Chrysler that best match their interests. In addition to the work their supervisors assign them, weekly discussions and special events enable them to gain insight into the fascinating world of museum work. This summer’s 15 interns represented 11 schools in four states. To apply for a Chrysler Museum internship, visit www.chrysler.org/jobs.asp or contact Alexandra Hunter at (757) 333-6268 or ahunter@chrysler.org.

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MUSIC IN THE MUSEUM

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s an ancient ideal, the museum was the home for all the arts—both visual and performing. The Chrysler hopes to make this ideal a reality with the initiation of Music in the Museum, which will make our own Kaufman Theatre the primary home for many of the region’s professional performance groups.

The program is designed to encourage audience crossover, lower costs for performing arts partners, and offer Chrysler Museum Members enhanced value for their patronage. While the Chrysler will promote Music in the Museum partners through its magazine, website, and e-News mailings, performing arts partners, in turn, will offer Museum Members discounted tickets to their programs. Virginia Arts Festival has agreed to offer select concerts in Spring 2010 through Music in the Museum, and two partners have agreed to present their full 2009-2010 concert series here: The Feldman Chamber Music Society will hold concerts on selected Monday evenings at 8 p.m. Each will include a complimentary wine and hors d’oeuvres reception at 6:30 p.m. in Huber Court and a concert preview by WHRO’s Dwight Davis at 7 p.m. in the Kaufman Theatre. October 26, 2009—Stradivari String Quartet November 23, 2009—Juniper String Quartet January 25, 2010—Los Angeles Piano Quartet February 15, 2010—Concertanti March 8, 2010—Hugo Wolf String Quartet April 5, 2010—Garth Newel Piano Quartet

Chrysler Museum Members may purchase tickets at the door for $20 (a $5 savings). The Tidewater Classical Guitar Society holds its concerts here at the Kaufman Theatre on selected Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Friday, October 16, 2009—Jason Vieaux Friday, November 20, 2009—Andrew York February 6, 2010—Members Concert March 5, 2010—Gabriel Bianco April 27, 2010—David Russell (co-sponsored with Virginia Arts Festival)

Chrysler Museum Members may purchase tickets at the door for $15 (a $5 savings), or may buy discounted season tickets for $65 directly from TCGS at P.O. Box 777, Norfolk, VA 23501. For information about becoming a Music in the Museum performing arts partner, contact Scott Howe, Director of Education and Public Programs, at showe@chrysler.org. For information on discounted performance tickets for Chrysler Members, contact Ruth Sanchez at (757) 333-6269 or rsanchez@chrysler.org.

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he Norfolk Society of Arts Lecture Series features a fascinating array of speakers and topics. Each lecture begins at 11 a.m. in the Museum’s Kaufman Theatre, preceded by a coffee reception at 10:30 a.m. in Huber Court. Cost: Free to the public, with preferred seating for NSA members Wednesday, September 23, 2009

The Hidden Met Philippe de Montebello Former Director, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Wednesday, October 28, 2009 (Mabel Brown Lecture)

The New Museum in the 21st Century Mary Sue Sweeney Price Director, The Newark Museum Wednesday, November 18, 2009 To Live Forever: Highlights of Conservation Treatment Lisa Bruno Head Conservator, The Brooklyn Museum Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Creating the New Art Gallery of Ontario: Why a Building is Not Just a Building Matthew Teitelbaum Director, Art Gallery of Ontario Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Fashion Fakes and Finds: Fifty Years of Fluctuation in the Market for English Ceramics Christina Prescott-Walker Senior Vice President, Sotheby’s Wednesday, March 24, 2010

A Gallery of Worthies: Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Antoine Houdon Anne Poulet Director, The Frick Collection Tuesday, April 27, 2010 (Annual Meeting and Luncheon)

Why Museums Are Necessary Susan Stamberg Special Correspondent, National Public Radio For more information about the Society or NSA membership, please contact Pam Pruden at (757) 623-0875 or email her at pctpruden@verizon.net.


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The Docents began their 50th year of service to the Chrysler Museum of Art on September 10, 2008 with the start of the first fall school tours. Photo by Ed Pollard

DOCENTS MARK 50 YEARS OF SERVICE

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ay 19 marked the 50th anniversary of the Chrysler’s longest-standing partnership—its relationship with its docents. These volunteer tour guides undergo rigorous training in art history and teaching methods before they present any of the 24 tours they commit to giving each year. Several of the Museum’s docents have served as art ambassadors for decades. At their year-end luncheon, active, former, and emeritus docents, as well as current members of the Junior League, which helped launch the program in 1959, celebrated the program’s milestone. Crowning the many tributes of the day was an official proclamation by Norfolk Mayor Paul Fraim praising the Chrysler’s docent program for its “invaluable contributions” to education and self-discovery in the community.

Former docents Vivian Duke (left) and Mary Lawrence Harrell (right) enjoyed celebrating the 50th anniversary of the program with active docents Glenda Knowles and Dodie Dougherty (center left and right, respectively).

After the luncheon, outgoing president Chris Fockler installed new Docent Council members with a floral tribute. Incoming officers include (left to right) Richard Parise (parliamentarian), Pat Tayloe (correspondence secretary), and Frances Padden (treasurer). Photos by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler Museum of Art

STUDENT GALLERY TO RETURN IN 2010

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or 36 years, The Virginian-Pilot’s Student Gallery celebrated high school artists from across greater Hampton Roads, Virginia’s Eastern Shore, and northern North Carolina. In Spring 2008, the last time that the newspaper funded the exhibition, more than 700 juniors and seniors submitted artwork to be judged. Of their works, 92 pieces were honored with exhibition at the Chrysler Museum of Art or the Contemporary Art Center of Virginia in Virginia Beach.

In 2009, due to the economic downturn, the paper was forced to cancel its sponsorship of the exhibition. Though some public school districts continued to feature high school artwork in juried public exhibitions, there was no region-wide recognition of these young artists. Thankfully, 2010 will be different. Representatives from schools and arts organizations across the region have been meeting since September 2008 to propose a new, viable model for the annual competition. Helping to lead this group has been Scott Howe, the Chrysler’s Director of Education, who believes that the Student Gallery is too important for our community to lose. Joining as sponsors for the first time are the d’Art Center, the Selden Arcade, and the Chrysler Museum’s Docent Council. As a result of this community-wide effort, the Hampton Roads Student Gallery will return in February 2010. Award winners and finalists still will be recognized and displayed at the Chrysler and the CACV, but for the first time, the work of all participants will be on view for two weeks at the Selden Arcade in downtown Norfolk before judging. For information on how to enter artwork or to sponsor awards for the young artists, visit www.chrysler.org.

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P R O G R A M S

Most public programs are free or are included with paid exhibition admission. Some special events have entry fees (as noted). In most cases, reservations are not required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS

SLEEP WITH THE MUMMIES A MASQUERADE FOR FAMILIES Friday, October 23 at 7 p.m. to Saturday, October 24 at 8 a.m. Do mummies have bad dreams? Here’s your chance to find out. Wear your best Egyptian costume and join us for an entire night of family-friendly activities, tours, snacks, and a film. Then, spread your sleeping bags under the night sky in Huber Court until Re returns with the morning sun. This event is open to families with children ages 6–12.

Jean-Siméon Chardin (French, 1699–1779) Basket of Plums, ca. 1765 Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

GALLERY TALKS

Cost: $35 per person for Museum Members, $55 per person for non-Members

Gallery Talks are customized tours that highlight works in the Chrysler’s permanent collection or the Museum’s visiting exhibitions. Each session begins at the Museum’s Information Desk in Huber Court at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, selected Thursdays, and selected Fridays, and at 2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Collecting with Vision: Treasures from the Chrysler Collection

To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum

This Gallery Talk is available on selected Saturdays. September 5, 12, 19, 26 October 3, 10

October 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, 25, 28, 30

Cost: Free

Norfolk and Western Railway Photographs by O. Winston Link This Gallery Talk is available on selected Wednesdays and Sundays. September 2, 6, 16, 20, 30 Sunday, October 4 Cost: Free

Special Gallery Talks on this remarkable visiting exhibition are available on selected Wednesdays, Fridays, and Sundays. Space is limited, so sign up at the Information Desk 30 minutes in advance. Cost: Free to Museum Members, or included with paid admission to the exhibition

American Portraits

This Gallery Talk is available on selected Thursdays and Saturdays. This Gallery Talk is October 15, 17, 22, 24, available on selected Wednesdays and Sundays. 29, 31 September 9, 13, 23, 27 Cost: Free October 7, 11

Baroque Art

Cost: Free

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Unknown (Egyptian) Anthropoid Coffin (detail), Roman Period, 30 B.C.–A.D. 395 Gift of Jack Chrysler, in memory of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.

Spaces are limited. A paid reservation by Friday, October 9 assures your family’s participation. For registration forms or more information, visit www.chrysler.org. To RSVP, call (757) 333-6239.

TICKLE MY EARS: STORIES AND ART AT THE CHRYSLER Geared toward pre-kindergarten children, this program takes place on the first Thursday of every month and features stories, songs, and surprises to help young children appreciate art. This program is generously supported by Target. Cost: Free

Pinks, Purples, Blues, and Green Thursday, September 3 at 11 a.m. in Mary’s Garden

Animals, Animals, Animals Thursday, October 1 at 11 a.m. in the Modern Galleries

COMING SOON: Walk Like an Egyptian Thursday, December 3 at 11 a.m. in the Large Changing Gallery A special focus on the exhibition To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum Cost: Free for children 5 and younger and Museum Members, or included with paid admission to the exhibition


P R O G R A M S

Most public programs are free or are included with paid exhibition admission. Some special events have entry fees (as noted). In most cases, reservations are not required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS

WHAT’S NEW ON WEDNESDAYS? Wednesdays are changing a bit here at the Chrysler. To round out our new free admission policy, we’re adapting our current programs and adding a slate of new events sure to please you and your family—films, theatrical performances, history lectures, musical events, and informal lessons about art. Of course, we’ll still host a popular jazz band and wine tasting on the first Wednesday of every month. As you read through the magazine, be sure to look for your old favorites, as well as find some fresh new offerings on Wednesday nights.

THE ART OF JAZZ The Art of Jazz, our monthly first-Wednesday music program features the best performers from across Hampton Roads. Sit in Huber Court to enjoy the band, which starts at 6:15 p.m., or listen from a distance as you peruse the galleries, open until 9 p.m.

The Fine Art of Wine, an informal tasting sponsored by Farm Fresh, complements The Art of Jazz. Museum Members receive a $1 discount on each glass of wine and half-off on all wine tasting. Other refreshments also are available for purchase. Art Riffs, short explorations of selected works of art, fill the quiet time when the band takes its first break. Guests meet at the main staircase in Huber Court at approximately 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, September 2 In Concert: Reggie Gist Art Riff: Samson Bringing Honey to His Parents by Guercino Wednesday, October 7 In Concert: Latin Jazz Conspiracy Art Riff: The Artist in His Studio by Nicolas de Largillierre

DRAWN FROM THE COLLECTION Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, called Guercino (Italian, 1591–1666) Samson Bringing Honey to His Parents, ca. 1625–26 Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., in honor of the Board of Trustees 1977–1985

ART IN MOTION On the last Wednesday of each month, the Chrysler connects its collection and exhibitions to films shown in the Kaufman Theatre. Cost: Free

Strangers on a Train (1951) Wednesday, September 30 at 7 p.m. After viewing O. Winston Link’s photographs of Norfolk and Western Railway’s last steam locomotives, enjoy the suspense of a train ride with a psychotic socialite and a tennis star in this classic Alfred Hitchcock thriller.

Dust off your favorite pencils, pastels, charcoals, even crayons, and bring them with your thickest sketch pad to the Chrysler on Wednesday nights to draw among the masters in our galleries. Invite a friend or meet new ones. Your level of experience doesn’t matter—everyone is welcome. Limited supplies are available for novices and an artist will be on hand to offer guidance. This new club meets at the Information Desk at 7 p.m. Cost: Free A recent visitor left this crayon sketch of Andrew Jackson, a neoclassical marble bust by Ferdinand August Pettrich in our Ricau Gallery of American Sculpture.

Rivers and Tides (2001) Wednesday, October 28 at 7 p.m. Consider the connections between the landscape photographs of Eliot Porter, on view in the Kaufman Theatre Lobby beginning October 24, and the environmental art of Andy Goldsworthy, the subject of this scenic documentary.

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P R O G R A M S

Most public programs are free or are included with paid exhibition admission. Some special events have entry fees (as noted). In most cases, reservations are not required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS

HISTORIC HOUSES PROGRAMS

SPECIAL EVENT Sukkot: The Feast of Ingathering Sunday, October 4 at 1 p.m. at the Moses Myers House Learn more about Norfolk’s Jewish heritage as the home of Norfolk’s first Jewish residents highlights the festival of Sukkot. This commemoration of God’s protection over the Israelites in the wilderness also celebrates the gathering of the harvest. Help build and decorate a traditional sukkah! For information, please call (757) 441-1526.

Weekend Programs at the Historic Houses explore specific themes of the Moses Myers House in greater detail. Weekend programs are scheduled weekly at 1 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. For more information about programs at the Historic Houses, please call (757) 441-1526.

Architour

Divided City—Norfolk’s Civil War

Saturday, September 5 and Sunday, September 6 Saturday, October 10 and Sunday, October 11

Saturday, September 26 and Sunday, September 27 Saturday, October 31

Go behind the scenes and uncover architectural evidence that reveals how the Myers House has changed over time to meet the needs of the people who have lived here. Find out how this evidence provides clues to daily life throughout the house.

Discover how the city of Norfolk was affected by America’s most destructive war. Through the experiences of the Myers family, find out how the war touched everyone in Norfolk at that time—soldiers and civilians, free and slave, white and African-American, Northern and Southern.

Ladies of Norfolk—The Myers Women

The Myers—A Jewish-American Family

Saturday, September 12 and Sunday, September 13 Saturday, October 17 and Sunday, October 18

Saturday, October 3 and Sunday, October 4

Spend an hour in the company of the women of the Myers household and learn about the vital roles they played at home and in society. Meet the Myers’ daughters—Adeline, Augusta, and Mary Georgiana—and contrast their lives with that of Chary, a 14-year-old slave girl.

…If You Lived During Slavery Saturday, September 19 and Sunday, September 20 Saturday, October 24 and Sunday, October 25

Randolph Rogers (American, 1825–1892) Ruth Gleaning, 1853 Gift of James H. Ricau and Museum purchase

Learn more about Norfolk’s African-American heritage from the stories of enslaved and free African-Americans at the Moses Myers House through the Civil War. Experience history through their eyes by following in their footsteps throughout the Myers House, and explore the unique differences between slavery in cities and on plantations.

Enter into the religious life of the Myers family and understand the challenges faced by early American Jews. Find out how the Myers family practiced their religion and how their beliefs found expression in their public lives.

THE FALL BOOK SALE September 9 – 20 in Huber Court near The Museum Shop Save 50% on a select group of fine art books. Choose from a large selection of titles, including art histories, how-to books, children’s books, and more.

THE ISLAND PEARL JEWELRY TRUNK SHOW October 16 from 11 a.m.–3 p.m. in The Museum Shop Virginia Beach native Leighton Reeve’s extensive travels to India, Thailand, and China allow her to work directly with families to handcraft her beautiful pearl and semi-precious stone designs.

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P R O G R A M S

Unless otherwise noted, no reservations are required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PROGRAMS FOR MEMBERS & SUPPORT GROUPS

MOWBRAY ARCH SOCIETY Fall Program Thursday, October 22 at 6 p.m. Members of the Mowbray Arch Society will celebrate the start of their 2009-2010 season by welcoming Robert Lehrman as their featured speaker. Recognized as one of the “Top 100 Collectors” in the United States by both Art News and Art & Antiques, Lehrman is especially known for the fine collection of American and European contemporary art that he has been building since 1979. He is also a patron of the arts and an active supporter and board member of many arts organizations. For more information on the Mowbray Arch Society, please call (757) 333-6253 or email Deborrah Grulke at dgrulke@chrysler.org.

SENIOR ART FORUM This group for life-long learners meets one Thursday each month for a tour, discussion of art, and light refreshments in the Diamonstein Education Workshop.

NORFOLK HISTORY SERIES The Norfolk Historical Society sponsors lectures in the Chrysler’s Kaufman Theatre on the second Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are offered after each event.

Remembering George Tucker Wednesday, September 16 at 7 p.m. George Tucker entertained as well as instructed readers in his Virginian-Pilot local history column for many years. He believed that while history must be respected, it wasn’t always respectable. Join NHS President Louis Guy for reflections on the contributions of this local historian.

Witchcraft in Colonial Virginia Wednesday, October 14 at 7 p.m. Learn about early American Halloween traditions in a presentation guaranteed to provide chills and thrills. Carson Hudson of Virginia Patriots leads an investigation into the witchcraft law, beliefs, and victims of early Virginia. Cost: Free to Members of the Friends of Historic Houses and the Norfolk Historical Society, $5 for all others. For more information, please call (757) 441-1526.

FRIENDS OF THE HISTORIC HOUSES Annual Road Trip Wednesday, October 7 (all day)

Cost: Free for Museum Members, $5 for all others.

Once again, it's time for the Friends of Historic Houses to fasten their seatbelts and hit the road. This year's trip will travel to Orange, Va., where the Friends will tour Historic Montpelier, home of our nation's fourth president, James Madison, and his wife, Dolley. Often overlooked compared to Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, Montpelier is nestled at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and has been undergoing a massive restoration since 2004. Learn more about "The Father of the Constitution" and America's first First Lady in this exclusive tour of the house and grounds. Space is limited to 50 participants.

COMING SOON To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum

For more details on this excursion or the Friends of Historic Houses, please call (757) 333-1086 or email John Christiansen at jchristiansen@chrysler.org.

The Artistic Career of Exhibitions Designer Willis Potter Thursday, September 3 at 2 p.m.

Through the Lens of Museum Photographer Ed Pollard

Willis Potter in the After Hours gallery Photo by Jake Gillespie for the Chrysler Museum of Art

Thursday, October 1 at 2 p.m.

Thursday, November 5 at 2 p.m. Cost: Free for Museum Members, or included with paid admission to the exhibition

Cost: $85 for Members of Friends of Historic Houses, $100 for all others

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P R O G R A M S

Unless otherwise noted, no reservations are required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PROGRAMS FOR MEMBERS & SUPPORT GROUPS

FRIENDS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART 4th Annual Q-Down Friday, October 2 at 6 p.m. in Huber Court Grab your hat and shine up your boots! It’s time again for the Annual Q-Down. This fun-filled evening always delivers with great music, dancing, and all-you-can-eat barbeque.

FLOWER GUILD Flower Arranging Club Thursday, September 17 at 1 p.m. in the Diamonstein Education Workshop Come see what all the excitement is about at the next Flower Arranging Class. The Flower Guild offers a class every other month and each session provides participants with an arrangement, container, mechanics, and several new skills and techniques for flower arranging. Space is very limited and past classes have been filled to capacity. Cost: $50 per person, paid by September 7 To make your paid reservation, please contact Deborrah Grulke at (757) 333-6253 or dgrulke@chrysler.org.

Fall Flower Guild Demonstration with Patrice Dupuis Tuesday, November 10 from 10 a.m.–noon in the Kaufman Theatre You won’t want to miss this exceptional session with Patrice Dupuis of Bloom, The Art of Flowers in Norfolk. Known for her innovative designs, Dupuis will present new decorating ideas for the holidays. Your Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s floral arrangements will never be the same. The Flower Guild is honored that Dupuis, as a loyal member of this Chrysler support group for many years, has graciously agreed to share her talents for its benefit. Cost: $25 for Flower Guild Members, $45 for all others Tickets are available for purchase in the Chrysler Museum Shop. For more information on the Flower Guild or this special event, please call (757) 333-6253 or e-mail Deborrah Grulke at dgrulke@chrysler.org.

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Cost: $35 for FAAA Members, $40 for all others

The FAAA 5th Annual Art Class Series

The FAAA’s annual Q-Down always delivers a great evening of evening of live music, dancing, and down-home food.

The Friends of African-American Art launch another year of art classes with this fascinating docket:

The Quest to Live Forever Saturday, October 17 from 10 a.m.–noon Join Director of Education Scott Howe and Chrysler Master Docent Pat Brown for an in-depth tour and discussion of To Live Forever and the Chrysler’s fascinating collection of Egyptian art. Also view the Museum’s collection of African art in its newly refurbished gallery.

The Hampton University Museum Collection Saturday, January 16, 2010 Don’t miss Hampton University Museum Curator Vanessa Thaxton-Ward’s special tour of one of the most prestigious permanent collections of African-American art in the United States.

The Abstract Artistry of Felrath Hines Saturday, February 20, 2010 Catch this exclusive tour of the Chrysler’s collection with Chief Curator Jeff Harrison as he presents the colorful Minimalism of this abstract artist and Civil Rights Movement leader.

“Class Pictures” by Dawoud Bey Saturday, March 26, 2010 See high school students in a whole new light. Bey's large-format, living-color photos reveal their inner souls, as do the brief autobiographies that accompany them. This class will be followed by a special FAAA lunch. Cost for the 4-CLASS SERIES: $70 for FAAA Members, $80 for all others Cost for EACH CLASS: $20 for FAAA Members, $25 for all others For more information on joining the FAAA or to RSVP for these events, please call (757) 333-6294 or email Jenny Kolin at jkolin@chrysler.org.


P R O G R A M S

Unless otherwise noted, no reservations are required for individuals, but please call for group reservations.

PROGRAMS FOR MEMBERS & SUPPORT GROUPS

TRAVEL ARTFULLY The Chrysler’s Art Travel Program offers flexibility, price ranges from budget to luxury, and the convenience of structured activities or the freedom of traveling independently. Your dream vacation awaits!

PERU

• March 22–April 10, 2010

Join us on this exploration of history and culture for a travel experience you will never forget. Nestled in the misty Andes Mountains, Peru is a rugged, storied land where vast Incan civilizations once flourished and Spanish conquistadors ruled. Enjoy cosmopolitan and colonial Lima and historic Cuzco, the former capital and holy city of the Incan empire. Marvel at the ruins in mesmerizing Machu Picchu and cruise on scenic Lake Titicaca to the Floating Island of Los Uros and Isla Taquile for a truly unique experience.

PROGRAMS FOR MASTERPIECE SOCIETY MEMBERS NEW YORK

• November 11 – 15, 2009 •

PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

SOLD OUT!

• February 4 – 7, 2010

Encore! Join us for the annual American International Fine Art Fair. This five-star event draws dealers from around the world and their best art, jewelry, and antiques. Plus, you’ll experience the Palm Beach art scene with visits to galleries, private collections, and The Norton.

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

• June 15 – 19, 2010

Glass lovers—join Curator of Glass Kelly Conway for this excursion to the home of the Studio Glass Movement. Enjoy The Tacoma Art Museum and The Museum of Glass, as well as exclusive tours of artists’ studios. Special visits to private collections round out this trip to the eclectic “Emerald City.” Sandra Tavss, Rachel Cottrell, and Carol Anne Kent (left to right) enjoy a white wine welcome from Blue Hill at Stone Barns during a Masterpiece Society trip to New York's historic Hudson River Valley.

Cost: $3,195 per person, double occupancy (plus airfare)

EGYPTIAN ODYSSEY

• April 12–23, 2010

Along the Nile River’s fertile plains the earliest of civilizations gave rise to one of the most intriguing cultures—the ancient Egyptians. This classic journey delves into the mysterious realm of the pharaohs to discover their colossal monuments, elaborate tombs, and captivating lives. Gain insight into the magnificent temples at Karnak and Luxor, the extraordinary Valley of the Kings, Abu Simbel, and the Great Pyramids. Explore cities full of architectural gems and important museum collections, and learn about life along the Nile as you cruise aboard a luxury riverboat. Cost: $5,895 per person, double occupancy ~ includes airfare from Norfolk

Masterpiece Society Members Angie and Gene Loving, Susan Goode, and Cabell Birdsong (left to right) relax after dinner.

Museum Trustee Linda Kaufman (center) shares a scenic moment with Anette Johnson (left) and Linda Taylor (right) during their Masterpiece Society excursion to Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

For more information about the Art Travel Program or the Masterpiece Society, please contact Deborrah Grulke at (757) 333-6318 or dgrulke@chrysler.org.

21


245 West Olney Road Norfolk, Virginia 23510-1509 www.chrysler.org

TO LIVE FOREVER AT THE MUSEUM SHOP

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID NORFOLK, VA PERMIT #3369

TO LIVE FOREVER MUSEUM SHOP BONUSES Friday, October 9 – Sunday, October 11 Spend $50 or more in The Museum Shop and receive a free To Live Forever mug (a $10 value). Spend $100 or more and take home an ancient Egypt-themed umbrella (a $20 value) as our thank you (while supplies last).

PERSONALIZED CARTOUCHE PENDANTS Throughout To Live Forever Dress like a goddess with your own Egyptian cartouche pendant and necklace crafted by artisans in Cairo. Place your order in The Museum Shop and 3–5 weeks later your individualized jewelry will arrive at your home. Name cartouches are available in sterling silver or 18k gold.

YOUR NAME

IN

HIEROGLYPHS

Throughout To Live Forever Discover your Egyptian identity. Insert a dollar bill into the obelisk outside The Museum Shop, enter up to 12 letters on the touch screen, and the 8 ½” x 11” printout will feature a cartouche of your name in hieroglyphs. The reverse side includes a history of cartouches and a key to the hieroglyphic alphabet.

The Chrysler | The Magazine of the Chrysler Museum of Art  

The Magazine of the Chrysler Museum of Art

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