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Career Services

is a division of Student Affairs

Graduate Career Guide 2019-2020

T: +27 51 401 7393 | E: career@ufs.ac.za | www.ufs.ac.za

Inspiring excellence. Transforming lives.


Table of Content Message from the editors

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Career Services on the Qwaqwa campus

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Skills and Support Employer application, selection, and assessment processes: what to expect

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You will most probably not be interested in this article

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My thoughts are causing me pain

14

CV Writing Tips

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Interview Skills Tips

18

Entering the working environment Aligning my academics with my career and ensuring that robots don’t take my job

20

Disruptions that influence the world of work

22

Working with the robots

24

Powerful factors that contribute to a better future of employment

27

Cultivating entrepreneurship through a growth mindset

31

Want to study Law?

34

Postgraduate Studies: A potentially lonesome journey

36

The role of graduates in the internationalisation of small businesses

37

Career Fair Success

41

Alumni Gallery 47 Employer Directory 56

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Message

from the editors By Belinda Janeke, Head: Career Services (UFS Bloemfontein campus) and Carmenita Redcliffe, Chief Officer Company Relations

E

very year we ask students and companies for inputs on the Graduate Career Guide, and just when we think we have all career-related topics covered, we hear a new buzz word and learn of new hot topics. In 2019, Career Services engaged in discussions about the future of work, entrepreneurship, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and the impact it will have on higher education institutions. Career Services also collaborated with various departments on campus to co-present workshops and events in order to make a bigger contribution and impact.This guide is our fourth publication and we are very thankful to our article writers for contributing on topics such as job applications, employability, entrepreneurship, mental health, and the future of work. Read more about successful alumni who moved from graduated to employed. Browse through the Employer Directory to see which firms are recruiting in various fields and industries, and which vacancies are available. Career Services is a division of Student Affairs and offers a variety of free services, including: • career advice; • CV/résumé assistance; • job interview preparation and mock interviews; • various work readiness workshops; and • organising career fairs, company visits, and presentations for job opportunities. Our aim is to assist and equip students to become employable. We also offer work experience opportunities to approximately 50 students annually through our Career Network Volunteer Programme, where students work at Career Services while gaining transferable (soft) skills.

Contact us today! www.ufs.ac.za/career

+27 51 401 7328

www.facebook.com/UFSCareers

Graduate Career Guide

career@ufs.ac.za www.linkedin.com/groups/7421353

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Meet the team

Belinda Janeke Head: Career Services

Carmenita Redcliffe Chief Officer: Company Relations

Nthabiseng Khota Intern: Company Relations

Lala Mpofu Intern: Student Relations

Reagall Marais Intern: Social Media Marketing

Cashandra Flusk Intern: Company Relations

Michelle Morgan Intern: Finance and Administration

Motlogelwa Moema Senior Officer: Career Services and Student Life, Qwaqwa Campus

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Career Services Company presentations & events

Career advice

Career network volunteers

CV writing assistance

Job opportunities

Interview skills & mock interviews

Training & workshops Internships

Graduate Recruitment

Career fairs & events

Work readiness programmes

Read the latest edition of the UFS Career Guide @ www.ufs.ac.za/careerguide T: +27 51 401 7393 | E: career@ufs.ac.za | www.ufs.ac.za

Inspiring excellence. Transforming lives.


Career Services on the

Qwaqwa campus By Motlogelwa Moema Senior Officer: Career Services and Student Life: Student Affairs

T

he University of the Free State’s Qwaqwa Campus is a multicultural campus that prides itself on authenticity and diversity.

The mission and vision of the Qwaqwa Career Services office is to professionalise the academic space while equipping young prospective graduates to be ready for the corporate world. We want to encourage the students to envision their academic journey beyond the confinements of the higher learning institution, and it is aimed at emphasising the vitality of training and development programmes. The office has transformed, hence the addition of the Student Life programme to the office was a journey to rediscovering and building a relationship with the students in all dimensions of their academic journey. There is always a great need to prepare young people for leadership positions through training, developing, and enriching them. As part of reaching out to students and bringing necessary change to the university and society at large, the office hosted a very successful career fair and established a working relationship with Academic Services by presenting work readiness workshops in lectures if a lecturer is not available to ensure that the academic slot is not ineffective. In addition, the office has established a social relationship that aims to network with the broader community of Qwaqwa by expanding its services to its residents and offering annual RC and SRC leadership training. Contact the Career Services and Student Life office to schedule an appointment or to find out more about upcoming events.

Email: Address:

moemam@ufs.ac.za Student Affairs Qwaqwa Campus UFS Telephone: 058 718 5377 Office: Intsika Building

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Employer application, selection, and assessment processes:

what to expect

By Camilla Pennington Project Manager, South African Graduate Employers Association

A

t some point during your time at university you are likely to start applying to potential employers – either for a bursary, vacation employment, an internship, or a permanent position as you approach the completion of your studies. Knowing what to expect and ensuring that you are adequately prepared for each step of the application and selection process will increase your chances of success. The figure below represents what an application and selection process might look like; not all will be identical, but most will follow a similar process. This article will guide you through each stage of the process, help you to understand what to expect, and share tips on how to do your best.

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Skills and Support Stage One: Online Application Most employers will require you to complete an online application. The length of the form itself will vary, as will the amount of detail you are asked to provide. Make sure you allow enough time to fill the form in correctly. You will need to have a copy of your Grade 12 certificate, your academic transcript, and your identification with you, and you may be required to upload these as part of the application process. In some cases, applying might be as easy as uploading your LinkedIn profile, so make sure you have one and that it is up to date. LinkedIn has put together a resource centre specifically targeted at assisting students with using LinkedIn (to access the resource centre, click here). Some employers will ask you to provide a CV. It is a good idea to make sure that your CV is concise and kept up to date. Depending on the type of vacancy you are applying for, you may want to customise your CV and include a cover letter that motivates why your application should be considered. Remember to use language that you have seen in the job or vacancy description; for example, if an employer refers to “a solution-orientated person”, use the same language in your CV and provide evidence of why you are a solution-orientated person. An important point to remember when applying for any vacancy is that you will be one of many applicants. According to the South African Graduate Employer’s Association (SAGEA), in its 2018 research among 91 of South Africa’s top graduate employers, the median number of applications received is 59 per vacancy. In other words, your application is competing with at least 58 others! It is therefore important to think about how you can differentiate yourself from other applicants by providing examples of relevant experiences and skills you have acquired during your time at school and university. While it is not easy to differentiate yourself through an application form, there will probably be one or two open-ended questions you are required to answer, such as: “Why do you believe you are suited to this position?” Think carefully about your answer and write it in a way that will make your application stand out from the rest. As part of their screening process, many employers will include what we commonly refer to as knock-out-questions. The purpose of these questions is to ensure that any applicants who are not eligible for the vacancy in question are screened out early. Knock-out questions might relate to things like citizenship (many employers will only be able to consider South African citizens), preparedness to relocate, or the type of qualification required for the position. If you do not meet the minimum criteria for the vacancy, you will not be able to continue with the application.

Stage Two: Assessment and/or Selection Interview You may be required to complete an online assessment either as part of the online application process or once you have completed an online application that meets the employer’s minimum requirements. This will likely take the form of a work-orientated personality questionnaire, a verbal or numerical reasoning test, or it may be a gamified assessment. The purpose of any assessment will be to evaluate certain attitudes, personality traits, thought patterns, decision-making processes, reasoning abilities, problem-solving approaches, language skills, or numerical proficiency and accuracy. Different employers will be looking for different skills and abilities, depending on the competency requirements they have stipulated for the vacancy in question.

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The most salient advice for completing an assessment is as follows: • Make sure you are completing the assessment at a time when you are focused, fresh, and well rested, and that you have enough time and data available if completing online. • There will usually be one or two practice examples that you will complete prior to doing the actual assessment – make sure you read the instructions carefully and know what is expected. • If there is a time limit imposed, be mindful of how long you are allowed to complete the questions, and rather than dwelling on an answer you are unsure of, move on and complete the other questions. You can always come back to a tricky question if you have spare time at the end. Balance speed with accuracy! • According to SAGEA’s research, up to 72% of employers use a personality assessment as part of their selection process. When completing a personality assessment, it is important to be yourself and go with your first instinct in terms of your answer choice. These types of questionnaires have built-in consistency scales and attempts to manipulate answers can usually be detected. If your application is successful beyond this point, you are more than likely to be invited to a screening interview, which will be conducted via one of the following three possible formats: • A telephonic screening interview. • A digital interview. • A face-to-face interview (this could take place on campus, at the employer’s premises, or may be scheduled online using Skype). Employers are increasingly embracing technology to make screening interviews efficient for both the candidate and to speed up their selection processes, as well as reducing their carbon footprint! Digital interviews can be done on a smart device – employers will upload pre-recorded questions and applicants then record their responses at a time that suits them. The interview is recorded and is sent to the employer for review. Screening interviews will usually require you to elaborate on the information in your application and/or CV and will explore your achievements, experience, and skills in greater depth. The purpose of this article is not to give you chapter and verse on interview preparation – that is a subject on its own and there are plenty of articles and tips to be found online. A few pointers are as follows: • When preparing for an interview, you need to do your homework about the organisation you are applying to. Visit the company’s website and read up about the organisation, their culture, and what they look for in potential employees. • Give some thought to the type of questions you might be asked, and how you would answer them. There is a strong possibility that you will be asked to talk about your strengths, weaknesses, and why you are applying for the position and/or to the company. How will you answer these questions and how can you relate your answers back to what you know about the company? • Give some thought to your personal appearance and dress code for the interview. Even if you are doing a digital or Skype interview, your appearance will make an impression on the interviewer/ company. Ensure that you look neat and are appropriately dressed based on the company’s culture and dress code (which you can research online). • If you are asked a difficult question, take some time to think about your answer, even if it means a pause in the conversation. It is better to give a considered response than to shoot from the hip!

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• Be your authentic self in the interview – don’t try to be something you are not! Interviewers are not looking for perfection; they want to learn more about who you are and whether you are suited for the position and company. Note: in some cases, a screening interview may precede a first-round assessment, while some employers may do this the other way around.

Stage Three: Assessment Centres Some employers will ask you to attend an assessment centre as part of their selection process, although you are more likely to encounter this type of scenario when you are applying for a permanent position than when applying for a bursary or vacation employment. An assessment centre is a technique consisting of multiple simulation exercises that reproduce what you are typically likely to encounter on the job. These simulation exercises are observed and scored by multiple, different assessors, resulting in a multifaceted and rigorous approach that is an extremely accurate predictor of a candidate’s likely success in a job. A typical assessment centre will consist of at least two simulation exercises. These are likely to be any of the following: • An in-basket exercise: This exercise looks like a typical day’s email inbox and you will be required to prioritise and address many issues/problems in writing.

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• A role-play exercise: This exercise takes the form of a meeting with another person (usually an assessor). There are a few possible scenarios, such as dealing with a customer complaint, working with a colleague to decide on a project for the organisation, or even dealing with a staff member who is not performing. You will usually be given the scenario beforehand, allowed time to prepare and then you will have an interactive meeting with the customer / colleague / staff member (who is the assessor). • A group exercise: In this exercise you and your fellow candidates are given a tough problem or situation to deal with. You may be asked to prepare individually, or as a team and would then have an interactive meeting with the other candidates, which would be observed by the assessor(s). • A presentation: You may be given a topic and asked to prepare a presentation. You will be given some time to prepare the presentation – together with guidelines on how long it should be – and would then be required to present to the assessor(s). • A panel interview: Many assessment centres will include a final interview with a panel of assessors. Often the panel will consist of a team of people with whom you would typically interact if you are employed – this saves time and allows for consensus in selecting the most suitable candidate, as well as reducing the chance of what is known as “interviewer bias”, which makes the outcome more accurate. At this point, you are probably thinking that an assessment centre sounds quite intimidating! It is, however, a holistic way of looking at your skills – you will have strengths in some areas, while other areas might need some development. Assessors are interested in the whole package and will make decisions based on where your strengths and development areas lie. An assessment centre should be a learning experience for you and if you think about it like that, it will seem less scary. Here are some tips to help you do your best: • Make sure you are well rested and that you schedule an appointment at a time that really works for you (e.g. you don’t want to be in the middle of exams!). • Ensure that you have accurate directions and that you get to the assessment centre at least half an hour early. Getting lost or being late will add to your stress and you will be flustered and unable to perform at your best. • As with an interview, give some thought to the dress code and ensure that you look neat and presentable. • Most of the exercises you encounter at an assessment centre will be observed by one or more assessors. It is very important to be as natural and authentic as possible. If you are a quiet person, for example, don’t feel that you need to behave as if you are the life and soul of the party! Do make sure that you speak up when you need to and that, when participating in group activities, your voice is heard – but do this in a way that is normal and natural for you. • When participating in group activities, try to ensure that all candidates are included and have an opportunity to share their input. • If you encounter a panel interview, again, be yourself. Ensure that you make eye contact with all the interviewers and that you address everyone on the panel rather than focusing on one person. • It is natural to feel nervous in these situations and it is okay to admit to being nervous, but don’t let it get the better of you! There is no “perfect” way to behave in an assessment and the assessors are going to be looking for a range of different behaviours and attitudes.

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Skills and Support • An assessment is not meant to be easy; it is meant to be a little uncomfortable and challenging but it is also a valuable learning experience for you. Keep reminding yourself that you are not expected to excel at everything in an assessment – the purpose behind the assessment is to establish whether you are the right person for the company or job and whether you would ultimately be happy if you ended up there. • If there is something you know you are not good at – or if asked a question you don’t know how to answer – admit to it and own it! • Put your best foot forward, ensure that you leave the assessors with a positive impression, and that they will remember who you are!

Stage Four: Final Interview If the process you have gone through does not include an assessment centre, you may be asked to attend a final interview, which could be a one-on-one interview or might be a panel interview. The above guidelines provided for selection and/or panel interviews will still apply.

What outcomes should you expect? As a young graduate, you are likely to experience varying degrees of feedback – ranging from no feedback at all to detailed assessment feedback. It all depends on the organisation, their assessment policy, and what stage of the selection process you reach. Most organisations will send unsuccessful candidates a regret letter via email, while other organisations will only inform successful candidates of the outcome. The reality is that many organisations are overwhelmed with hundreds of applications and just don’t have the resources to get back to every person. If you have completed an assessment for which you have not received feedback, you are entitled to request this. If you do choose to do so, it is recommended that you request feedback in a respectful manner, indicating why you are interested in the feedback and how it might contribute to your future development. In conclusion, employers will use different selection processes and tools based on their needs and requirements. Their main objective is to use scientifically valid and reliable assessments and assessment centres as the most objective way of making accurate and fair employment decisions. As an applicant, your objective is to find out more about the company and job you are interested in pursuing and, ultimately, to be confident that they will be right for you.

References: Input for this article was provided by interviewing four professionals who work in the area of assessment: Karen Harmse and Lize Greeff of Joint Prosperity, Kevin Distiller of Odyssey Management, and Anne Buckett of Precision Assessment Centre Solutions. We thank them for their time and valued input.

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You will most probably

not be interested in this article By Gerben van Niekerk Student Media Manager (Student Affairs)

I

only have seconds to grab your attention and only 55% of readers will spend less than 15 seconds on this article. I am already on 10 seconds so for those who are not going to read any further, here is the gist: if you cannot communicate effectively, you are in deep, dark waters with a cold wind sweeping over your soul. Okay, maybe that is a bit too dramatic. At least I had 55% of the readers for longer than 15 seconds. Score! If you are one of the 55% who is not going to read the rest of this article, I wish you the best of luck with the rest of your career. Cheers. If you are reading this, you are part of the selective minority, so well done and thank you! As I am sitting here on a Wednesday afternoon listening to my neighbours watching Despicable Me 3 for the umpteenth time (they were considerate enough to buy a massive Soundbar during Black Friday, so now I can follow the movie), when I am done writing this article I have to go wash the dishes. So you have my guarantee that I am going to take my time writing this. This article will not be a rush job. Let’s get cracking, shall we? When I get asked what I studied, and I answer “Communication Science”, I very often get asked, “But why?” I usually retort with “Why not?”. Most replies sound something like this: “Why do you want to study something that is obvious? I mean you can communicate, why study it?” To avoid the risk of making this article sound like an advertorial to study Communication Science, let me cut to the chase. Communication is obvious: you talk, I listen, I talk, you listen... well, hopefully. But, effective communication is a different beast altogether. Before we go any further, let’s get the technicalities out of the way (and this is also an opportunity for me to use big words). Communication is vast, from non-verbal communication (hand gestures, facial expressions, etc.) to verbal communication (oral and written) and many other forms. In this day and age, you have mere moments to grab someone’s attention and keep it. Think of this article. It is one of many written texts in this publication. This publication competes with many other mediums for your attention at this very moment (social feeds, other texts, voice notes, etc.). Thus, the chances of you still reading this article at this point are stacked against me. If that is the case, how did I get you to read up to this point? I was sneaky. I used a couple of techniques to get you here:

#1.

I started the article with a disruption. My introduction was somewhat novel. I could’ve started the article with the very generic: “The Oxford dictionary defines communications as...”. When I hear or read that type of intro, then I “check out”.

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#2.

I rewarded you, the reader. I made you feel special (you are). I made you stand out: 55% will not read this article, but you are not part of the masses, are you? No! You are different than the rest because you decided to continue reading.

#3.

I pulled you into my life. I am not merely this faceless dude who is writing this; you know something about my life. You know what my neighbours are like, you can identify with doing anything else but washing the dishes. In short, you could identify with me.

#9.

(I know it should start with 4. but I like 9. so let’s run with it.) I use humour. Most of the time my jokes are dreadful (usually my wife’s verbatim response when I try to be funny), but if I can make you smile, or shake your head or make you lose hope in humanity, then I have elicited a reaction from you. Technically, boredom is also a reaction but not something you want.

#144. I don’t have a point to make here; I just need to make up some time before I need to go wash the dishes.

Thus, in the 5.4 minutes we have spent together (thank you speechtominutes.com for the calculation), we have seen that effective communication is not the same as communication, and that in the world of communication “hyperoverload” (I just made that up), how you communicate is almost more important than what you communicate. Let’s say you have the best idea in the world. In my books that would be cars running on tap water. If you have only five seconds to grab an investor’s attention and you start with: “According to Wikipedia, water covers 71% of the earth and my uncle says that he read somewhere that there are over a billion cars on the roads worldwide”, then you are doomed to failure and we are doomed to pay R40 per litre for petrol. Be honest with yourself: mirror, mirror, on the wall, how effective is my drawl (it was a coin toss between that and catcall to rhyme with wall)? The good news is there is no “spoon”. Being able to write well or do a great presentation is a skill. Identify where you can improve and start practising. Write your own blog, join a public speaking club, read, and read some more. Action breeds action, and inaction? Well, inaction is going to get me in trouble if I don’t start on those dishes. Good luck with your career, I cannot wait to read your blog and watch your presentation.

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My thoughts

are causing me pain By Dr Melissa Barnaschone Director: Student Counselling and Development

A

dmit it, we all think a lot! Often times we over-think, overanalyse, and over-complicate things. On top of that, our thoughts very often go unchecked and we believe them as if they are true, wreaking havoc in our lives without us knowing it.

We base our actions on our thoughts … but what if they’re wrong?

Worrying involves negative (often catastrophic) predictions about the future: I’m going to embarrass myself tomorrow when I give that presentation. My hands will shake, my face will turn red, and everyone will see that I’m incompetent!

Ruminating involves Our inner monologue can include 2 destructive types of thought patterns

How to

stop

I shouldn’t have spoken up in the lecture today. Everyone looked at me like I was an idiot.

1 Keep the focus on solution building:

Dwelling on your problems is not helpful, but looking for solutions is. Instead of asking why something happened, ask yourself what you can do about it.

overthinking Graduate Career Guide

rehashing the past:

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2 Challenge your thoughts:

Learn to recognise and replace your unhelpful thinking patterns with more helpful thoughts and ideas.

3 Change the channel:

The more you try to avoid the thought from entering your mind, the more likely it is to keep popping up. Distracting yourself with an activity is the best way to change the channel. Exercise; engage in conversation on a completely different subject; think of something humorous or tranquil; or get working on a project.

4 Thinking too much about things isn’t just a nuisance; it can take a serious toll on our mental, physical, and emotional wellbeing.

Notice when you are thinking too much:

Awareness is the first step in putting an end to overthinking. Pay attention to the way you think. When replaying events in your mind over and over, or worrying about things you cannot control, acknowledge that your thoughts are not helpful.

Other techniques you can try ANTI-PERFECTIONISM

Do poorly rather than do nothing at all.

EXPOSURE

DON’T BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU THINK

The more you confront in life, the less fearful you become.

RELAX

By using exercise, meditation, or mindfulness.

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CV Writing Tips Step 1

Dos and Don’ts of a CV

Do

Don’t

• Target your CV

• Get too personal

• Be honest

• Use abbreviations

• Be informative but concise

• Include your grades

• Avoid spelling mistakes

• Go overboard with intricate design or decoration

• Design with clarity and visibility in mind

Compile your CV

Step 2

The different sections of a CV …

Header & Personal Info

Qualifications

• Include your full names

• List most recent qualifications first

• Include up-to-date contact details

• Include the - qualification name - institution - date

Remember to include information requested in the advert

Remember to include short courses and certificates

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Experience • List most recent experience first • Only include experience that is relevant to the job

Remember to list key duties

of the position that is relevant to the job you are applying for

References • Include 2-3 references • List each reference’s position and contact details

Remember to ask reference if you

Skills, Achievements, Interests • Highlight professional and personal skills that are relevant • Include skills like - Computer literacy - Language literacy - Leadership and other traits required for your chosen profession • Highlight the most relevant achievements. These could include - Leadership - Awards - Honours

may include them on your CV

Step 3

Remember to list hobbies and activities like sport or membership to clubs or groups

Write Your Cover Letter 7 NB Secrets: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Customise each cover letter Remember to follow a formal Complement CV, don’t repeat it letter format; include your address, Less is more! – get straight to the point the organisation’s address, and Compliment the organisation sign off with you signature Show you have done your research Show enthusiasm Talk about your achievements and what you can offer the company

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Interview Skills Tips Part 1

Prepping for the interview

3

Tip 1: Prepare for different types of interviews

Tip 2:

Most common interviews

1. The traditional interview (1-1) 2. The phone or Skype interview 3. The firing squad (panel)

Research, Research, Research!!! Know the company

• Vision and mission • Company achievements or milestones

Tip 3: Prepare for different types of interview questions

Personality

Know yourself

• Google yourself • Compare your skills & qualifications with the job description

Hypothetical Ethical

Opinion

Illegal

Behavioural

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Competency/ skills

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Tip 4: The Mock Interview Book a free practice interview career@ufs.ac.za


Skills and Support

Tip 5:

Dress code

Plan ahead

• Dress the part

Travel

Prepare

• Extra copies of you CV • Portfolio (creative professions)

Part 2

During the Interview

Tip 1: #Enthusaism #Confidence #BeDifferentBeYourself #Breathe #Honesty

• Water to clear your throat • Questions you’d like to ask • Notepad & pen or tablet to take notes • Folder with relevant documents

Avoid interview mistakes • • • • •

Space fillers Talking too much Not answering the question Avoiding direct eye contact Bad-mouthing previous employers

Tip 3: Expect interview extras

• Double-check the address • Have a map • Get contact details

Tip 2: The right impression

Tip 4: Follow up • Assignments or tests that demonstrate talent • Portfolios of evidence that showcase your work

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Send a thank you email

• Show your gratitude • Show that you are serious

Graduate Career Guide


Aligning my academics with my career and ensuring that

robots don’t take my job By Monique Schoeman Academic Advisor at the Centre for Teaching and Learning

T

he Fourth Industrial Revolution is the latest revolution taking the workplace by storm. It is characterised by new ways in which technology becomes embedded in societies (Davis, 2016). This is a time during which the rhetoric of artificial intelligence (AI) and genome editing is becoming a more standard practice. However, these exciting innovations can also cause anxiety due to their potential to increase unemployment (Davis, 2016). As AI (i.e. robots) helps to automate processes, it may start to replace those workers involved only in routine tasks. So, how do I ensure that robots do not take my job? The answer is simple: by making use of effective career development practices, especially while at university. Career development is a general umbrella concept that can be described as “the lifelong psychological and behavioural processes as well as contextual influences shaping one’s career pathway over the life span” (Niles & Harris-Bowlsbey, 2005). What happens throughout our lives, the decisions we make, and the goals we set influence our career. Within the higher education setting (i.e. university) there are three prominent types of career development practices, namely career counselling, career advising, and career services. This article will briefly discuss each, as well as their interdependencies on one another, so as to maximise your exposure and guide you to an enhanced experience of each. (a) Career counselling is a process facilitated by registered counsellors and/or psychologists. They help guide you to choose broader career fields that you might be interested in. However, these counsellors and psychologists do not work with the academic programme’s curricula. The practice is then succeeded by career advising. (b) Career advising is defined and practised as an integrator of the developmental continuum of academic advising and is not limited to psychologists/counsellors. During this process, the advisor assists students so they better understand how their personal interests, abilities, and values (which may be informed by career counselling feedback) may predict success in the academic and career fields considered. The career advising process is also the phase during which the advisor supports the students’ decision making and guides the formulation of the academic and career goals accordingly (Gordon, 2006). In seeking further help, advisors from this practice also refer students out to attain the relevant skills set for the world of work through engagement with career services and development units.

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World of Work

(c) When it comes to the next part in terms of looking at how to present ourselves as employable, the third type of career development practice is career services. Career services are in most instances referred to and presented as intentional activities that build and prepare students for the world of work and expose students to relevant company relations. Activities may include CV writing, preparing for job interviews, career fairs, and accessing specific job-related information and opportunities. In this way, students can prepare themselves and present the knowledge, skills, and abilities gained and identified through career counselling and advising. In summary, the Fourth Industrial Revolution may bring some anxiety that robots will take over our jobs. However, making efficient use of career development practices can help ensure that we do not become part of the statistics of those replaced by robots. It is thus encouraged that while you navigate the academic space, you also consider your career pathway and not detach your academics from your future career. Remember, some jobs we are studying towards will not exist anymore, thus we need to acquire all the relevant attributes in order to best fit the ever-evolving job market. The UFS provides all three of these practices residing under the career development umbrella term, and should you need to make use of the services, feel free to get in touch. It is not just about graduating but rather about graduating with the necessary and relevant skills, knowledge, and abilities to complete globally, so connect and clarify! Student Counselling and Development offers career counselling/assessment services. The Central Academic Advising Office at the Centre for Teaching and Learning has academic advisors to help you develop, clarify, and align your academic and career pathways. The Career Services Office assists with student- and company-related matters to make you an employable graduate.

Sources: Davis, N. 2016. What is the Fourth Industrial Revolution? [Online]. Available at: https://www.weforum. org/agenda/2016/01/what-is-the-fourth-industrial-revolution/ [Accessed 30 April 2019]. Gordon, V.N. 2006. Career Advising: An Academic Advisor’s Guide. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Niles, S.G. & Harris-Bowlsbey, J. 2005. Career Development Interventions for the 21st Century. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.

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Disruptions

that influence the world of work By Belinda Janeke Head: Career Services (UFS Bloemfontein campus)

T

he landscape of work is ever-changing. The industrial revolutions throughout the ages show how quickly the workplace, technology, and skills have to change.

1st Industrial Revolution

2nd Industrial Revolution

3rd Industrial Revolution

4th Industrial Revolution

Water & Steam

Electricity

Automation

Cyber-Physical Systems

Steam and water power replace human and animal power with machines.

Electricity, internal combustion engines, aeroplanes, telephones, cars, radio, and mass production.

Electronics, the Internet and IT used to further the automation of mass production.

Driverless cars, smart robotics, materials that are lighter and tougher, and a manufacturing process built around 3D printing.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution, or Industry 4.0, is triggering many emerging industries, which include, but aren’t limited to: • • • •

3D printing; virtual currency; online retailing; robotics;

• • • •

Internet of Things (IoT); artificial intelligence; virtual reality; augmented reality;

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• big data; • Web 3.0; and • private space travel.

Career Services


World of Work According to Deloitte, there are three forces that cause disruption in the future of work. These forces cause “work” to be redefined, thus the need for a mindset shift and constant re-skilling.

Forces of change

1. Technology: AI, robotics, sensors, and data 2. Demographics: Longer lives, growth of younger and older populations, and greater diversity 3. The power of pull: Customer empowerment and the rise of global talent markets

Work and workforces redefined

1. Re-engineering work: Technology reshapes every job 2. Transforming the workforces: The growth of alternative work arrangements

Implications for individuals 1. Engage in lifelong learning 2. Shape your own career path 3. Pursue your passion

Implications for organisations 1. Redesign work for technology and learning 2. Source and integrate talent across networks 3. Implement new models of organisational structure, leadership, culture, and rewards

Implications for public policy 1. Reimagine lifelong education 2. Transition support for income and health care 3. Reassess legal and regulatory policies

Figure 1: A framework for understanding the future of work Source: Deloitte analysis

https://jobmarketmonitor.com/2017/08/04/the-future-of-work-a-framework-for-understanding/

It used to be that only certain types of jobs – think of computer programmers and IT troubleshooters – needed constant training and upskilling. Now, all of us are expected to continuously learn new skills, new tools, and new systems. Therefore, it is crucial for us to have mindset skills of selfleadership, self-confidence, diligence, resilience, curiosity, communication, collaboration, problem solving, and more. To learn more about the mindset skills and practical steps to take in order to upskill and re-skill yourself, visit our Blackboard page.

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Working with the robots By Nthabiseng Khota Career Services

S

o you have studied and suddenly you read or hear about how robots are taking over the workplace. You might be asking yourself where you will work, what you will actually be doing, and who exactly will hire a robot over you. All of a sudden you wonder how technology will affect you as a future worker. Some jobs will cease to exist because of artificial intelligence (AI). However, this does not mean that you will be out of a job completely. Just as you learned soft skills while volunteering and job shadowing, you should be able to learn other skills or improve the skills that you have already. According to the World Development Report of 2018, the rise of information technology is increasing the demand for highly skilled graduates who can use that technology effectively. Will a robot eventually interview and hire me? It is important to note that there are companies that plan to use robots for real job interviews; however, they will still use human recruiters for the second round of interviews. AI will eventually play a greater role in deciding the best candidates for specific roles, which leaves Human Resources to play an increasingly administrative role. AI will certainly change the workplace. As previously mentioned, some jobs will no longer exist because these robots will be faster and more efficient in completing tasks. It is also noted that robots do not get sick, tired, or require salaries.

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World of Work How would I compete with that, you may ask yourself. Well, firstly, we will not run out of jobs; these robots will create jobs we have not even thought about. Secondly, these robots will actually allow us to be more innovative and give us more free time. Furthermore, these robots will never be human. Human qualities will become more valuable as robots cannot transfer their skills from one industry to another. You should not worry about job losses, but you should consider giving the robots the boring tasks (such as pattern recognition, information retrieval, and optimisation and planning), while we focus and spend more time on higher-level tasks (such as being creative, solving problems, drawing conclusions about emotional states, and social interactions). Remember, it’s not a matter of you versus the robot, but you and the robot. “Human plus machine equals superpowers.” There are also certain skills that are least likely to be replaced by AI, which include critical thinking, teamwork, interpersonal skills, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Do your research. If you will be working in a field were there could be significant job reductions or the robots will take over, you should consider re-skilling yourself. Some routine tasks like a cashier’s job are quite easy to automate. Some jobs have proved to benefit from AI. Technology has benefited the surgeon by increasing his/her productivity in terms of digital imaging. You should continue being a lifelong learner, gain exposure to new projects, and try to get experience on the job. Anticipating and preparing for future skills requirements will be important if you want to seize the new opportunities and markets.

Five ways AI or robots will benefit you in the long run 1. You will be able to have a conversation with a person speaking a different language without a human translator in almost real time. 2. You will not have to answer the same question over and over, which will help you to be more productive. 3. You will be able to prioritise better. 4. Meetings can be recorded on a cloud; you will be able to read transcripts of meetings by searching for keywords. 5. AI will help in terms of making information more accessible to those who are disabled (adding text to an image / allowing a text to be read out loud). Cathy Bessant, Chief Operations and Chief Technology Officer of the Bank of America, said in her Davos chat: “This isn’t what we let AI do to the workforce, it’s how we control its use to the good of the workforce.” This may sound ironic, but AI is making the workplace more human.

References: Greene, J. 2019. 21 ways AI is transforming the workplace in 2019. Available at: https://www. askspoke.com/blog/automation/how-ai-is-transforming-workplace (Accessed on 15 April 2019). Jardine, R. 2018. How artificial intelligence will impact the South African workforce. Available at: https://www.itnewsafrica.com/2018/03/how-artificial-intelligence-will-impact-the-southafrican-workforce/ (Accessed on 11 April 2019). McWilliams, O.E. & Budoff, J.R. 2019. The impact of artificial intelligence in the workplace. Available at: https://www.law.com/corpcounsel/2019/03/18/the-impact-of-artificial-intelligence-in-theworkplace/?slreturn=20190315082206 (Accessed on 15 April 2019).

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Naterer, G. 2019. How to prepare students for the rise of artificial intelligence in the workforce. Available at: http://theconversation.com/how-to-prepare-students-for-the-rise-of-artificialintelligence-in-the-workforce-113797 (Accessed on 10 May 2019). Roe, D. 2018. 6 ways artificial intelligence will impact the future workplace. Available at: https:// www.cmswire.com/information-management/6-ways-artificial-intelligence-will-impact-thefuture-workplace/ (Accessed on 15 April 2019). Roper, F. 2019. 5 ways AI is changing the workplace. Available at: https://www.bizcommunity. com/Print.aspx?=196&ct=1&ci=187363 (Accessed on 11 April 2019). Savage, M. 2019. Can artificial intelligence make the hiring process more fair? Available at: https:// ww.npr.org/2019/04/08/711169794/can-artificial-intelligence-make-the-hiring-process-morefair (Accessed on 9 April 2019). Wentzel, W. 2016. Artificial Intelligence: Opportunities and challenges. Available at: https://www. itweb.co.za/content/2JN1gP7OzYWvjL6m (Accessed on 9 April 2019). World Bank. 2018. World Development Report 2018. Available at: http://www.worldbank.org/en/ publication/wdr2018 (Accessed on 9 April 2019).

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World of Work

Powerful factors

that contribute to a better future of employment By Thatayaona Mabote Career Services

O

ne of the main reasons given by students for going to university is to be able get a good job afterwards, but with around 500Â 000 people graduating each year, the job market is extremely competitive. A university course will help you develop some of the skills that employers are looking for, but you need more than a degree to get a graduate-level job. As a result, it is never easy for those in the job market. Indeed, the job market is very competitive everywhere at the moment. So, how can you go about making yourself stand out from the crowd? Here are some factors that contribute to a better future of employment.

Get involved in university life Whether you enjoy sport, culture, dancing, or just going out and having fun, your university will have a club or society just for you. Besides meeting new people, you can learn new skills, particularly if you are involved in organising events or take on a leadership role.

Research and planning It is crucial to understand the kind of career field of study you are in and the approach to it. In sales, for instance, having a track record of money brought into the company will far outweigh any degree. Your chosen career field will dictate how education and experience stack up against each other. Planning is part of time management skills. If you are not good at it, find a mentor who can guide you on how to manage your time. You can also review your achievements or progress and evaluate them. After evaluation, figure out what is your next step and make plans.

Ask student advisors for professional advice Many people postpone visiting Career Services until they have nearly finished their course but it is better to start visiting from your first year. It can help you choose a suitable career and learn what employers are looking for in a new recruit. Also make sure you get advice on your CV and attend a session to practise your interview or assessment techniques. First impressions are important and a simple spelling mistake or poor presentation can mean your CV ends up in the reject pile.

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Networking It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. Attend career fairs and company presentations to speak to the people involved in recruiting graduates. Also create a professional social media account. LinkedIn is the best option.

Volunteering Experience is the bottom line. Even unpaid work, such as being part of the residence committee or your school’s hosted events, can count. Don’t shy away from a position that may not be exactly what you are seeking. Vaughn-Furlow (2018) mentions that if you accept a job and show high performance and commitment, you will have a better opportunity to move up the ladder to eventually obtain that desired position. Also, Jannen (2018) states that your employer / business partner wants to know that your prior work experience is useful to the company’s needs. Some of your work experience may speak for itself and represent you as trustworthy and skilled enough to be given responsibility.

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World of Work Reputation Your reputation is as important as your career. You should start thinking about the difference you are making in activities you are involved in and consider how you handle conflict. The reputation you develop in school, internships, or part-time or summer jobs will follow you in your job searches throughout your career. Nothing can replace an outstanding recommendation from your teachers and managers.

Social networks Social networks are a powerful platform for everything. You need to be aware that you are a brand and can use social media to your advantage (use it for good, not evil). Everything that you post on your social networks has consequences because it reflects who you are. Ever wondered how your posts on social networks can end up catching up with you? For instance, posting racist, sexist, or any offensive comments can jeopardise your status. You need to consider what you post on your online platforms, such as how you deal with conflict, how you express yourself, and the activities that you are involved in. Furthermore, note that you may use online searches for jobs on social networks. Some websites include Indeed, TempStaff, LinkUp, Glassdoor, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Flexibility Currently, there are quite a large number of companies retrenching and thousands of people will be affected (some of whom do not have any other kind of work experience and knowledge apart from what they are doing). Some unemployed individuals are in possession of qualifications, and they are mostly young people. Meanwhile, millions of students are striving to obtain those qualifications. With this being said, it is advisable to be open-minded about your career and be ready to grab every small or big opportunity you may come across. Finally, companies want to see other achievements as well as qualifications, and they also want to make sure you have the right employability skills to be able to do the job – such as being a good communicator, having the ability to work in a team, and being able to solve problems. A positive attitude, enthusiasm, and adaptability are also seen as important as you will have a lot to learn when you start your first graduate job.

Sources: Fotolia.com. 2019. Reputation, word cloud. Available at: https://stock.adobe.com/ search?as_channel=dpcft&as_source=ft_web&as_campaign=za_interception&as_ campclass=brand&as_content=lp_search&k=Reputation%2C+word+cloud Jannen, B.J. 2018. What does qualification means on a job application? Available at: https:// work.chron.com/qualifications-mean-job-application-2113.html Vaughn-Furlow, B. 2018. Which will help land you a job: College degree or experience? Available at: https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/2018/08/04/job-seekers-weighcollege-degree-vs-experience/879022002/ Wiki.optimy.com. 2017. Corporate volunteering. Available at: https://wiki.optimy. com/?s=Corporate+volunteering

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World of Work

Cultivating entrepreneurship

through a growth mindset By Carmenita Redcliffe Chief Officer: Company Relations

S

o there’s good news and bad news. The bad news is that, according to Stats SA, youth graduate unemployment increased in the first quarter of 2019 to a rate of 31% as compared to 19.5% in the fourth quarter of 2018. That’s a staggering 11% increase! The good news, however, is that graduate unemployment is still the lower rate as compared to the unemployment rates of other educational levels. This may be indicative of the fact that education is key to the prospect of accessing employment opportunities in the South African market.

Source: Stats SA. 2019. Quarterly Labour Force Survey – QLFS Q1:2019.

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While this picture is bleak, it has set in motion a chain of events that see public and private organisations and universities collaborate to intensify their efforts to promote entrepreneurship in South Africa as a viable alternative to traditional employment. However, what does all of this mean to YOU? It means that whether you choose employment or entrepreneurship, there is value in understanding and accepting that a secure, permanent, lifelong job may be less of a reality for many, and opening yourself to the opportunities of entrepreneurship may be a viable option that puts you in the driver’s seat of your future. Is entrepreneurship for YOU, though? If you do not believe in yourself, how can anybody else? The answer to this question could be short and easy, or it could lead you to many more questions such as what drives individuals towards entrepreneurial growth and success? The answer is their mindset. Jared Goetz, the co-founder of 12th Bean and guest writer for Entrepreneur.com, posed the above question in a recent article in which he addressed the entrepreneurial mindset, also referred to as a GROWTH mindset as opposed to a FIXED mindset. Below we explore some of the attributes of a growth mindset versus a fixed mindset.

Source: Hawk-Bridges, T. 2017. Entrepreneur education: Do you have a fixed or a growth mindset?

In general, a person with a fixed mindset does not like change; believes that abilities, intelligence, and talents are fixed; they are not particularly versatile; and certainly do not enjoy being challenged. Therefore, not the ideal mindset for an entrepreneur. However, a person with a growth mindset understands that an appetite for lifelong learning will strengthen their talents and abilities over time, with effort and persistence. Change is a permanent

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World of Work feature in the life of a growth mindset individual, and such people thrive on challenges. It is therefore the ideal mindset for an entrepreneur.

Want to shift your mindset to propel your growth? According to various articles by entrepreneurship and business specialists such as Jacqueline Whitmore, Nina Angelovska, Tammy Hawk-Bridges, and some of my own developmental and entrepreneurial experiences, the following techniques may assist in shifting your mindset from fixed to growth. 1. Embrace new challenges, expect setbacks, and persevere despite them – When the challenge has been addressed, you will feel motivated. If you do not succeed at first, you will learn pertinent lessons. 2. Acknowledge when your efforts bear fruit and be a creative thinker when they do not – Develop the habit of celebrating small wins as real success does not happen overnight and it is important to acknowledge your efforts in a bid to stay motivated. Patience and perseverance may prove difficult but are necessary elements for a growth mindset. When one method is not working, get creative and try another one. 3. Welcome complaints and criticism – Criticism can at times be a bitter pill to swallow, but those with a growth mindset welcome constructive criticism and view it as part of a lifelong learning and improvement process. 4. Determination and inspiration – Every entrepreneur goes through difficult times. While others may throw in the towel, a growth mindset challenges you to view failure as fuel to keep moving forward and persevere through difficulties. Others who have succeeded are potential role models or mentors – learn from others’ mistakes and let their lessons inspire you to succeed. 5. Change is the only constant – Charles Darwin once said, “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change.” The ability to perceive change as a positive thing, and to react and adapt to it is one of the most powerful skills to nurture in this rapidly evolving environment we live in. Become more agile and adjust quickly. 6. Perseverance, potential, and lifelong learning – Those who succeed seek relevant knowledge that will help them grow to reach their full potential anytime, anywhere, and from anyone. Successful entrepreneurs are willing to sacrifice hours of sleep and skip social activities to invest in their potential. Be mindful how you spend your time, feed your brain with quality content, and surround yourself with people from whom you can learn and share new experiences with. 7. Perception, people, and passion – Broadening your perception helps you find and create opportunities where others see none. People are at the heart of our current digital industrial revolution. The success of a company, a business unit, or a country depends on its people, and every entrepreneur, leader, or manager with a vision needs a team that supports the vision to make it a reality. Passion is the driving force or core energy source for entrepreneurs. It fuels the attitude and altitude of high achievers who share the belief that most things can be done. 8. Proactive, risk taker – Any new venture or growth involves risk. The successful entrepreneur knows how to initiate, sees the bigger picture, has an instinctive knowledge of how to mitigate and manage high-risk situations, and can foresee circumstances. A growth mindset requires one to be proactive instead of reactive.

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Postgraduate Studies:

A potentially lonesome journey

By Danila Liebenberg Postgraduate School

Y

ou may feel that you are the only one awake beyond bedtime. Night after night. You may consider these strenuous hours not worth the while anymore. All these thoughts are crossing your mind because you are pursuing a postgraduate degree. And you experience it as considerably challenging. Henry Ford once said, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.” His statement on how perspective may change your attitude to a situation, although the situation remains the same, may just be what you need today. Those challenges that are frightful to you during your postgraduate studies may become so immense that you forget where you are heading. You may be focusing so much on the grueling hours and the loneliness that you forget that this will not last forever. It is temporary if considered in relation to the lifespan of your life. These hours will pass. Just as the day of graduation will pass. You may be the one who juxtaposes this lonesome journey against the support offered by your family, close friends, and the Postgraduate School. Then your perspective of the journey, while you are travelling this route, may change; and this will enable you to still see and pursue your end goal. The Postgraduate School offers an extensive research development programme. All the steps in the postgraduate journey when you write a dissertation are covered by this programme. These workshops start with the delineation of your topic, title registration, and ethical clearance assistance, how to write a literature review, the choice of your research methodology, and research-assisting software. The Postgraduate School also offers coffee mornings where you may interact with your peers also on this route, towards the same end goal. Therefore, if you perhaps at this stage just see the lonesome journey of postgraduate studies, remember what Ford said, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.” Keep marching, for surely you will succeed if you keep reminding yourself of your postgraduate study goals.

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World of Work

The role of graduates in the

internationalisation of small businesses By Francis Mayebe, Cornelius Hagenmeier, Zenzele Mdletshe, Chevon Jacobs, Bulelwa Moikwatlhai, Kanego Mokgosi, Mbali Moiketsi, Letlela Tshabalala, and Bonolo Makhalemele Office of International Affairs

Globalisation in businesses During the last decade, emerging markets have opened up and integrated with the world economy. More opportunities have emerged for small businesses and young entrepreneurs to expand their businesses globally, and internationalisation has played a major role in the realisation of those prospects. The gig economy, technological advancement, Internet services, and many other unlisted factors have boosted international business participation through increased accessible global markets. Although this is a fact, one finds that in developing countries, successful integration into the global market is usually hindered by the lack of skill in implementing effective internationalisation strategies, such as intercultural competence.

The role that internationalisation of small businesses plays in globalisation Internationalisation of small businesses is a process through which a business takes steps to gradually increase its footprint or client base outside its country of domicile and on global markets. Internationalisation involves the improvement of the internal management strategy, which is the core of a business’ structure and processes of operation in order to adapt it to the international market, as well as to expand its operations beyond the local market. Small businesses are usually at the developing stage. It is at this stage that they strengthen the structures laid out at the foundation stage by successfully establishing themselves in the market both locally and internationally. It is an advantage to have a good early development strategy that merges with progressive internationalisation to successfully integrate beyond the local market.

South African approach In South Africa, there is a growing emphasis on the development of small businesses and entrepreneurship through the introduction of various government funds for innovative small business owners and prospective entrepreneurs. Graduates play a crucial role in this development as they are the fresh minds and the future economic drivers of the country. Small businesses need to overcome barriers to internationalisation to succeed globally.

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Barriers to the internationalisation of small businesses An internal factor that hinders internationalisation in small businesses is the management focus on the domestic market. This is when a business concentrates its focus, resources, and outputs to satisfy only the local market. A wide range of factors, which include language, cultural difference, and lack of information, supplement the existence of this barrier. Lack of information, diversity, and foreign exposure in small businesses makes it difficult for them to target global markets; hence small businesses tend to limit their strategic targets to the local market and consequently miss out on global opportunities.

The effect of internationalisation on graduates One may wonder how the above information is related to graduates and university students. What valuable attributes must graduates and students possess in order to successfully contribute to the internationalisation of small businesses? What role do the universities play in this regard? To adequately answer the above questions, one needs to understand the importance of internationalisation in modern business, its trending growth through globalisation, and the influence it has on the recruitment strategies of businesses, as well as the expectations of professionals in their various fields. Most businesses, ranging from small-sized businesses to major corporations, are increasingly involved in international transactions and partnerships, and recruitment strategies have been adjusted to focus beyond academic excellence on the ability to interact efficiently with a diverse pool of foreign clients, partners, and/or colleagues.

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World of Work A modern graduate needs to have certain attributes, which include a diversification of knowledge, experience, and skills in working in an internationally diverse environment; intercultural competency; foreign exposure; and many others that will enable them to efficiently engage with foreign stakeholders and contribute to the development of both progressive internal and external strategies to internationalisation. Even though internationalised curricula greatly contribute to developing these attributes, they cannot exclusively be taught in a lecture room. They can be developed through the experience of participating in internationalisation programmes offered to students during their time with their respective institutions.

The importance of internationalisation for higher education The internationalisation of tertiary institutions plays a vital role in the development of the abovementioned graduate attributes. In South Arica, the promulgation of the draft policy framework for the internationalisation of higher education in South Africa is expected in the near future, which understands internationalisation of higher education to be an intentional or steered process to incorporate intercultural, international, and/or global dimensions into higher education in order to advance the goals, functions, and delivery of higher education and thus to enhance the quality of education and research.

Internationalisation at the UFS The UFS advances the process through its 2018-2022 Internationalisation Strategy. Students are given manifold opportunities to participate in internationalisation activities, as the university strives to provide every student with an international experience during their UFS studies.

Opportunities we offer The Office of International Affairs coordinates a wide range of internationalisation activities, and many other programmes are offered by the faculties. The Umoja Buddy Programme connects local and international students on an individual basis. A variety of student exchange programmes provide opportunities for students to study abroad. International exposure is a great opportunity to learn about foreign cultures and the market, which would be handy for graduates in their contribution to internationalisation in the workplace. Other activities include celebrations of cultural diversity, e.g. the annual Africa Day commemoration and the annual international cultural diversity festival. Participation in these activities does not only benefit the students in growing a worldwide network but also in gaining international exposure, different cultural experiences, and other necessary graduate attributes that will work to their benefit in the future.

Benefits of participation in internationalisation activities Students should use all institutional opportunities to participate in internationalisation activities. This will enable them to effectively manage internationalisation strategies in their fields of expertise and be at the forefront of integrating small businesses into the global market. The Office for International Affairs provides information on internationalisation-at-home opportunities, international student exchanges, and mobility opportunities. We are located in the Mabaleng A Building on the Bloemfontein campus and have a satellite office in the Qwaqwa Administration Building (Office 130B). Alternatively, you can email us at internationalenquiries@ufs.ac.za.

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Career Fair Success By Carmenita Redcliffe, Chief Officer Company Relations and Nthabiseng Khota, Company Relations Intern

Our Career Fair segment celebrates the opportunities in entrepreneurship and employability available to you by participating in our annual career fairs. This segment will firstly share tips and golden rules on how to gain the most out of a career fair; secondly, acknowledge the companies who participated in our 2019 career fairs; and lastly, share news on our 2020 career fairs so you can plan for your FUTURE WORLD OF WORK success.

Career Fair Success Checklist Before the Career Fair: 1. Get your CV checked by emailing career@ufs.ac.za. 2. Find out which companies will be at the career fair (https://www.facebook.com/ UFSCareers/), do your research, and plan your questions. 3. Think about experiences that will make you a stronger candidate. 4. Bring your student card, which will be scanned before you can enter the career fair.

During the Career Fair: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Arrive early with copies of your CV or personal/business cards. Dress the part and make a positive impression. Be mindful of your body language and maintain eye contact. Ask engaging initial and follow-up questions. Get information and engage and don’t just expect to receive freebies. Explore all your options and visit all the company stands. Thank the company representatives for their time and information. Bring a notepad to make notes when you move from one company to another. 9. See our Social Media stall at the career fair for competitions. 10. Suggest as to how we can make the career fair better for you.

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After the Career Fair 1. Follow up your initial engagement with a company representative by sending a thank you letter/email attached with your CV. 2. Connect with career fair company representatives on LinkedIn. 3. Maintain professional contact after the career fair (with permission of the company representative).

Career Fair Golden Rules • Do not come across as arrogant or ignorant. • Do not just grab a freebie and leave! Ask nicely and say thank you. • Think of the career fair as a series of brief interviews – first impressions are important.

Thank you to all of our 2019 Career Fair Company Exhibitors Economic and Management Sciences Career Fair: 5 March 2019 • • • • • •

A2A Kopano Incorporated Auditor General South Africa BDO Bright Vision Education Ernst & Young Exceed

• • • • • •

MGI Bass Gordon Moore Stephens Ngubane & Co PwC Rand Water RSM South Africa

• • • •

SAICA SAIGA SAIPA SNG Grant Thornton

Law Career Fair: 19 March 2019 • Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr • ENS • Hogan Lovells

• Honey Attorneys • Legal Aid South Africa • MacRobert Attorneys

• Phatshoane Henney Inc. • Symington & De Kok • Werkmans Attorneys

Natural and Agricultural Sciences Career Fair: 2 April 2019 • Cell C • Department of Economics, Small Business Development and Tourism

• Department of Environmental Affairs • Enactus • OVC • SAMBA

• • • • •

SANBI SAPS Forensic Services STEM Business.Org Tamashi Workforce

First Semester General Career Fair: 7 May 2019 • Allan Gray Orbis Foundation • Mercedes Benz • One Capital

• OVC • Proctor & Gamble • Public Investment Corporation

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• RCL Foods • Standard Bank • Vega School

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World of Work

The UFS Career Fair Team: From left to right, Nthabiseng Khota (Intern: Company Relations), Lala Mpofu (Intern: Student Relations), Carmenita Redcliffe (Chief Officer: Company Relations), Reagall Marais (Intern: Social Media Marketing), Cashandra Flusk (Intern: Company Relations) and Michelle Morgan (Intern: Finance and Administration)

2019 Upcoming Career Fairs and Events • Second Semester General Career Fair at Callie Human Centre on 14 August 2019 from 09:00 – 15:00 • Entrepreneurship Festival at Thakaneng Bridge on 1 October 2019 from 09:00 – 16:00 • Think Beyond a Job at Equitas Auditorium on 17 October 2019 from 12:00 – 14:00

Get set for Success and Save the Date for our 2020 Career Fairs 2020 is the year we switch things up to make our career fairs MORE accessible to students and companies. The biggest change is our move from the Callie Human Centre to the Centenary Complex. This move allows us to plan our career fairs earlier for the benefit of both students and companies to participate. Each career fair will focus on employability and entrepreneurship, with a dedicated zone for both types of exhibitors. Student entrepreneurs are encouraged to book free exhibition space by emailing career@ufs.ac.za to form part of the Entrepreneurship Showcase at each career fair.

Save these dates and connect with us on https://www.facebook.com/UFSCareers/ so we can connect students with some of the top employers in South Africa! All career fairs will be hosted in the Centenary Complex from 09:00 – 15:00. 3 March 2020: 7 April 2020: 12 May 2020: 4 August 2020: 1 October 2020:

Economic and Management Science Career Fair Law Career Fair Natural and Agricultural Sciences Career Fair General Career Fair Entrepreneurship Festival

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First Semester General Career Fair 7 May 2019

Natural and Agricultural Sciences Career Fair 2 April 2019

Law Career Fair 19 Marh 2019

Economic and Management Sciences Career Fair 5 March 2019


2020 Career Fairs Save these dates and connect with us on https://www.facebook.com/UFSCareers/ to connect with some of the top employers in South Africa! r Caree Fairs nts & Eve

any Comp ations nt Prese

Job nities u t r o Opp

2020 Career Fairs will be hosted in the Centenary Complex from 09:00 – 15:00 on the dates below. 3 March 2020:

Economic and Management Science Career Fair

7 April 2020:

Law Career Fair

12 May 2020:

Natural and Agricultural Sciences Career Fair

4 August 2020: General Career Fair 1 October 2020: Entrepreneurship Festival

Contact Carmenita Redcliffe Career@ufs.ac.za | +27 51 401 9199 www.ufs.ac.za

Inspiring excellence. Transforming lives.

s

nship

Inter


Alumni Gallery

Alumni

Gallery

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Business School

Dr Erich Bock Regional Director: Netcare Hospitals Pty (Ltd) Qualification(s): BA (Human Movement Science); BA Honours (Psychology); PGCE; MBA (General Management); and PhD (Business Science)

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? In particular, the years at the University of the Free State’s Business School created the platform for me to develop as a leader and to gain insight and exposure into the market place and the complexities that are facing corporate South Africa today.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? I’m sure there will be a variety of answers for this one, but I value someone who is driven and brings energy to the team. Many of the skillsets required for business success draw from a tacit source of knowledge rather than explicit knowledge or theory. So you need someone who is able and willing to learn as much as possible from the experienced employees in the organisation.

What is the most challenging part of your job? The most challenging part of my job is definitely the complexity of decisions I am expected to make daily. This is also the most rewarding part of the job and provides a continuous challenge.

What drives you to excel in your career? I see my work as a God-given opportunity to be a positive influence in the lives of the staff and customers I interact with daily.

Name three things you wish you had been told as a university student. Be mindful of your actions as people judge you based on your actions, but you judge yourself based on your intentions. Life owes you nothing. Many problems can be solved by good communication.

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Alumni Gallery Economic and Management Sciences

Likeleli Monyamane CA(SA) Director for Business and Management Consulting at Inspire Innovation Business Consultants MBA, African Leadership University, Chartered Accountant (South Africa), B. Compt Honours (UNISA), and B. Accounting (UFS)

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? Doing an undergrad and honours degree (CTA) in Accounting prepared me to write my board exams and positioned me to get accepted into a training programme at PwC where I qualified as a CA(SA). Being involved in extramural activities such as playing netball for my residence and province, playing soccer for the university and for my residence, and writing for a campus publication – Kampus Volksblad – really prepared me to be a multitasker, taught me how to work with diverse groups and people, and taught me to always keep abreast of current issues. Being a vice-prime at my residence, Welwitschia, opened me up to being responsible for people other than myself, and built a foundation of developing into a leader.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? In the workplace, soft skills (or professional skills, as we call them) are as important as technical skills. Soft skills are skills such as the ability to function in a team, communication skills, time management skills, and the ability to manage oneself. Technical skills are also important. The ability to practically apply theoretical knowledge is also very important. All these are skills that can be developed on the job.

What are the best opportunities for someone entering your career? There are quite a lot of opportunities for people entering the accounting profession. The training that we receive is in accordance with the competency framework of the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA), which is quite comprehensive and prepares trainees for a variety of career opportunities after training. These opportunities include working in public practice (audit firms) or working in the public or private sectors as a finance professional. Many chartered accountants have also ventured out of the profession to pursue entrepreneurial ventures or other roles, including consulting, operations management, or even careers in the creative industry.

Name three things you wish you had been told as a university student. • Give yourself fully to every opportunity that opens up to you when you are at university. • Don’t underestimate your potential. Believe in yourself and in your ability to improve on yourself and on your grades. • Make friends and have fun.

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Education

Lehlohonolo Mofokeng Accounting teacher at St Bernard’s High School BEd (Accounting and Businesses Management), BEd (Hons: Policy and Governance), and MEd (School Leadership and Management)Â

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? My life was shaped mainly in the lecture halls and my residence, Karee. In these two settings I always had encounters with students from diverse backgrounds, economically and culturally. In multiple ways, this prepared me for the work environment in that now I am able to engage professionally with the colleagues and my learners alike in a non-bigoted and non-judgmental way. Notwithstanding the challenges that come with working in a township setting, I am now able to find ways of working with people who may hold extremely different views and beliefs to mine thanks to my tertiary education. I also learned the importance of presenting my work professionally if I am to be taken seriously.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? In the teaching fraternity, it is important to have a spirit of altruism, collaboration, emotional intelligence, and effective time management. Equally important is communication skills. In addition, you are going to have interactions with different people (learners and colleagues); as such, always strive to see things from their perspective.

What is the most challenging part of your job? I have had multiple challenges as a young teacher. For instance, I have had to deal with parents who take their children’s side even when the facts are against them. Managing my temper in the face of disrespect by a learner has been quite a challenge. In equal measure, motivating a learner who does not see value in education has been one of my greatest challenges.

What are the best opportunities for someone entering your career? Being a teacher may not be as financially rewarding as other careers but its ability to sharpen your social skills is something to behold. If you pay attention, teaching allows you to stay in touch with your inner self. You are also in an opportune industry that allows you to directly influence both the intellect and behavior of the youth. Exciting! Materialistically, your impeccable teaching record of accomplishment can land you promotions. I know of 29-year-old teachers, albeit small in number, who are now principals.

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Alumni Gallery Health Sciences

Dr Suzanne Staples Principal Investigator and Research Clinician at THINK: TB and HIV Investigative Network MBChB, and MPhil: Transdisciplinary Health and Development Studies

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? University is where you learn about more than just your degree; you also build your social skills and learn who you are. During my time at the UFS, I had the opportunity to interact with people from various backgrounds and different levels of seniority, from friends to deans. This prepared me for the importance of skills to implement good teamwork. University also brings a time of independence and freedom; this also develops, and sometimes tests, your work ethic, dedication, and the independent thinking needed to succeed in any career. Lastly, going through medical school taught me compassion for the sick, resilience to keep going when times might feel hard, and the importance of looking at the bigger picture, where a patient sitting in front of you isn’t just the disease they present, but also that they are part of a family and a community that needs a holistic approach.

What drives you to excel in your career? On a day-to-day basis, I am driven by the fact that someone has trusted me with their health; they consented to join my trial voluntarily. Therefore, I need to be humbled by that and do everything I can to give them the best care. On a larger scale, the research work I do in the field of tuberculosis, and what other researchers do in their respective fields, is changing global policies and the way that we treat all patients going forward. Knowing that I am making a difference not just in the lives of my patients, but also to millions of people and their families across the world maintains the passion, the drive to do more, and to do better.

What are the best opportunities for someone entering your career? Medicine and research are both such broad fields that it really has an opportunity for everyone to find something they are passionate about. You also get to interact with people from all over the world, which broadens your horizons and gives you the opportunity to build a global network of colleagues and mentors.

Name three things you wish you had been told as a university student. What you studied at university might not be what you end up doing as your career, and that is okay. With the above, who you are at university might not be whom you turn into as an “adult�, and with this change, your passions, goals, and motivations might change, so follow your heart and not the expectations. Stumbling along the way and even failing are okay; usually we expect more from ourselves than others do, so do not be so hard on yourself. Career Services

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The Humanities

Ms Helen Namponya

Graduation Process Leader at the University of the Free State, Corporate MC (Master of Ceremonies), Advisory Board Member: Miss Commonwealth SA, and Organising Committee Member: Chancellor’s Distinguished Alumni Awards BA Media Studies (2008), BA Hons Communication Sciences (2010), BA Hons Film and Visual Media (2017 cum laude), and MA Film and Visual Media (in progress)

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? I will be honest in saying that the bulk of my time was spent gaining work experience rather than attending lectures. I spent most of my Grade 12 year reading up on careers in the media and looking at job requirements, which convinced me that I needed to get as much experience as possible if I was ever to land a job. I was a journalist and HR officer at IRAWA; I was a radio presenter, news reader, and publicist at Kovsie FM; an academic tutor at the UFS; and interned at ZPR Communications under Lynne Landman (an alumnus of the UFS), where my role entailed media and public relations, experiential marketing, and events coordination. All this experience helped me sharpen my skills and equipped me with those soft skills we tend to deem unimportant, like telephone and email etiquette, drafting documents, verbal and written communication, and the like. Most importantly, I knew what to expect from the work environment; it’s not all sunshine and roses, and without being prepared, I may have failed.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? To succeed in any work environment, you need communication skills and you need to be able to take initiative. Just because your job requires you to wash the window doesn’t mean you should stop there… clean that window until it sparkles and then help your colleagues clean theirs. Work ethic is everything and so are good relationships; not just with your immediate colleagues, with the cleaners, security, service providers… they will go to the ends of the earth to assist you if you show them some respect and humanity.

What is the most challenging part of your job? My job is events orientated and can be challenging when people think they know everything but actually don’t. When we provide cut-off dates for RSVPs, there is a reason… Caterers need to ensure they have sufficient stock, suppliers must be able to source décor and furniture on time, and where gifts are involved, one needs to purchase enough. So when you are asked to RSVP on 20 May, don’t RSVP on 6 June.

What drives you to excel in your career? People go to events every other day and so the need to provide a unique experience is a major driving force.

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Alumni Gallery Law

Nomvula Makate Director at Resurgence Enterprise and owner of Sky Diva Beauty Works LL.B

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? I must say that university really taught me patience and perseverance more than anything. I realised that not everything worth having comes easy; some things are harder than others and also some things aren’t meant for you. University is where you are exposed to different social groups, challenges, and opportunities that can pave your way to greater success. I got to university and was told that the Law Faculty was full and that I had to take an alternative course. I found myself studying B.Soc.Sc. It really was not what I wanted to do but I still spent a year studying it. The subsequent year I enrolled for the LL.B degree and was finally on my journey, which also later changed.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? I would say that self-discipline, honesty, integrity, dedication, and good old people skills are very vital in the beauty industry, which is where I ended up. It is very important to give a client what they need and not always what they want. One needs to be true to oneself as it flows through to the various client energies that we get exposed to on a daily basis.

What is the most challenging part of your job? The most challenging part of being an entrepreneur in the beauty industry for someone who studied law was the mental shift that came with the job. I had to do workshops, conduct extensive research studies, and basically teach myself in a short time about the different elements associated with my job, such as basic accounting and business management, just to name a few. Other challenges included risk taking and getting out of my comfort zone to adjust to the growing needs in society and grabbing hold of the God-given opportunity placed in front of you. I was conditioned for the longest time as to the kind of work environment I would be exposed to, the kind of relationships I would have to establish, and I must say what is below the iceberg is not as easy as we make it out to look. Having to leave my law career all for the challenge of entrepreneurship was the scariest part of the whole transition... a career that gave me an exceptional level of professionalism. My exposure to the law environment cultivated a sense of professionalism that I’ve translated into my business; how it’s managed and expanded.

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Natural and Agricultural Sciences

Ms Nozimanga Bonje Clinical Data Specialist at IQVIA BSc Human Molecular Biology and Honours in Genetics

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? My university experience helped to boost my confidence. It also aided in my critical thinking and time management skills. One of the things I struggled with was time management; however, my university experience afforded me the necessary skills to manage my time better and this proved to be beneficial even today. This experience also taught me the importance of collaboration and working in a team.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? When entering the workplace, you need to know who you are and stand by it. There will be a lot of conflicting situations; however, you must remain confident in who you are and in your capabilities. You also need to be aware of your strengths and weakness so that you work towards using your strengths, managing your weaknesses, and striving to overcome them. You must also be willing to work in a team as this is a major factor in the workplace.

What is the most challenging part of your job? The most challenging part of my job is being one of the youngest people on the team. There is really a fine line between respecting people who are older and voicing my ideas. This is a work in progress, though, as I strongly believe that age should not be a determining factor when it comes to the workplace. Work-life balance is also a challenge for me as I strive to be the best at what I do, which sometimes results in me going the extra mile.

What drives you to excel in your career? My eagerness to learn more and be better at what I do has become a driving factor in excelling. I also believe that I have a lot of potential, so there is a constant need to better myself. I am also passionate about helping people, so I believe that when I excel in my career, it will effect positive change.

Name three things you wish you had been told as a university student. • “Bophelo ke ntwa” (life is a fight) • Financial management (regardless of which course you study) • Stress management in the workplace

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Alumni Gallery Theology and Religion

Mr Hendrik J. Prinsloo

Lecturer (Units) & Research Assistant: Old and New Testament Studies at the Faculty: Theology and Religion BTh (cum laude), MDiv (cum laude), and PGDip (cum laude)

How did your university experience prepare you for your current career? My studies have prepared me really adequately. As for my undergraduate studies, the BTh degree enabled me to gain a nuanced introduction to the sphere of theology as an academic discipline. With regard to my postgraduate studies, the MDiv degree challenged me to think critically in order to distinguish and justify my own position, which enables me to continue with my own research. Regarding the practicality of my studies, the postgraduate diploma, PGDip, in conjunction with a practical year at the Dutch Reformed Church Pellissier, taught me how to apply my theoretical knowledge in church ministry.

Which characteristics or skills are essential for the workplace? Integrity is the most important characteristic in the workplace that influences my work ethic. With regard to essential skills, I shall suggest that critical thinking and a hermeneutical approach in dealing with biblical text are also essential. By means of critical thinking, it is important to discern and justify your own position with regard to which tradition or philosophy you identify with and why. With refence to a hermeneutical approach, it is important to understand the particular lenses through which you interpret biblical text.

What is the most challenging part of your job? Within the sphere of theology, the challenge is to bridge the biblical text responsibly to the world of today. For me, the challenge is not only to understand text within the original context, but enabling others to interpret the biblical text responsibly by discerning how to apply it in their lives in today’s context.

Name three things you wish you had been told as a university student. The three things I had been told as a university student are: (a) How to understand my own pattern of thinking. Once you gain a better understanding of the way in which your thoughts are structured, the better you can express yourself and justify your own position. (b) To not only believe in your own potential, but also how to embrace it in order to make use of every opportunity. (c) The practical challenges of serving people with the gospel in a relevant manner. Once you start gaining a better understanding of your context, the better you will be able to discern how to minister people in such a way that they not only come to know God, but also glorify him with their lives as part of the Body of Christ.

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Employer Directory ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

ASL Company description:

Auditing and Accounting

What we are looking for:

Brand ambassadors of our values, work ethic, teamwork, relationships, attitude, client centric

What we offer:

SAIPA, SAICA, CIMA trainee contract

Location:

Somerset West

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

www.asl.co.za/careers

Closing dates:

N/A

For more information:

Email: hr@asl.co.za

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

www.asl.co.za/ LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

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Career Section

BDO South Africa Company description:

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

At BDO, we invest in our people to help them grow, both professionally and personally. The foundation of our business is strong relationships - with colleagues, clients and other stakeholders and we work hard every day to make this a reality. We create unlimited growth by giving our people continuous opportunities and our clients’ unparalleled support. So, if you are looking to work for one of the world’s leading professional services firms, BDO should be your first choice.

What we are looking for:

Students currently pursuing the CA route

What we offer:

SAICA & SAIPA Articles | Vacation work

Location:

Durban, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria, Roodepoort, Stellenbosch

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

www.bdo.co.za/careers

Closing dates:

31 December for the 2020 applications

For more information:

www.bdo.co.za

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

www.bdo.co.za

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

Bright Vision Education Group Company description:

What we are looking for:

Bright Vision Education Group, also known as Zhuoru International Education Group, is an educational company aimed to inspire and develop elites with leadership and worldviews who contribute positively to their communities and the world. Bright Vision strives to take full advantage of our Chinese and Western teaching philosophies to facilitate students in life planning and lifelong learning. We are looking for the candidates to bring their passion and wisdom to share with our students. We are looking for the candidates to make full usage of what they have learned from their teaching process. In this way our children can fully experience the charm of the western cultures, broaden their horizons, and become individuals with world vision and modern mindset.

What we offer:

We currently offer ESL Program, K-12 Online Program, International Program, Study Abroad Program and Study Tour Program.

Location:

Different schools in China

SA citizenship required:

English native speakers

How to apply:

nancy@zhuoruedu.com or jessie@zhuoruedu.com www.eslteach24.com WhatsApp: +8615253592137 or +8613953660983

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ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION


ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Company description:

A leading South African commercial law firm

What we are looking for:

Students studying from 2nd year: LLB, BALaw and BCom law

What we offer:

Bursaries, practical vocational training and vacation work

Location:

Johannesburg and Cape Town

SA citizenship required:

Yes/permanent residency

How to apply:

www.apply4law.co.za

Closing dates:

Bursaries 2020 (01 September 2019) Practical Vocational Training 2021 (01 May) December Vacation Work (01 August 2019)

For more information:

Hlumelo.mtanga@cdhlegal.com

www.cliffedekkerhofmeyr.com

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

Go Abroad Company description:

Agency assisting with teacher placements abroad

What we are looking for:

Any degree and a sense of adventure

What we offer:

Great salaries and benefits abroad

Location:

Spain, China, South Korea, Thailand, Vietnam

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

Visit our website www.goabroad.co.za to apply online

Closing dates:

N/A

For more information:

www.goabroad.co.za

www.goabroad.co.za LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

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Career Section

Honey Attorneys Company description:

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

At Honey Attorneys, we service a diverse group of clients across South Africa. This means that we are always looking for talented people to join our dynamic firm. Take the first step in becoming a Legal Eagle and let your career take flight. We offer services in Appeals, Business rescue, Commercial law, Constitutional law, Construction law, Corporate law, Deceased estates, Dispute resolution, Family law, Financial planning, Insolvency law, Personal injuries, Property law, Tax law and Third party claims.

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

What we are looking for:

LLB degree completed

What we offer:

Candidate Attorneys for articles and a “shadow on attorney for a day” opportunity during the holidays.

Location:

Bloemfontein, Free State

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

Email CV to jackie@honeyinc.co.za or visit www. honeyattorneys.co.za

Closing dates:

31 August 2019

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

For more information:

Jackie Niewenhuis at 051 403 6600 and follow us on facebook @honeyattorneys and LinkedIn @honey-attorneys-inc

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

Investec Bank Ltd Company description:

What we are looking for:

What we offer:

Investec Bank Ltd is a distinctive specialist in banking and asset management. We provide a diverse range of financial products and services to a niche client base in three principal markets: the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia. Dynamic, energetic and people filled with tenacity, integrity and out of the ordinary thinking. We value individuals who in turn value our culture; that is, a cando attitude while challenging convention. Diversity, competency and flexible leadership are respected in pursuit of the growth of our business. Our available graduate programmes: CA Programme, IT Grad Programme, and Specialised grad programmes. Grad opportunities in Global Client Support Centre, and Shared Services. Our available vacation programmes include CA Pathfinder, Navigate, and IT Explore. Scholarships: CA Scholarship, IT Scholarship, and the Investec CSI Bursary.

Location:

South Africa

How to apply:

Please apply via our online job portal for all relevant programmes/positions www.investec.co.za/grads

Closing date: For more information:

Applications open and close throughout the year Please visit www.investec.co.za/grads

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ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION


ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

MGI Bass Gordon Company description:

When you join MGI Bass Gordon, you become part of a global family of independent auditing, accounting and consulting firms. With decades of experience, we are able to offer our trainees exciting career development opportunities through a personal mentorship program and broad-based business exposure.

What we are looking for:

We are looking for graduates who want more than just the ordinary accounting firm, who want to become business leaders and who have an entrepreneurial spirit.

What we offer:

SAICA training contracts, vacation program, financial assistance.

Location:

Cape Town

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

Recruitment@bassgordon.co.za

Closing dates:

31 October 2019

For more information:

Nicole Stopforth or Celest Dames recruitment@bassgordon.co.za / 021 405 8696 /

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

www.bassgordon.co.za THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

Moore Stephens Company description:

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

What we are looking for:

Accounting & Auditing Firms Get Moore from your career. Get the Moore Stephens 360° experience. Size matters! Did you know more trainees qualify from small to medium firms? Why? Because they get more experience, exposure, training, support and hands-on opportunities to learn. We’re looking for South African candidates who are optimistic, energetic, driven, assertive, well presented, computer literate and academically competent.

What we offer:

SAIPA/SAICA/CIMA and SAIT Training Contracts

Location:

Port Elizabeth, Benoni, Cape Town, Durban, East London, George, Humansdorp, Jeffreys Bay, Johannesburg, Litchenburg, Mosselbay, Pietermaritzburg, Pretoria & Stellenbosch

SA citizenship required:

N/A

How to apply:

Visit www.moorestephens.co.za to apply now. We’ll need a copy of your CV, your academic transcripts and ID

Closing dates:

N/A

For more information:

Please go to our website and contact any Office/ Province of preference

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

www.moorestephens.co.za Graduate Career Guide

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Career Section

Phatshoane Henney Inc

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

Company description:

Largest law firm in the Free State

What we offer:

Vacation programmes & articles

Location:

Bloemfontein

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

www.phfirms.co.za/graduates

For more information:

www.phinc.co.za

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

www.phinc.co.za THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

PwC Company description:

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

PwC is a multinational professional services network that provides industry-focused assurance, advisory and tax services to public, private and government clients in all markets.

What we are looking for: PwC is looking for well-rounded individuals who aren’t just academically talented, but show leadership in all aspects of their lives. What we offer:

Location:

Exciting opportunities within the PwC family exist for students or graduates pursuing the CA(SA) qualification – from bursaries, vacation work, job shadowing and training contracts. Bloemfontein, Cape Town, Durban, East London, Johannesburg, Kimberley, Mafikeng, Nelspruit, Pietermaritzburg, Port Elizabeth, Robertson, Secunda, Stellenbosch, Witbank and Worcester.

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

Apply at www.pwc.co.za/students

Closing date:

Closing dates vary from office to office. Visit our website for more details

For more information:

www.pwc.co.za/students

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NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

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EDUCATION

Graduate Career Guide


ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

RCL Foods Company description:

RCL foods has a ‘one company’ philosophy with the ambition to build an African food business of scale with compelling brands and a sustainable value chain that delivers to consumer and customer needs. It has a market capitalization in excess of R14bn and over 20,000 employees.

What we are looking for:

Food Technology, IT and Business Intelligence, Agriculture, Engineering, Human Resources, Supply Chain, Finance, Sales and Customer service.

What we offer:

Management Trainee Program (our graduate program)

Location:

Durban, Mpumalanga, Johannesburg & Cape Town

SA citizenship required:

Yes

How to apply:

www.rclfoods.com

Closing dates:

31 August 2019

For more information:

www.rclfoods.com

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

www.rclfoods.com

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

RSM South Africa Inc. Company description:

Audit, Tax and Consulting

What we are looking for:

B Acc / B Acc Hons students who are passionate to become a CA (SA)

What we offer:

SAICA training contracts

Location:

Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

SA citizenship required: Yes How to apply:

On line at www.rsmza.co.za

Closing date: 2019-09-30 THE HUMANITIES

For more information:

marita.cloete@rsmza.co.za

www.rsmza.co.za LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

Graduate Career Guide

62

Career Services


Career Section

SAICA

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

Company description:

South African Institute for Chartered Accountants

What we offer:

Professional body for Chartered Accountants

Location:

Illovo

How to apply:

To learn more about SAICA visit www.saica.co.za

For more information:

To learn more about SAICA visit www.saica.co.za

EDUCATION

www.saica.co.za

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

SAIGA

(The Southern African Institute of Government Auditors) Company description:

SAIGA is a professional institute for government auditors, advancing auditing and accountability.

What we are looking for:

We are looking for graduates who want to become an RGA

What we offer:

RGA membership

Location:

Centurion

How to apply:

https://saiga.co.za/saiga/careers/

For more information:

www.saiga.co.za

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

www.saiga.co.za LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

Career Services

63

Graduate Career Guide


ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

SNG Grant Thornton Company description:

Our firm has more than 1300 people working in 13 cities of the country and is the South African member firm of Grant Thornton international Ltd

What we are looking for:

BAcc and CTA students

What we offer:

SAICA/SAIPA Articles

Location:

Free State and Northern Cape

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

SA citizenship required: No How to apply:

Send CV to cathrine.mangara@sng.gt.com

Closing dates:

30 September 2019

For more information:

Contact Cathrine on (051) 430 5120

www.grantthornton.co.za LAW

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES

VKB Company description:

A modern, dynamic and leading agricultural enterprise that has, since its establishment almost a century ago, constantly focused on progressively managing solutions for the changing and various needs of agricultural producers and related stakeholders.

What we are looking for:

Innovation, loyalty, discipline, good ethics, team player, flexibility

What we offer:

Internships, permanent employment, learnerships, and vacation work

EDUCATION

HEALTH SCIENCES

THE HUMANITIES

LAW

Location:

Reitz, Free State

SA citizenship required:

Yes, first preference should be given to SA citizens unless otherwise stated.

How to apply:

Online on www.vkb.co.za

Closing date:

As per advert

For more information:

Portia.lepesa@vkb.co.za

NATURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

www.vkb.co.za

THEOLOGY AND RELIGION

Graduate Career Guide

64

Career Services


Career Services on Blackboard Need some help preparing for your new career, but having trouble finding the time?

Use the 3 easy steps and get access to great advice and online tutorials. STEP

1

STEP

2

STEP

3

Log in to Blackboard

Under My Organizations select CAREER SERVICES BFN Support Meet Guy and pick any one of our great career starter tutorials such as:

CV Writing

Interview Skills

T: +27 51 401 7393 | E: career@ufs.ac.za | www.ufs.ac.za

Inspiring excellence. Transforming lives.

Networking & Job Hunting

Future of Work

Profile for Chrysalis

UFS Graduate Career Guide 2019-2020  

The 2019 - 2020 Graduate Career Guide for the University of the Free State's Student Affiars.

UFS Graduate Career Guide 2019-2020  

The 2019 - 2020 Graduate Career Guide for the University of the Free State's Student Affiars.

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