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Churches of Christ Care Aged Care Marketing Communication Strategy

April 2006


CONTENTS Introduction

3

Market analysis

4

Communication issues and challenges

10

Positioning recommendations

13

Marketing communication strategies

20

Target audiences and key messages

33

Appendices: Appendix A: Competitor and positioning research analysis Appendix B: Communication audit results

41

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Introduction Synchronous Communication was appointed in December 2005 to develop a marketing communication plan for Churches of Christ Care‟s (Care) Aged Care Division. This document focuses on the marketing communication needs of the entire Division generally, and its three core areas of business specifically, which include:  Residential aged care  Retirement villages, and  Community aged care. In preparing the strategy and positioning recommendations, the following information was taken into account:  Research results from surveys and stakeholder consultation completed in November 2005  The organisation‟s strategic plan, and  A marketing analysis of the industry and competitive environment undertaken as part of this project. Based on this research and analysis, a number of external communication issues were identified which have strongly influenced the development of this document. This document provides:  Recommendations as to the appropriate positioning for Care‟s Aged Care Division and related sector interests  A discussion as to the core communication issues and challenges facing the Division  Marketing communication strategies based on the communication challenges and opportunities in each sector  High level tactical recommendations that can be developed into an implementation plan, and  Primary marketing and communication messages about the Division, residential aged care, retirement villages and community care tailored to specific target audiences and in-line with the organisation‟s Christian mission.

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Market Analysis Care owns and operates high and low care, independent living and in-home care services in 26 locations across Queensland in an industry that continues to experience rapid growth. The organisation has identified the expansion of its aged care services operation as a key strategy for sustainable future growth, in particular the development and promotion of its retirement village operations. According to Care‟s research (November 2005) a number of factors will influence the demand for aged care services (residential aged care, independent living and at home community care) in the coming decades:  Increased life expectancy due to continued medical advances, which will create demand for both high and low care accommodation for a growing number of older Australians. Many people will remain active for longer, and some could enjoy 30 or more years of retirement.  The sea-change trend, which has underpinned strong population growth in Queensland‟s coastal centres, is already putting pressure on retirement services in coastal areas. The support and community environment of a retirement village may attract retirees relocating to the coast who lack a social network in their new town or city.  Baby boomers increasingly expect to live active, vital lives and enjoy good health well into old age. Many will want to live in resort-style accommodation in coastal locations, with golf and other activities close by, or in up-market, central locations close to facilities and transport.  Strong growth in residential property prices since the late 1990s will mean that many retirees selling their home will be able to afford a very high standard of accommodation. Increasingly retirees are demanding modern, spacious accommodation that does not look like a traditional retirement unit. There is strong demand for two or three bedroom units, rather than one bedroom, and units that are currently marketed as independent living units are likely to be regarded as “hostel-style” accommodation in the future. These trends highlight a significant opportunity for Care to grow its services, as addressed in the organisation‟s strategic plan. This document will address how Care can improve its positioning and brand awareness to support those strategies, and enhance the organisation‟s competitive position, particularly in its pursuit of growth in the delivery of retirement or independent living villages. The aged care and community care sectors in Queensland continue to be dominated by not-for-profit and religious organisations (e.g. Blue Care, Qld Health) or private companies (e.g. Tricare). While organisations such as Blue Care have positive reputations and brand awareness due to their history and dominance in a particular area of care provision, a desk review of Care‟s main competitors in this sector highlights a generally average standard of coordinated marketing. This presents an opportunity for Care to raise its standard of marketing to help position itself as reputable, experienced aged care provider to improve its reputation with each stakeholder group.

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The retirement village sector, which was once the domain of not-for-profit providers, is increasingly being dominated by public and private companies such as FKP (for example) and it is likely, as has happened in NSW and Victoria, that the market will see the entry of significant financial backers such as Macquarie Bank and Babcock and Brown. In addition, alternatives to the traditional retirement village model, such as those offered by SunnyCove Management and Village Life, will continue to grow and target the lower-cost end of the independent living/retirement village market. Current trends in the retirement village sector are significant for Care‟s Aged Care Division, both in terms of its growth strategies (which are addressed in the organisation‟s strategic plan) and also in terms of branding and corporate positioning.

Care‟s current position While the organisation is seeking to achieve increased scale and scope through the development of new or expansion of existing retirement villages, it also needs to improve its visibility with its target audience and be able to clearly articulate and demonstrate its points of difference. At this point in the product life cycle, particularly in the Queensland market, Care needs to consider its competitive position and brand relative to the „for-profit‟ providers in order to remain viable in the longer term. While „like‟ providers of aged care (e.g. the Uniting Church) may be targeting a similar audience, it will be the aggressive marketing of the „for-profit‟ operators that could potentially undermine Care‟s growth strategies and market share. Recent benchmarking research conducted for Care found that awareness of the organisation in the broader community is low. Only 2.9 percent of survey respondents identified Care as a provider of aged care and retirement village services without prompting. However, awareness was substantially higher among Care‟s target market. Some 66.9% of people aged over 60 living in the catchment suburbs around Care‟s retirement villages were aware of them, and 72.0% had a very positive view of the organisation. In the current Queensland market, based on its existing product mix and service offering, Care is viewed as a provider of a quality service at a value price among its target audience. With these facts in mind, the proposed marketing communication program has been designed to assist in improving general awareness of the organisation‟s services in the aged care and retirement sectors, while highlighting Care‟s points of difference. It also considers timing implications of the round three accreditation which will impact residential aged care in the next year.

Marketing Analysis The following table provides a summary analysis of Care‟s marketing attributes (i.e. product, position, price and promotion) in the aged care sectors in which it operates, as well as the aged care sector in total. While the marketing communication recommendations made in this document focus on „promotion‟, the total marketing mix has been taken into consideration. For example, the identified key strengths and weaknesses of Care‟s „product‟, „position‟ and „pricing‟ need to be considered to ensure the key attributes promoted reflect the core differentiating factors delivered by the brand.

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Sector Aged Care Division Strengths

Weaknesses

Retirement Living Strengths

Product

Position

Price

Promotion

 Established facilities, history and experience  Quality care with processes and standards in place  Christian values underpinning service delivery  Spectrum of care services offered

 Existing services and facilities are positioned in growth areas  Co-positioning between retirement villages, residential aged care and community care services

 Pricing structure is flexible and accessible for the „mass market‟  Retirement living sector yields profit to fund residential aged care sector  Strong quality of care models and processes ensure expense management is strong in comparison to the competition

 Key opportunity to develop a niche positioning and build a profile to differentiate the brand  Strong community based relationships

 Varied history of accreditation results

 Increasing competition in growth „sea-change‟ and „tree-change‟ areas

 Continual pressure to yield return on investment due to cost-base of residential aged care

 Low brand awareness of the Care brand and Aged Care facilities and services

 Focus on „community‟ relationships and Christian values  Security that „medical care‟ is on hand

 Existing and planned facilities are based in key growth areas  Proximity to „Residential Aged Care‟ making a potential move less disruptive

 Accessible and flexible pricing for the „mass market‟

 There is opportunity to differentiate in the market based on product/price mix and Christian values  Opportunity to leverage reputation and experience in community care and 6


Sector

Weaknesses

Residential Aged Care Strengths

Weaknesses

Product

Position

Price

 Competitive environment to attract residents  Refurbishment or upgrading of existing facilities required to compete

 High competition in key growth „sea-change‟ areas

 Does not cater for „highend‟ market

 Standards significantly improved in recent times  Strong management systems and flexibility  Christian values underpinning service delivery  Varied history of accreditation  Haven‟t received desired bed allocation numbers in the previous 5 years

 Positioned in key growth areas with proximity of intake from co-positioned retirement villages

 Cost structures are well managed  Pricing is accessible to the mass market and flexible to accommodate needs / wants

 Competitive marketplace

Promotion residential aged care in delivering messages about Care‟s focus on improving the lives of older Australians  Low awareness of retirement villages until „active‟ in market  Competition is focusing and investing in brand development in this area in the „general‟ community  Demand is higher than supply, therefore opportunity to focus on the desired market segment

 Low awareness of residential aged care available  Low general public awareness of the extent of Care‟s services or history of care in Queensland 7


Sector Community Care Strengths

Weaknesses

Product

Position

 High quality standard of care provided with history and support of residential aged care services

 Positioned to grow substantially to meet market demand

 Haven‟t received desired package numbers in the previous 5 years

 Relying on package allocation

Price  Priced for mass market accessibility

Promotion  Market demand is and will continue to grow  Opportunity to develop differentiated brand early  Cross marketing opportunities with residential aged care (i.e. experience/knowledge/ understanding) and retirement villages  Community Home Care as a category needs greater awareness

Target Audiences In considering the marketing communication needs of the Aged Care Division, it is important to consider the Division‟s target audiences (as a whole) as well as the various target audiences for each of three sub-sectors. Below is a list of primary audiences who should be considered in the implementation of this strategy. Further detail about target audiences is provided in section five of this document. External  Government  Existing and potential customers (across all three sectors)  Families of existing and potential customers  Media – regional/local, state, industry publications  Churches of Christ congregations  Neighbours/local community of existing and planned communities (residential aged care and retirement villages)  Relevant industry unions and associations  Property developers or potential industry partners  Industry in general and industry peak bodies 8


 Allied health professionals Internal  Care executive team and board  Division employees  Care employees in general  Volunteers It is important to note that, within each target group, there will be differing levels of understanding about who Churches of Christ and Care are, the scale and scope of the organisation‟s services, different perceptions of Care‟s ability to provide those services in a consistent quality manner, and different motivations for being interested in Care or its services. The challenge will be communicating with those stakeholders in such a way that it ignites the „triggers‟ for positive association with the organisation. For example, marketing communication efforts for the retirement villages must consider the consumer „triggers‟ that would encourage a retiree to choose a Care village. A recent article in the Courier Mail (18.02.06, p. 35) on the current state of the retirement village market highlighted that „getting people in (to a retirement village) presents a marketing problem‟. It states that „some people clearly dislike the idea of moving into a complex with strangers or are suspicious of management‟. It is overcoming common issues such as these that need to be addressed in Care‟s overall positioning and the development of its reputation in the sector. As part of the organisation‟s growth strategy in the residential aged care sector is through acquisition, it is important to note that from a strategic perspective, ensuring Government and the industry are cognizant of Care‟s quality of service, growth and skills, will be key parts of the implementation of the recommended strategy.

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Communication Issues and Challenges Care‟s Aged Care Division faces a number of communication issues and challenges which need to be managed, to ensure they do not undermine the success of the Division‟s growth strategies (as outlined in the Organisational Strategy 2005-2010). MARCOM GOALS Division Goal: To enhance Care‟s reputation in Queensland as a responsible and experienced provider of aged care services.

COMMUNICATION ISSUES  Low general public awareness of Churches of Christ and its beliefs  Very low general public awareness of Care and the breadth of its services  Confusion between Churches of Christ and other Christian denominations with similar names  Significant competition from other, more „mainstream‟, Christian denominations in the residential aged care and community care space  Care has been a „quiet achiever‟, gaining little public recognition for the work undertaken in its 75 year history  Care has low awareness among potential business sponsors about who they are and what they provide  There is a need to grow awareness as a preferred employer to attract medical staff due to industry shortages and competitiveness  The Division as a whole does not have any consistent image, collateral or messages, which may undermine the potential positive messages communicated about the organisation  Historic accreditation/management issues have not been forgotten by key stakeholders

COMMUNICATION CHALLENGE How does Care build a reputation for the Division as a whole, given current low profile, budgetary constraints, historic issues with aged care accreditation, and in an increasingly competitive environment? How does Care harness its experience and knowledge (accumulated over the past 75 years) to position itself as a leader in the aged-care sector? How does Care elevate its profile and reputation in order to get invited to participate in Government consultation with the industry?

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MARCOM GOALS Residential Aged Care Goal To leverage Care‟s experience and improvement in its residential aged care services to continue to attract funding, employees and demand for services

Retirement Villages Goal To create a marketing position for Care in the retirement village market that differentiates it from its competitors and provides a compelling attraction for new residents – both for existing and new villages

COMMUNICATION ISSUES  Fragmented nature of the industry  Previous compliance and management issues have led to the Government and Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency continuing to question Care‟s capability  There is a lack of awareness and understanding of the extent of improvements made by Care and therefore credibility is still lacking, which has impacted bed allocation  Care‟s low profile may result in the organisation missing out on opportunities through developers with land in high growth areas  Care is competing for beds and general public awareness predominantly with other „like‟ not for profit providers, many of which are „mainstream‟ Christian denominations who have had high profile brands related to a particular service (eg BlueCare) 

  

The media has a very low awareness and understanding of Care (who they are and what services they provide) and therefore Care receives very limited media support Awareness of the range and quality of services provided by Care is not consistent across the health care community There is low brand awareness in the general community regarding Care‟s retirement living options Care‟s lack of brand profile in the market does not place them in a strong competitive position against other „higher profile‟ retirement village brands, thus impeding its growth aspirations The „baby boomer‟ generation perceives „retirement villages‟ as being required when they see the need for having care on hand

COMMUNICATION CHALLENGE How does the Division overcome past perceptions about its capabilities, while reinforcing its mission, commitment to providing world-class aged care services and continuous improvement efforts?

How does Care enhance its reputation within existing communities, local neighbourhoods and with potential residents, to garner goodwill for its villages and attract demand? How does the Division achieve widespread community support for and interest in its new retirement villages, while enhancing the organisation‟s reputation?

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MARCOM GOALS Community Care Goal To enhance Care‟s reputation as a quality provider of home care services in the context of the Division‟s range of services to this demographic.

COMMUNICATION ISSUES  Low awareness in the community of the services provided by Care  Mixed understanding in the community of what is offered by home care services  The need to increase understanding and belief in the capability of Care among government stakeholders who evaluate and allocate home care packages

COMMUNICATION CHALLENGE How does the Division establish a higher profile and reputation for the quality services it provides in the community, to help sustain or improve the level of funding it receives from the Government?

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Positioning Recommendations In determining positioning recommendations to assist the Aged Care Division create a strong, trusted reputation in the sectors in which it operates, market positioning analysis was undertaken (summarised in this section and further analysis in the Appendix of the document) using the following analytical framework:  Analysis of consumer trends and desires to develop a relevant positioning  Analysis of the strengths Care has in the market (now and planned for the future)  Perceptual mapping of the competitive market positioning territories, and  Identification of the positioning opportunities available and strategic alliance to Care.

Division Brand Positioning The Aged Care Division‟s positioning has been developed alongside the following principles. The positioning needs to: 1. Have a direct/close relationship with the organisation‟s positioning “Christian Values. Community Spirit” 2. Be relevant to the Retirement Village, Residential Aged Care and Community Care sectors 3. Reflect the key attributes of Aged Care valued by primary target markets 4. Be based on the differentiating strengths of Care‟s Aged Care service and product offering. Research conducted in November 2005 identified two key attributes as being common across the target audiences relevant to the Division‟s three core business areas: 1. Care that is personal: Individual high quality care – at the level needed on hand 2. Independence and community environment: Community / friendly feel; privacy and independence; modern facilities; social activities; Christian values. These attributes suggest that Care is in a prime position to attract strong interest in the market. The perceptual map outlined on the following page identifies a key opportunity for Care to develop a differentiated market positioning that also fulfils the needs of consumers.

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Brand Positioning Perceptual Map Identification of possible differentiated brand positioning for Care

High emphasis on health care

Care

Possibility for Care to position here

Blue Care

OzCare „Largerâ€&#x; more mass approach

DCA

Small community

Group

focus, Christian values

TriCare RSL Care Primelife

Regis Group

Low emphasis on health care 14


With this in mind and based on analysis undertaken, Care‟s positioning line - “Christian values. Community Spirit‟ – is still considered highly appropriate for positioning the organisation in the Division‟s three target sectors. It reflects Care‟s values and highlights its points of difference. It communicates what the organisation‟s commitments are, its strengths, how it manages/directs its services, and the values the organisation strives to foster. It is therefore recommended that this positioning be retained and firmly adopted in all marketing materials for the Division and its three focus areas. Adopting this positioning line places the organisation in a strong position to build a differentiated profile in the face of increasing „for-profit‟ competition, in the retirement village sector in particular. The strengths and key points of differentiation it offers include:  The focus on „Christian Values‟ will clearly differentiate Care from its „for-profit‟ competition and attracts the market who place value on this attribute  The focus on „Community‟ reinforces the emphasis that Care places on relationships within and external to its facilities or villages or with residents  Inclusion of the word „Spirit‟ reflects the „life‟ and sentiment that Care fosters in the delivery of care or services in this sector. Primary Marketing Message A primary marketing message: „Enriching the lives of older Australians and their families‟ is recommended to support the corporate positioning. It too clearly states Care‟s aims in delivering its services in the aged care and retirement sectors and is designed to highlight that the organisation recognises that older Australians still have valuable contributions to make, rich lives to live, and that Care can contribute to helping enhance those lives through quality accommodation, service and care. Secondary messages, based on the key attributes of each service area, would support the positioning and help tailor communication to the needs of specific audiences.

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The following diagram illustrates how the positioning hierarchy will work.

Corporate positioning Primary marketing message Secondary messages

Christian values. Community Spirit

Conveys Care‟s point of difference, what it offers. Should be used effectively in all marketing collateral and advertising.

“Enriching the lives of older Australians and their families”

States the organisation‟s goal. It‟s not about money or beds, but about making life better for the people the organisation serves.

RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE •High quality service and care •Individual holistic care •Christian values •Experienced operators •Recognise the valuable lives of each patient •Strong sense of Community •Emotional security • Access to trained and supervised pastoral carers

RETIREMENT VILLAGES •Community focus – facilities and lifestyle •Appealing locations •„Real‟ communities •Christian values •Trusted operator •Experienced providers of service to older Australians • Access to trained and supervised pastoral carers (regardless of Faith)

COMMUNITY CARE •High quality service and care •Individual holistic care •Christian values •Convenience of •„in your own home‟ care •Experienced in all aspects of aged care

Secondary messages developed based on „triggers‟ for target audiences. Key attributes that should receive focus in marketing materials

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At a sector level, the following guide to positioning is recommended: Aged care: The Division is competing predominantly with „like‟ organisations and has to counter historic issues and perceptions. Care needs to „raise the bar‟ in terms of professionally marketing or communicating improvements. This requires a more professional and coordinated approach to collateral, use of branding, and careful consideration to messaging. Consistency in timing and content will be essential. In addition, the marketing needs to work at three levels: across the State; at a local level to raise each centre‟s profile in local communities to garner support and respect; and with residents‟ families who are part of and communicate with the local community. Retirement villages: It is recommended “Christian values. Community Spirit‟ supports the name and branding of each retirement village, with all messages tailored at a local level. The primary marketing message could be tailored for this sector, for example:

Enrich your life at SANCTUARY PARK Churches of Christ Care LOGO Christian values. Community spirit.

The secondary messages need to reflect sentiments such as:  “I know there will be support for me when I need it”  “I was concerned I‟d move here and feel out of place. But I was welcomed as part of a close knit community”  “It is a village in the true sense of the word”  “Moving to a village was a big step for me/us. But we‟ve moved into a community of like-minded people and know we‟ll be looked after if we ever need it” Community care: In addition to the corporate positioning, and primary marketing message of „Enriching the lives of older Australians and their families‟, it is recommended that collateral focus on the individual attention each client would receive. Materials should emphasise the „human‟ nature of Care‟s service delivery i.e. profiles or photos of real staff, working with residents. Messages should also reinforce that Care‟s experience in providing at home care, is from an organisation that also has a history of providing world-class residential care in a Christian environment. 17


Roll-out Given Care‟s current competitive position (see Appendices for competitor analysis) the organisation has an opportunity to reposition itself in general and specifically in the three target sectors, particularly before the entry of more aggressive for-profit operators in the retirement village industry accelerates in Queensland. It is recommended that repositioning be undertaken concurrently across all three sectors. This should include divisional-wide activities and development of collateral that highlight Care‟s strengths, values and core competencies in general, and Care‟s understanding of the needs of ageing Australians specifically. In the residential aged care and community care sectors the aim is to change perceptions about the organisation and its professionalism. Care needs to demonstrate that its approach to service and quality has, and will continue to improve. Care needs to reinforce its commitments and its values and demonstrate that its motivation is not just business growth (i.e. more beds or funding), but delivering real improvements in peoples‟ lives in a Christian environment. Existing and new retirement villages in particular need to be aggressive in how the positioning is adopted and rolled out. Competition in this sector is more likely to be from the for-profit providers. What Care offers as a point of difference is the cultural motivations behind how the communities are managed and their underlying Christian values. Building messages and materials based on these differences will help to position Care‟s retirement villages as a real alternative to those offered by the private sector in the same price point. Finally, as a principle, we recommend Care isn‟t shy about using its Christian focus strongly as a point of difference. In particular we recommend highlighting the non-denominational nature of the Churches of Christ and the welcoming of people from all Christian backgrounds.

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Timing The following table illustrates how the roll-out could be staggered, bearing in mind the impact of the accreditation process on residential aged care. Sector Residential Aged Care

Retirement Villages

Community Care

Year One Pre accreditation: Adoption of new positioning and key messages Initiate process for updating of collateral materials Initial focus on new villages Initiate process for updating collateral and related materials for all villages Adoption of key messages for use in advertising and publicity for new villages

Adoption of new positioning and key messages Initiate process for updating of collateral materials

Year Two Post accreditation: external focus on building reputation and image with industry, Government and general community Localised advertising campaign for new and existing villages (scaled as per need requires) to generate potential residents (new) and increase profile/reputation/understanding of care in their local communities (existing) Adoption of new materials and messages across all villages External focus on building reputation and image with industry, Government and general community

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Marketing Communication Strategies In developing the marketing communication strategies for Care‟s Aged Care Division, two key considerations were taken into account to ensure the program‟s effective implementation. Firstly, it is important to ensure that any marketing communication strategies developed for Care‟s Aged Care Division align with the broader communication framework previously developed for Care (Communication Strategic Framework and Plan 2003 – 2005) which focused on:  Phase 1: Creating a shared understanding internally about Care, its services and values  Phase 2: Cementing partnerships and Care‟s position as a trusted and respected care organisation  Phase 3: Developing awareness of Care among the broader community. In particular, the progress made in implementing this whole-of-organisation communication framework needs to be considered to ensure promotional efforts focused on Care‟s Aged Care Division also support (and not detract from) the organisation‟s broader communication priorities, especially as Care completes phases two and moves into phase three. Secondly, as outlined in the communication issues and challenges section, Care‟s Aged Care Division has a number of profile/awareness and reputation issues across a broad range of stakeholder groups which need to be addressed if sector specific marketing communication campaigns are to be implemented successfully. It is therefore recommended that the promotion of the Division‟s services to its three core sectors (independent living, aged care, and home services) needs to be underpinned by a whole-of-Division „umbrella‟ marketing communication campaign aimed at general profile raising; perception correction; and divisional positioning / market differentiation. Both the umbrella marketing communication strategies and the targeted sector-specific strategies are outlined below. This section also includes a number of high-level tactical suggestions, which could be further developed by Care‟s marketing and fundraising team following endorsement of the recommended strategic approach and strategies.

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Umbrella marketing communication strategies Challenges # 1: How does Care build a reputation for the Division as a whole, given current low profile, budgetary constraints, historic issues with aged care accreditation, and in an increasingly competitive environment? How does Care harness its experience and knowledge (accumulated over the past 75 years) to position itself as a leader in the aged-care sector? How does Care elevate its profile and reputation in order to get invited to participate in Government consultation with the industry? Target Audience: All key stakeholders Communication issues Awareness related issues  Low general public awareness of Churches of Christ and its beliefs  Very low general public awareness of Care and the breadth of its services  Care has been a „quiet achiever‟, gaining little public recognition for the work undertaken in its 75 year history  Care has low awareness among potential business sponsors about who they are and what they provide  There is a need to grow awareness as a preferred employer to attract medical staff due to industry shortages and competitiveness

Communication Strategies

Perception related issues  Historic accreditation/management issues have not been forgotten by key stakeholders  Confusion between Churches of Christ and Christian denominations with similar names

Sample tactics: A series of Divisional fact sheets / brochures including one for each sector as

1.1 Harness Care‟s experience and knowledge (accumulated over the past 75 years) to position it as a leader in the aged-care sector and build a strong differentiated profile for Care‟s Aged Care division to improve market awareness by: 

Developing a distinct story about the Division which demonstrates its experience in the sector and highlights its longevity and the breadth of its offering

Positioning the Division as an “expert” in understanding and caring for older Australians through both marketing and communication led programs (i.e. lead commentator on industry issues as well as through marketing focused activities such as advertising)

Leveraging Care‟s current „corporate‟ communication and marketing efforts to maximise „cross-sell‟ opportunities with key target audiences

Adopting a more pro-active approach with the media, particularly local media (i.e. within

Care‟s „catchment‟ areas) Developing a cross-facility marketing communication program focused on developing and strengthening relationships with local communities / neighbourhoods

well as an overall ‘positioning’ brochure that shows the end-to-end service provided; advertising campaign; direct marketing campaign; internal ‘cross sell’ workshops; media relations program; community development program; development and adoption of strong key messages about service and capabilities that are rolled out internally and used in external collateral materials. 21


which may lead to perception that Churches of Christ Care is a bit “left-field” Significant competition from other mainstream, Christian denominations in the residential aged care and community care space

Positioning related issues  The Division as a whole does not have any consistent image, collateral or messages, which may undermine the potential positive messages communicated about the organisation

1.2 Proactively leverage the strength of Care‟s religious heritage and values by promoting Churches of Christ‟s core principles, receptiveness to all Christians, and emphasizing the „mainstream‟ nature of the church, by 

Developing a set of messages that specifically explain Care‟s religious values and beliefs and Care‟s Christian “ethos”

Developing a campaign to promote the link between the Church and Care, involving local Churches in awareness raising activities at residential aged care centres or retirement villages

Utilising the “Christian Values. Community Spirit” positioning line in all collateral / materials and external marketing activities

Profiling the „everyday‟ of the Church, by running a localized campaign that uses „real‟ members of the Church who are also staff or volunteers

Sample tactics: Key message document; localized media relations and advertising program; open days; a targeted brochure to be made available at all residential facilities/villages 1.3 Address perceptions relating to the Division‟s ability to provide quality care and build stronger confidence and credibility with key Government and Agency stakeholders by: 

Providing regular, informative communication (ensuring activities complement corporate initiatives)

Ensuring all proactive communication with Government focuses on the demonstrated outcomes of Care‟s services to its residents

Demonstrating the “genuine / tangible” improvements Care has made to its aged care services (processes) and facilities

Working with other divisions within Care to jointly promote how the organisation is improving its track record with accreditation

Initiating opportunities for face-to-face interaction with key Government stakeholders to put a „face‟ to the Care organisation 22


Sample tactics: quarterly newsletter; bi-annual breakfast/ seminar; face-to-face briefings; introduce a standard report card template which highlights improvements or quality maintenance 1.4 Get invited to participate in Government consultation of the industry, by  

Raising Care‟s profile within the senior executive of target agencies and demonstrating Care‟s knowledge and opinion on matters of significant interest Raising Care‟s profile and voice with national media commentators on aged care issues

Sample tactics: (In addition to those raised in 1.3) Program of letters to the Minister for Ageing commenting on specific public issues affecting the industry, ensuring Care’s credentials and experience are highlighted in each letter; media relations program, including relationship building activities and proactive feature story generation 1.5 Address perceptions relating to the Division‟s ability to provide quality care and improve its credibility as a potential „employer of choice‟ with prospective employees by:   

Developing a „potential employee‟ communication program to position Care as an employer of choice Leveraging existing staff as ambassadors Developing clear messages as to why Care is a great place to work (with emphasis on values-based competitive advantages, rather than perquisites)

Sample tactics: sponsorship of target industry events; open days or recruitment days targeting people such as palliative specialists, nurses etc.; face-to-face briefings with medical recruitment specialists

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1.6 Achieve consistency of messages and positioning by underpinning all external profile raising activities with: 

An enhanced internal understanding of the Aged Care Division‟s positioning and product offering

A suite of key messages that support the Division‟s positioning and are easily understood

Appropriate collateral and communication marketing tools that demonstrate how Care is an “expert” in understanding and caring for older Australians

An agreed communication process to ensure divisional messages and positioning work in with and can leverage wider corporate communication programs

Suggested tactics: new collateral analysis (brochures, videos, presentations, capability document); development of relevant templates (media releases, presentations); key message document

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Residential Aged Care marketing communication strategies As mentioned in the overview of this section, the below strategies should be employed in conjunction with the umbrella marketing communication strategies to ensure the Division‟s profile/awareness and reputation issues do not impede the success of sector specific programs. Challenge # 4: How does the Division overcome past perceptions about its capabilities, while reinforcing its mission, commitment to providing worldclass aged care services and continuous improvement efforts? Target Audience: Key government officials; Accreditation Agency; Property Developers; Potential Residents & their families Communication issues  Previous compliance and management issues have led to the Government and Accreditation Agency continuing to question Care‟s capability  There is a lack of awareness and understanding of the extent of improvements made by Care and therefore credibility is still lacking, which has impacted bed allocation  Care‟s low profile may result in the organisation missing out on opportunities through developers with land in high growth areas  Care is competing for beds and general public awareness predominantly with other „like‟ not for profit providers, many of which are „mainstream‟ Christian denominations who have had high profile brands related to a particular service (eg BlueCare)

Communication Strategies Umbrella strategies + 4.1 Ensure potential residents and their „circle of influence‟ (families, friends, doctors, sporting clubs, congregations etc) perceive Care as a quality provider of aged care services and have a favourable view of their local Care facility(s) by: 

Developing a community-based marketing communication program for all Care‟s facilities focused on building a “first-hand” understanding of their local Care facility (needs to be tangible / tactile experience not just through written materials)

Build supporting communication collateral that showcases real life experiences / testimonials from current residents

Developing a “transition” program targeted to families of potential residents that‟s focused on the transition between leaving the family home and moving into aged care – to „personalise‟ the experience and allay concerns.

Sample tactics: Community development program that could include Facility Open Days; Sponsorship of community-based events; ‘By-invitation’ events for local church groups and clubs to ‘flower shows’ et. hosted at the facility; brochures and other marketing collateral; home visit service for family members to meet Facility staff (at their home) to discuss the facility, level of care.

25


4.2 Increase Care‟s reputation and exposure in the industry to demonstrate the organisation‟s presence and intentions, by: 

Ensuring Care has a voice and presence at industry conferences

Proactively seeking speaking opportunities at industry events

Contributing to industry publications and newsletters

 Sample tactics: Speaking schedule; mobile exhibition/display highlighting Care’s history and credentials; series of feature stories on issues in aged care that could be contributed to industryfocused publications or used as letters to the editor in industry publications 4.3 Government (see strategies 1.3 and 1.4)

26


Retirement Village marketing communication strategies As mentioned in the overview of this section, the below strategies should be employed in conjunction with the umbrella marketing communication strategies to ensure the Division‟s profile/awareness and reputation issues do not impede the success of sector specific programs. Challenges #5: How does Care enhance its reputation within existing and prospective communities, local neighbours and potential residents, to garner goodwill for its villages and attract demand? How does the Division achieve widespread community support for and interest in its new retirement villages, while enhancing the organisation‟s reputation? Target Audience: Existing residents and their families; potential residents and their „circle of influence‟; allied health professionals; local communities; peak bodies Communication issues  The media has a very low awareness and understanding of Care (who they are and what services they provide) and therefore Care receives very limited media support  Awareness of the range and quality of services provided by Care is not consistent across the health care community  There is low brand awareness in the general community regarding Care‟s retirement living options  Care‟s lack of brand profile in the market does not place them in a strong competitive position against other „higher profile‟ retirement village brands, thus impeding its growth aspirations  The „baby boomer‟ generation perceives „retirement villages‟ as being required when they see the need for having care on hand

Communication Strategies Umbrella strategies + 5.1 Build the Division‟s reputation as a quality provider of retirement village style accommodation and as an “expert” in understanding and caring for older Australians by: 

Ensuring the Division‟s media program specifically targets publications and programs aimed at the baby boomers

Identifying opportunities to participate in or sponsor events that target baby boomers, particularly those that emphasize the key attributes the audience values or associates with (i.e. vitality, lifestyle etc)

Developing a community program of events whereby various facilities host public / community related events on-site (at facilities) with dual purpose of showcasing the facilities and services as well as Care‟s support for/involvement in activities that appeal to / are important to older Australians

Embarking on an aggressive advertising campaign that markets its facilities as well as Care‟s philosophy and positioning (Christian Values. Community Spirit) and what that means for this specific target audience

Demonstrating through all communication and marketing activities that Care 27


understands that “accommodation” is only one component of what‟s important to this market segment (i.e. Financial freedom/choice, family & friends, lifestyle, travel/dreams, security etc are still important to the 60+ age group) 

Maximising cross-sell opportunities generated through the Division‟s other aged care programs (see Residential Aged Care marketing communication strategies) to target baby boomers (for example, baby boomers may be part of the decision making process for selecting aged care facilities for aging parents etc.)

Sample tactics: Marketing collateral; Local media campaign (utilising resident-based’ stories or capitalising on the latest retirement village related trends); Sponsor ‘baby boomer’ related events eg. golf, tennis, bowling days; advertising 5.2 Garner support from allied health professionals (in key regions) for Care‟s retirement villages by: 

Conducting annual, regional information days for allied health professionals to help ensure they have first-hand knowledge / experience about Care‟s facilities and to ensure they feel comfortable about referring them to their clients

  

Providing regular communication about Care‟s Retirement Living services in the region Providing marketing collateral to allied health professionals that they can pass on to prospective clients Inviting allied health professionals to actively participate (speaking opportunity) or attend open days and other on-site events, to build Care‟s network and achieve related third party endorsement

Sample tactics: Direct mail (monthly email update); Sponsorship (eg. sponsor morning tea/lunch or guest speaker to attend local allied health events); Visitation program (to inform of Care’s local services and deliver collateral); Invitations to onsite events

28


5.3 Ensure potential residents and their „circle of influence‟ (families, friends, doctors, sporting clubs, congregations) perceive Care as a quality provider of retirement villages and have a favourable view of their local facility(s) by: 

Developing a community-based marketing communication program for all Care‟s facilities focused on building a “first-hand” understanding of their local Care facility (needs to be tangible / tactile experience not just through written materials)

Build supporting communication collateral that showcases real life experiences / testimonials from current residents

Sample tactics: On-site event program welcoming non-residents to join in (eg. craft classes, snooker competitions, cooking demonstrations, motivational speakers, seniors exercise classes); Quarterly community newsletter; 5.4 Earn the trust and support of local community for new and planned facilities by engaging them early in the development process to minimise concerns about disruption and/or loss of amenity to surrounding properties particularly during construction. This can be achieved by:  

Establishing an open, transparent dialogue with those affected, and demonstrating a willingness to listen to and consider their concerns Applying best-practice stakeholder engagement principles including: providing plenty of warning (ideally prior to, or immediately after, purchasing a site) ; establishing personal relationships with those affected; letting the community have a say; demonstrating that you are listening; continually communicating

Sample tactics: Community consultation/Information night; Direct correspondence (eg. letters to those directly affected); Progress updates; Project hotline; Media relations; Displays, Community Liaison Officer. 29


5.5 Build credibility as a whole-of-service provider in the 60+ market by partnering with targeted specialists to provide ancillary services that support Care‟s notion that they „understand‟ the needs of that demographic. For example, Care could: 

Source ancillary services at the local level such as a financial advisors/ solicitors /beauty therapists etc that visits all of Care‟s retirement villages to help residents with their investment decisions etc.

Provide free shuttle services to local churches, clubs, shops etc

Offer technology services that help residents stay “connected” with family and friends

Install an in-house media room for a cinema-like experience

Set up a children‟s play area/ room for the grandchildren of residents to encourage / facilitate enjoyable family visits

Sample tactics: In all collateral include key messages about Care as a whole-of-service provider eg. Financial advice morning teas; Shuttle bus to local places of interest (shops, libraries, clubs); Internet access; Media room; Children’s play area.

30


Community Care marketing communication strategies As mentioned in the overview of this section, the below strategies should be employed in conjunction with the umbrella marketing communication strategies to ensure the Division‟s profile/awareness and reputation issues do not impede the success of sector specific programs. Challenge # 5: How does the Division establish a higher profile and reputation for the quality services it provides in the Community, to help sustain or improve the level of funding it receives from the Government? Target Audience: Existing residents and their families; Potential clients and their „circle of influence‟; Allied Health Professionals; local communities; Government and accreditation agencies Communication issues  Low awareness in the community of the services provided by Care  Mixed understanding in the community of what is offered by home care services  The need to increase understanding and belief in the capability of Care among government stakeholders who evaluate and allocate home care packages

Communication Strategies Umbrella strategies + 5.1 Build the Division‟s reputation as a quality provider of home care services and as an “expert” in understanding and caring for older Australians by:   

Leveraging Care‟s experience in home care and residential aged care to demonstrate their particular expertise and knowledge in providing support for older Australians Developing a cross-marketing program that specifically promotes the growth, demand and success of Care‟s home care services Developing a suite of messages and supporting collateral that explains what constitutes home care

Sample tactics: Marketing collateral (brochures, fridge magnets, book marks); Information booth (in local shopping centres); Media relations. 5.2 Garner support from allied health professionals (in key regions) for Care‟s home care services by: 

Providing regular communication about Care‟s home cares services in the region

Co-sponsoring events with allied health professional bodies targeted at older Australians 31


ďƒ˜ ďƒ˜

Providing marketing collateral to allied health professionals that they can pass on to prospective clients Inviting allied health professionals to actively participate (speaking opportunity) or attend open days and other Care sponsored events to help ensure they have firsthand knowledge / experience about Careâ€&#x;s services and therefore feel comfortable about referring it to their residents / clients

Sample tactics: Visitation program to inform allied health professionals about the service and deliver collateral; Quarterly email updates; Invitations to onsite events; Event sponsorship.

32


Target Audiences and Key Messages Target Markets Care‟s aged care division operates within three core sectors. While some audiences are common, each has its own target groups to consider. Marketing communication activities must therefore be undertaken in the context of the Division, but tailored to specific audiences relevant to business area. The following table provides an overview of the core target markets, and delivers key messages tailored to each target audience. These messages can be used to support the development of collateral, and to achieve unity and consistency in how the Division communicates its core purpose and approach. They are also designed to support the positioning discussed earlier in this document. Stakeholder / Target Market External Local, State and Federal Government

Target Market Description

Federal – Department of Health and Aging; MPs State - Queensland Health and Accreditation Authorities Local - Councils

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services

  

Care owns and operates a range of Retirement Living, Residential Aged Care and Community Care services based on high quality service models of care and Christian values. Care‟s Aged Care Division is dedicated to enriching the lives of older Australians and their families within a Christian environment. Care seeks offers residents a range of quality services, backed up by stringent policies, processes and systems. With a growing number of residential aged care centres and retirement villages throughout Queensland, Care is an increasingly important player in the State‟s aged care services industry, and is committed to improving the standard of care for older Australians specifically, and the reputation of the industry generally. Churches of Christ is a non-denominational Christian church, which believes that all denominations of Christianity should be unified under the one „church‟. Care‟s services are freely offered in an inclusive, caring, compassionate environment without discrimination or judgement. 33


Stakeholder / Target Market

Target Market Description

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services 

 Media

General Messages

 

 

National & State– General News, Business, Health and Aged Care

Care‟s residential aged care services are fully accredited and are committed to the provision of the highest possible standard of spiritual, physical, emotional and social care to residents. Care will reinvest its 2004/05 operating surplus in a capital investment program to upgrade and expand our aged care services and facilities to ensure that we continue to deliver the highest possible standard of care. Care has a 75 year history of helping Queenslanders in need. Established in 1930, Care is a leading provider of retirement living, residential aged care and community care in Queensland, providing services to more than [xx] older Australians each year. Care is an agency of Churches of Christ in Queensland, a group of churches that is part of the worldwide Christian church. Care‟s services are non-denominational, and are freely offered to all in an inclusive, caring and compassionate environment without discrimination or judgment. Care is a not-for-profit organisation committed to social justice and Christian compassion for all. Care‟s residential aged care services are fully accredited and are committed to the provision of the highest possible standard of spiritual, physical, emotional and social care to residents. Care offers independent living in a Christian environment in their retirement villages. In response to a growing need, Care will make a significant investment in upgrading and expanding its aged care and retirement living, residential aged care and community home care services in Queensland over the next XX years. Care‟s residential aged care services are fully accredited and offer the 34


Stakeholder / Target Market

Target Market Description

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services

Local news

 Aged Care – Retirement Publications

 

Allied Health Professionals

Doctors Specialists Hospitals

highest possible standard of spiritual, physical, emotional and social care to residents. Care is an active member of the communities we serve. We welcome community involvement and interest in our aged care services and residential facilities. Each of Care‟s aged care facilities is managed in consultation with a local Committee of Service, to ensure that Care understands and responds to the particular needs of the communities in which we operate. Care will work with closely with the communities in which we operate to ensure that our presence enhances and strengthens the community overall, as well as improving the quality of life of its elderly people. Care strives to provide of quality retirement accommodation options at a reasonable price, to suit residents‟ particular care requirements. Care‟s services are non-denominational, and are freely offered in a caring, compassionate environment without discrimination or judgement. Care offers a range of accommodation options, enabling residents to remain in a familiar, supportive environment of as their needs increase. Over the next xx years, Care will make a significant investment in upgrading and expanding our existing retirement accommodation, and developing high quality new accommodation options in a range of attractive locations. Care offers quality retirement living, residential aged care and community home care services within an expert care system administered by highly qualified and experienced nursing and medical staff. Care‟s residential aged care services are fully accredited and are committing to meeting the spiritual, physical, emotional and social 35


Stakeholder / Target Market

Future residents

Target Market Description

People still living at home aged 64+ in regions where services are provided Clubs frequented by 64+ age group Average age entry into retirement village xx yrs Average age entry into residential aged care xx yrs Average age entry into community home care xx yrs

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services needs of residents.  Care‟s services are non-denominational, and offer an inclusive, caring, compassionate environment without discrimination or judgement . Residential Aged Care  Care provides fully accredited nursing home care in a compassionate, supportive environment administered by highly qualified and experienced nursing and medical staff.  Care is able to care for the very frail elderly and those requiring highly specialised care in an environment of dignity and compassion. Retirement Villages  Care offers inclusive, community-based retirement living in an environment based on tolerance, inclusiveness and Christian values. Community Care  Care provides a range of quality in-home services designed to allow older people to remain in their own home safely and with dignity, for as long as possible. Residential Aged Care  Care provides dedicated residential care for older people requiring a high level of care, in a compassionate, supportive communityenvironment  Care‟s residential aged care facilities are fully accredited, and are administered by highly qualified and experienced nursing and medical staff.  Care‟s aim is to enrich the lives of every patient through individualised care, quality services, a strong sense of community, and access to trained and supervised pastoral carers.  The service and support delivered by Care‟s team is underpinned by the Christian values that drive the organisation. Retirement Villages 36


Stakeholder / Target Market

Target Market Description

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services 

Churches of Christ Care congregations

Congregations in regions where Care is located

Business Groups

High profile groups interested in sponsoring Care‟s growth

With a selection of attractive, high quality accommodation options in coastal and regional locations, Care offers inclusive, community-based living in an environment based on tolerance, inclusiveness and Christian values. Community Care  Care provides a range of quality in-home services designed to allow older people to remain in their own home safely and with dignity, for as long as possible.  Care links older people to their community with a range of in-home services to help them maintain their independence for as long as possible.  Care provides a range of high quality retirement living, residential aged care and community care services based on the values of Christian compassion and justice.  Care‟s services are non-denominational, and offer an inclusive, caring, environment to all those in need.  Churches of Christ Care is committed to working in partnership with the Church to meet the physical, social, spiritual and emotional needs of those in its care. 

Care is meeting a need in the market for high quality retirement living, residential aged care and community care services based on a market leading care competency system underpinned by Christian values and compassion. Increasingly, retirees are healthier and more active than in past generations and are looking for alternatives to the traditional retirement accommodation model. Over the next xx years, Care will make a significant investment in meeting the changing needs of retirees, by upgrading and expanding its 37


Stakeholder / Target Market

Target Market Description

Property Developers

Developers building large scale community villages Developers seeking buyers for land

Potential Employees

Doctors Nurses Administration Support

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services existing retirement accommodation, and developing high quality new accommodation options in a range of attractive locations. Retirement Villages  Increasingly, retirees are healthier and more active than in past generations and are looking for alternatives to the traditional retirement accommodation model.  Care aims to meet a growing need for inclusive, community-based retirement living that also caters for residents‟ diverse lifestyle needs, by providing a range of quality aged care services in high population growth centres. Residential Aged Care  Care offers a range of accommodation options from low to high care, to allow residents to remain in a familiar, supportive environment as their needs increase. Community Care  Increasingly, retirees are healthier and more active than in past generations and are looking for alternatives to the traditional retirement accommodation model.  Care provides a range of quality in-home services designed to allow older people to remain in their own home safely and with dignity, for as long as possible.  Care owns and operates leading retirement villages, residential aged care and community home care services.  Care‟s residential aged care services are fully accredited and are committing to meeting the spiritual, physical, emotional and social needs of residents.  Care is committed to its vision of building a vibrant, caring community based on Christian values where people work, grow, contribute and belong. 38


Stakeholder / Target Market

Target Market Description

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services 

Internal Current residents

Employees

Living in retirement villages Average age retirement living 82 yrs Living in residential aged care Average age aged care living 85 yrs Living at home receiving community care - Average age community home care 85 yrs

Management Doctors Nurses Administration Support

Care is committed to providing ongoing training and professional development opportunities to enable all staff to reach their full potential in a supportive, caring work environment.

Care‟s services are non-denominational, and offer an inclusive, caring, compassionate environment without discrimination or judgement .  Care holds the value and worth of each person sacred, regardless of race, religious background, education or wealth.  We value your input as a member of our Care community. Residential Aged Care  Care is committed to providing you with high quality care that is responsive to your changing needs, in a supportive, loving environment. Retirement Villages  Care is committed to providing you with quality retirement community living that caters for your lifestyle choices and particular needs. Community Care  Care provides a range of quality in-home services to help you remain in your own home safely and with dignity, for as long as possible.  As an employer values and recognises employees‟ skills, professionalism and dedication to those in their care.  Care is committed to creating a work environment that is a vibrant and caring Christian community where people grow, contribute and belong  Care is committed to continuous improvement and to meeting and exceeding industry accreditation standards.  Care is committed to its vision of building a vibrant, community based on Christian values in which each member of staff and management feels valued and supported.  Care is committed to providing ongoing training and professional development opportunities to enable all staff to reach their full potential 

39


Stakeholder / Target Market Churches of Christ Care Board and Executive Team

Target Market Description

Board Executive Team

Key Messages/Desired Perceptions of Care’s Total Aged Care Services

 

in a supportive, caring work environment. Care is pursuing a fully researched strategy of carefully managed growth in areas of high demand for quality aged care services. Since XX Care has put in place rigorous quality management systems and contemporary business practices to ensure that we are able to continue to provide high quality care to those in need in a sustainable manner. Care has in place rigorous commercial practices and risk management measures to ensure that growth is managed effectively and without risk to the organisation.

40


Appendix A: Competitor Analysis „Corporate Brand‟ Positioning Competitive Overview Competitor

Positioning

Care

Christian values. Community spirit.

Tricare

Leaders in Aged Care

Core Target Markets Retirement – 65+ Aged Care – 70+ Low-mid market

Retirement – 65+ Aged Care – 70+ Low-mid market

Brand Strengths

Brand Weaknesses

Service / Facilities  High quality of care  Differentiated care model focused on holistic individual care  Strong focus on low-middle market – high demand, lower competition Locations  Existing facilities are located in high growth regions well placed for growth Relationships  Strong community relationships  Government and accreditation relationships becoming stronger with potential for increase in residential and community aged care package allocation

 Largest private operator in Australia with aggressive growth in the residential aged care and retirement village sectors  Strong market awareness of retirement villages in South-East Qld, positioned in key growth

 Focus on return on investment drives lower service quality and staff to patient ratio  Service quality systems require improvement

Low community brand awareness across all sectors Existing facilities require refurbishment and upgrading to meet consumer expectations Will be subjected to aggressive growth by private organisations into retirement and aged care sectors

41


Competitor

Positioning

Core Target Markets

Brand Strengths

Brand Weaknesses

regions  Focus on community spirit and accessibility  Position themselves as a leader in standard of care provided Blue Care

Helping with Heart and Soul

Retirement – 65+ Aged Care – 70+ Low-mid market Specialty focus in: Disability Custody Indigenous Dementia Palliative Cancer AIDS

OzCare

Caring for our Community

Retirement – 65+ Aged Care – 70+ Low-mid market

 Strong market awareness of „Blue Nurses‟ – Community Care  Positioned in key growth regions with additional growth planned in key coastal and regional areas  Expanding residential aged care strongly into Queensland coastal centres  Concentration on „distinct markets‟ is positioning well for the future

 Low awareness of residential aged care facilities in „general‟ community

 Strength in residential aged care and community home care nursing in Queensland (clients in home care are diverse)  Intention to achieve growth through license approvals and acquisitions  Consistent service quality

 Quality systems less superior than Care  Still establishing brand awareness since name change from St Vincent‟s

42


Competitor

Positioning

RSL Care

More lifestyle choices

St Lukes

Primelife

Core Target Markets Australia and allied ex-service community with growth into broader community

Retirement – 65+ Aged Care – 70+ Low-mid market Retirement – 55+ Mid-upper market

FKP

Mid-upper market

Village Life

Low market

DCA

Low-mid market

New Private Developers

Mid-upper market

Brand Strengths

Brand Weaknesses

 Strong residential aged care and retirement village presence with aggressive growth plans in key coastal and growth regions  Focus on lifestyle in design of new communities to boost independence and privacy  Significant growth in community and aged care (with Anglicare merger)  Largest national retirement village provider with strong growth capability  National brand presence with the marketing capability to achieve growth  Focus on community „resort-style‟ facilities appealing to younger and more active end of the market  Large national retirement village provider  Aggressive growth in aged care market with capital access  Robust medical quality systems  Concentration on aggressive growth in residential aged care and retirement villages in key growth regions

 Focus on return on investment affecting care and service quality  Service quality issues may limit growth in bed licence allocation in next 12 months

 Recent merger with Anglicare may distract from pursuit of growth opportunities  Small aged care presence  Struggling commercially with quality systems, understanding of the market and cost management  More commercial pricing structures  Operating model difficulties affecting service quality  Medically driven model (i.e. one dimensional)  Will require „care‟ expertise to operate effectively and protect reputation in aged care sector

43


Retirement Villages - Brand Positioning Competitive Overview Competitor

Positioning

Target Market

Care

Christian values. Community spirit.

Low-middle market (existing) Middle-upper market (new)

Retirement Villages – Brand Strengths Services  Low-middle market demonstrates demand and less competition  Transparent and simple pricing  IT including internet access  Co-location with Aged Care & Community Care facilities enhances security and added care support when needed  Christian base with chaplaincy services  High service quality supported by IT Relationships  Strong community focus – in the villages and surrounding hub  Compliance with competent care management system Locations  Existing and planned villages are in areas of high retirement population growth

Retirement Villages – Brand Weaknesses  New large private entrants into the market and the need to fasttrack growth  Low brand awareness in general – higher brand awareness in immediate communities is suggested but needs proof  Ageing existing facilities requiring significant refurbishment  New facilities targeting the middle-upper market face stronger competition

44


Competitor

Positioning

TriCare

Leaders in Aged Care

Blue Care

Helping with Heart and Soul

RSL Care

More Lifestyle Choices

DCA Group Primelife

Target Market

Middle-upper market (owner & partnership arrangements)

FKP

Middle-upper market (licence)

Village Life

Low market (rental) Middle-upper market (licence)

New Private Developers

Retirement Villages – Brand Strengths  Positioned in key growth regions  Strong brand awareness in retirement village market  Achievement of recent growth with further planned growth on the horizon  Positioned in key growth regions with intention to continue aggressive growth

Retirement Villages – Brand Weaknesses

 Largest national provider (59 villages) with strong growth capability  National brand presence  Target middle-upper market  Community facilities for recreation and dining – higher offering than Care  Extra care services optional  Large national provider (79 villages)  New facilities  Located in key retirement growth areas across Australia

 Commercially struggling  Quality systems, understanding and cost management is weak

 Low brand awareness in retirement village market

 Higher pricing and more complex pricing structure than Care  Operating model difficulties  More complex pricing arrangements

45


Retirement Villages – Brand Positioning Perceptual Map Identification of possible differentiated brand positioning for Care Mid-Upper Market

Recreational “resort style” focus Other Private Entrants

FKP

Primelife

Privately run

Community focus

Corporate attitude

Christian values

Pricing complexity Care

Possibility for Care to position here

RSL Care Village Life Care and Security Low-Middle Market

focus

46


Aged Care Brand Positioning Competitive Overview Competitor

Positioning

Aged Care – Brand Strengths

Aged Care – Brand Weaknesses

Care

Christian values. Community spirit.

Competence / Services  Philosophy and model of care focuses on the individualised care – working as a partner with the individual and their family in planning and delivering care  Care delivery quality systems and management systems achieving compliance and reduction of paperwork by direct care staff  Centralised approach enables economies of scale and quicker response to growth opportunities  Attract high quality care staff  Achieved reforms ahead of other not-for-profit organisations  Chaplaincy services  Investment in IT continuing to improve quality systems and reduction of administration for service care staff Relationships  Relationships with Federal Govt Depts and Accreditation Agency (due to service quality, adoption of financial accountability requirements and meeting of certification timelines)  Strong community partnerships – attractive to small service providers looking for a partner Location  Existing services largely located within growth corridors supporting future growth  Future growth of new services planned

 Low brand awareness (with limited marketing expenditure allocated in future budget)

 Threatened by large private organisations

47


Competitor

Positioning

Aged Care – Brand Strengths

Aged Care – Brand Weaknesses

TriCare

Leaders in Aged Care

 Largest private operator in Australia with

 Lower quality and quantity of staff on hand  Quality systems aren‟t integrated, therefore

growth on the horizon  High brand awareness

impacting performance

 Doesn‟t offer chaplaincy Blue Care

Helping with Heart and Soul

 Largest presence / number of beds  High brand awareness  Expanding aged care strongly into coastal

 Consistency in quality of care  Less flexibility of options of care  Slow to respond to growth opportunities

Queensland centres through successful application of beds OzCare

Caring for our Community

 Large Queensland presence  High brand awareness  Consistent service quality with intent to grow

 Quality systems less superior than Care

through bed licence approvals and acquisitions RSL Care

DCA Group

Primelife

More Lifestyle Choices

   

Large Queensland presence High brand awareness amongst core target Intent to grow through acquisitions Aggressive growth with capital acquisitions – access to capital  Robust quality systems  Deliberate focus on high care  no strengths observed

 Service quality issues to limit growth in bed licence allocation in next 12 months

 Model and philosophy of care is medically driven only, versus individual holistically driven

 Small presence with other retirement products struggling commercially

 Quality systems, understanding and cost management is weak Regis Group

 no strengths observed

 Lower quality and quantity of staff on hand  Focus on income maximisation (accommodation bonds)

 Consistency in quality of care  Acquisition target 48


Aged Care – Brand Positioning Perceptual Map Identification of possible differentiated brand positioning for Care Strong community

High Quality of Care

based approach

Care

Possibility for Care to position here

DCA Group

Privately run

OzCare

Pure medical

Christian values, individual holistic

impersonal approach

care RSL Care TriCare

Blue Care

Primelife

Regis Corporate attitude

Group

and reputation Low Quality of Care Focus on income maximisation 49


Community Care Brand Positioning Competitive Overview Competitor

Positioning

Community Care – Brand Strengths

Community Care – Brand Weaknesses

Care

Christian values. Community spirit.

Services  Future accreditation will provide an advantage with quality systems already in place  Complementary to residential aged care making transition smooth Location  Located within growth corridors, placing the service well for future growth Relationships  Strong relationships with Dept of Health & Aging due to service quality, early adoption of financial accountability requirements and trialling of accreditation arrangements.  Community engagement models are attractive to smaller providers who may want to partner with Care  Largest provider with strong brand awareness complementary to domiciliary nursing  Strong growth with allocation from government  Large provider with increasing brand awareness since change from St Vincent‟s – complementing residential aged care  Significant provider with aggressive return on investment targets  Significant growing provider of community care complementary to domiciliary nursing services and residential aged care (merger with Anglicare provided residential aged care)

 Recent non-allocation of packages from the

Blue Care

Helping with Heart and Soul

OzCare

Caring for our Community

RSL Care St Lukes

Roman Catholic Archidiocese

More Lifestyle Choices

government

 Experiencing difficulty in establishing each program allocated

 Lower care and service quality  Merger with Anglicare may distract from pursuing growth opportunities in the short term

 Not specialists in aged care – delivered as part of a broader community based service 50


Community Care – Brand Positioning Perceptual Map Identification of possible differentiated brand positioning for Care High Quality of Care

Blue Care

Care

Possibility for Care to position here

OzCare

General domiciliary

Individual holistic St Lukes

nursing services

aged care specialists

RCA RSL Care

Low Quality of Care Focus on income maximisation 51


Competitor Strength Analysis Competitor

Positioning / Points of Difference / Strengths

TriCare

Leaders in Aged Care  Privately owned  Strong awareness in South-East Queensland  Expanding with first interstate retirement village in Melbourne  Focus on standards of care and position themselves as a benchmark in exceeding industry standards Aged Care Services  13 nursing homes and 3 hostels  Offers respite and dementia services  Provides a range of accommodation choices (different cost levels) Retirement Village Services  6 retirement villages  Philosophy - Communities designed to meet residents‟ needs  Focus on „community spirit‟; accessible to transport and shops

52


Blue Care

Helping with Heart and Soul  Promoting and delivering quality community health and caring services based on the compassion of Christ  Not-for-profit Christian organisation (Uniting Church)  Care for all people in the community regardless of socio-economic, ethnic, religious, spiritual background. Assist older people, younger people and others with a health care need within the general community.  260 centres including 35 nursing homes, 60 respite centres, 57 hostels, 1430 community / home care packages  The largest provider in Queensland for aged care, retirement care and community care  Awareness strong in community / home care services – in particular the “Blue Nurses”  Recent growth in residential places in coastal areas (Bribie Island, Bagara, Sunshine Beach)  Planned growth regionally in Toowoomba, Gladstone, Yeppoon, Kingaroy, Gayndah and Warwick  Organic growth achieved in local communities  Mission to concentrate on the most disadvantaged  One of the most significant disability service providers in Queensland  Provides nursing support to 17 watchhouse custody locations, boarding houses and hostels  Concentrating on responding to the need in indigenous communities in Queensland  Recognises and provides respite, dementia and palliative care services  Focus on specialist health care (e.g. breast cancer, AIDS)

53


Oz Care

Caring for our Community  Core focus is on providing nursing to all people in the community through home-based visits or nursing homes  Focus on Christian values and providing services to the aged, frail, disabled and disadvantaged, concentrating on the poor and socially disadvantaged Nursing Homes  Operating eight homes in Queensland – low and high care  Strong focus on special care Community Nursing  Clients are diverse, ranging from new mothers, children, adolescents and elderly

54


Ramsay Health Care

People Caring for People

Australia‟s largest private hospital health care group – with over 40 facilities including hospitals and aged care

Aged Care facilities 

Five key facilities in Victoria

State they want to explore opportunities to expand in aged care (currently 1% of their services)

Home Care facilities 

„Silver Circle‟ home care (personal, respite, 24 hour care, overnight care) – currently in NSW and Victoria

55


RSL Care

More Lifestyle Choices

Primary focus to provide services to the Australian and allied ex-service community – but services are provided to the broader community

Intending to explore acquisition to expand services

Integrate retirement and aged care facilities so transition is made easily

Retirement Villages Currently 19 retirement villages in Queensland and northern NSW – with new developments and extensions of existing villages in planning Focus on lifestyle with design to boost independence and privacy without compromising security Expansion focused on coastal areas, Ipswich, Toowoomba Home Care 

Intention to expand home care

56


APPENDIX B: Communication Audit Results Communication Audit Approach Review of existing print based communication provided including:  Stationery  Marketing and media relations materials  General community communication  Facility specific materials This review was conducted to analyse:  Use of the brand within and across facilities  Use of key communication messages / phrases  Tone and style of communication  Duplication of communication (i.e. where cost efficiencies might be found) Limitations of the analysis includes:  Few internal documents provided  Public Relations/ marketing plan unclear as not all materials provided Summary of Findings ISSUES

IMPACT

Key issue 1 – Inconsistent branding (design & layout), unprofessional layout & missing or unclear branding There is significant inconsistency in the design and layout of the materials, creating a missed opportunity strengthen the Care image by consistently branding the individual facilities and linking them back to the parent organisation

Disparate image in marketplace, leading to lower brand awareness and missed opportunity to put forward „strong network of Care facilities‟ message. Professional image of organisation (both parent and local facility) compromised by unprofessional and unattractive materials that need proofreading. . Typos, poor typography and inconsistent design weaken the organisation‟s image and the potential effectiveness of brand messages.

57


through use of logos and consistent layout/ design features. Key issue 2 – Existing copy does not create „good fit‟ with organisation The copy in some of the materials is inconsistent with the organisation‟s image (caring Christian values) or are not suited to the intended target market For example the “Dealing with itinerant tradesmen” document copy is inappropriate in content and style. Key issue 3 – Inconsistent use of key positioning A variety of key phrases are used across the materials, including “Community Spirit, Christian Values”, “Caring for communities: God‟s unconditional love in action”, “Ongoing Care” and “See life differently”.

In order to gain maximum potential from brand messages it is important to maintain consistency across all elements, including tone and style of copy. Equally, Care needs to ensure that copy is appealing and suited for the intended market to ensure effectiveness and avoid wasted resources.

Key issue 4 – Inconsistent materials across facilities Each facility is developing different marketing communication materials with differing levels of information provided.

Smaller facilities are unfairly disadvantaged in that they may not have the resources or may not have considered creating and/or distributing marketing/PR materials.

Consistent use of key messages work to strengthen the organisational message and image. Conversely multiple messages dilute the organisational message and theme. By using a key positioning consistently across all of the facilities Care will be able to strengthen their own image.

58


Recommendations Enforce consistent approach to design  Develop materials for „across facility‟ use, so all facilities utilise one communication piece, customising it to suit their service Corporate identity and design  Update all marketing communications to feature the new corporate identity, positioning and design guidelines for each communication medium. Ensure professional, appropriate copy  As each marketing communication piece is developed, engage professional writers to develop content appropriate for the target market and to suit the personality being developed for both the local facility and the parent organisation. Standardise positioning  Prioritise key messages, giving “Community Spirit, Christian Values” primary positioning and “Caring for Communities: God‟s unconditional love in action” secondary. Ensure primary positioning appears on all materials and hierarchy (if both appear on the one piece) is clear. Develop stationery guidelines  Currently when using corporate stationary, some facilities print their details in top right corner while some do not. Set standard format for doing this to ensure consistent and professional look and feel across facilities. Rebrand and share marketing materials across facilities  Rebrand marketing communication materials to maintain consistency with Care corporate identity and considering where combining materials can achieve cost efficiency. Distribute across facilities, taking advantage of economies of scale in printing costs.

59


Communication Audit Findings

Churches Of Christ Care - Parent Organisation Materials TARGET MARKET 1

ExternalGeneral/ Stationery

COMMUNICATION ITEM

BRANDING

LINK TO MASTER BRAND

POSITIONING/KEY PHRASES

Letterhead

Churches of Christ Care

Yes - logo & watermark

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action

1B

Presentation folder

Care

Yes

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action

2A

External Marketing & PR

COMMUNICATION TONE (COPY)

General Comments: Stationery has been recently updated according to corporate guidelines/ identity. "Christian Values, Community Spirit" positioning not used consistently.

1A

2

DESIGN: OVERALL LOOK & FEEL

Attractive design adheres to corporate identity guidelines but uses incorrect positioning statement. Need to standardise placement of individual facility corporate information. Attractive design adheres to corporate identity guidelines but uses incorrect positioning statement.

N/A

NA

General Comments: Limited communication to analyse. Greater consistency in corporate identity, design and improved content is required. Need to consider the effect of placement and prioritising information to maximise potential of materials. Promotional plastic bag

Dept Housing Qld Government

No - no Care branding at all

Home Assist Secure

Standard promotional bag featuring service name and logo. Does not feature any Care branding therefore not adhering to corporate guidelines.

N/A

60


2B

Promotional brochure

CoCC - Services Brochure

3

General Documents

General Comments: Limited communication to analyse

Privacy Policy Document

Guideline document

3A

Care

Care

Yes

Yes

Christian Values, Community Spirit

Design follows corporate guidelines but poor copy layout gives appearance of being text heavy. Need to improve layout of service lists and general copy to increase readability.

Copy clear and well written. Need to prioritise services listed to make brochure more effective.

None

Unprofessional photocopied appearance and poor layout detracts from professional image and message

Clear, concise content.

Aged Care

2

2A

2B

Facility/ Target External Marketing & PR 2A

Record Book

COMMUNICATION BRANDING LINK TO MASTER POSITIONING/KEY OVERALL LOOK & FEEL COMMUNICATION ITEM BRAND PHRASES TONE (COPY) General Comments: Purpose for some materials unclear. Professional design let down by poorly planned layout.

Aged Care Division

My Personal Records

Care

Yes

Christian Values Community Spirit

Care

yes logo on front, corporate colours

Christian Values, Community Spirit

Professional design consistent with Care corporate identity. Yellow headings result in poor legibility which would be an issue for (aged) target market.

Attractive, professional design as per corporate guidelines. Interior pages well laid out.

Purpose of brochure unclear. Use of set age (74) rather than launch date has resulted in brochure being unusable outside of the year it was published. . Comprehensive record book 61


3 3A

ExternalPatient 3A

3B

3B

3C

4

4A

4B

Fair Haven Retirement Village Monthly Mementos

Employment Ads

General Comments: inconsistent use of logo, font and layout. Some pieces need copy updated. Some need to be updates so they are clearly branded as Care Family & Friends CoCC Yes - Logo on front Christian Values Unprofessional layout and Typographical FAQ Booklet Community Spirit images used throughout errors throughout detract from organisation's copy detract from professional image. organisational image and message. Tone of copy 'familiar' but suited to purpose of document It's Your Move' Small No Ten questions older Unprofessional appearance Well written, Booklet - for older attribute to people should ask before (typography, design, printing comprehensive, people considering Wesley on leaving home quality) detracts from considerate moving out of inside cover otherwise effective resource. content. home Purpose drawn cartoons use humour to communicate emotionally unsettling messages but their simplistic design conveys a sense of unprofessionalism. Safe & Confident No logo but No logo but has Safe and confident living Poor layout, uninteresting Does not provide Living Program has name name typed out program images detract from the information typed out professional image and impair required. readability. General Comments: Requires stronger relationship with parent organisation and improved professionalism in design and content.

Newsletter

Maintenance worker +Nurse

Name written in text, no graphic logo Fairhaven small in text

Care logo top right corner

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action.

Very poor quality images and design convey unprofessional image

Poorly written but adequate for that type of resource.

Yes clearly branded as Care

Compassion, required to uphold values of CoCC.

Complies with Care corporate identity guidelines

Professional, succinct.

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4C

Marketing/ Admin materials (EOI, Rates, Services etc)

Some have Fairhaven logo

Some have Care logo

Ongoing Care

Inconsistent and low quality images, design and typography detract from organisation's professional image

4D

Welcome to Fairhaven Retirement‌.

Fairhaven in text but no logo

Care logo in black and white

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action.

Inconsistency, poor design and typography detract from professional image.

Fairhaven in text but no logo

Yes colour bottom right corner

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action.

Unprofessional images and design detract from professional image.

Welcome booklet Residents Handbook

5

5A

6

Toowoomba Facilities NuMylo & Nubeena Marketing brochure

General Comments: consistency to parent organisation in terms of logo use, key phrases and layout.

Fassifern Retirement Village

General Comments:

Nubeena & NuMylo

All names (Nubeena, Care etc) in text only

Text only, no graphic logo. Inconsistent with corporate identity

For an independent lifestyle within a caring environment. Caring for communities - God's unconditional love in action (Mission, vision & values appear on back page) Requires closer relationship with parent organisation in design and positioning

Poor layout and design detract from professional image. In particular, poor layout contributes to illegibility

Informative but needs reworking - a few typographical errors and often issues with subject/verb agreement Copy is informative but inconsistent style from page to page Abrupt in style, some areas need more detail. Assumes readers have a level of knowledge that they may not possess. Generally informative.

Copy needs to be updated.

63


6A

7

Info Handbook

Care logo but text only for Fassifern

care logo

Quality Accommodation & Care

Design and print quality needs to be aligned with corporate identity guidelines

Informative but some areas need more detail and others simplification - seems overwhelming.

Gleneagles on the River

General Comments:

All Gleneagles materials finished to a high standard.

7A

Marketing booklet

General brochure

Gleneagles in text

Clearly branded as Care

Christen Values, Community Spirit, see life differently

Attractive, professional design complies with corporate identity guidelines

Well written and informative

7B

Marketing booklet

Smaller version of above

Gleneagles in text

Care

Christian Values, Community Spirit, See Life Differently

Attractive, professional design complies with corporate identity guidelines but use of colour copy on plain paper detracts from professionalism.

Provides general overview but does not include the most important information.

7C

Marketing flyer

Dual sided flyer

Yes, Care on back

Well written, succinct, informative

Ads

B+W ads for local print media

Christian Values, Community Spirit, Change your view on retirement. Change your view on retirement

Attractive, professional design complies with corporate identity guidelines

7D

Gleneagles in text, Care logo on back Care + Gleneagles

Attractive, professional design complies with corporate identity guidelines

Well written, succinct, informative

Care logo

64


Community Care TARGET MARKET

COMMUNICATION ITEM

3

ExternalPatient / Client

General Comments: Greater consistency in corporate identity, design and improved content is required, along with attention to detail for typographical errors.

3A

Welcome brochure

Travel Care brochure

3B

BRANDING

LINK TO MASTER BRAND

POSITIONING/KEY PHRASES

OVERALL LOOK & FEEL

Care

Logo on front and company info on teaser but no branding inside

Christian values, community spirit. Travel Care: Community Respite Options

External design complies with corporate identity guidelines but interior pages lack professionalism

Care

Yes

Christian Values Community Spirit (in logo)

Basic, uses corporate colours but needs work with layout and typography.

COMMUNICATION TONE (COPY)

Content tone quite sharp but otherwise effective and informative.

Grammatical errors, needs to be Crowes Nest Care reworked. All basic Services info covered. General Comments: These documents appear to have originated outside of Care. Recommend aligning materials with corporate identity guidelines.

4

Home Assist

4A

Home Assist Newsletter

Newsletter

Care & Qld Government

Yes

For those 60 years and over or people of any age with a disability

Banner professional and consistent with corporate guidelines but rest of document is unprofessional.

4B

Guidelines

Guide to Itinerant Tradesman

No

No

None

Lack of branding and poor presentation detract from organisation's professional image

4C

Guidelines

Intro document

Care

Yes

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action

Basic design and layout requir3es updating to align with Careâ€&#x;s professional image

Typographical errors and low quality content detract from organisation's professional image. Copy is judgemental without consideration to market's being addressed. Factual, informative.

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4D

Marketing Brochure

4E

Brochure

4F

4G

Care

Yes

Caring for communities God's unconditional love in action

Poor design and layout detract from professional image

Lacks detail

UQSAIL

Care (small on back)

Yes

Uni. Of Qld Safe and Independent Living Service

Professional photography let down by poor quality design and layout.

Booklet

Western Suburbs Brisbane Home Assist Service

None

No

None

Design and images need updating to align with corporate identity guidelines

Content requires updating to reflect tone required to suit target market Factual, clear

Newsletter

Western Suburbs Brisbane Home Assist Service

No

No

None

Poor design and layout detract from professional image

Factual, clear

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BR2