Issuu on Google+

The  Rift  Of  The  Magi   My  cousin  and  I  were  both  7  years  old.     We  found  a  dead  mountain  lion,  injured  somehow,  looked  like  a  fight.  Nearby,  we   heard  her  nearly  newborn  cubs  mewing.  We  somehow  got  our  parents  to  bring  the   cubs  home  so  we  could  nurse  them  until  they  could  live  on  their  own.  That  first   night  the  cubs  were  in  our  barn,  they  yowled.  They  cried  out  for  their  mother.  It  was   the  worst  sound  I  had  ever  heard.  From  them,  I  learned  to  hate  the  sound  of   injustice,  of  pain,  of  the  universe  disordered.  Nothing  else  of  note  happened  in  my   life  for  10  years…   …  and  then  my  fingers  slipped  on  the  smooth  wood.  My  father’s  order,  “Don’t  try  to   move  it  yourselves;  wait  until  I  get  home  with  ropes,”  replayed  in  my  head.  My   cousin’s  eyes  opened  wide  –  he  was  six  feet  away  from  me,  just  a  few  steps  down,   but  he  might  have  been  on  the  other  side  of  the  world  for  all  that  I  could  help  him.   My  fingers  slipped.  Free,  the  grand  piano  lurched,  hit  my  cousin  square  in  the  chest,   and  he  flipped,  rag  doll,  down  the  stairs,  the  piano  banging  its  way  after  him.   His  screams  and  the  twanging  strings  and  the  splintering  wood:  dissonance  far   worse  than  kitten  cries.  My  ears  ached  from  the  sound  of  Things  That  Are  Not  Right   And  Should  Not  Be.    My  own  voice  made  no  sound.  No  cry  I  could  make  would  add   anything  to  that  horrible  noise.   He  was  17.  I  was  17.  We  thought  we  were  immortal.     It  ought  to  be  impossible  to  recover  from  such  a  mistake.  A  man’s  life  was  taken  by   my  stupidity.  Oh,  true,  my  cousin’s  stupidity  had  played  into  it,  but  that  merely   shared  the  blame.  It  did  not  relieve  me  of  my  guilt.  But  life  goes  on,  and  while  family   cannot  forget  and  cannot  forgive,  it  can  forge  ahead  anyway.  And  so  I  finished  high   school,  went  to  college,  and  began  a  career  –  in  accounting.  I  think  I  punished  myself   –  I  chose  as  bleak  a  career  as  I  could  find,  one  I  loathed.  I  was  good  enough  to   survive  but  not  good  enough  to  excel.  I  moved  paper  around  in  cheerless  offices.  I   suppressed  my  love  of  music.  In  all  pianos,  I  heard  only  the  dissonant  echoes.     He  will  forever  be  17.  But  I  went  on  to  be  27.  And  I  learned  I  am  immortal.   My  Magi  chest  was  delivered  on  a  brisk  September  morning  by  the  United  States   Postal  Service.  I  know  the  Ordo  has  shrunk  over  the  centuries,  but  is  a  personal  visit   really  too  much  to  ask?  Someone  to  at  least  stand  there  when  a  chest  is  opened  to   make  sure  a  reborn  Magi  doesn’t  die  then  and  there  from  shock  and  awe?  Should  I   ever  have  the  responsibility  for  delivering  another  Magi’s  chest,  I  will  not  be  so   callous  as  to  use  the  parcel  post!   I  had  no  master  to  guide  me  this  time.  This  time.  By  the  scratch  marks  inside  the   chest,  I  count  this  as  my  29th  incarnation.  I  wish  I  had  dates  for  each  of  the  previous   28,  but  “year  of  the  poor  harvest”  would  probably  be  of  little  aid,  and  I  have  reason   to  suspect  that  this  is  only  my  third  life  of  the  “common  era”.  Do  I  sleep  between  


incarnations?  I  do  not  recall  any  dreams.  But  I  leave  little  messages  for  myself  in  my   chest,  and  the  most  emphatic  is  to  add  a  scratch  mark  to  mark  the  incarnations.   There  is  also  the  warning:  “If  this  is  your  32nd  incarnation,  never  ever  cast  the  spells   that  command  lightening.”  What  prophetic  oracle  gave  me  that  warning?  I  have  no   memory.  What  does  it  mean?  That  is  a  problem  for  a  future  me.  But  I  added  my   scratch  to  the  box.  And  then  I  opened  my  Codex.  I  screamed.  The  sight  of  that  first   inscription  reminded  me  of  the  pain  of  my  last  death.  When  or  where  or  how,  I  do   not  know.  I  do  know  it  was  torturous  and  caused  by  a  friend’s  betrayal.  My  ragged   voice  choked  out.  It  is  hard  to  sustain  rage  when  you  do  not  know  whom  to  despise.     The  tale  of  how  I  awoke  the  dead  portion  of  my  soul,  how  I  forgave  myself  for  the   accident  of  my  cousin’s  death,  how  I  grew  in  the  ways  of  magic  and  how  I  became   the  Magi  who  now  tells  you  this  tale  –  that  long  period  I  now  gloss  over.  It  matters   little.     Eventually,  I  turned  37.     There’s  no  heroic  guide  for  turning  37.  Seriously…  look  at  most  storybook  fiction.   Mages  are  all  either  adolescent  apprentices  or  wizened  wizards.  Those  that  aren’t   are  20-­‐something  dashing  ladies  men  who  save  princesses  from  dragons.  I  did  a  lot   of  that,  but  it  gets  old  –  the  dragons  turn  out  to  be  better  company  than  the   princesses.  And  most  of  the  great  Fights  Against  Evil  turn  out  to  be  merely  Fights   Against  Casual  Neglect,  which  is  actually  much  more  insidious  and  much  less   exciting  to  combat.  There  just  isn’t  enough  real  evil  in  the  world  to  really  mount  a   serious  campaign  against  it.  Oh,  there  are  corrupt  judges  and  horrible  bosses  and   lousy  prostitutes,  but  few  of  them  are  truly  evil.  So  please  forgive  me  that  I  ceased   being  vigilant.  I  had  ceased  to  keep  my  spells  in  practice.  The  passion  of  youth  had   burned  out  long  before  Purple  Demon  Night.   PDN  is  known  to  most  Magi  as  “the  night  of  that  weird  gagging  screech  sound.”  If   you  Cast  any  incantation  that  night,  you  probably  heard  this  awful  sound  like  a   needle  being  ripped  across  a  vinyl  record  right  as  you  finished  Speaking.  I  call  it  PDN   because  it  was  nighttime  and  the  demon  was  purple.   My  home  is  on  a  wide  empty  plain  in  western  Oklahoma,  far  from  the  lights  of  the   next  farm,  much  less  a  town  or  city.  Why  not?  I  like  people,  but  for  a  Quantum  Magi   like  myself,  all  the  cities  of  Earth  are  equidistant,  and  I  also  like  the  empty  spaces.  I   live  alone:  many  friends  but  none  ever  lived  up  to  the  memories  I  have  of  loves  from   past  lives.  Are  my  standards  too  high?  I  have  memories  of  loving  two  goddesses  and   an  emperor.  No  idea  who  they  were,  but  until  I  find  someone  like  that  in  the  modern   era,  I’m  good  on  my  own,  thanks.   I’m  wandering  from  my  story.  My  apologies.  My  mind  resists  remembering  that   night.  I  have  tried  to  write  this  story  twice  before,  and  both  times  I  failed  to  stay  on   topic.  I  started  telling  stories  about  college,  like  this  one  time  when  –  no.  I’m  doing  it   again.  The  demon  does  that.  It  wants  to  be  forgotten.  It  knows  the  more  people  I  tell,   the  worse  its  chances  next  time.  Its  attempts  to  slip  my  mind  are  why  I’ve  had  to  


sneak  up  on  this  story  –  start  at  my  childhood  and  walk  forward  so  I  can  remember   it  by  surprise.  Is  it  really  alive  in  my  memory?  I  think  it  is.  Like  a  portrait  painting   that  comes  alive  and  mimics  the  original  person,  the  demon  in  my  mind  is  as   devious  as  the  real  one  I  encountered.   But  I  have  the  demon  by  the  tale  now,  as  it  were.  As  I  was  saying  –  my  home  is   isolated.  In  this  isolation,  I  have  practiced  my  Art  and  using  that  Art  I  have  created  a   lesser  art.  I  use  my  spells  to  cut  rifts  in  space  to  refract  sunlight.  When  the  sun   strikes  one  of  my  stacks  of  interlocking  rifts,  it  is  like  a  sunbeam  shining  through  a   prism,  but  infinitely  more  complex.  A  million  colors  blasting  across  the  sky,  twisting   back  on  each  other,  fractal-­‐like.  Red  and  green  and  blue  and  purple.  Purple?  Oh   right.  Purple.  Demon  purple.  Anyway,  I  have  created  towers  of  these  rifts.  There’s   nothing  in  my  Codex  that  says  you  shouldn’t  nest  rifts  inside  rifts.  Nothing  that  says   there’s  an  upper  limit  to  the  number  of  rifts  you  should  have  in  one  area.  Nothing.   Let  me  tell  you  –  there  is  an  upper  limit,  and  I’m  going  to  write  that  into  the  Codex   for  future  me.  It  turns  out  that  if  you  stack  enough  rifts  in  one  place,  reality  becomes   a  bit…  weak.  Things  from  Beyond  can  crawl  through.   It  happened  at  sunset.  One  of  my  pieces  flares  spectacularly  in  the  dying  of  the  light   at  end  of  day.  I  sat  in  the  long  prairie  grass  to  watch  it  shine  and  then  fade  as  the   shadows  lengthened.  But  in  and  among  the  reds  and  oranges,  I  noted  a  spot  of  black.   I  dismissed  it  as  a  trick  of  the  light,  but  it  grew  just  a  bit.  And  staring  into  that  spot   triggered  a  memory.  I  had  seen  that  shade  of  black  before.  This  was  not  a  black  like   the  night  sky,  not  the  black  of  a  deep  cave.  This  was  the  black  of  a  soul  at  3am  that   cannot  see  a  reason  to  live  until  dawn.     I  heard  someone  Speak  three  Words  and  saw  a  hand  appear  in  front  of  me.  In  the   center  of  the  hand  was  an  eye.  It  turned  away  from  me  toward  the  darkness,   positioning  itself  between  me  and  the  black  spot.  A  moment  later,  the  spot  yawned   open,  swallowing  all  the  interlocked  rifts,  and  a  demon  stepped  forth:  humanoid  but   not  human,  naked  and  most  obscenely  male,  with  skin  that  glowed  purple,  a   radiance  that  was  as  deadly  as  the  claws  and  teeth  he  bared.  The  first  pulse  of  that   radiance  might  have  knocked  me  badly,  but  the  Khamsa  caught  it  all.     It  was  then  that  I  pulled  my  Codex  from  my  pocket.  I  turned  to  one  particular  spell   and  Spoke  it,  followed  immediately  by  the  words  to  the  Khamsa  spell.  I  gestured.   The  spell  consumed  the  only  temporal  rift  I  had  on  my  property,  but  it  carried  the   Khamsa  those  valuable  few  seconds  into  the  past.   The  creature’s  crossing  had  destroyed  one  of  my  works  of  art,  but  there  were  others   all  around  the  house.  It  had  attacked  me  in  my  stronghold.  I  had  rifts  to  spare  like  I   had  never  had  in  any  battle  before.  I  had  not  created  my  paintings  as  defenses,  but   that  night  their  luminescence  became  a  bulwark  against  the  dark.  I  spoke  a  word   and  one  rift  Ruptured.  The  twang  of  its  collapse  hit  the  demon,  like  a  snapped  string   strikes  a  harpist.  It  left  a  mark  on  the  demon.  That  gave  me  hope.    


A  true  demon  crossing  into  reality  sets  the  universe  resonating.  He  and  I  were  both   flush  with  power.  His  claws  shredded  anything  they  touched,  and  I  flickered  around   him,  dodging  his  strikes.  I  tried  two  more  Ruptures.  One  hit.  The  other  ricocheted   off,  killing  a  ground  squirrel.  The  demon  had  raised  some  sort  of  shield.  I  kept   listening  for  its  voice  to  be  Casting  so  I  would  have  some  clue  as  to  what  it  was   throwing  my  way,  but  it  somehow  roused  power  to  action  without  ever  giving  voice   to  the  Words.  Demonic  power,  indeed!     I  persevered,  recognizing  his  spells  by  their  effects  instead  of  by  their  Words.  I  have   no  idea  how  long  the  battle  raged.  We  piled  on  Slow  Time  and  nested  Temporal   Bubbles  ‘til  both  of  us  could  have  written  our  memoirs  in  the  duration  between   movements.  My  Codex  and  my  rifts  were  wearing  down,  but  I  sensed  that  whatever   power  he  was  tethered  to  was  also  wearing  thin.  I  turned  to  a  spell  I  had  sworn   never  to  cast  again.  I  do  not  remember  swearing  that,  but  just  looking  at  the  page,  I   knew  I  had  done  so  in  some  past  life.  But  I  had  so  little  left.  This  was  going  to  hurt.  I   Cast  the  Event  Horizon,  and  I  collapsed  my  last  two  rifts  so  I  could  push  the  spell   past  some  of  the  temporal  delay.  I  just  had  to  stay  alive  long  enough  for  it  to  hit.     Eventually,  my  spell  did  hit.  It  hit  everything  –  demon,  squirrels,  birds,  grass,  me.   And  I  felt  pain  like  I  hadn’t  felt  in  a  long  long  time.  I  expected  that.  But  I  felt   something  far  worse.  Putting  a  small  black  hole  on  the  surface  of  the  Earth  is  Wrong.   It  is  a  Thing  That  Should  Not  Be.  The  universe  decided  that  I  was  to  be  disciplined   for  this  wrong  thing  I  had  summoned.  I  felt  my  soul  tear  just  a  bit  and  I  screamed.   Across  time,  I  heard  myself  scream,  discordant  against  my  own  voice.  I  was  barely   alive  and  I  cursed  that  fact  for  in  that  instant  I  wanted  to  die.  The  spell  wasn’t  worth   this.  Oh,  gods  above  and  below,  I  repent  that  I  ever  drew  breath!  I  had  vowed  never   to  cast  that  spell  again,  and  this  was  the  price  of  breaking  that  vow.  The  puny  phrase   “discord  event”  in  the  parlance  of  the  masters  fails  to  capture  the  punishment  that   the  universe  deals  to  Magi  who  transgress  too  often  its  laws.     I  stumbled.  My  vision  cleared.  And  I  saw  the  demon  bent  down  on  one  knee,   struggling.  All  the  pain  of  the  Horizon  and  the  damnable  thing  still  lived!  I  was  angry.   I  should  not  suffer  that  much  pain  and  still  suffer  a  demon  to  live!  This  was  injustice!   And  lion  cub  and  crashing  piano  and  friend’s  betrayal  all  rang  out  together  in  my   voice.     They  say  that  spells  are  crafted  through  careful  research.  I  know  one  that  was  not.   My  screech  etched  the  pavement  of  my  driveway,  deep  gashes  cut  in  stone.  I  saw  the   markings  and  knew  them  for  the  Words  of  a  spell  I  had  never  Cast  nor  ever  heard   before.  But  there,  in  that  moment,  with  the  universe  and  its  usual  rules  twisted  out   of  shape  so  badly,  an  incantation  had  inscribed  itself.  The  concrete  became  another   page  of  my  Codex.  The  Words  registered  themselves  on  my  brain.  I  knew  what  the   spell  would  do  if  I  Cast  it.  It  would  mean  more  pain,  greater  risk.  But  I  was  in  no  sane   mind.  I  Spoke  those  Words.  My  chest  ripped  apart.  My  mind  ripped  apart.  I  WAS  A   RIFT.  I  became  both  guardian  and  gate.  My  yell  of  injustice  was  that  “weird  gagging   screech  sound”  that  all  other  Magi  heard  that  night.    


I  then  reached  into  myself  and  pulled  the  power  of  The  Unraveling.  Demons  are   creatures,  but  their  bodies  on  this  plane  are  but  constructs  of  power.  I  had  battered   its  shields  to  nothing.  Now  my  Unraveling  tore  apart  its  physical  form.  Bereft  of   anything  solid,  its  spirit  was  drawn  back  to  the  Void  through  the  nearest  rift  –  me.  I   felt  its  claws  rake  my  insides  as  I  swallowed  it  within  me.  And  then  I  calmly,  quietly,   dismissed  the  rift.  I  felt  the  emptiness  within  myself  fill,  felt  a  wrongness  righted.   I  passed  some  hours  in  meditation  before  I  dared  to  move,  letting  the  harmonics  of   our  battle  fade  away.  And  as  I  meditated,  I  realized  that  because  I  had  been  the  rift,   when  the  demon  had  passed  through  me,  I  had  heard  its  name.  Escolias.  Rendered  in   Semihu  Thinara,  the  name  is  a  binding  on  the  demon.  So  long  as  it  is  Spoken  once,   somewhere,  every  day,  the  demon  cannot  create  a  physical  form  in  our  world.   Escolias.  I  offer  this  name  to  my  brother  and  sister  Magi.  Escolias.  I  could  save  it  for   myself,  keeping  it  like  so  many  other  secrets  that  we  keep,  but  I  choose  not  to.  My   reward  for  that  night  is  the  spell  that  etched  itself  in  my  driveway,  which  through   clever  magic  I  later  turned  into  a  true  page  of  my  Codex.  But  the  demon’s  name  I  will   share,  and  share  broadly.  The  demon  wants  me  to  forget  him.  But  I  will  not!  I   defeated  him  that  night  years  ago,  and  tonight,  by  writing  this  down  at  last,  I  defeat   his  memory  at  last.  That  is  one  demon  that  will  find  no  foothold  in  our  world,  so  long   as  there  are  Magi  to  Speak.   This  night  I  am  47  years  old.  In  my  mind,  I  hear  the  demon  howl.  For  the  first  time,  I   smile  at  the  sound  of  discord.      


the-rift-of-the-magi