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Courtesy of Blue opera fantasia in two acts for cello, orchestra, and thirteen other voices A dissertation presented by Christopher Jon Honett to The Harvard University Music Department in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the subject of Music Composition Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts April, 2007


Š 2007 Christopher Jon Honett All rights reserved.

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Professor Julian Anderson

Christopher Jon Honett

Courtesy of Blue ABSTRACT First, simply, I wanted to tell a story with music, a story that mattered to me, a modern opera that I, as a member of the audience, would find engaging. The philosophical essence of this piece would be that man is more than merely a product of fate (Dr. Viktor E. Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning). My desire wasn’t to write an opera or a ballet or a tone poem or any similar preordained form per se, but to choose freely the devices that would allow me to most effectively incorporate my own ideas into one cohesive work of art. I deliberately chose not to limit myself to any one preordained form. Instead I opted for a less conventional approach—alternating music over pantomime, incidental music over which conversations are freely spoken, poetic recitations, using the voice as an instrument without text, and more or less-than-traditional song settings. I wanted to design it in a manner that would be uncompromising in its global conception, while retaining a certain practicality with regards to the logistical likelihood of having parts or all of it performed. I designed this work to be modular, consisting of various movements, many of which could be performed independently. I also constructed a meta-orchestra, the whole of which is never used in any one movement. This gave me freedom to work in a variety of ways for individual movements within a larger, formal shape of changing instrumentations, allowing me to compose twenty-one pieces in the service of one story.

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CONTENTS

i. Title Page ii. Copyright Page iii. Abstract iv. Contents v. Opening Credits vi. First Dedication vii. Acknowledgements ix. The Actors x. Other Instrumental Forces (Complete Orchestral Instrumentation) xii. Conspectus of Musical Movements xiv. Nomenclature (General Score Information & Specific Instrumental Indications) xx. The Process of the Dream (General Rules and Explanations of Invocation)

Passages: the Libretto xxv. Act I (The Mirror Dimly) xxxvii. Act II (The Moment Continuous)

Music 2. Act I (The Mirror Dimly) 119. Act II (The Moment Continuous)

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drama concept & dialogue Christopher Jon Honett and Jason Kristopher Lind

poetry & lyrics Crying for the Moon in Peace by Samnang Ly (XII. The Final Lullaby); Cygnus Olor by Hillary Zipper (IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends); April by Ken Ueno (IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends); II. City and Flood: First Lullaby, The Farewell (VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music), The Laugh (IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends), IXc. Breathe, and X. Lachrymose by Christopher Jon Honett

music Christopher Jon Honett

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Dedicated first:

to my parents,

to James Heiner,

and to any friend who will make music from it, in part or in whole:

thank you so very much.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS with so very much gratitude There are debts I can never repay. Thank you, my family, my friends, my teachers—I appreciate you more than I can say. My parents—for their love and support, encouraging me in my adventures, teaching me to take responsibility for my own life, introducing me to the value of books, ideas, and wonder, and giving me a safe and loving place to which to come home. My family—my sister, Wendy, for her insightful editing and hard-working spirit, my grandparents, Rose, Mosside, Eloise, and Eugene, who placed the family before themselves. Jason Lind, my best friend and first accomplice. For the journey together that this story and our friendship has been. My dearest friends. In California—the American River Pirates, in particular Robert Henshaw, whom I hold in high esteem: a model of hard work, optimism, openmindedness, and a great encouragement to me. On the East Coast—Peter Gilbert, an exceptional and gentle soul, Ken Ueno, brilliant and generous, my big brother from the beginning of my days in Cambridge, and Hexa (a.k.a. Mary Greitzer), whose wisdom, generosity, love, and chess seem to border on the mystical. So many beautiful minds and hearts with which I have been blessed to be surrounded for the last few years—Hillary Zipper, Ashley Fure, Bob Hasegawa, Gabriela Diaz (for whom all the violin parts were written), Xaq Pitkow (for whom all the thermain parts are in homage), and Eric Hewitt (who was in mind when every saxophone note was committed). Indeed, these have been some of my truest teachers. Thank you for your friendships, your time, and your continual love. My adopted California parents—Karen and Steven Lind, warm and generous, who always kept dairy-free cookies around the house. James Heiner, who recognized something I did not.

Jeremy Haladyna, Mario

Davidovsky, Joshua Fineberg, and Lee Hyla. Chaya Czernowin, Bernard Rands, William Kraft, Julian Anderson, Magnus Lindberg, Jonathan Harvey, Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Hans Tutschku, Elliott Gyger, Yehudi Wyner, Leslie Hogan, Tikey Zes, and Deborah McFarlane-Flickenger. For every support, insight, challenge, and belief, and for so much patience with me.

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The Harvard Music Department and the people who help make it so amazing—Nancy, Ean, Jean, Charles, Karen, Mary, Leslie, Kaye, Sheri, Ben, and Fernando. For all the faculty. Thank you for this education that I can never repay. Thank you for allowing me to live this dream. And thank you for the incredible gift of time to write this. The College of Creative Studies at UC Santa Barbara and the remarkable people there who make it so wonderful. It will always have a very special place in my heart. Roy and Bonita Thompson, an anchor and a shelter in Thailand. Tong Pomgrapee, who found me the beautiful hiding place in which this was assembled. Verapong Supachok, my dear friend, and for our many great conversations on the terrace. For Linda, Nok, Noong, Noi, Ude, Manus, Golf, the taxi drivers, and all my friends in Cha-Am. Without good people who take care of a friend they’ve only just met, I imagine I would be more lost than I could imagine. Sophie, my beautiful, beautiful wolf. For her quietness. For her understanding. For our many conversations. And for our naps on the porch when I was a boy. Thank you all, so much more than I could ever say.

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THE ACTORS

Jonathan.....................Protagonist. Early thirties to middle age. Bass. Jonathan’s Double...A member of the orchestra. Boy Soprano Tamara.......................An island resident. The woman who dies, and the woman with whom Jonathan falls in love. Always dressed predominately or completely in white. Often has a white flower in her hair. Soprano. Tamara’s Double.....A member of the orchestra. Mezzo-soprano. Fate, as the Guitarist, the Postal Deliver Boy, the Hotel Clerk, the Curator, the Waiter, and the Office Worker.....Antagonist. Always dressed predominately in orange, except possibly where otherwise noted. Always carries a pocket watch that he checks almost obsessively, when he’s not singing. Tenor. Dr. Virgil Arnés........A gentleman, attired in a classic off-white suit, striped tie, and panama hat. Not much older than Jonathan, if at all. Married to Alice. Not a singer. Alice.............................A dark young alto, preferably with some form of a foreign accent. Married to Dr. Arnés, though a bit younger than her husband. Henshaw.....................Manager of the Factory. Preferably short and stocky, with red hair. Not a singer. Chorus.........................Five singers (SATBBs) who act as extras as well as assist in the changing of the sets.

No one ever wears blue.

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OTHER INSTRUMENTAL FORCES

(Complete Orchestral Instrumentation) Flute I/Piccolo Flute II/Alto Flute/Contrabass Flute Oboe I Oboe II/English Horn Bb Clarinet I/Bass Clarinet Bb Clarinet II/Contrabass Clarinet Soprano Saxophone/Tenor Saxophone/Baritone Saxophone Tenor Saxophone/Bass Saxophone Bassoon Contrabassoon 4 Horns in F 2 Trumpets in C Tenor Trombone Bass Trombone Tuba Percussion I: large symphonic bass drum (literally as large as possible; a taiko drum would in fact be ideal), a length of heavy chain and a sheet of metal against which to drag it, drum set [kick bass drum, snare drum, four graduated toms, two large graduated suspended crash cymbals (a ride cymbal may instead be substituted for the smaller of the two in X. Lachrymose), and two graduated brake drums], crotales (two octaves), medium to large crash cymbal (free, not suspended), two graduated conga or conga-like drums (a more exotic pair of hand drums would actually be preferable), two graduated stones, and a wooden shaker; double bass bow (as well as standard beaters and mallets, of course) will be required Percussion II: four timpani: 32-30 inches, 29-28 inches, 26-25 inches, and 24-23 inches; additionally, for IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends, Percussion II will be required to play a large, offstage symphonic bass drum (please see note preceding the movement for specific instructions) Percussion III: kick bass drum, large suspended china cymbal, large suspended crash cymbal, large brake drum, snare drum, metal chimes (preferably with a somewhat strange, exotic, and distant quality), two graduated wood blocks, two graduated stones, two graduated conga drums, and a lion’s roar; for VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music please borrow the wooden shaker from Percussion I; for X. Lachrymose please borrow the large bass drum from Percussion I; for IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends, Percussion III will be required to play a large, offstage symphonic bass drum (please see note preceding the movement for specific instructions) Percussion IV: marimba (five octaves), large tam tam, large suspended thundersheet, kick bass drum, wood drum, large brake drum, suspended crash cymbal (in size somewhere between those of Percussion I), glockenspiel, claves, and a glass item (to be broken at the opening of XIIb. Dialogue II: Last Processionals (Revelation of an Auto-Apocalypse)—flexible in exact dimension, though the size and shape of an average vase would be good); for X. Lachrymose please borrow the Congas from Percussion III; hammer (or other similar hard beater) and double bass bow (as well as standard beaters and mallets, of course) will be required

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Electric Guitar/12-String Steel-String Acoustic Guitar for the Electric Guitar: with tube amplification and tube distortion (where required); will require an E-Bow as well as a pick; CGCFAD scordatura for I. Sandman only; otherwise, standard EADGBE tuning (two electric guitars, one for either tuning, would naturally be ideal) for the Acoustic Guitar: CGCFAD scordatura sempre 5-Sting Fretless Electric Bass Guitar 5-string bass, with a low B-string (BEADG); for XII. The Final Lullaby the low B-string will be tuned down a third to G for the scordatura Piano I will require the wooden stick of a beater or a hard plectrum of some kind, a somewhat gentler plectrum, two 4ft-long, 1&1/2in-thick wooden dowling rods, and a brick or other object with which to keep the pedal depressed Piano II will require the wooden stick of beater, a pair of gloves or mittens, two 4ft-long, 1&1/2in-thick wooden dowling rods, and two 2ft-long 1&1/2in-thick wooden dowling rods, and a brick or other similar object with which to keep the pedal depressed Toy Piano (F below Middle-C to the E above the treble clef); most often played by one of the two principal pianists, though in V. Jaleo a separate player will be required Harmonium used only in V. Jaleo Accordion (120 bass, 41 treble keys); will require two 1/12in-thick dowling rods of sufficient length that they together could depress all the treble keys simultaneously, and a board of sufficient size to depress all the bass keys simultaneously Theramin an optional instrument, for ossia solos in V. Jaleo and X. Lachrymose (When string soloists are not specifically listed as performers in a movement, they should of course play with the rest of the section.) Cello Concertante always the principal cello soloist in any context; preferably amplified in any movement where prominent as a soloist Violin I Solo may be amplified in XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus Violins I Violin II Solo Violins II Viola Solo Viola D’Amore Solo used in IXa. A Love Song Song for My Dear Friends only; scordatura: C#F#BCF#BC# Violas Cello Solo (distinct from the Cello Concertante) Cellos Contrabass Solo scordatura for XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus;: AADG; otherwise, CADG for all other pieces; may be amplified in XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus Contrabasses all Contrabasses must have low C extensions; scordatura for I. Sandman only: CGDG A second conductor will most likely be necessary V. Jaleo

(N.B.—All scordaturas are listed from the lowest to the highest strings.)

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CONSPECTUS OF MUSICAL MOVEMENTS ACT I (The Mirror Dimly) I. Sandman (Opening Music) [cello, boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double, bass/Jonathan, mezzo soprano/Tamara’s Double, and orchestra, with a spoken introduction by the tenor/Fate] Ib. Collapse of the Strangest Animals [boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double, chamber orchestra, and chorus] II. City and Flood: First Lullaby (How We Disappear) [bass/Jonathan, boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double, bass clarinet, contrabass clarinet, bass saxophone, contrabassoon, percussion I, acoustic guitar, piano, viola solo, two cellos, and two contrabasses] IIIa. Dialogue I: First Processional to the Continuing Train [Jonathan (spoken), Fate (spoken), and contrabass solo, with an introduction by Percussion III] IIIb. First Train Anthem/Anthem of the First Train [march for cello, piccolo, two pianos, orchestra, Jonathan (spoken), Dr. Arnés (spoken), and Alice (spoken)] IIIc. Aubade (Retrospectual Prophecy) [piano, cello, and orchestra] IV. Terrible Variation [soprano/Tamara, bass/Jonathan, Fate (spoken), cello, and orchestra] V. Jaleo [fantarinade and trance for cello, two pianos, two orchestras, boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double, and chorus; most likely with two conductors] VIa. Interlude: Prelude to a Kind Machine (First and Second Parts) I [meditation for contrabass flute and percussion (unpitched wood instrument)] II [meditation for contrabass flute, cello, and percussion (bass drum)] VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music (Un Callejón Sin Salida) [contrabass flute, percussion I, piano, mezzo-soprano/Tamara’s Double, boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double (spoken) with toy piano, and cello, with ossia offstage oboe and percussion III]

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ACT II (The Moment Continuous)

VII. The Guitarist (Codetta Cominciare) [acoustic guitar and cello] VIII. Alba (Ritual Construction of a Sunrise) [orchestra] IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends [madrigal for contrabass clarinet, two percussion, piano, mezzo-soprano/Tamara’s Double, viola d’amore solo, viola solo, two violas, two cellos, and contrabass solo, with a spoken introduction by the boy soprano/Jonathan’s Double] IXb. Ownership and Water (postlude/interlude: music for a rainstorm) [bass clarinet, piano (one piano, four hands), violin (also playing tam tam), and cello] IXc. Breathe (Ariasa Fantastia) [soprano/Tamara, mezzo-soprano/Tamara’s Double, piano, cello solo, and string quintet] X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate) [tenor/Fate, bass saxophone, three percussion (I, III, & IV), two pianos (piano II plays toy piano as well), electric guitar, violin, and electric bass guitar, with ossia theramin solos, and a scream by the boy soprano] XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus [chant-fantasy for violin and contrabass alone] XIb. Pendulum (Nocturne for the Returning/for the Never-Returning Train) [piccolo solo, alto flute solo, oboe solo, baritone saxophone solo, bass saxophone solo, bass clarinet solo, contrabass clarinet solo, percussion quartet, two pianos, mezzo-soprano/Tamara’s Double, violin, two violas, four cellos, and three contrabasses] XII. The Final Lullaby (Arrangements in Black and White) [aria for alto/Alice, percussion quartet, piano, cello, and electric bass guitar] XIIb. Dialogue II: Last Processionals (Revelation of an Auto-Apocalypse) [bass/Jonathan (spoken), tenor/Fate (spoken), boy soprano (spoken), cello solo, and contrabasses, with downbeat by the percussion quartet] XIII. Wrath: Coda/Ending Music for the Death of Fate [guitar, cello, and orchestra]

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NOMENCLATURE General Score Information and Indications transpositions The score is in C, though the Piccolo sounds one octave higher, the Crotales and Glockenspiel sound two octaves higher, and the Contrabass Clarinet, Contrabassoon, Guitars, Electric Bass Guitar, and Contrabasses sound one octave lower than written. accidentals From measure to measure, notes without accidentals should always be considered natural. microtones All microtonal indications are meant to be approximate inflections only, and are not intended to be taken as specific cent regulations. Both sixth-tone and quarter-tone divisions have been used in the first movement, I.Sandman (Opening Music), the only movement in which sixth-tone divisions are utilized. The employment here of two different microtonal divisions is meant to assist in the guidance of a specific kind of independence between the various shiftings of different parts (though such shiftings are prevalent throughout much of the opera, generally as the underpinnings of a kind of drifting tonality or evolving drone). Again, though, these indications should not be considered to be strict denotations of cent regulations. quarter tones

˜

three quarter-tones sharp

(#

two quarters sharp (semi-tone sharp))

Âľ

quarter-tone sharp

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sixth tones

l

four sixth-tones sharp

(#

three sixths sharp (semi-tone sharp))

L

two sixths sharp

k

one sixth sharp

K

one sixth flat

j

two sixths flat

(b

three sixths flat (semi-tone flat))

J

four sixths flat

miscellaneous ~

approximate pitch

poss (ffff or pppp)

as loud or as soft as possible as possible, respectively, while still procuring the desired effect; i.e., less concern for tone quality and more focus on pure dynamics

–

sing into or through instrument; if not specified, vowel that is sung is left to the performer’s discretion

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Straight dotted lines always indicate a smooth transition. Dotted slurs indicate a phrase, and not a specific bow or breath. In these instances, bowing or breathing is left up to the individual or applicable group. Glissandi should last throughout the duration of the time indicated. They should never be interpreted as portamenti (there are no portamenti in this opera!). Accents should be overemphasized. It is far better to err on the side of too much rather than not enough.

Specific Instrumental Indications winds

æ

fluttertongue

±

air

multiphonics: where not specified, choose any multiphonic with the given pitch as the fundamental; generally, the fuller the bandwidth the better, though playability in any given passage is of course crucial

·

whistle tone

percussion .

dead stroke/choke

+

rim shot

(N.B-There are occasions where, for instance, a rim shot is used consistently over an extended period of time. In this case, it may be that each note is not indicated and instead a more general direction/indication is used instead.)

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voice

¡

whistle

piano +

stopped: on lower strings, place the fingertip directly where single string emerges from the coil; on higher strings, however, stop the string only partially so that some pitch is still available

O ď ¸

m

pizz strings in harp (with fingernail or plectrum) scrape fingernail, plectrum, or wooden stick of a beater along the length of the string

clusters

all white notes only with given range

all black notes only within given range

all notes (white and black) within given range

strings asp

alto sul ponticello (as close to the bridge as possible)

sp

sul ponticello

ord

ordinario

st

sul tasto

ast

alto sul tasto (as high on the fingerboard as possible)

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op

over pressure

clb

col legno battuto

clt

col legno tratto (only wood, no string)

ml

mezzo-legno (some string included)

¨

highest pitch(es) possible on given string(s)

X

a general notehead used for certain noisier effects: when placed on the staff it can indicate, for instance, which string is to be played behind the bridge; when placed in the center of a staff, or on a staff with a percussion clef, then pitch is not an issue with which the performer needs to be concerned

Å

bow marked pitches as close as possible to the fingers; this should be quite noisy

(N.B.—in order to avoid any confusion regarding durations—and since an open/empty diamond notehead is always used to indicate the locations of the specific nodes to be touched in order to produce certain harmonics—durations of a half-note or longer are in these cases always notated using combinations of smaller divisions that are tied together (for instance, a half-note harmonic-pressure touch of the lowest Ab on the violin’s sul IV would be indicated using two quarter-notes tied together, and not one half-note by itself); naturally this is not applicable when the actual harmonic produced, and not the node touched, is instead notated.) guitar (Naturally, when the 12-string guitar is used, the sympathetically resonating strings are not notated.) X

·

left-hand muting: fingers touch, but do not depress the indicated strings; the strings are touched in the middle of the fret, and not over a node harmonic(s) on whatever node indicated

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Âą

feedback; depress the note(s) on which the feedback indication is marked; this will help produce a slightly more pitched noise

m

scratch pick up and down string coiling

electric bass guitar o

slap with thumb

+

pick with finger

xix


THE PROCESS OF THE DREAM General Rules and Explanations of Invocation the modular structure This opera is modular, in that, with the exception of IIIa. Dialogue I: First Processional to the Continuing Train and XIIb. Dialogue II: Last Processionals (Revelation of an Auto-Apocalypse), any of the individual movements that make up the work as a whole may also be extracted and performed alone or in conjunction with other such movements. In these cases, the unset texts/dialogues may be omitted, and the subtext, actors, and staging of the story may be dispensed with. It should be understood, however, that this work is first and foremost an opera, and that the most ideal performance situation of any of its individual parts could only ultimately be in the context of a staged performance of the complete work. Since this is principally a complete opera, and only secondly a series of individual pieces, the former character was generally given precedence in any situation where a conflict might have arisen between the dual roles: if there was a question as to whether an idea should be notated with the idea of the work as a whole in mind, or simply within the context of the individual movement, the former was generally given precedence (with a few necessary exceptions—please see foreign doublings for a principal example). Given this, a certain flexibility is of course permitted with regards to extracted performances. For instance, in movements where the part of the boy soprano is merely speaking and is not actually singing—as is the case in VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music (Un Callejón Sin Salida)—any young child, boy or girl, who is able, may recite the given text in an extracted performance. Lastly, since all parts of the work are related to each other in ways beyond those that may at first be obvious, certain creative arrangements of various extracted movements may also allow these relationships to become more salient. foreign doublings Concerning instances in which a performer is asked to play some other instrument—for instance, the violinist bowing the tam tam in IXb. Ownership and Water (postlude/interlude: music for a rainstorm), or the boy soprano playing the toy piano in VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music (Un Callejón Sin Salida)—it should be understood that if the movement is performed in the context of the entire opera, then such a passage would instead be played by whoever would most naturally play it: the tam tam being instead played by percussion IV and toy piano by piano II, respectively, in these examples.

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alignments of text, music, and action Various and alternating methods are used to communicate the actions, dialogues, and other such dramatic ideas present throughout the work: text is set to music in a relatively traditional manner, text is spoken over but not precisely coordinated with music (including music that deliberately drowns out the speakers’ voices), text is spoken independently of music altogether, singers go an entire movement uttering nothing but a single vowel, and pantomime of actions and mouthed dialogue occur while the music is all we can hear (as in a silent film). Given the shifting relationship between the words and the music throughout the opera, the manner of notation naturally shifts as well. Actors are included in the score as instruments only when and to the degree that it’s necessary: when specific alignments between recitations/dialogues and music are crucial—in IIIa. Dialogue I: First Processional to the Continuing Train, for instance—and, naturally, when the text is sung. In cases where the relationship is instead more general and flexible—for example, the alignment of the text of the phone conversation in Act II, Scene 7 with XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus—the nature of the overlap of the two (whether the text or the music begins or ends first, etc.) is much less crucial and is left far more to the interpretation of the director and the conductor. When general stage directions or points of coincidence are included in the score—for instance, in IV. Terrible Variation—only the level of specificity of alignment necessary is indicated. In cases like this, the exact location of spoken or mouthed words and the duration of any given sequence, within the timeframe allotted and contingent on the preordained aspects of the music, of course, are quite flexible. When a relatively freely-spoken recitation of text needs to coordinate a bit more specifically with the flow of a musical movement—for instance, in VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music (Un Callejón Sin Salida)—cues are given for the coordination of crucial moments of the concurrence of music and text. These points of temporary cohesion are indicated with X noteheads, and typically include the first few words of a key phrase. In between these points, however, the exact rhythm of the spoken words is left to the discretion of the speaker(s). In this context, he or she should deliver the dialogue freely, as if in a play, so long as the given text remains within the time allotted before the next text begins or, if it happens to be the last line of verse, before the movement ends (unless otherwise specified, of course).

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general vocal qualities Regarding desired vocal qualities, please do not necessarily assume a traditional operatic approach. Consider first the work of Maynard James Keenan and Diamanda Galás, for instance, before that of any traditional opera vocalist or style. the scream There are two movements in which the Boy Soprano is specifically called upon to scream: V. Jaleo and X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate), and one in which the MezzoSoprano is called upon to scream: I. Sandman (Opening Music). Of these three instances, however, only the screams in I. Sandman (Opening Music) and V. Jaelo have been specifically notated in the score along with the other instruments, while in X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate) only the general stage directions and approximate location in the scene have been indicated. The reason for this difference in notation is that in the cases of I. Sandman (Opening Music) and V. Jaleo the timing of the occurrence of the scream is of actual musical significance, while in X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate) the scream has in a sense passed through the music to become more an object purely of the stage and the dramaturgy, and its timing with regards to the music need not be quite so exact. Also, it’s worth noting that the scream of the boy soprano in X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate) is in a sense intended to mirror that which occurs in V. Jaleo. amplification and effects Aside from the electric guitar and the electric bass guitar, which of course must be amplified, it would also be ideal if the cello concertante were to be judiciously amplified in any movement in which it performs any soloistic work, and if the contrabass and violin soloists were to be amplified for XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus. Additionally, any singer may be amplified if desired, and reverberation may be added to augment his or her voice (this would be particularly desirable for the alto solo in XII. The Final Lullaby). If reverberation is a possibility, it could also be considered for the instrumentalists in XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus, as well as for the cello concertante in general. fundamental staging, projection, costumes, and masks With regards to the general staging of the opera, the most crucial single point is simply that it should be beautiful. It should be beautiful, and the stage should preferably be in some way inundated with some thing or things—perhaps flowers or lanterns or Christmas lights or, more improbably, candles, or glass, or some kind of impossible machinery.

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There must be a screen or a scrim and a projector. The screen should be on or adjacent to the stage, so that the images projected onto it are visible to everyone in the audience. The projected video clips and the still images indicated in the libretto must be included. The actions directed in the libretto and the music must of course be followed, but, as mentioned before, may be interpreted broadly. Whether or what kind of props might be used, other than those specifically listed in the libretto, is left to the discretion and imagination of the director. The fundamental color scheme, as it is articulated on page ix and in the body of the libretto, must of course be followed. Beyond these instructions, however, costumes are left to the discretion of the director. Musicians may be allowed to wear masks. As long as the masks are in no way silly, the design of the masks is left to the discretion of the director and the consent of the conductor. All of these dramaturgical directions, suggestions, and possibilities may be disregarded, however, if the work is instead experienced in absolute darkness.

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Passages: the Libretto

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ACT I

(THE MIRROR DIMLY) N.B.—The title of the opera is the title of the only art work exhibited in the museum on the Island, the Courtesy of Blue. However, these words are never actually uttered in the course of the story. The Work is never referred to by its title, not even in pantomime. It may be implied that the title of the opera refers to the title of the Work, though the title of the Work is, again, never once actually uttered in the course of neither the spoken nor the unspoken narrative.

I. Sandman (Opening Music) The stage is dark. Fate walks out to the front of the stage, perhaps even to the front of the orchestra. The spot directed on him is the only available light. He is attired exactly as he will be at the opening of the Act II: in either the all-black suit and hat of a flamenco guitarist, with an orange rose on his lapel, or in a completely orange flamenco suit and hat. He addresses the audience, speaking to them and welcoming them directly. FATE Ladies and gentlemen, it is my very great pleasure to welcome you to… Fate is not allowed to finish his introduction, however, as he is interrupted by the first bass drum attack of I. Sandman (Opening Music). He is, however, utterly unfazed, and he exits the stage comfortably and calmly, as if he were in complete control and not at all surprised. The theatre remains dark and the curtains, if there are such things, remain closed before us as the music continues. This darkness lasts until the very end of the movement. Only then is the scene illuminated—fading in inversely to the last scream’s exit—as the curtains are slowly opened.

Ib. Collapse of the Strangest Animals S CENE 1: HOUSE B EDROOM /JONATHAN, TA M A R A , DELIVERY BOY

AND THE

P OSTAL

There is a bed and phone, stage right. A dresser and four packed bags, stage left. There is a door somewhere between them, upstage. Next to the door is a coat hanger or a coat rack with Jonathan’s hat and jacket hanging from it. On a far side of the stage, there is a small, inconspicuous pile of rope or cord. Tamara is wearing a white dress and has a white flower in her hair. She is lying motionless on the bed. There is blood on her dress and the sheets—she has obviously been stabbed to death. Jonathan is standing down stage center, and is dressed in a suit. As the scene opens he is standing with his back to the audience. The Chorus is arranged around the audience, at the four outermost points of the quadrangle, as well as at the back of the hall. If the audience is a stage facing the actors’ stage, then the arrangement is as follows: Soprano, up stage right; Alto, up stage left; Tenor, down stage right; Baritone, down stage left; Bass, up stage center (in the middle of the back of the hall). The aria begins.

II. City and Flood: First Lullaby (How We Disappear) (lyrics by CJH)

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JONATHAN This is how a man Begins to disappear. This is how a man, my love, Just simply disappears. It starts with one inaction That accumulates to years. As a man just slowly slips away, And gently disappears. Disappears… Disappears… This is how a man, my love, Begins to disappear: A choosing to be choiceless– That escape is always pure. And now you touch my face And hear my voice– But I’m no longer here. For I have disappeared, my love. I have simply disappeared. Disappeared… Disappeared… Disappeared… Disappeared… So to whom do I belong now? To whom do I belong? Does it matter if I sing again, Or end this endless song? I just want some hand or other voice To come along and guide me. Some other hand or absent voice To replace the voice inside me. Come again to guide me… Come again to guide… Become the voice inside… Is it then some other hand That reaches out to bind me? Or does this choice before me Not in some way still define me? What is it that defines me? What is it that defines me? The trains have all now ceased together. And all the heartbeats end together. There are no more words of any kind, No more words, my love. There are no more words of any kind, No more words, my love. I am lost. I am lost. I am lost. I am lost. I am lost.

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JONATHAN’S DOUBLE How long have we been wandering here? How long have we been here? How long have we been wandering here? How long now have we been here? And how does a man turn from a man Into a mere outline of his fears? How long have we been wandering here? How long have we been here? And is the darkness really darkest Before daylight reappears? If, in the holocaust of time and of patience, We are mere vacationing clay On the briefest tour of sentience… How long have we been wandering here? How long now have we been here? How long now? How long have we been wandering here? How long have we been here? Tell me, how long have we been wandering here? How long have we been here? Does this all come from some hand Beyond my hands’ control, Or somehow from my own— Somehow a consequence of mine alone? There are a few knocks at the door as soon as the aria has ended. These knocks open the next music.

IIIa. Dialogue I: First Processional to the Continuing Train SCENE 2: HOUSE DOOR/JONATHAN AND THE POSTAL DELIVERY BOY Jonathan answers the door to find the Postal Delivery Boy standing before him. The Postal Delivery Boy has a ticket, as well as his book and a pen. The perspective is such that the Postal Delivery Boy cannot see the bed. (N.B.—Fate, is his various incarnations, often has this book with him—perhaps a ledger book of some kind—from which many of his props seem to be pulled. He is usually holding it, unless he is in a situation where this would be impossible (when playing the guitar, for instance)). POSTAL DELIVERY BOY To Jonathan. As a barrage of exuberance. Good day, sir! Fantastic to see you again, sir, and might I say that you are looking well! A ticket! I have a ticket for you—the ticket that you ordered, to be delivered exactly three minutes ago. He looks at his watch. Oh, I do sincerely regret being slightly late, though, sir.

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He flashes the ticket and turns out towards the audience. Speaking to the audience. A stunned and quite bewildered Jonathan stares back at the Delivery Boy with a countenance that makes no attempt to hide his state of utter confusion. He shows no recollection whatsoever of having purchased such a ticket. “I don’t recall,” he replies simply, trailing off. And then, “I…don’t…believe I…ordered this. You…you must be mistaken.” He laughs pleasantly. To Jonathan. Oh sir, don’t be so silly, for why would I be at your residence with a ticket had you not requested it? Naturally! To the audience. Naturally! Returning to the scene. To Jonathan. Now, I am going to need you to sign here first, sir. Again I do apologize for my tardiness. To the audience. Still showing little evidence of comprehension… JONATHAN Stumbling over his words. I’m sorry, but what is it I’m signing for again? POSTAL DELIVERY BOY He sighs. To Jonathan. Sir, as you told me when you asked and when you ordered it, and as I of course stated and confirmed when it was initially ordered—long before you ever opened this door and found me as I am now—as usual—being asked about what you, yourself, ordered and what I am here, now, at this very moment before you to deliverer. Quite simply, a ticket. Jonathan leans in. He looks as though he is about to speak but the Postal Delivery Boy interrupts him. A ticket sir, for the train to the boat, and for the boat leaving for the Island tonight. You remember all this of course, sir. He turns toward the audience. Speaking to the audience. An island. “How very peculiar,” he thinks. He tries to remember. “Did I just forget?” he asks himself. But how could he have forgotten? “And yet, here is the ticket, and so I must have purchased it,” he tells himself. Pausing briefly. After a moment, “a ticket for what?” he asks me yet again. After a moment, speaking to Jonathan. Your phone is ringing, sir. To the audience. Jonathan looks at the ground and supports himself a bit against the frame of the door, trying to compose himself somewhat. He glances at the phone and then back to the xxviii


Postal Delivery Boy. But the boy just smiles at him and continues speaking to the audience. After a moment. Ring. Ring. Ring. To Jonathan. I will of course wait here for you, sir. Jonathan goes to the phone, slowly and still clearly disoriented, and answers it. We hear only his half of the conversation. JONATHAN Yes, hello? Pause. Is this…? Pause. With apparent confusion. Uhh… Pause. No… Pause. It’s just that…I can’t make that choice right now… He looks around. Pause. Still not fully convinced. You may be right—it’s a choice either way, isn’t it?…okay…I’ll come to the Island. Pause. Yes, yes I will. Thank you. He hangs up and returns to the door and to the Postal Delivery Boy. POSTAL DELIVERY BOY To the audience. “Where do I sign,” Jonathan asks with a bit more confidence and an attempt at some kind of professional deportment. He finally seems to understand now, and so he signs in the book and the Postal Delivery Boy hands him the ticket. Jonathan signs in the book and the Postal Delivery Boy hands him the ticket. Speaking to Jonathan as this is happening.

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By the way, sir, may I say what a smart pair of cufflinks you’re wearing! Red beetle shell is always a classic choice. He hands Jonathan the ticket and stands back from the doorway. Jonathan walks down stage center and for a moment silently contemplates the apparent choice between his deceased lover and the ticket. The Postal Delivery Boy lets himself in and grabs two of the four suitcases and walks out the door, never noticing Tamara, the violent scene, or any sign of anything out of the ordinary. He pauses with the bags outside the door, waiting for Jonathan to follow. To Jonathan. The train awaits you, sir. Jonathan looks back and forth again, apparently beginning to make a decision. In a moment of what seems like a sudden burst of panic or confidence, Jonathan quickly grabs his hat and coat off the rack, following the Postal Delivery Boy out the front door. He takes one last look at the body of his dead lover before he exits, slamming the door behind him. This sound of this door closing is coincident with the first attack of the next music. The lights go down as he exits.

IIIb. First Train Anthem/ Anthem of the First Train There is a brief darkness before the lights slowly come up again on the Chorus, who have already begun descending from the audience to change the scene.

SCENE 3: TRAIN LOUNGE/JONATHAN, DR. ARNÉS, AND ALICE As the Chorus finishes setting the scene, Jonathan is still finding a seat in the train’s lounge. There are two tables close to one another. Dr. Virgil Arnés is already seated at the other table. He is dressed, as he always will be: in a classic off-white suit, striped tie, and panama hat. Jonathan and Arnés nod at each other in polite greeting but do not yet speak. After a moment.

JONATHAN

As he puts away his last items and gets settled. Speaking to Arnés, though almost to himself—perhaps looking somewhere far off for a moment. I used to love the first sounds of a train. I remember, as a boy—it always sounded to me like the beginning of an adventure. Pauses a moment. Coming back to the present, sighing perhaps. Now it just sounds like work. DR. VIRGIL ARNÉS Smiling, kindly, immediately friendly and with a humorous understanding. Also speaking in a way almost to himself. And yet how strangely it seems that some of the most interesting adventures so often start somewhere more in the middle. At this time, Alice returns and accidentally and absentmindedly stops and sits down at Jonathan’s table, perhaps mistaking him for a moment for her husband. ALICE Realizing her mistake, embarrassed but laughing a bit. Oh, I’m sorry! I mistook you for my husband. Pointing to Arnés.

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She gets up and moves to sit with Arnés. Arnés and Alice chuckle lightheartedly. JONATHAN Still a bit preoccupied, but kind and polite. Please, it’s no problem at all. After a moment, he introduces himself to them both, standing, shaking their hands. Jonathan. DR. VIRGIL ARNÉS Very pleased to meet you. Dr. Virgil Arnés. This is my wife, Alice. ALICE A pleasure to meet you, Jonathan. They all stand and shake hands, then sit back down. Arnés and Alice are both very sincere, welcoming, smiling, and interested. DR. VIRGIL ARNÉS So, what brings you to the Island? The dancing, the rum, the Museum, the Festival? Maybe to try your hand at a little gambling? Or did you perhaps just come to take a taste of the infamous beetle? (N.B—Indigenous only to this Island is the Giant Red Beetle. The Beetle is typically cooked upside down over an open fire. The meat is extremely tender and sweet and is considered to be something of a delicacy.) JONATHAN Actually, unfortunately, I’m just here for work. And actually, it will be my first time visiting. I really haven’t heard very much about the Island before now… The music has been growing as a wall of noise, or as a great sea, until it now completely overpowers the voices. From this point until XIIb. Dialogue II: Last Processionals (Revelation of an AutoApocalypse) much of the dialogue of opera will be as a silent movie, a pantomime. Though the actors will continue to appear to speak to each other as if this were not the case, we will most often hear only the music and the lyrical and recited texts, though the actual dialogues as they are described will often be only acted out. Jonathan, Alice, and Dr. Arnés continue to chat as before. Dr. Arnés and Alice are very friendly, and though Jonathan is a bit awkward, he is friendly as well. They discuss the Island, its attractions, their respective jobs, etc. The doctor and his wife both exhibit a kind of old-world calm, sense of etiquette, and friendly lack of pretension that comes across as completely natural. Projected above them as this conversation continues, we see the following images, in no particular order: the Island, dark revelry from the Festival, two men fighting with their bare hands, white wings, the unmarked door to the Museum, the giant red beetle. The lights go down as they continue to talk.

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SCENE 4: OUTSIDE HOTEL ENTRANCE/TAMARA AND JONATHAN

IIIc. Aubade (Retrospectual Prophecy) The lights come up slowly on the next scene. It is morning. Jonathan disembarks near the entrance to the Hotel.

IV. Terrible Variation Tamara is on the Street Outside the Hotel Entrance, singing. Jonathan arrives at the Hotel. Tamara appears to be a street vendor, selling a variety of old books. She is wearing wings (due to the Festival) and but has no white flower in her hair. There is no sign whatsoever of the injury or the aftermath that we observed in the first scene. Jonathan and Tamara do not seem to know each other. He walks by her and proceeds into the Hotel Lobby.

SCENE 5: HOTEL LOBBY/JONATHAN AND THE CLERK As Jonathan exits the last scene and moves to this next, the tune that Tamara was singing suddenly becomes the background music of the Hotel Lobby. Jonathan walks across the Hotel Lobby and to the counter, setting his bags down. JONATHAN Hello, I’m… He is interrupted by the Clerk. CLERK Yes! Excellent to have you here with us, sir! May I say what impeccable timing you have? A Mr. Henshaw phoned to inquire about your arrival just a moment ago, in fact. Jonathan is somewhat stunned. Excuse me. How dreadful—I should let you catch your breath. Welcome, my friend. Let’s get you settled in, shall we? To the audience. Jonathan appears to be a bit tired from his voyage, but collects himself and then requests to use the telephone. He explains the importance of getting in touch with the aforementioned Mr. Henshaw as soon as possible. The Clerk snaps his fingers and two member of the chorus each grab a bag from Jonathan’s feet and proceed up the stairs and off the stage. The phone is here for your use, sir. He places the phone in front of Jonathan. Please feel free to make any and all calls from here, whenever you may need. It is our business to make your stay on the Island as convenient and as comfortable as possible, so please do not, no do not hesitate for even a moment to ring myself or any others here for any and all needs that you may have. By the way, dial 9 to get out, sir. Jonathan takes off his hat, places it down next to the phone, picks up the receiver, and dials.

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JONATHAN Speaking on the phone. Hello…Thank you…Certainly…No…Yes, certainly…10:00 am…Yes, see you then. He hangs up and turns back to the Clerk, who slides the book in front of him. CLERK Please sign here, sir. Jonathan signs and looks up to receive his key. Room number 427. Enjoy your stay. Jonathan exits the Hotel Lobby through the front door, proceeding outside and directly into the next scene. (N.B.—the Clerk hands Jonathan the clipboard and pen with exactly the same gesture as did the Postal Delivery Boy. Fate’s characteristic movements, almost caricature in fact, should be similar throughout these types of scenes/movements.)

SCENE 6: OUTSIDE HOTEL ENTRANCE/TAMARA AND JONATHAN As Jonathan exits the Hotel, the tune suddenly becomes the huge Festival song of a passing parade. And then suddenly it’s just Jonathan alone humming the tune. Tamara is outside just as she was in Scene 4, still wearing the wings. Jonathan stops walking and humming when he sees her. At the beginning of their conversation, Tamara is perhaps just trying to pleasantly convince him to buy something of hers, but throughout this encounter she becomes increasing intrigued by him, most notably perhaps by his resistance and his shyness. She is kind to him and their interaction presents a stark contrast to Fate’s interaction with him in the previous scene. They chat briefly, discussing the tune he was singing, which she was of course singing in the previous scene. He doesn’t realize that it was she whom he had seen before, and is a bit embarrassed when he then notices her wings and realizes that she is the same woman that was singing the tune he’s singing now. Jonathan begins to leave, but Tamara stops him with a question about the Festival. He answers. After a moment he starts to walk off again, but this time he stops on his own and looks back at her, giving her a slight look, saying farewell, and then walking off once again. She says farewell and smiles. During this scene, there are images projected on the screen or scrim above: a great and beautiful storm, a train at night, an ocean of candles and lanterns. At the close of the scene, these images are for a moment the main point of focus, as all goes dark except for the scrim.

V. Jaleo Scene 7: Maltodavian Rum Factory/Jonathan, Henshaw, the Chorus, and the Office Worker The lights come up and the music begins as Jonathan arrives at the Factory. He stands in the middle of a fairly standard looking office. The desks are filled with bodies typing away on typewriters and moving about busily. This is the Chorus and the Office Worker. It is also a dance, a strange dream of a dance that they are dancing to the sound of the machines, though to everyone present it will seem entirely natural. Neither Jonathan nor Henshaw participate in this dance. Henshaw and the Chorus are all be wearing the same color. The only exception is the Office Worker, who is of course wearing something orange, perhaps in some form of jumpsuit.

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Henshaw enters. He makes his way over to Jonathan, who is standing a bit awkwardly in the front center (down stage) of the activity. Henshaw is a very sound and confident, as well as an apparently slightly energetically loud individual. Their conversation that follows is rather mundane at first: introducing themselves amiably, chattering about the details of the Factory’s progress. They agree that everything seems to be good. Jonathan says that he’ll return in a few days to check back once more before he leaves the Island. They then briefly discuss the Work. After this, Henshaw returns to his own work, leaving the stage, as Jonathan exits, walking directly into the next scene. (N.B.—No one notices when the boy soprano screams. It is a presage of something later, outside of time.) This scene could be something else entirely, but this other scene is instead projected on the scrim above: There is a room that is much darker than this room. In this room, there are men dressed in black and white, playing guitars and simple percussion instruments with their hands. Some people are dancing, but one individual in particular is the center of attention—a woman. She is particularly beautiful, but she is impossible to capture. Her black hair is pulled back into a severe bun. She wears black and white as well, but also a vibrant and insane red. The dance is becoming, and has already become, a frenzy. At the point of ultimate frenzy, though, the images suddenly cease and all goes dark.

VIa. Interlude: Prelude to a Kind Machine (Parts One and Two) (N.B.—The spoken parts for this piece have in no way been noted in the score, as this is in particular intended to be a segment of incidental music, and does not require specific cues. The only alignment that matters here is that the conversation and scene end before the next music and the next scene begin.)

S CENE 8: OUTSIDE TAMARA

THE

E NTRANCE

TO THE

HOTEL/J ONATHAN

AND

The lights return. Tamara is in the same place as she was before, selling her books. Jonathan walks toward the Hotel entrance. He stops and they speak a bit more. She asks him if he would to go out that evening to see the Festival. He stops and turns back. She jokes with him a bit. They agree to go out for the evening. She has the last word and begins to hum again, though this time we can’t hear her, and Jonathan turns away and walks into the Hotel, directly into the next scene.

Scene 9: Hotel Lobby/Jonathan and the Clerk Jonathan walks into the hotel and past the Clerk. CLERK Speaking to Jonathan. Sir, I see that you’re in great haste, and so I hope you don’t find it rude when I say that I’ve noticed now, just now, that your cufflinks seem to have gone missing. Would you, sir, like me to procure for you a suitable replacement, for this evening’s activities? Jonathan stops. Speaking to the audience. Jonathan does what Fate describes as Fate describes it. Looking down at the ends of his sleeves, Jonathan observes the holes where the nowabsent cufflinks should have been. “Where did they go?” he wonders.

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(They have, in fact, been missing since the morning he arrived at the Island.) To Jonathan. If you, sir, are going out this evening, may I suggest the shell of the red beetle, a native to this Island, and always a classic choice? The red beetle is never brazen, and is always complementary to all who wear it. The Clerk lifts his watch—which is encased in red beetle shell—from his pocket in order to show Jonathan. Not to worry. I shall have a pair sent up to your room right away. I wouldn’t want you to be burdened with such nonsense. Jonathan turns to go, a bit bewildered but apparently expressing gratitude. He then turns back and addresses the Clerk. JONATHAN Also… CLERK To the audience. A ticket! To Jonathan. Is it your ticket sir? Not to worry! I had figured that you wouldn’t be staying with us forever, naturally. I have already booked passage for you and…for just you, for your travel home, of course. The Clerk looks out at the audience and clears his throat. He turns back to Jonathan. If I can be of no further assistance, I shall hold up you no longer. Good evening, sir. Jonathan smiles, nods, and walks off. All goes dark as Jonathan exits the scene.

VIb. Clockwork of a Summer Night Music (Un Callejón Sin Salida) SCENE 10: RESTAURANT/JONATHAN, TAMARA, AND THE WAITER Jonathan and Tamara walk into the Restaurant together and are seated by the Waiter. She is no longer wearing the wings, and she will not wear them again for the remainder of the opera. Jonathan and Tamara proceed to have dinner. They are attending some kind of ritual battle associated with the Festival, of which we have only an obscured view. The battle is behind the scrim, though we see the following images projected on it: men tearing each other apart with their bare hands, monkeys being slaughtered, crowds of moneys gathered to watch, perhaps some kind of Roman coliseum. Following this there are images only of beautiful things. The Waiter also intermittently directs the actions of members of the Chorus. We do not hear him, but at these moments he appears to be speaking and directing through a bullhorn. Before the scene ends, the Waiter leaves this bullhorn on the stage.

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JONATHAN’S DOUBLE (The Farewell, by CJH) (N.B.—Incidentally, this recitation is in no way intended to appear to be coincident with the Waiter’s directings.) And the child begins to speak: You labyrinth-builders and oblivion seekers, You hope addicts and you slow train dreamers. You lovely skin vandals and lovers and thieves. You song-screamers, Still shivering with this whole life. You travelers and you air-eaters, Chess-raving and time-drunk. You, My Friend and Stranger. My friend, Wake up – We are nearly there. We are nearly there. And when we have arrived, Word-gluttonous and mathechistic, Eventually refusing to believe In even our own atheisms, We will then be alone And beautiful. So Farwell for a minute now, I will leave the Christmas lights on for you So that you won’t come home to the dark. Shhhhhhhhh..... At this song and this scene ends, all goes dark. It is now the beginning of the intermission. The bullhorn has been left on the stage by the Waiter, down stage center, with its trigger now permanently depressed (perhaps with tape). If the curtains have closed, then this is the only item left out front for the audience to see. Now there is only the loud emptiness of the prepared bullhorn. It stays as it is throughout the intermission, as a different silence and is picked up by a member of the Chorus as the very last item removed, in the last moments before Act II begins, as the light comes up on the Guitarist.

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ACT II (THE MOMENT CONTINUOUS) As Act II begins, a member of the Chorus walks by and picks up the bullhorn, removing it and walking off the stage in one continuous action, perhaps just as the last of the props or sets are put into place. The Guitarist is in his chair, with his guitar, sitting mid or down stage center, with his back to the audience. Fate is dressed as he was for the beginning of Act I: either in the blackest suit and hat of a flamenco guitarist, with an orange rose on his lapel, or otherwise in the strict orange. All is dark. Then the spot comes up on him, so that all is dark except for him. He hunches over the guitar and begins to play. The music, of course, begins as he does.

VII. The Guitarist Toward the end of this piece, when it is well underway, but while the sound of the guitar and the accompanying instruments continue, he very calmly ceases to play, gets up, and leaves the chair where he was sitting, taking his guitar with him—though the music of course continues as if no such thing had occurred. He then takes his place behind the counter, perhaps changing his attire first, perhaps not. A chorus member walks by and removes his chair from the stage in one smooth action, just as before with the bullhorn, though walking across the stage in the opposite direction from this previous action.

SCENE 1: HOTEL LOBBY/JONATHAN AND THE CLERK Jonathan enters the Hotel Lobby. The Clerk is behind the counter. They chat, generally amiably, the Clerk suggesting quite exuberantly and adamantly that since Jonathan has some free time today, he visit the Museum and the Work. Jonathan concedes, though he does interrupt the Clerk at a point, an action that for the first time appears to briefly surprise and startle Fate, though Fate is again exuberant when Jonathan finally concedes. (N.B.—The museum on the Island in infamous. It houses only one piece of art. Everyone he has met who has seen it—except for Dr. Arnés and Alice, who were vague on the subject, and Tamara, who never mentioned it—describes it as amazing, beyond measure, breathtaking, life-changing, or some similar energetic variation.) Jonathan exits. All goes dark.

VIII. Alba (Ritual Construction of a Sunrise) The lights fade up, much slower than usual, as in a dawn. This slow change of light occurs over most of the course of the following scene.

SCENE 2: MUSEUM/JONATHAN AND THE CURATOR Jonathan arrives at and enters the Museum. The Curator is there, and excitedly takes him to view the Work. Jonathan sees it, finally, but ultimately rejects it as art, for it turns out that there is nothing there but an empty room, and he is unwilling to accept this. In doing so, Jonathan is for the first time making a decision in direct contravention to Fate’s strange plan, leaving the Curator more than a little startled. Jonathan exits. CURATOR Caught a little off guard. Exclaiming just as Jonathan has exited. But sir, it’s so undeniably beautiful! The Curator is left standing alone and a bit lost in the middle of the stage as the scene goes dark.

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IXa. A Love Song for My Dear Friends JONATHAN’S DOUBLE (The Laugh, by CJH) In the darkness, we hear him speaking, slowly and patiently, unaccompanied. The laugh is the unanimous symbol for the universal, incontrovertible optimism—the gorgeous, endless, hopeless hope behind every good motivation. When I imagine an idea I would like to become, I think that I would like to be that thing that is symbolized by the laugh. Not by the word laugh, but by the sense that calls forth the thing that we call laugh. By that perfect mixture of freedom and joy and faith and satisfaction all exploding in a few slices of the thinnest, most gelatin moment. If ideas could be entities or if entities could be ideas, I would choose to be that thing. I once read that a knowledge became flesh. That an idea, the expression of the idea, and the one behind the idea all became a man—that a logos was made incarnate. Sometimes when traveling—though I know it’s the thought of a child—I like to imagine that one form of this idea could be the Laugh. That there are perhaps these few, enormous, eternal ideas. But then there are also a wild multitude of these much smaller, more flexible ideas; these little shrapnel—ectoplasmic entities just wandering around in some metaphysical diaspora. And when you and I travel together, you, the Moment, and I, the Laugh, I feel very, very alive. And when you left me that day in that old city, I felt like the loneliest god that had ever walked this earth. You and I. We’ve been traveling together for some time now. You as the Moment and I as the Laugh. And do you see where it is we’ve walked to? We have again found ourselves on the edge of the perimeter. We can choose now whether to go in, or to stay out and go on just a bit further. The music begins on the final word of this monologue and continues throughout the following scene. The lights begin to come up once the music has started. Jonathan walks into the restaurant, the same restaurant as before, meeting Tamara there. She has already arrived and is waiting for him.

SCENE 3: RESTAURANT/JONATHAN, TAMARA , THE W AITER , DR . ARNÉS, AND ALICE Jonathan and Tamara greet each other. They are seated by the Waiter and proceed to order drinks—a pitcher of black wine. The Waiter leaves. They chat briefly. The Waiter returns with the pitcher and two glasses. He places the glasses before them and with a great sense of panache fills them both. Jonathan orders their dinner—a giant red beetle, full shell. The Waiter leaves and Jonathan and Tamara toast and drink. They proceed to eat and converse as they watch the fight, part of which we will see projected overhead. On the screen or scrim above the projections again flicker on. We see images of the fight, rain, lanterns on the sea, and then a monsoon. A member of the Chorus is walking around selling white flowers to the people having dinner at the various tables, other members of the Chorus. Jonathan purchases one and places it in Tamara’s hair. The Waiter returns with the large upside down red beetle. He places it on their table and exits. They proceed to eat its meat out of the shell by the handfuls. They continue to talk. When they finish, Jonathan leaves some money, and they get up from the table and exit the Restaurant.

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TAMARA’S DOUBLE (Cygnus Olor, by Hillary Zipper) That was (Albertine) a long time ago, the day the birds awoke at once, feeling Fall’s furrowed brow arose -si) gone

God’s

(cyleaves of air fell, ascending my ear to

heart CONTRABASS CLARINETTIST (April, by Ken Ueno) What I see is a thick band of gray a line that elides the end of the day into the beginning of night the space between stretched out over many years perhaps a lifetime, when we begin we are already beginning to end That gray band is in the motoric animation of the lower jaw gnawing regular pulsations at the upper lip – the space left vacant by absent dentures; the tight grip – that obscures the sheet’s edge into the hand the irregular breathing – in which we are lost traces almost words the increased heart rate seemingly responding to proximity; the eyes – a miracle of human effort opens in coincidence to one calling his name

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The foreign language of physical gestures recorded on this day, a gray band transcribing in what little we can understand our hopes, that which we want to interpret as signs of life continuing…

IXb. Ownership and Water (postlude, music for a rainstorm) (N.B.—Perhaps this music is the nocturne of the last flood, the nocturne of the end of rain and lanterns.)

SCENE 4: FESTIVAL PARADE/JONATHAN, TAMARA, DR. ARNÉS, AND ALICE Jonathan and Tamara proceed to walk along as a parade of floats and a crowd of people—the Chorus—passes by. Perhaps this parade comes in some way from the masked orchestra. On one of the floats are a man and a woman, both in masks. The man and woman wave to them and jump off nearby. Removing their masks, we see that they are Dr. Arnés and Alice. The three are all pleased to see each other again, and Tamara is introduced to them as well. They chat, especially Jonathan and Dr. Arnés, before the couples say farewell and part. All goes dark. The music continues.

SCENE 5: STREET IN FRONT OF HOTEL/JONATHAN AND TAMARA The lights return. It is morning. Jonathan and Tamara approach the Hotel. They have been out enjoying themselves all night. They say a few last words, kiss, and then part. She is going to her Room to pack, to leave with him. He is going to the Factory for a last little evaluation before they leave. He exits and she remains alone to sing her aria, proceeding slowly to her Room, perhaps pausing on occasion as she does so.

IXc. Breathe (Ariasa Fantastia) (lyrics by CJH) TAMARA Are we here, are we alive To do more than just survive? Or are we just passing The time In perpetua? Is this moment some chance, Or just a part of the dance? Is this life Just a death In absentia?

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TAMARA’S DOUBLE Breathe. Breathe. Breathe, just, Breathe. Breathe. Breathe. Breathe, my love, Now breathe. TAMARA Since we’re more than just slaves Who are freed by our graves, Then each moment In some way Becomes me. Yes, in every circumstance There’s some choice and there’s some chance, But in what I have I will choose To become free. TAMARA’S DOUBLE Breathe. Breathe. Breathe, Now breathe. TAMARA But when we choose to love, We choose also to trust, And our all our choices Become intertwined. So that now as I choose, My choice as well affects you, And your consequences Must also be mine. Yes, your consequences Must as well Become mine… The lights go down as the song ends. The next aria begins soon afterward. The next scenes begin together as the lights return.

S CENE 6: MALTODAVIAN R UM F ACTORY /JONATHAN , HENSHAW , THE CHORUS, AND THE OFFICE WORKER; TAMARA’S ROOM/TAMARA AND THE OFFICE WORKER

X. Lachrymose (Aria of an Incarnation of Fate) (lyrics by CJH)

The lights come up as Fate begins to sing.

xli


The stage is split down the center. There are two scenes going on simultaneously on the opposite sides of the stage: Jonathan and Henshaw, et al., in the Factory on one side, and Tamara in her Room packing on the other. During the first part of the scene, the focus is on Jonathan in the Factory and his pantomime conversation with Henshaw. During this sequence, Tamara is slowly packing in her Room. No one on stage notices or hears Fate. At the opening of the scene, Tamara enters her Room as Jonathan enters the Factory. The Factory is similar to the way it was before, except that now there’s no dancing. There is only the working one might expect of such a place. Members of the Chorus are seated and working at the various desks. The Office Worker is also there at a desk, among them. In the Factory, Jonathan and Henshaw spend a moment on small talk. Then Henshaw explains that a new situation has arisen quite suddenly: Everything now seems to be falling apart. Things are collapsing at a wildly unnatural rate, as if entropy were acting exponentially. The trees are rotting to the core, the strip metal is rusting itself out…everything is just eroding away much faster than it should. And there is no explanation—nothing makes any sense. These and other similar images explaining the situation are described in the projected images. Jonathan says he’ll return to the head office with this issue. Meanwhile, the Office Worker has gotten up from his desk in the background, pulling something from a drawer in the desk, and has begun to creep across to Tamara’s side of the stage. We see in a moment that this object is a knife—a long stiletto. No one in the Factory notices what he’s doing. As Jonathan and Henshaw both look into the books together, the Office Worker moves from the Factory to Tamara’s Room. Once he has snuck to her side of the stage the point of focus changes to her Room. She is packing and doesn’t notice him. We see that he is brandishing his stiletto, with the clear intent of killing her. Just before he can do this, however, Jonathan’s Double screams as loudly and as suddenly as he possibly can. This frightens the Office Worker, enough to scare him from Tamara’s Room, and to startle Tamara, who looks around but sees nothing. No one on the opposite side of the stage seems to have heard the scream—only Tamara and the Office Worker. Fate exits her Room, but doesn’t return to the Factory either. Instead, he moves down stage as both of these scenes go dark. The only remaining light then is the spot directed at him as he finishes his song. All goes dark as the aria ends. FATE/OFFICE WORKER So what of these creatures Of flesh and volition? What of these kings Who trade kingdoms for prisons? What of these beast-covered gods’ Supposition? – They prefer anodyne chains to Insecure abolition. What is this species With such gifts and such reason, Who’ve created such wonders Yet themselves can’t believe them? Who are these humans That endowed with such freedom Still imagine some slavery Will save or redeem them?

xlii


I am the idea Of a man absent of freedom. I am the belief that life is Nothing but a machine. I am the spiral As it wraps and continues And continues to wrap Through these lies never-ending. But I am no devil, No god, And no stranger. Believe it or not I live at your discretion. I’m just one incarnation Of an old superstition That exists on the light Of your tacit permission. Yes, I am no monster But the monster you’ve made me. And I am no evil But the evils you’ll believe. For it’s you who can choose Whether to choose me; It’s you who decide What you will or will not be. And when you choose to be choiceless, It’s me that you’re choosing. And as I grow stronger, It’s you that you’re losing. For I’m merely the weakness You’ve decided to be, And my name is the name Of the excuse you believe. But I am no devil, No god… I acknowledge that sometimes A man wakes and does see– That awaking, he may choose to Choose his own what-will-be. And yes, when this happens A small piece of me dies, As if cut by some snake In my own garden of lies. But though I need you much more Than you ever will need me, Still I don’t believe Most will ever believe me. You’ll never escape, For your own sweet vanities Will rarely permit you To see all this that I see.

xliii


Now trust me child And for your own sake, please listen– Free will is just a cold cruel imposition. So reject these soft chains Into which you were given, And your life can instead be My own composition. Yes, I promise to make your life My composition… Yes, I need you to make your life My composition. All goes dark. Fate exits. The next music begins in this darkness.

XIa. Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus Soon, the lights return.

SCENE 7: HOTEL LOBBY/JONATHAN AND THE CLERK Jonathan enters the Hotel and walks to the Clerk, who is standing behind the counter as before. They greet each other amiably at first, though when the Clerk asks Jonathan what he thought of the Work, they disagree about its value and the Clerk grows a little hostile and impatient. Jonathan, however, quickly cuts off this conversation with the Clerk by taking the phone that is sitting on the counter and making a call. JONATHAN Pause. Hello my friend. Pause. Yes. Just listen. Pause. Are you planning to come? Pause. You must…you must act. Pause. Not to choose is also a choice. For now, just start with this one thing. Pause. So you’ll come to the Island? Pause. He hangs up and gives the Clerk a knowing and confident look before he exits. The scene ends with the Clerk standing alone and somewhat taken aback. The next music begins as the scene goes dark.

XIb. Pendulum (Nocturne for the Returning/ for the Never-Returning Train) SCENE 8: THE RETURNING TRAIN/JONATHAN AND TAMARA

xliv


The lights return slowly as the scene is changed by the Chorus. Jonathan and Tamara take their places on the train, up stage. They sit together, conversing happily. The white flower is still in Tamara’s hair. Toward the end of the scene, Alice enters and stands down-stage center. As the music draws to a close, the lights on Jonathan and Tamara fade out, though not completely, as the spot on Alice fades in.

XII. The Final Lullaby (Arrangements in Black and White) Alice begins to sing very soon after the last music has ended. The train has apparently stopped and Jonathan and Tamara exit during this next piece. Then all the lights but the spot on Alice finally fade out completely, and she is all we can see. The scene is changed in the darkness behind her while she continues. During this song, the video projected in the darkness are of a young mother and her child. We see them from somewhat above, and at a distance of maybe one hundred meters. As the song begins, they are on the beach, approaching the sea. Throughout, the mother is helping her child—a little girl—and then watching her, alternating in these actions, as they move closer to the water and then into the water. The little girl is afraid at first, afraid of the ocean and its waves. But the mother guides her slowly in and the girl grows less afraid and begins to play. The mother moves in tandem with her, standing throughout. The little girl sits and plays in the water, and then stands and moves in further and then sits and plays again. Slowly they move further in, together. Slowly they progress into the ocean, until they are both consumed and covered, gently and permanently covered. And they disappear completely. [Dedicated to every person whose rightful choices have been terribly and inhumanely curtailed, and who is just trying to do the best that he or she can in some horrible circumstance. And dedicated especially to the trafficked women of South and South-East Asia.] ALICE (Crying for the Moon in Peace, by Samnang Ly) Plant leaves unfold in spring The flowers bloom in summer Fall, the leaves are changing Beautiful snow comes in winter. There is an old lady In her small bright room She's old, but she's pretty She's writing a poem. She has a poor baby She is not a mother Her sick son's so risky Her life'll never be brighter. It'll never be the same Her boy can't even talk He'll never say her name The boy can't even walk. She walks to the window Looks up at the sunny sky Her mind fills with sorrow Tears come to her eyes. She really wants to run She wishes she can fly Live in the hot sun Stay in it, to hide.

xlv


Among all kinds of stars There is a full moon Brightly it seems too far Why does it feel alone? At the seashore she's standing The ocean meets the sky A skinny bird is dying Strong wind makes her cry. Swimming in the sad sea Walking in the heavy snow Her heart is so empty Crying to see the rainbow. She wishes for best things No one will understand But the worst things are always coming Her son'll never be a man. Her son lives in peace Without a mother of his own Smiling is what she wished She died in nature all alone. My son is shining bright, like a star at night up in the sky sitting on a cloud smiling down on me. But everything is just happening in my dreams. I hope I can write this on the blue sky which shows between the clouds, to tell him how sad I am and how much I miss him. The scene has been changed. Alice exits the stage as she sings the last few lines.

SCENE 9: HOUSE BEDROOM/JONATHAN, FATE, JONATHAN’S DOUBLE, AND TAMARA This is the same room from the very first scene of the story. Now, however, there is no blood nor any sign of violence. Also, the rope is no longer on stage. Jonathan and Tamara enter. He leaves his coat and hat on the hanger or the coat rack by the door, and they both leave their suitcases exactly as we first saw them in Scene 1. They lie exhausted next to each other on the bed, chatting briefly and happily. Jonathan gets up. It appears that he needs to leave to do some work at his office. However, she convinces him to stay. He gets back in bed, with his clothes on, and they fall asleep together. It appears that the show might nearly be over, as now the music ends and the lights go down. All is darkness for a few moments.

XIIb. Dialogue II: Last Processionals (Revelation of an Auto-Apocalypse) The front door is thrown open and Fate—in the guise of the Postal Delivery Boy from the opening scene of Act I—stands cheerfully and threateningly in the doorway with the knife in his hand. A spotlight directed solely at him is the only light that we can see, appearing when he does. Slowly, Fate moves across to the rack where Jonathan’s coat and hat hang, and he calmly puts them on as he looks over at the bed. Now the spotlight moves from him to the foot of the bed. He finishes getting dressed and glances down at what we believe to be the sleeping couple. He smiles a bit more. However, given the darkness, the angle of the bed, and its coverings, we can’t see whether anyone is actually in the bed at this point. Slowly, Fate moves closer to the bed as he raises the knife.

xlvi


FATE To himself. Calmly, as usual. I am here to collect. BOY SOPRANO From somewhere offstage. Softly, thoughtfully. Is it then some other hand That reaches out to bind me? Brief pause. JONATHAN From behind Fate comes Jonathan’s voice. Jonathan, cool and collected, is in a sense now emulating Fate’s tenor throughout the rest of the opera. May I help you? Startled for a moment, Fate stumbles backward a few steps. Is there anything I can get for you, sir? BOY SOPRANO As before. What is it that defines me? What is it that defines me? The stage is illuminated with a flood light, a flood of light, as if in a stadium. We see that no one is in the bed. From behind Fate Jonathan appears. Fate, startled, turns to face Jonathan’s ambush. JONATHAN The roles begin to switch, clarifying—through Jonathan now—Fate’s previous accommodating quality. There is nothing here for you. There is a pause. Fate chuckles, regaining his composure. FATE Speaking to Jonathan. I do apologize, sir, but there is, after all, one more little detail that still requires some attending to. Indeed, I am truly sorry for the inconvenience of all of this, and of course most appreciate your turning a blind eye once again. To himself. Quietly. Now trust me child And for your own sake, please listen– Free will is just a cold cruel imposition… To the audience. As before with his stage directions. With no hesitation, Jonathan moves aside, allowing his fate to once again take control… xlvii


BOY SOPRANO As before. This is how a man, my love, Begins to disappear: A choosing to be choiceless– That escape is always pure… JONATHAN Unmoved. In the form of a knife? FATE To Jonathan. Actually, it’s more a scalpel, sir…for your health, shall we say..? He smiles a bit more. For a little surgery. To himself, quietly. So reject these soft chains Into which you were given, And your life can instead be My own composition… To the audience, as before. Jonathan’s mind races… JONATHAN Yelling, interrupting, again startling Fate. Just as Fate seems to be regaining control, Jonathan seems to again steal it away. Hey! You don’t seem to be listening. As I said, there is nothing here for you to finish. A bit calmer. Nothing at all is needed from you. FATE Calmer, regaining his composure a bit. Seductive. My friend, this isn’t my idea. It was never my idea. I am nothing but the idea. I am merely the idea—the idea to which you yourself have so often appealed. The idea that you wanted. The idea that permitted you to turn the blind eye you’ve perpetually craved, the idea that permitted you to exist so free of responsibility. I have only ever been what you’ve needed me to be: happenstance, bad luck, the gods’ will, the anonymous hand. Whatever name you chose, I was merely the force that you’ve allowed. I know what I was created to do, and it was only ever for you, my friend. And now, once again, I am just doing my job, as I always have. And I am here now to merely collect for you a debt far over due—just a little part of our old understanding. So please, my friend, do step aside once again and allow the inevitable to occur. xlviii


Jonathan looks down calmly. Fate misunderstands his demeanor as that of one slightly defeated. But Jonathan is instead just checking his rage. BOY SOPRANO As before. Does this all come from some hand Beyond my hands’ control..? FATE To himself, as before. And when you choose to be choiceless, It’s me that you’re choosing. And as I grow stronger, It’s you that you’re losing… To the audience, as before. Broken by the weight of a lifetime of absented choices, he… Jonathan suddenly charges Fate, interrupting and surprising him, wrestling him to the bed. They struggle feverishly until Jonathan finally manages to wrest the knife from Fate’s hand. Jonathan stands, backing away a few paces, and throws the knife far offstage. JONATHAN No, my friend, this will not happen tonight. FATE To Jonathan. Yelling, exasperated, finally losing his composure. What don’t you understand?! I did all that was ever asked of me! What makes you think you can change our arrangement now?! He wipes his face. Slowly he rises from the bed and collects himself a bit, straightening his clothes and pulling himself together. After a moment, though still a bit exasperated. To both Jonathan and the audience. As you yourself have said so many times before “sometimes these things just happen.” Slowly in the background a noose is lowered from above, suspended behind Fate so that he can’t see it. It is being lowered by the Boy Soprano. JONATHAN Calmly. Yes. I have said that. FATE Fate believes he’s regaining control. He is distracted a bit by the audience and still doesn’t see the noose. “I have no choice in this matter.” Remember? JONATHAN Yes. xlix


FATE To Jonathan. Imploring, with great pathos. I promised to make your life my composition. I need you to make your life my composition. JONATHAN Yes, I know. Tamara emerges from the shadows and stands behind Fate as the noose falls into her hands. Fate doesn’t see this. FATE Fate clearly believes he is completely back in control now. He relaxes. Then we understand one another. Thank you, my friend. Thank you. He sighs. I am ready to receive my prize.

XIII. Wrath: Coda/ Ending Music for the Death of Fate Tamara slips the noose around Fate’s head as Jonathan restrains him. The rope is retracted and the knot pulled tight as Fate is pulled up into the air. He struggles and gasps until his body finally goes limp and lifeless. The proscenium is now a defaced clock—Fate hangs as if a dead pendulum. The curtains close. ALL GOES DARK.

finis

l


Music


ACT I (THE MIRROR DIMLY)


I. Sandman (Opening Music) [cello, boy soprano, bass, mezzo-soprano, and orchestra, with a spoken introduction by the tenor]

3


instrumentation Piccolo Alto Flute Oboe English Horn Bass Clarinet Contrabass Clarinet Soprano Saxophone Bass Saxophone Bassoon Contrabassoon Four Horns in F Two Trumpets in C Tenor Trombone Bass Trombone Tuba Percussion I: snare drum, length of chain and sheet of metal against which to drag it, crotales, two graduated conga drums, Percussion II (Timpani): 32-30 inches, 29-28 inches Percussion III: symphonic bass drum, large suspended china cymbal, Percussion IV: thundersheet, large brake drum, glockespiel, tam tam, suspended crash cymbal Piano I: brick or similar object with which to hold pedal down, stick of beater or hard plectrum, two 4-ft long 1&1/2-in thick dowling rods Piano II: stick of beater or hard plectrum, two 2-ft long 1&1/2-in thick dowling rods, gloves or mittens Accordion Tenor (spoken only) Boy Soprano Bass Mezzo-Soprano Cello Concertante Violin I Solo Violins I Violin II Solo Violins II Viola Solo Violas Cello Solo Cellos Contrabass Solo Contrabasses: sul III should be tuned down to an open G

4


Piccolo

Contrabassoon

I & II Horns in F III & IV

I

Tenor Trombone

Bass Trombone

Tuba

Percussion I

Percussion III

Percussion IV

Electric Guitar

Accordion

Jonathan (Bass)

Tamara's Double (Mezzo-Soprano)

Cello Concertante

3 4

c

&

3 4

c

?

3 4

c

?

3 4

c

&

3 4

c

?

3 4

c

?

3 4

c

?

3 4

c

?

3 4

?

43

&

34

ä± (pitch) air c ±J ‰ Œ Ó Í air ä ± (pitch) c ‰ Œ Ó ± J Í c ∑

&

34

c

?

?

± ± ± c ± ‰ Œ 43 J ∏ F f poss

?

34

ã

&

32-30" Timpani (remains fixed) 29-28" Timpani (gliss down throughout)

?

34 ± ± ± c ±J ‰ Œ ∏ F f poss

4 3 4

3 4

Bass Drum

ã

ã

?

t

with Large Bass Drum Beaters

Large Brake Drum

∑ (hold pedal down sempre with a brick or similar object, resonating even into the next movement)

?

3 4

3 4

3 4

(senza sordina)

∑ ∑

c

c

±

±

±-

±

‰ ± ± ± ±- ±

‰ ± ±- ±

Ó

Ó

Ó ˙ ˙ Ø poss

Ó

3

˙

wæ w æ

wæ˙ .. æ Ó

wæ w >æ

Kœ J >æ

Œ ‰ œ

Heartbeat

π sub

œ Œ Ó

wæ w æ

wæ˙ . æ

jœ æ

wæœ . j œ œ æ æ>J æ Œ ‰ œ ‰ π

y æ

π sub +w ◊

¿ ¿- ¿ ¿

¿

¿

·œ

o ·œ ·œ œ· ¤ ˙-

¿ ¿ ¿- ¿

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿-

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿

w

3 o ˙ w-

¿- ¿ ¿ ¿ o œ- w J

π

œ

˙ ‰

P

j Œ œ >

o œ

· J ∏

wæ˙ æ

Ó

y y æ æ

y æ p

œ bœ œ æ æ æ

wæ˙ æ

y æ π

y æ

¿ ¿-

3o œ œJ

o œ ˙-

ord

Œ Ó

Ó

Œ ‰ ∑

· J π

Œ

 o

· J p

Œ

‰ ∑

o œ

· J π

∑ Solo like glass

Œ

(boy soprano and bass should be singing the same vowel sempre)

o œ- w

π

o œ ˙-

st

œ œ. J

3

43

c

¿

¿

¿

ord

sp

¿

˙.

c

Ó

3

ord bow

·œ ∏

˙

o µ -œ ..

F

j œ >

o œ- ˙ R

∑ ast 3

w

˙

œ bœ

˙

˙

œ œ

ord vib

o b -œ œ œ J

st

ord

œ. œ

sp

y y y æ æ æ

·œ

˙

˙.

œ

P

o œ ˙-

o œ œ- ˙ . sp

ord

bow on the mute; focus on "wolf tone"; jagged, raw, unstable, quasi-liberamente

Œ

¿

¿ ¿ ¿

sp

¿ ¿ ¿ Ø poss oo œ œ ˙ œ-

˙

ord

o j nœ

senza vib st distant, ethereal

‰ # ·œ ·œ π

34

c

34

c

43

Ó

y y y æ æ æ

J˙ æ

√-o ·œ b œJ J p st o œ œ-

·œ

ast

y æ

j Ó Œ ‰ bœ ˙ âAaa... F deep, grainy, rich, a bit noisy 3 Ó Œ ‰ b œj œ b˙ âAaa... F ∑

b ·&b œ æ P oj œ ˙o

pure, transparent, ethereal

clt (senza vib) asp

wæ˙ æ

œ.

¤ ·œ. œo œ

~

Ó

(boy soprano and bass should be singing the same vowel sempre)

¿ ¿-

y y y æ æ æ F ∏ sub

gliss across strings in harp

sp

y æ

¿

y æ

¿

œ p

¿

Ó

y æ

œ b œ œ wæ w æ æ æ æ > ∏ sub ≈P œ >œ

o œ

Ó ∑

œ æ

œ œ œ æ æ æJ ‰ Œ P ∏ π ∑

ast

˙ ..

œ-

π

Ó

These three instruments begin together as a single sound, somwhere between the throat singing of one man, and the growls and cries of some lost animal.

ord vib

∏ sub Œ ‰ ~ œ

gliss across strings in harp

ord

‰ œ ◊+

Œ

∑ œ

y y æ æ

while striking key (lower note), touch string in harp to produce upper pitch(es) as harmonics; presaging the piano as drum

Ó

œ

P

(stopped)

Œ

œ œ œ œ µ œ- œ œ ˙ ∏ P π sub 3

œ Œ Ø

y æ

Ó

π

y y y y æ æ æ æ p ∏ sub

Œ

wæ w æ

p

œ æ

‰œ œ ˙ ∏ P

3 œ œ ä˙

œ æ > œ

‰ µœ ˙ Ø poss

œ

l.v. sempre

Ó

‰ œ

∑ Ó

∑ subterranean

subterranean

Ó

(stopped)

Œ

œ #œ p P

3

B

±

34

con sordina

±-

con sordina

±

II

±

B

±- ±

I

B

ord vib

Viola Solo

&

bow on the bridge (sul I); clt; preferably without any pitch at all; noisy, unstable; a voice lost in the wilderness

¿¿ c ∏ (senza vib) -· ·œ œ c ∏

c

c

c

II

·œ

sp b ··œ œ· b œ Œ P π sub

c

3 4

c

3 4

c

3 4

u

3 4

3 4

c

34

c

con sordina

con sordina

N.B. - In this movement only, the Cello Solo is not the same as the Cello Concertante.

con sordina

con sordina

con sordina

con sordina

N.B. - In this movement, for Contrabasses I and II (div), the 3rd string should be tuned down to an open G. If this is not possible, please ignore the sul III drone when it is present. con sordina

?

34

c

Ó

c

Ó

c

± ±

con sordina

?

Î c œr ≈ ‰ Œ + > ° sempre

œ œ- Ó

y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ π æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ π ∏ π æ∏ π Ø ∏ ∏ p π Ø π prepare for Glock. Œ Ó ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

° sempre

±

34

con sordina

?

43

‰ ≈ ±- ± Ø

&

?

I

?

3 4

3 4

con sordina

?

c

&

Violins II (div.)

c

stopped

Violin II Solo

II

34

3 4

&

Contrabasses (div.)

34

is my ve - ry great plea-sure to wel-come you to...

II

I

(choke, by keeping beater

(with volume knob)

(interrupted by the drum, he calmly exits the stage)

con sordina

Violins I (div.)

c ˘y Ï

∑ senza vib air

¿ ‰ Œ æ Ø poss

Œ

∑ ∏

p

(unstable, fluctuating, quasi-liberamente, sempre)

con sordina

Contrabass Solo

(l.v...)

÷ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ 34

&

c >œ

poss (Everything is born from the drum)

j œ

œ

œ nœ œ

shake with hand a kind of solo

?

c æ ww Øæ

‰ œ œ ˙

Ø poss

Crotales (Bowed)

3 4± ± ± c ± ±Œ Ø poss ƒ ¤> œ (ord) c R ≈‰ Œ 43 ∑ Î

&

II

3> 4 ˙. Î

interrupting

3 4

I

I

with Beaters

œ ˜ œ- œ

Ó

c ¿ ¿¿ æJ ∏æ p æ

œ

∑ Ó

‰Œ œ Ø poss ∑

3

±æ ± ± œ œ œ ˙ µ œ- œ œ π∏ p ∏ ∑ ∑

Solo a distant undertow of breath

drag chain across floor or any lower range metal instrument; quasi-liberamente 3

Chain

,

to Crotales, with Bow; also prepare for Cymbal with Beater

Œ

c

3 4

&

c œ fl Î

feedback

(hold pedal down sempre with a brick or similar object; remove it on the bownbeat of mm 79)

con sordina

Cellos (div.)

3 4

Ó

with Hard Mallet or Beater or Hammer depressed after strike)

with distortion on sempre

&

c Ó

Snare

with Snare Stick (dead)

ca.

3 Thundersheet c y 4 ∑ Ø possæ

&

q» ª™ 3

(Tremelo betweeen the two timpani, glissing the lower timpani down almost continuously throughout the movement; sixth-tone accidentals are merely approximate guideposts.)

ã

(pitch)

air

ord vib pitch

∑ (pitch)

air

&

Cello Solo

Solo senza vib air

Violin I Solo

Violas (div.)

∑ ∑

Lad- ies and gen - tle- men, it

Jonathan's Double (Boy Soprano)

∑ ∑

Speaking to the audience; freely

Fate (Speaking Tenor)

∑ ∑

& Piano II

∑ ∑

& Piano I

∑ ∑

÷ Percussion II: Timpani

∑ ∑

Trumpets in C II

c c

English Horn

Bassoon

4

&

Bass Saxophone

A Voice, An Animal, And An Inflorescencing Machine q»ca. ª™ 3

34

Oboe

Soprano Saxophone

(Opening Music)

cello, boy soprano, bass, mezzo-soprano, and orchestra, with a spoken introduction by the tenor

&

Contrabass Clarinet

U

&

Alto Flute

Bass Clarinet

I. Sandman

c

Solo

senza vib (strings III and IV sempre: gliss continuously down the C string throughout the movement, ml while also continuing to play the open G string "drone" (until mm. 77); sixth-tone accidentals are merely approximate guideposts.) sp (naturally, vib indications ord vib

c

refer only to the stopped string)

nw â ∏

w

n w-

Kn ˙

˙

5

Kn w â

w

l n w- w π

ww ∑

l w-w

# ww ∑

# w-w

ww ∑

o n œ. ‰ p

Œ


Solo senza vib air

±-

15

Picc.

Picc. Vox.

A. Fl.

Bs. Cl.

Bs. Sx.

±

& Ø poss

±

Tnr. Tbn.

Tuba

Perc. I

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

Perc. IV

E. Gtr.

Pno. II

&

?

∑ ,

pitch

?

±

±

œ

the slow breathing heartbeat

6:4

œ ∏

?

senza vib

I

œ

? æ ww æ ã Œ ã y æ &

Œ

y y y æ æ P π sub

wæ w æ

y æ

y æ p

y æ

y æ ∏

&

& œ ?

(√)

&

œ œ

Œ j œ

p

j œ p obœ

3

Ó

Ó

o œ-

π

œ

¿-

¿

¿

¿

& ¿

-¿ F

¿

¿

(¤)(ord) o w& π

œ

&

œ

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

B

y æ

y æ

∑ œ

B

Cb. Solo

Cbs. II

? ?

(ml) ord

L wâw

œ

œ

œ

œ â

œ

œ

œ

P

˙ æ

y æ

bow on the bridge

¿3

¿

y πæ sub

gg œ gg gg gg ggg gg gg gg œ g>

y æ

j œ >

(stopped)

ä¿

±

3

Œ

gg œ gg gg ggg gg gg gg ggg œ >

f

œ.

± Ø

¿

¿

f

j ± F

Œ

æ k ˙˙ .... æ

o ˙- .

œ

j œæœ æJ

π sub œ+

Œ

y æ

y æ

±

±

±

±

±

∑ Œ

(stopped)

∑ Œ

œ+

P

Œ

œ+ ◊

&

~

Œ

∑ ∑ ∑

w

(harmonic glisses, sul II only) (senza vib) clt

?

Œ

‰ ¿ Ø poss

Œ ¿ F æ

Ø

¿ ≈ ‰ Ø poss

3

Ó

≈ ¿ ¿ f >

sub bow on the mute; focus on "wolf tone"; jagged, raw, unstable, quasi-liberamente

Œ

¿ Ø poss

3 ä ¿ ¿ J p

L œ-œ .. p

· µ· J Ø poss

‰ ¿

¿ p

> ¿ f

j œœ J

asp

¿

¿-

π sub ˙˙

F

ä ¿

¿

≈ ¿ ‰ p

¿ π

¿ J Œ ¿

≈ ¿ ¿ æ æ P

k ww P Œ

6

Ø poss

¿

¿ p

· ·

·

~

·

Œ

P

flautando on tailpiece

ŠΠ3

¿

¿

~

p

ä ¿

bow on string behind tailpiece

sub bow on these strings behind the bridge; op; a brief incision

bow on the tailpiece groaning, unstable

ä ¿

¿

3

¤3 ·œ-

3

¿ ∏

> ¿

f

Œ

ä ¿ f

¿

¿

µ· · P

· F

¿ π

¿ ≈‰

Ø poss

·œ

œ

¿ Ó

œ+

,

œ

˙- .

±Ø poss

œ

±

œ J

œ

œ

F

wæœ æ

y æ

Ó

œ

y æ

Œ

‰ œØ poss

y æ

Ó

f j Ó œ >

Œ

±∏

Ó

n˙. æ

œ

,

Œ

œ.

π sub

F

œ

±

Ó

3

Ó

6:4

œ â π

Solo air

y æ

y æ

¿ p

œ œ fâ ä ‰ œ· œ·

œ √o œ

II

Œ

·œ

œ·

œ J

~

~ #·

#· ·

o ˙- ..

·

&

¿

j œ œ.

π

µ·

√¨ ~ n·

µ·

·

∏  

clb; higest range on sul I & II together, alternating at will; quasi-liberamente, like rain

Œ

clb; higest range on sul I & II together, alternating at will; quasi-liberamente, like rain

Ó ¿ Ó

·œ

·œ

√ ¨ ~ n·

· ¨·

Œ

  ‰ Ó

 

    π3

molto vib ord; III, highest pitch possible ~

 

œ -

œ â f

¨·

(highest harmonic possible)

Ø poss ¨· ‰

Ø poss

P p               3

3

 

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

‰ œ· Ø poss

Ó

Œ

Ó

B

Œ

Ó

B

  π

Ø poss

j œ J p

ord

≈ j. œ-· . œ· Ø      poss     F   

∑ k wâw p

o œ ˙- .

œ.

∏ ¨·

 

3

senza vib asp

œœ

Œ

ord vib ord (IV)

j œ œ µœ. P πp

IV

˙ ∏

F

¨·

œ

senza vib sp

Œ

o œ

œ

œ. œ œ œ œ ooooo oooo oo oooooooooo œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- -œ œ- œ- -œ

ß

˙

oj œ

œ.

III

·œ

˙

˙

f

(highest harmonic possible)

Ó Œ

œ â f

∑ œ

Ó

˙ P

œ

Œ

œ

&

op slow, groaning, grinding, gritty

œ Ø poss

·

Ó

bow on bridge (III); a gentle noise-floor

¿ Ø poss

· Ó

ä ¿

œ

œ œ œ oooooooooo oooooo oo oooo œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- -œ -œ

ord

bow on the bridge (IV); distant noise, unstable, whispering

· ~µ· J ~µ · Ø poss       ¨· harmonics; ord; I         quasi-liberamente     ≈ ~· ≈ ® ® ®≈ ‰

Œ

∑ Œ

ast

F

œ.

Œ

± p

p

Œ

œ+

Œ

Œ

œ

≈ –. Ø to Flute

j œ

,

œ

gliss across strings in harp

(harmonic glisses, sul I only) (senza vib) clt ~

Ó

touch-tritone harmonic; molto vib (messy) asp

œ

œ

Hum a shadow

œ.

ord vib

Œ

±

Œ

œ

Œ

bow on the mute; focus on "wolf tone"; jagged, raw, unstable, quasi-liberamente

Œ

œ

6:4

y y y æ æ æ f Ø sub

y æ

o ˙-

Ó ..

œ-

œ ∏

Ó ..

Ó

π

emerging from the voices

œ k œ ˙æ˙ ‰ J F > πæ sub

y æ

p

œ

œæœ æ

y æ ∏

Ó

˙ ∑

œ

π

Ó

P

Ó

P

œ œ

Œ

¿

œ â

n˙. πâ

Ó

¿

œ

˙

Crotales (Bowed)

(bow on string behind the bridge) as close as possible to tailpiece near bridge

¿

œ

Ó

Ó

molto vib (feedback) V

¿-

œ

Ó

y æ F

œ

j Ͼ

kœ æJ ‰ >œ

‰ g œj g ◊ gggg f sub gggg ‰ gggg gg gg œ ◊>

Œ

~

œ

,

¿ π

p

ww ∑

œ

6:4

Œ

Ó

?

,

˙

¿

Vcs.

II

,

Ó

œ

¿

6:4

œ π

¿-

?

˙

Œ

gliss across strings in harp

œ

Solo breathy

Ó ∑

oooooo oooo oooooo oooooo œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- -œ -œ œ-

N.B. - In passages such as this, it is understood that the sounds that will be produced by different players among the various groups will not be at all identical. This "chaotic" aspect is not to be avoided, and is in fact a desired component of the overall effect.

?

œ œ ∏ Ó

˙

Ó

?

oooooooooooooooo ooooo ooooooooooo oo oooo oo oo œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ œ- -œ -œ œ- -œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- -œ œ- -œ œ- œ-

B

œ

˙æœ... æ ‰

œ.

˜˙

3

Vlns. II II

˙

œ

o b œ-

asp/op

op

asp

&

ϯ

ord vib

ord vib

w

pitch

senza vib

(¤) -o -o o- o- -o -o -o o- -o -o -o o- -o o- -o -o -o -o -o -o -o œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ & & Ø poss

w∏

j Ó # +œ

, œ â

with the stick of a beater or hard plectrum of some kind, strum approximately these strings up and down in the harp (size and shape of frame will determine how many strings will be comfortably available); almost scraping, somewhat violently and raw (final note should occur on the beat)

p

±

?

œ+

œ

y æ

π

±

a kind of solo

Œ

&

?

±-

œ Ó J p

3

±

b ˙- .

&

±

Œ

ml

Vln. II Solo

œ

bow on the bridge (sul I); preferably without any pitch at all; noisy, unstable

II

œ

?

asp Heartbeat

I

œ

& ord bow

Vlns. I

Œ

œ â π

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

œ

,

6:4

b˙ . â Ø poss ?

(stopped)

B

±-

t

Boy Sop.

±

15

Pno. I

±

(voice is notated at actual pitch, but may be transposed down an octave if necessary)

&

senza vib

C. Bsn.

±-

˙ P

˙˙ ..

ord

senza vib (III) (IV)

œœ œ P


œ

21

Picc.

Picc. Vox.

Bs. Cl.

Bs. Sx.

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

Hn. I & II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

Perc. I

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

&

≈≈

nœ œ

& – ≈ ≈ n– – π ∏ ? ? ?

‰ Œ œ Ø poss

œ f

≈ Œ Ø poss

–. p Œ

Ó

senza vib

±Œ

˙ ..

±

±

ϯ poss

˙.

& ?æ ww æ ã

j œp

,

senza vib

wØ poss

Πtogether, as one long breath; clear, interruptive, yet somehow distant

,

,

œ ∏

±

œ

œ-

˙ P

(gliss continuously down; sixth-tone inflections are only approximate guideposts)

œ

wæw æ

with Beater

Œ

ã y æ p ?

y æ

Pno. I

Pno. II

Boy Sop.

B

Vln. I Solo

I

Vln. II Solo

I

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

y æ

&

?

&˙ ?

˙

œ

&

y æ

œ p œ

π

Œ

Œ

III

Œ

œ·

(stopped)

œ·

-o ˙

˙

p

& &

(¤) ˙ .. &

&

& B

B

?

?

œ

? ? ? ?

œp

‰ Ó œ≈ Ø poss

Œ

F

Ó

¿ F

j ‰ œœ > P

·œ œ

ord vib ord

P3

Ø

flautando

˙-˙ Ø

¿

¿

3

&

ä ¿

¿

3

&

¿ Ø

Œ

Ó

ord

˙˙ .. π

3

3

3

Œ

·œ

F

Œ

Ó

¿ π ·œ

> ¿

ä ¿

3

P asp (I) ‰ ·

Ø poss

≈ ¿. π

· ¿

˙-˙ ∑

3

Œ

3

3

Ó

˙-˙ P

n w-w p œœ π

¿ æ

¿ π ·

¿ Ó Ø poss

ord

3

æ P >¿ ä ä ¿ ¿ ¿ P ·œ ¨· ≈ >Å . ∏ Å> Å. Å

∏ ¿ ¿

(gliss harmonic up)

>Å Å f sub

> ¿ æ F ·

3

ä ¿ f

¿ >

¿

senza sordina

Å >Å äÅ ÅÅ Å ® Œ æ ƒ f ¿ ‰ Œ Ø poss ·       ≈ Œ p 6:4 π

approaching flies

bow on these strings behind the bridge; biting

&

(senza vib) ast I

b -·

p

≈¿ ¿ ≈ Œ ¿ F >

molto vib

3

F

bow on strings behind bridge; noisy, pure, incising

œ J

Kw â π

j w-

˙æ˙ .... æ ∏ sub

¿

Œ

op

æ ¿ ¿

(senza vib) ast

Œ

Ó

· ·

molto vib messy

3

Œ

Œ

y æ

sim...

gg œ gg gg gg g ‰ gggg gg gg œ g>

Œ

op

P ¤ sp œ æ π

 3 æ

Œ ∑

5:4

f

Œ Œ

· b·

·. ·. P

Kw-w p

Ó

  æ

P

Œ

o ˙-

F o w-· J

3

ƒ ¨

Å Å

  

o >o œ- œ-

o >o œ- œ-

f

    ‰.

p> Å Å

-· -· -· -· -· -· -· -· -·

 

 

>     

π Å Å

sp

Œ

6:4

III

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ F â

¿ ∏

Œ

(sim)

œ

œ >

œ

nœ > Ø

œ > Œ

œ

œ > ∏ œ >

œ

œ > ‰

(I) sp ~

(ambitus of glissando pulls apart)

œ >·      

p >Å Å

B

(off the board, messy)

op

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿- ¿- ¿ ¿ π F fl

IV 6:4

gliss between all notes

π

µ œœ â ƒ

œœ

œ

œ >

œ >

3

≈ ¿. F

¿ Œ J P

3

ƒ

6:4

bow on string behind the bridge

¿ f

  ‰ >Å Å

π

 

3

     ≈≈  ≈     

6:4

ww

(bartok pizz) more drums

Å Å

bow on these strings behind the bridge; like voluminous whispering

¿ ¿ pâ

disappearing off the string

-· -· -·

(sim)

(generally parallel glissandi)

¨ J Œ Ø poss

3

#·         Í

(III, highest pitch possible)

p

o >o o >o œ- œ- œ œ- œ-

harmonics, IV; quasi-liberamente

-· -· -· -·

?

œœ

œ >

Ó

(gliss up and off sul IV, while holding sul III)

ƒ

œ

‰           ≈              ≈  ≈Œ 6:4 p F ∏

# œœ â f sub

œ >

o >o o >o œ- œ- œ œ- œ-

6:4

asp/op; ugly, gritty, building...

œ œ > Ø poss

Ó

˙

II

vib · ord · Œ Ø poss

pizz (IV) like drumming

ƒ

ggg œ gg gg gg gg ggg gg œ gg >

>            ® >     

f poss >Å Å

œ >

ord vib ord

>        ≈

y æ

Ó

Œ

Œ

y æ

f

o >o œ- œ-

o >o œ- œœ

senza vib ord

œœ ƒ

o >o o >o œ- œ- œ œ- œ-

y æ

gg œ gg gg gg gg gg gg ggg œ g>

o œ-

harmonics sempre; gliss between all notes; quasi-liberamente; cascading (sim)

I II

gg œ gg gg gg gg ggg gg gg œ g

p ≈ œ œ

π ¤(I) -· -· -· -· -· -· -· -·

f poss >Å Å

y æ

Œ œœ œœ ..

7

≈  ≈          ‰.     ≈     Œ 6:4 6:4 6:4 π P ∏

y æ

3 p sub

> ≈ ¿ ‰ F

Ó

y æ

w

>Å Å> Å Å ‰ æ F3

Œ

·

gliss across strings in harp; growing increasingly rambunctious

o >o œ- œ-

o œ-

,

Ó

æ k ww æ

˙.

3

¿ π

K˙˙ ord

œ

ord vib

æ ¿ ¿ â F

Œ

j œÍ

Ó

P

Ó

jw

¤ ˙ ∏

œ

Ó

∑ ˙

molto vib

Ó

bow as close as possible to the fingers; op/asp; gritty, noisy, pure and incisive, like cutting something with a mirror

(bow on string behind the bridge)

œœ

molto vib asp

œ

F sub

3

ä Œ ¿ F ·œ œ ·œ œ

poss Solo; harmonics sempre; gliss between all notes under slurs; collapsing, quasi-liberamente

ord bow

n w-w F

(sim)

p

Œ

œ+

bow on the mute; focus on "wolf tone"; jagged, raw, unstable, quasi-liberamente

·œ

f

Œ

˙ ˙ o >o o >o o >o o >o œ- œ- œ- œ- œ œ- œ- œ- œ-

œ.

F œ+ ≈ œ . +

3

˙

f

˙ o >o œ- œ-

œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo œo äœo

œ J Ó

bow on the mute; focus on "wolf tone"; jagged, raw, unstable, quasi-liberamente

asp/op

˙

œ·

senza vib sp

Œ

P

&

äo n˙

˙

∑ œ

wj œ J

j wØ poss

˙

‰ ≈

w â

j œæœ æJ F

˙-

Œ

j wØ

‰ ≈ œ ≈ œ. F

Πrelinquish Glock Beater, pick up 1 Tam Tam Beater, prepare to pick up second Beater

-o b˙ .

œ

senza vib

,

r œæœ ˙æ˙ æR æ

œæœ .... æ

˙.

œ-

Œ

˙+ .

oœ J

œ-

œ œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙. (¤) o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ∑

Œ

˙œ

≈ ‰

f poss

F

Œ

3

œ

y y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ F ƒ f scratch fingernail up and down sting coiling, unstable ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ j ~g œ n˙. ˙ œ œ gg gg ◊∏ g p P f sub gggg gg ∑ ∑ gg gg ~ gg œ ◊> ∑ ∑

√-o ˙

Ó

y æ f

∑ œ p

?

Vcs.

II

y æ

?

Vlns. II II

y æ

Vlns. I II

y æ

(√) oœ & Vc. Ctrtnte.

y æ

˙- . ˙ Œ F

ord vib

œ.

flautando

Glockenspiel

Ó

wæœ K ˙ .. æJ ∏ æ

w

π

Ó

Ó

œ π

Crotales (Bowed)

Ó

Œ

œ

˙

3

Perc. IV

21

˙- . œ

œ-

±

˙

œ

˙

∑ ±-

ord vib

œ π

˙- .

œ P

pitch

œ

˙ ∏

Œ

&

œ.

˙

3

˙- . ,

n˙.

senza vib

Œ

– ≈ ‰ ˜– Ø poss

∑ Œ

±

Ø poss

,

˜œ

3

π

≈– – – ∏ π

∑ ±

˙

µœ

Ó

?Ó ?

˙- .

?

œ œ.

œ.

˜ – –.

˙-

?

?

˜œ J

œ œ >

f

œœ

œœ π

œ >

œ

œ >


27

Picc.

&

œ

œ œ.

œ

ord vib

œ

˙- ..

œ

œ

‰ ‰

Fl.

&

Ob.

&

E. Hn.

&

?

?

&

?

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

Sop. Sx.

Bs. Sx.

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

Hn. I & II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

Perc. I

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

Perc. IV

?

w∏

? ?

Œ ∑

? j ˙-

? j w?

ã y æ

y æ

y æ

Boy Sop.

B

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

I Vlns. II II

I Vlas.

y æ

?Œ (◊)

≈ œ‰ gg gg g ƒ ggg gg ≈ gggg ‰ gg gg œ

&

y æ

&

?

(√) ˙ &

œ

?

(¤) > o o œ- œ&∏ molto-vib asp · œ & p

>o >o o >o œ- œ- œ œ- œ- œ- œ-

·œ

ä· . œ.

Ø poss œ œ. ‰

(¤)o œ& f (¤) · &

·

molto vib

asp

&Π&

-I ≈ #·.

P        ~·        ‰

B

ƒ

3

 

F

·œ

¤oœ

·œ

·œ

· · Œ

j ¿ ƒ

3

bow on string behind the bridge

‰.

≈ ¿. f

¿

¿ >

I

Vcs.

≈ œ. fâ ord

˙

? ˘¿ ƒ

6:4

≈ . ¿ f

¿

6:4

¿ >

? k ww â f ? œ > π

≈ œ. fâ

ord vib

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

˙

sub

œ

œ > œ

œ œ > œ >

Ó

y æ

y æ

y æ

y æ

?

æ    æ

æ     æ

æ    æ

Œ

Ó

3

äœo

äo ˙

˙

Ó

·

¿

¿

¿ >

f

¿

Ï

·

·

¿

¿ â

¿

¿

3

˙ œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙ â â â 6:4                                           sp                                 6:4

6:4

¿ > œ

6:4

¿ œ â

œ >

Œ

(continue to articulate gliss...)

6:4

¿

¿ >

¿

˙

¿

˙ â

œ œ >

œ œ >

œ œ >

œ >

œ >

œ >

œ >

Œ

œ >

µ äœ

œ

œ

π > œ ‰

œ

P ,

j œ

œ >œ

œ

 

 

·

·

¿ > œ

˙. ƒâ

 

  3

¿ >

3 4 asp/op

 

  3

Ó

œ ‰

> œ ‰

œ >

8

œ >

œ > ‰

·3 œ 4 ∏ sub

3 4 ¿ â

œ œ >

Œ œ > Œ

ord vib ord

Œ

ƒ ‰

œ

œ >

&

∑ >y Œ y Œ J F #· · #· · · · · · · · ‰ # # ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· P ‰

IV V VI

3

(touch strings on given harmonics)

˙. œ

y · ·· ·· · ·· ·· · ·· ·· 3

bœ nœ bœ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

œ

œ

œ >

˙.

ord vib ord

Œ

ord vib ord

Œ

äœ

Ï

·œ

ord vib ord

·œ &

œ.

&

3 4 ˙˙ . . Pâ sub 3 4 œ œ œ > fl f ƒ 3 4 œ œ > fl f

Ø sub

ä ‰ bœ

œ

3

, äo œ

B

B

œ

o œ-

3

˙- . œ

·

·œ

·œ

·

·

·

·

·

·

Ø sub

II

∏ sub

Œ Œ

arco

I

Ø sub # ·# ·-

F œ

f n· f

œ

Ó

œ

o b œ-

asp/op

œ

Ó

Ó

Ó

·

· J

Ó

· J

Ó

f

# ä· .

≈ ƒ sub œ . 3

Œ

¤o˙

f ·

· J

f ·œ

(II) sp/op (III) luminescent, an incisive cloud, glimmering

˙˙ -

Ó

· J

(II) luminescent, an incisive cloud, but a bit more distant than the other (III)

œœ

˙.

·

Ó

p · J

p · J

f ·

(II) (III)

o ˙- .

·

(II) senza vib (III) ord

arco

·

∏ sub II ·

senza vib ord

·

·

ord vib ord

·

·

‰ ‰

·

· I

ord vib ord

Ó

œ fl

∏ sub II b ·

¿ fl

¿.

b I·

ord

œ

bœ nœ bœ

growing progressively noisy, unstable, and insane

·

3 4 œ œ

j gg œ gg gg gg gg gg gg ggg œ g>

œ

>œo 3 J ‰ 4 f -o 3 ˙. 4 ~·

3 4 · > ƒ

¿

to China Cymbal

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ â â â â œk œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3 4 œ >

 

œ

3 4 ¿

¿

¿

asp

5:4

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ > > > > > > P > œ Kœ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ‰

œ

5:4

3

p œ 3 J 4

3 4 &

 

˙. â ƒ

f

(harmonic).....depress finger.....ord

Solo ml senza vib sp

5:4

œ œ œ œœ > >

œ

œ ƒ

œ-

∑ palpitations 5:4

œ

3

œ-

Œ

3

œ Kœ ‰

œ

œ bœ ~b œ œ œ > > ◊> ~ ¤œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ >œ œ œ ®≈

3 4 fR ≈ ‰

·

asp

¿ ƒ

œ â äo œ

¿

 

~

3 barely audibly laughter as well 4~ œ g œ œ g gg œ gg ◊gggg gggg gggg gg ƒ ggg ggg ggg gg ggg 3 g gg g 4gggg gggg gggg gg ggg œ ggg œ gggg œ gggg œ g g g ◊ ä> > > g > œ 43 œ ‰ Ó

3 4

œ ‰ Œ Ø poss

Large Brake Drum with Hammers abrupt, puncturing, deep hammering

3 4 ˙ äo œ 3 4 ƒ

molto vib

¿ â ƒ

~b œ ◊ ƒ

œ-

˙

œ

,

˙.

œ-

p

n ˙-

˙ ƒâ

f

 

Œ

œ

œ

ä œ

äo . ˙

n w˙

œ >

˙

F Ó

3 4 Œ

o œ-

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > > > > P F ‰

˙-

(let fall to natural out-of-tune 7th)

Solo the insurrectionist pulse

3 4 ˙

o ˙- .

œ

k ww-

,

Œ

f sub

∑ ¿

ä ˙

ƒ

∑ ¿

o œ

> œ ‰

little stratospheric (ord) bells

o w-

√   ‰ · Ø poss · #·

with Hands

?

w

œ

harmonics gliss sempre; asp; liberamente (IV) (articulate gliss)

Œ

Conga-like Drums

3 4 Œ

œæ œ æ

w

f

3 4

o ˙- .

Ó

3 4 Œ

œ

drumming, barbaric (two-handed clusters - one hand all white notes, one hand all black notes, within the given range)

Ó

Œ

œ

œæ œ æ

f

Œ

with Tam Tam Beaters

œ.

Tam Tam

strum all notes within approximate range with the stick of a beater or hard plectrum; with lh, while keeping rh on the keyboard

o n œJ

œ

œ >

3 > 4 œ œ > P 3 4 >œ

ƒ

Œ

Î poss æ œæ     œ æ æ

¿ â

œ p>

Œ

?

ä b ˙o

(l.v...)

3 4k ˙ . â p 3 4 œ

Œ

Ø poss œ fl f

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ ∑

3 >y Œ Ó ∑ 4 y æ p poss f ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3 r 3 ‰ ≈ œ ˙ ˙ œ ≈‰ 4 ˙. π F

3

¿

y

Ï

Ó

≈ ¿.

6:4

y æ

œ

œ

‰ ..

3 4 . ˙ â p sub 3 4 . ˙ π â Solo I + rabrupt 3 œ but distantb œ 4 R≈ ‰ p

release Thundersheet and pick up second Beater

P æ b œ  æ ◊

o w-

·

y æ

œ π

3 4 œ fl p 3 Ó 4

Œ

Ó

œ

˙ â

œ œ > ‰

Œ

,

> > ‰ œ œ œ œœæ.. ‰ ‰ æ 3 F π sub ‰ ≈ œ Œ ‰ œ

æ ˙˙ .. æ

ww œ

œ

œ-

o ˙-

¿

asp/op; sul III & IV together; molto vib (sul III, of course); grinding, edgy, wailing

II

æ ww æ

Œ

3

3 4 œ P œ3 4 F 3 4 œ

œ

œ fl f

˙œ

œ-

Ó

3

&                                   ∏ 6:4

Œ

œ > f

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o ooo œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- k œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ- œ

·

flautando on tailpiece

Ó

P sub

·

‰ Œ

œ Ø poss

3

¤ä ˙o

Œ

3

o w-

n wf

b ˙+ .

˙+

˙

Ó

œ-

˙

ƒ

f

˙

>o k œ-

o œ-

˙

˙ ˙œ

3

b ˙+ ◊

˙

o >o œ- œ-

molto vib asp

o ˙-

3

Ó

˙-

?

Ó

Jw â

œ pfl

3 4

≈ ‰

Ó

Solo scratch pick up and down sting coiling

F

,

˙œ

œ-

œ

Heartbeat

≈ ‰

y æ

(stopped)

œ œæ œæ F

œ

&

6:4

Vc. Solo

y æ

Ó

nœ æJ

strum across strings in harp; expand ambitus of strings strummed as indicated; quasi-liberamente

asp/op; sul III & IV together; molto vib (sul III, of course); grinding, edgy, wailing

II

y æ

Ó

t

Snare

asp

Vla. Solo

æ ˙w.. æ

&

Acc.

(while maintining a smooth tone)

Ó

&

œ,

b wØ poss

≈ œ.

(◊)

Pno. II

˙œ

œ-

œ

Œ

Œ

w˙œ

j w-

?æ ww æ p ã Œ

f

Œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈ 3 4 π sub F     >œ noisy                   ‰. 3 ∑ 4 R≈ ‰ Ó p poss f äœ œ 3 ∑ ‰ Œ ∑ 4 p poss F 3 ä ∑ œ ‰ Œ ∑ 4 œ p poss F

˙.

w â π

w

ã

˙- . ˙œ

F

27

Pno. I

sim, but a bit less distant

ã E. Gtr.

Ó

˙

˙. â

Ó

œ- œ

# ·-

sp/op

œ J F

·

œ

œ

œ J # ·-

·

œ f

œ

˙˙ K ˙˙ π sub

K ˙˙ π sub

·

P

· # ä·

· ·

ord vib cantabile

œ.

3

K œœ œœ f œœ f

œ


34

Picc.

Fl.

Bs. Cl.

Sop. Sx.

Bs. Sx.

&

äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

&

?

& Œ

b ˙-

?

œ äœ œ

C. Bsn.

Tpt. I

Tpt. II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

?

Œ

˙-

&

œ ∑

?

œ

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

Perc. IV

>œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ > > > > F 6:4 > > ? > œ Kœ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ‰

E. Gtr.

ã

ã

Large Suspended China Cymbal

≈ y >y

≈ >y .

6:4

?

(◊)

?

bœ œ >

œ

&

Boy Sop.

B

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

I Vlns. II II

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

?

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

Œ

K ˙- .

œ

Ó

—æ

,

æ —

3

æ —

—æ >

œ

˙- . œ

œ

œ

,

œ-

k˙ â

œ-

œ

≈ æ — —æ â ,

æ — â

æ —

b ˙-

cantabile

œ

œ

— >

≈ ‰

œ-

œ

œ

œ-

F

œ

œ

œ-

k œ-

—æ â

b >Ͼ

Ͼ >

æ œ >

3

œæ â

,

œ ‰

œ

3

æ œ œ. >

æ œ â

˙‰

b œ-

Ó

a drum; heavy, punctuating, bludgeoning

Ó

K ˙-

œ

Ó

ord vib

,

œ P

Ó

ord vib

œ

,

a drum; heavy, punctuating, bludgeoning

a drum; heavy, punctuating, bludgeoning

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > 7:4 f > > œ Kœ œ œ ‰ ‰ f with Soft Beaters >y y. J æ Ø f y ≈ y >y

y.

Œ

> œ jœ ‰

> œ jœ ‰

Œ

> œ ‰

Œ

(sim)

Œ

> œ

> œ ‰

> œ

> > œ jœ ‰

y y y æ æJ æ ∏ sub P

y æ

3

Œ

> œ ‰

y æ π

œ ‰ fl ƒ sub

Ó

> œ

> œ ‰

>y

y æ P >y

> œ

> > œ jœ ‰

to Bass Drum

ƒ

Ó

> œ ‰

> œ

> œ ‰

> œ

≈ œ

Bass Drum with Large Bass Drum Beaters

Œ

Ó

œ F

ƒ

> œ jœ ‰ Œ Œ

(sim)

> > œ bœ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

œ

Œ

> œ bœ ‰

y

Œ

Œ

y >y

œ

ƒ sub flœ

Ó

> œ ‰

ƒ sub ˘ œ ‰ ƒ sub

Snare with Snare Sticks

œ

˘ œ

K ˙-

Ó

œ

a drum; heavy, punctuating, bludgeoning

œ

Œ

∑ ‰

œ

‰ ..

∑ ‰

b ˙- . p sub

œ

b —æ â ƒ sub

b˙. â P

œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

— â

œ

œ

œ

,

˙

œ-

æ —. >

Œ

˙

Œ

œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

œ

œ äœ œ

Solo; Multiphonics: please choose a fairly full-band and noisy multiphonic for each given fundamental; screaming, unstable, grainy, insane, abrupt, aggressive

∑ — fl

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

to Contrabass Flute

p poss

œ

œp

·

—æ

œ

·

P

Œ

œp

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

œ

‰ ..

· -· .

F

? œ (√) œ &

¿-

œ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

, œ-

œ

◊3

œ

œ

˙

ä¿

b ˙-

¿

?

˙ œ œ œ (¤) ä ä ä ä ä ä - ä ä ä ä ä ä k œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œ œo œo œo œo œo k œo œo œo œo œo œo œo & P F sp · II n · ∑ & P sp n· II b · ∑ & P (¤) -o ˙. œ. & P F sp · I · ∑ & P sp · II · ∑ & P (¤) o o œ. œœ. œ-o œ œJ & F sp II · · ∑ & P ∑

? B B ? ? ?

·

ä·

œ

œ

·

œ ˙˙ ..

·

molto vib op

ord vib ord

molto vib op

ord vib ord

œœ P œœ P

I

Ó Ó

·

Ó

œ

> œ ‰

> œ

‰ Œ

to Crash Cymbal

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

F œ

œ

#œ Ø

(IV) (ord)

# ä· .

ä·

œ

·

asp/op; ugly, unstable

œ

ä · b· 3

œ œ J

K ˙˙ .. -

K ˙˙ .. ∏

K ˙˙ .. ∏

Œ

Í ·

I st

asp/op

œ J Í asp/op ·

F asp/op · F œ

Í asp/op ·

F ·

asp/op

F

j fœ ä· 3 ä· fl

œ

Œ

f

~

œ

˙- .

approaching mosquitos

ƒ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

,

senza vib ord

·

·

3

π sub

6:4

6:4

6:4

œ

œ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ > œ

bœ J ƒ

I

6:4

Î poss

œ

Œ

6:4

b œ-

˙. â

molto vib asp

·

6:4

6:4

6:4

·

F

œ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ > ¤> nœ

œ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

Œ

(ord)

,

œ

œ

˙.

œ

¿

¿

ä¿

¿

ä¿

¿

¿

¿

œ

œ >

œ

Ó

(stopped)

œ

œ

f , ˙-

œ

III

6:4

œ

bow on strings behind bridge emerging from the strings II

Œ

F

ƒ

6:4

˙

6:4

œ

œ

6:4

œ

œ

·

·

F p sub asp/op · Œ F

asp

œ J ·

ƒ 3 j œ œ > ä œ œ J f

Œ

6:4

Œ

ƒ

b +œ ◊>

¿

¿

¿

¿

II

¿

œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

·

sp

P

œ œ. Ï œ asp/op; ugly, unstable ä· ·- # ä· . œ œ. ƒ

œ-

ä¿

6:4

bow on string behind the bridge as close as possible to tailpiece near bridge

¿

6:4

...increasing threat and promise of the oncoming train...

ƒ j œ >

Î poss

&

6:4

P ‰ œ ~

Solo messy, rumbling, violent gliss across strings in harp

bow on the bridge

¿

6:4

œ J

3

6:4

œ

6:4

b œ& J

Vcs.

II

≈ y.

6:4

bœ nœ

bœ (◊) >

Pno. II

·

Œ

pale, ethereal senza vib

p

ƒ ƒ # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · >· · · ? # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· 34

Pno. I

·

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

5:4

ã

æ — > ƒ sub

pale, ethereal senza vib

Œ

,

œ P sub

˙- .

∑ 5:4

Perc. I

,

?

Œ

?

p poss

œ f ‰

˙

&

˙.

? Œ

·-

whistle tone distant, emerging from the bass saxophone

Solo; Multiphonics: please choose a fairly full-band and noisy multiphonic for each given fundamental; screaming, unstable, grainy, insane, abrupt, aggressive

Bsn.

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

œ

ä· œ Ï

·

·

·

ord

·

bow on string behind the bridge

f

bow on string behind the bridge

o ˙- .

œ

·

asp

sp

f o˙.

˙.

¿-

3

¿

¿

¿-

3

¿

¿

œ.

Ó

Ó

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

Heartbeat

3

Œ

Œ

o œ-

œ. Œ

senza vib sp a premonition

œ. # ·II

Ø poss

Œ

B

Œ

&

o œ- œ J

b œo .

œœ op

œœ P op

œœ P

F ·

K ˙˙ -

ord

K ˙˙ p-

ord

K ˙˙ p-

œo

f â¿

œ

# ·-

· ∑

œ

#· p

sp 3

  J

#·              3

Œ

Œ

˙˙ op

ord

op

ord

œœ œœ F P

œœ œœ F P

9

œœ œœ

Œ

ord

ƒ #·

ä·

o b œ-

Œ

¿ œ

¿ â f

¿

·

·

Œ

3

¿-

¿·

¿

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ J

œ

3

3

3

3

Œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

senza vib III ord

F ·-

III senza vib ord

p sub

Solo sp senza vib

·

b ·œ ∏ sub ·

‰ ·

·.

œ

œ

œ

œ.

œ œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œœ

j ˙˙ -

j ˙˙ ∏

œœ ∑

œœ π

·

p sub

·

j ˙˙ j ˙˙ -

3

œ

P

·

·

œ ·-

Œ

·-

·

œ œ ä· ·

·

o œ-

·œ

· ·

3

·œ

·-

j ˙˙ .. -

3

Œ

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

¿

œ.

ƒ œ

ord

-¿

ä· ·

œ œ J3 ä · b·

o ˙-

·.

œ

˙˙ ..

¿

ä · b· 3

œ ·

ord

¿

¿

œ ·

j œœ ˘ j œœ ƒ op ˘ j œœ ƒ

¿

-¿

œ ä·

op

¿

¿

3

ƒ œ #·

·

¿

π

3

¿

¿ â f

œ

bow on string behind the bridge

B

3

Œ

¿

f P sub

bow on string behind the bridge

I

o œ- œ .

œ.

·-

Ó

¿ â f

bow on string behind the bridge

·

Œ ‰

bow on string behind the bridge

3

f f

œ ·

œ

‰ ‰


äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

41

Picc.

Cb. Fl. Vox

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

&

&

Bs. Cl.

? ≈ b —æ. â

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tpt. I

Tpt. II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

Perc. I

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

Perc. IV

E. Gtr.

? ?

æ œ â

?

?

?

I Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

I

II

bœ â

˙

I Cbs. II

≈ ‰ œ Ø poss

œ Œ

b œ-

Œ

æ≈ æ — — >

æ — >

—æ. â

≈‰ œ Ø poss

? ? ?

,

˙

K œ-

˙ P sub

K œ-

, Ó

œ fl

ã

? > œ bœ ‰

> œ ‰

ã

> œ ‰

œ

,

> œ

œ

Ó

> œ bœ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

> œ ‰

j ˙- .

j ˙- .

> œ

, ,

Œ

‰.

> œ bœ ‰

> œ Jœ ‰

Œ

œ

> œ ‰

b˙ â

œ

b˙ â

œ f

Ó > œ

> œ ‰

Ó

> œ ‰

œ

Ó

Ó

≈ œ.

> œ

> œ ‰

Ó

ƒ

œ p poss

æ —

—æ â

æ≈ —

æ —

J ˙Ø poss

p

œ

Œ

> œ ‰

œ

> œ ‰

> œ

œ

Œ

> œ Jœ ‰

> œ ‰

ƒ >œ

œ

æ ‰ œ p poss

æ œ p

3

‰ æ —æ — â p ∑

æ b—

∑ ∑

≈‰ œ p poss

œ

Ó

æ ‰ — p poss

J˙. pâ

œ f > œ ‰

Œ

œ fl Í

œ

˙. â P

o œ œ. ∏ o. œ œ ∏ o œ. ∏ o œ. ∏

bœ â F

# ˙-

p poss sub Œ

p

æ —

b ˙Ø poss + b˙ ˙ P+ ˙ ˙ P + ˙ P + ˙ P

Œ

œ

backing off into the background a bit

Œ

œ

> œ Jœ ‰

3

æ —

p poss sub

,

æ —

œ

‰ ..

˙- . P

∑ ∑

> œ

œ

œ

œ

> œ Jœ ‰

> œ kœ ‰

> œ ‰

> œ

>y ≈ y. y y y Ó ∑ æ æ æ æ ƒ π #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · ? # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ã

6:4

œ (◊)

œ

bœ >

œ

?

? & &

# äœ

Ï sub

? ˙. Ïâ #ä·

&

6:4

œ >

œ

œ >

6:4

ord

6:4

6:4

6:4

6:4

œ

œ √œ

bœ >

œ

œ

œ >

œ

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

Œ

‰.

äœ

œ

œ

œ

,ä #œ

œ

˙.

ä·

·

, · # ä·

·

6:4

Ó

·

n >œ ,

œ n >·

6:4

˙ â

6:4

œ

œ

bœ >

œ

œ >

œ

Œ

F

Ó

6:4

6:4

œ

œ

œ >

œ

bœ >

œ

œ œ-

œ >

œ

Ó

raucous gliss across strings in harp

b -œ

Œ

P

∑ œ ˙. ·

œ

·

p

œ

# äœ

œ ˙.

, · # ä·

·

p sub

~

·

~

·

·

·

·

·œ

¤o ˙-

Åä

Å

~

· ~

B

F

B ≈

äÅ .

? ? ?

˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙

F

Å

~

·

œ

o ˙-

·

·

·

·

·

˙.

&

&

·

~

~

·

Å

b œœ b œœ b œœ -

œœ

f

·

·

·

·

œ-o

· ~

·

~

˙ ~

·

· · ~

˙

~

·

~

b >·

·

~

·

œ

o œ-

œ ä 

äÅ

 

 

 

ä 

Å

Å

(group need not gliss exactly together)

b ˙˙ .. -

·

œ œ.

œœ p

 

4:3

b ˙˙ -

 

4:3

 

ä 

 

 

ä 

 

∑ ∑

10

π

˙˙

·

ord vib asp/op;

·

·œ æ

·œ æ f

œ

œ

≈ ‰

Ó

·

f o œ-

˙. â

4:3

∑ ∑

ä 

ä 

ä  J œœ -

œ

bœ >

œ

6:4 (all-note cluster)

œ œ

Œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

œ >

œ >

œ >

ƒ

ord

6:4

Œ

œ >

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

˙.

·œ-

·œ

·œ

·œ

·œ

·œ

sp

Ø (sub)

ƒ

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo ord vib

3

3

3

3

3

œ· Ø st ·œØ

·œ

·œ

·œ

·œ

·œ-

·œ

Ø ·st œ

ä 

œ

·

Ø œ

4:3

œ >

·

sp

·

·

˙

ä ·

sp

·

œ

adamant, persistent; quasi-liberamente IV

3

·

6:4

˙.

Ø st ·œ-

œ œo

œ

bœ >

6:4

·

ƒ sub œo Käœo œoäœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo Käœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

transitioning smoothly

f sub

œ

ord vib

· ·· J

· f

· f ˙-o .

~

 

Å

·

·

·

6:4

œ > ˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙ F # ä˙ .

œ

œ ..

·

˙ p

. ~œ ◊

œ

6:4

Î poss

F

,

·

œ

f ·

·

 

(group need not gliss exactly together)

·

~

o ˙~

·

senza vib

 

Å

·

·

Åä

Å

·

·

Å

˙˙ .. œœ f

·

œ

˙ Å

~

b >œ

œ

senza vib (¤) ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä k œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo k äœo œo äœo œo äœo K œo œo œo œo œo œo œ œo œo œo œo œo K œo œo œo œ œ & π b· · senza vib resonating with the snare · · -· b· · b· · ord · · · · · · · · · · J J ‰ . ∑ Œ ‰ Œ ‰ R & p sub Ø Ø F sub P sub Ø ·œ ·œ ·œ œ œ b ·œ œ b ·œ œ ·œ œ ·œ œ ·œ ∑ ∑ Œ ‰. & æ æ æ æ ∏ sub P senza vib (¤) ä ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo & 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 π senza vib (from this point until the last beat of mm 45 all pitches are approximate) ord IV · · · · · · ·- · · ·· · · · · · · · · · · · & ‰ f ∏ sub p

&

Œ

∑ ,

F

6:4

œ

, ä #·

6:4

œ

œ-

to Glock.

with Soft Beaters

,ä #œ

Suspended Crash Cymbal

Ó

f

bow as close as possible to the fingers; op/asp; grinding, noisy, gorgeous and ugly, dense and translucent

Cb. Solo

œ

j — fl

—æ.

– P

˙

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈ hum or whistle; may vary timbre throughout; ghostly, ethereal

3

Ó

π

somewhat breathy; unstable vibrato; dark

b ˙-

Solo; Multiphonics: please choose a fairly full-band and noisy multiphonic for each given fundamental; screaming, unstable, but starting far in the distance

œ äœ œ

# ˙- . p j b —æ —æ â

bow as close as possible to the fingers; op/asp; grinding, noisy, gorgeous and ugly, dense and translucent

II

æ œ >

—æ

B

Vcs.

b ˙b ˙- .

æ œ. >

œ fl

—æ

II

I

Œ

æ œæ œ >

—æ. â

œ

Ó

B

Vc. Solo

˙.

,

‰.

b —æ â

œ

3

äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

œ >

˘ & œ

I Vlas.

—æ

æ œ

Ͼ

(¤) Vla. Solo

b œ-

≈ æ bœ. â ƒ

Ϲ

b Ͼ >

senza vib ord IV

Vlns. II

Ó

subterranean

b ˙p poss

Ͼ >

3

senza vib I asp

Vln. I Solo

Œ

j œæ œæ â

3

∏ sub

the beginning of the chant

Vc. Ctrtnte.

æ æ œ œ. >

j œæ b œæ â

œæ œæ. â

3

∑ ‰

œ

j Ͼ Ͼ >

b œæ â

P

≈ ®œ

Ó

Ó

(◊)

B

j Ͼ Ͼ > 3

œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ ‰

˘ & œ

&

Boy Sop.

,

æ œ

—æ â f

œ äœ œ

≈ æ b —. > ƒ

— >

6:4

Acc.

æj œ â

3

Œ

œ

?

Pno. II

‰ ∑

æ œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

—æ

˙

?

41

Pno. I

æ —

&

Bs. Sx.

b— > f

Solo; Multiphonics: please choose a fairly full-band and noisy multiphonic for each given fundamental; screaming, unstable, grainy, insane, abrupt, aggressive

&

œ äœ œ

? Ó

E. Hn.

Cb. Cl.

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

Åä

ƒ

äÅ

ƒ ˙˙ .. f

ord vib

·œ

œ ·œ ·œ

o ˙Åä äÅ

ƒ

·œ

3

ƒ ƒ

ƒ ƒ

·œ ·œ

3

Å

3

ord vib ord

ord vib ord

·œ

Ó

·œ

œ

ord vib

Å

Ó

Å p poss Å

p poss

ord vib

J ˙˙ .. â

senza vib

ord vib

J ˙˙ .. â

J ˙˙ .. â

3

3

3

Ó Ó

o ˙-

œ

ord vib

˙˙ .. Ø poss

Ó ord vib ord

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

senza vib

˙˙ .. Ø poss

ord vib ord

bow on mute; focus on "wolf tone"; swarming, quasi-liberamente

f

œ.

cantabile

Ó

Œ

ä ¿

¿

äo œ

œ

F

?

clb presaging the noise

?

œ. P

œ


48

Picc.

Cb. Fl. Vox

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

Bs. Sx.

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Perc. I

Perc. II: Timp.

Perc. III

&

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

œ äœ œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

P

& ≈ . – p-

–P

–-

œ- . p

œ

œP

œ

œ

œ

œ-

œ-

# œ-

œ

œ-

? ≈ & ?

œ

# œ-

œ

? Ó ? Œ ?

æ ‰ — p

æ — â

Œ

œ

? Ó

Solo I Heartbeat

? ? ? ã

—æ

—-æ p poss

j —æ —æ >

—æ

œ-

œ

3

3

œ

F

k ˙-

b —æ >

œ

œ

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

ã

> œ

k ˙-

œ

œ

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

Œ

3

—-æ

æ —

œ J

—æ â

—æ

—æ

—æ

—æ P

˙ F

Œ

äœ f

œ J

œ œ

ƒ

œ > ƒ > œ ‰

> œ

Œ

æ —.

E. Gtr.

6:4

?

(◊)

œ

?

œ (◊) >

& Œ. Pno. II

Acc.

Boy Sop.

B

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

I Vlns. II II

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

Vcs.

II

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

—æ

Œ.

n ˙-

œ

> œ kœ ‰

> œ ‰

Ó

9:6

œ

9:6

n œØ poss > œ ‰

œ

> œ

äœ F

—æ

œ.

Œ.

Œ.

, ,

œ

œ

œ

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

9:6

œ

œ

œ

> œ

—æ

—-æ

—æ

—æ

œF Œ.

˙.

œ J

œ

ä˙ .

˙.

K˙ F

˙

f

œ

œ

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

> œ

Ó

œ œ >

6:4

œ œ >

Œ.

? œ b œœ & b œœœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

6:4

œ

3

œ >

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ œ > ‰

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

œ ≈ ‰

# äœ

? œ

œ ≈ ‰

& ·

·

œ â

&

œ

ord

œ ƒ >

œ >

6:4 6:4 6:4 all-note clusters in each hand (as many notes as can fit under one hand) sempre; strike in approximate locations (empty note-heads are general indicators of upper or lower ambitus, respectively); raucous, quasi-liberamente

 

 

  >

 

Œ

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

 

 

  >

 

 

 

  (loco) >

 

(loco)

6:4

6:4

 

 

 

 

  >

 

  >

 

6:4

&

—æ

 

 

  >

 

  >

 

,

nœ. ◊

œœ œœ œœ œ

˙. œœ œœ œœ œ

˙. œ b œœœ b œœœ

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

˙.

œ ≈

˙.

˙.

œ ≈

·

·

6:4

 

 

  >

 

œœ œœ œœ œ

˙.

·

k œœ -

˙˙ ..

·

·

·

—æ â

K œ-

,

K œ-

œ

œ

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

œ œ

Ó

œ

> œ ‰

> œ

with Soft Beaters

6:4

 

#ä˙ ˙ â -·

œœ œœ œœ œ

6:4

6:4

   

>

œœ œœ œœ œ

·

6:4

   

¤ nœ Ï ∏ F ƒ scratch fingernail up and down sting coiling, unstable ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

—æ p

ƒ

6:4

 

,

— p poss

Tam Tam

6:4

 

— P

˙

œ

to Tam Tam

P œ

Œ

œ

—æ

—- — p poss sub ≈ ‰ Œ —æ > P

—æ

9:6

—æ

‰.

Œ

œ

œ.

œ

,

ƒ

with Beaters

—æ

˙-

œ

—æ

—p sub

˙,

œ

œ

—-æ p

,

œ

Glockenspiel

Ó

—æ â P

∑ ‰

˙- .

,

the growing tide coming in

œ.

œ

—æ ∑

—æ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

y pæ # · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · #>· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · #>· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · #>· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · # · >· · · >· · ? # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· # # ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· 48

Pno. I

—-æ p

Œ

Perc. IV

ã

,

œ äœ œ

—æ

Ó

—æ > F

˙.

Ó

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

&

Heartbeat

? > œ kœ ‰

Solo III

,

—-æ

— p poss sub

œ-

9:6

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ ∑

Ó

Œ

9:6

Ó.

≈. œ

Œ

æ — â

Œ

œ

œ

Œ

æ — p

˙.

,

Jœ P

,

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

 

ord

œ. ≈ ‰ ˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

  > Ó Ó

 

  >

œœ œœ œœ œ

  >

 

y y æ æ >· · >· · >· · >· · ·>· · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · 6:4 6:4> > >        

 

&

œœ œœ œœ œ

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

˙.

˙

œ ≈‰

˙.

˙

œ ≈‰

·

·

œœ

k ˙˙ -

·-

·

·

·

(¤) ä ä ä ä ä ä K œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo & f molto vib ä ä· ä ä ·œ ·œ ·œ ·œ ·œ ·œ ·œasp K K ·œ KK ·œ KK ·œ œ KK ·œ messy; a distant swarm approaching ∑ Œ ‰ Ó & . # · π . · sub vib ord vib ∏ ¤ senza F 3 insane vib >· · ast (I) · ord # I· · · · · · · · ∑ Œ ‰ Œ & æ æ æ æ æ æ æ · · Ø poss sub ˙ f ƒp ƒ F (¤) ä ä äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo œo œo œo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo & 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ƒ f strained I œ √, ä molto vib 3 asp Å asp/op b ä äää äœ äœ äœ . incisive ä bœ œ œ œ œ äœ äœ äœ œ ord œ œ œ œ asp ·I · · J ∑ Œ ‰ ® ‰ .. ≈ ≈ œ & œœœ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ π ƒ sub œ œP œ ƒ sub f ƒ ƒ J F sub Ï ƒ æ bow as close to the finger as possible, op ƒ sub Pæ sp 3 ragged, vicious asp III   II sim         >  (gliss off board) ord II -3     · · b ·   · ·     · ∑ Œ · · Œ ‰ · b· n·   ®     ® ≈ ‰ ≈ Ó & æ æ π f P p ƒ f P sub 6:4 ƒ ∏ o o (¤). o ˙ ˙- . ˙ œœ œ ˙ œ ˙˙. & (ord vib) f F ord molto vib ä ä (trem between open strings (III&IV) œ œ strained œ œ œ œ > and double harmonics) incisive œœ ord (harmonics) swarming st ≈       ®            · ·œ·œ B Œ ‰. ·       ®®     ‰ .. Œ · · ‰ ‰ & Œ ˙ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ · · Ø poss ˙â â (ord vib) ƒ f ord bow on mute; focus on "wolf tone"; p sub ∏ F π p ƒ ƒ f π sub f (trem between open string (III) a gnawing, unstable swarm; and double harmonics (III&IV)) fluctuate timbres as much as possible; quasi-liberamente b· · ·· ·· ä ä ä swarming ä ä ä b · œ B ¿ ¿. ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ Œ Œ Œ ‰ Ó ¿ ¿ ¿. ¿ ¿ · œ œ œ œ · œ œ ˙ œ œ π sub π sub ˙F ƒ ƒ â ƒ sub (¤) äo ä o ¤ -œo œ -œo œ . ·œ·œ ·œ ·œ -˙o œ œ œ. œo œ œ. œ œ -œo . œœ œ œ œ œäo œ & sul III bow as close to the finger ƒ f f F "seagull effect": as possible (sul IV open); sp hold shape of false harmonic, ord, 3 clb ord vib ä begin where necessary so that it lands where indicated; >Å presaging the noise op molto vib KK œ· Å äÅ Å quasi, liberamente flourescent ord         ? ‰ B ‰ œ œ œ œ . Œ Œ ‰ ‰ ∑ ≈ & œæ œæ œæ œ œ œ œ π sub ∏ f π f Ø poss sub p Ï ƒ (senza vib) f ord bow III&IV together: (IV) molto vib (IV); · · · · · · œ J· asp/op ? B ? Ó ‰ Œ ≈ Œ ‰ Œ & æ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œœœ œ œ p F sub ƒ Ï P æ f fl π æ ƒ Ø possæ sub ƒ P ? op . œœ ˙˙ J ˙˙ k œœ ˙˙ .. œœ ˙˙ n œœ k ˙˙ k ˙˙ . ? op . œœ ˙˙ J ˙˙ ˙˙ .. œœ ˙˙ n œœ k œœ k ˙˙ k ˙˙ . ?

op

œœ

J ˙˙ -

˙˙

. k ˙˙ . -

11

˙˙

n œœ -


54

Picc.

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

& ? &

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈ æ — > P

?

—æ

Sop. Sx. Vox

& Ó

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

—æ Solo cantabile

æ —

π

œ.

? œ œ ‰ Œ.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

? ?

㠜

Perc. II: Timp.

? > œ ‰

Perc. III

Perc. IV

E. Gtr.

‰ – Ø poss

,

–.

– ˜–

æ —

æ —

≈ ≈

Acc.

Boy Sop.

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

I Vlns. II II

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

æ — â F

æ b —p

Ó

j˙. â , f

> œ

f

,

∑ œ

> œ Kœ ‰

> œ ‰

œ > œ ‰

œ

Ó

œ

ƒ

> œ

?

> œ ‰

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

(ord)

· · · ·& · (¤) ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä K œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œ œo œo œo œo œo K œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo & ƒ ä ä ä ·œ ·œ KK ·œ KK ·œ ·œ ·œ & asp ¤ä œ ord · œ œo äœo œo äœo œo · Œ ‰ & æ 3 3 3 f π sub (¤)ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo & 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 (√) 3 Å Å Åä Å Åä & Œ

(¤) Heartbeat ä œ œ œ œo œo

& &

ƒ

7:6

·œ

ä B ¿

& Π? ? ?

˙˙ .. ˙˙ .. ˙˙ ..

P

ä œo œo

äÅ . œ.

7:6

œo

ä ä œo œo œo

f ä ä œo œo œo œo

ä œo œo

·œ

o œ-

˙.

ä ¿

Å Å.

Å Å

œ œ. ‰

˙.

œ œ ast I

≈ · π

ä ¿

¿

äÅ Å äÅ . œ

       f

˙˙ .. ˙˙ .. ˙˙ .. -

> œ ‰

œ

> œ

œ

œ

> œ Kœ ‰

> œ ‰

¤

 

P

 

· · œ

ƒ

·

·

·-

·œ

ä KK·œ

ä· œ

·œ

œo äœo 3

äœ

œ

Œ

œ

œ

> œ Kœ ‰

> œ ‰

Œ

œ fl f

œ

Œ

œ >. œ b œœœ b œœœ

œœ œœ œœ œ

j œ > œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

œ

·

·

œ œœ œœ œœ œ

œ >. ˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

#äœ

œ

µ– – F

ƒ

# äœ

9:6

Œ

Œ

f

œ.

Œ.

Œ. Jœ

J ˙- .

œ

 

ä˙ .

9:6

, ,

ƒ

y æ · >· · · >· · · ··· ·· · ··· ·· >œ

6:4

œ bœ

œ

œ

äœ

œ

·

·

·

·-

k˙ â

œ

> œ jœ ‰

> œ ‰

∑ œ > œ ‰

œ

> œ

y y y æ æ æ >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · ·· ·· · · · ·· ·· · · ··· · · ·· ·· · · · ·· ·· · · ··· · · >œ

6:4

Ï

œ

ƒ

Œ

~

œ b œœœ b œœœ

6:4

6:4

œ

Œ

relinquish sticks

¤ bœ

Œ

with 2-ft dowling rods: one for black notes on upper half of instrument, one for white notes on lower half of instrument; drumming, barbaric

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

k˙ â

œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

f

 

f

Œ.

III and IV together

œ

y y æ æ >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · ······ · ·· ··· ······ · ·· ··· > 6:4 6:4  

> œ

—æ

œ9:6 Œ J

≈ œ ‰

 

—æ

˙.

> œ ‰

Ø poss , æ— b —-æ P F

J ˙- .

œ

Ͼ

b —æ Fâ œ ˙ ‰

œ.

œ œ ‰

> œ ‰

 

œ.

b œ-

ä ‰ œ F

> œ jœ ‰

 

˙ â

Œ

—æ

9:6

> > œ jœ ‰

y æ Ø >· · · >· · · · · ·· ·· · · ·· ·· > 6:4

≈‰

Œ

œ-æ p sub

Œ

—æ > f

—æ

b —-æ p

œ

Œ œ > Î poss get both 2-ft sticks Î poss Œ j œ > œœ œœ œœ œ

·-

·

–.

œ

sim the oncoming flood

Ó

µœ ˙

œ

Œ

æ œ

n œ äœ œ

~

Œ

¤ œ

œ

œ

> œ œœ ◊œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

> œœ œœ œœ œ

œ ◊ >œ

œ

œ

äœ

œ

·

·

·

·-

¤

œ

äœo

œo äœo 3

Œ

äÅ3 œ

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo o ˙- . ¿

o ˙- . œ

3

3

3

Å äÅ . œ œ.

3

3

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

7:6

Åœ ƒ

Å˙ œœ œœ œœ

ƒ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo

3

ä œo œo 7:6

ä œo œo

3

3

3

œo äœo œo äœo

3

3

¿

ä œ œo œo 7:6

ä œ œo œo

7:6

ä ¿

œ

Å ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ -

Å äÅ .

Ŝ

Ŝ

œ œ.

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

3

3

3

3

ä œo K œo

o ˙-

¿

7:6

3

3

ä ä œo œo œo K œo

Ŝ

˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙

12

ä ¿

¿

œ ?

3

3

3

> ¿

ä œo œo

3

ä ¿

7:6

3

3

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

-¿

7:6

ä œo œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

3

3

o œ-

œ F

ä ¿

¿

o œ-

œ

Œ

Å

Ŝ

Å˙

K œœ ƒ â sp

˙˙ ..

K œœ â

˙˙ ..

sp

˙˙ ..

3

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

3

¿

ä K œo œo ä K œo œo

7:6

bow on strings behind bridge as lovely as possible

sp

K œœ â

3

7:6

œ

Ó

œ

¿

ä ä œo œo œo K œo

7:6

ä ¿

3

3

3

3

¿ ¿ â F

3

3

> ¿

ä œo œo

ä ¿

7:6

ä œo œo

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

7:6

œ

œ J

œ ä ¿

œ

œ J

œ

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿

¿ ¿ â

Ŝ

Ŝ

7:6

ä œo œo

3

œo äœo œo äœo

ä œ œo

Heartbeat

f

¿

ä œ œo

Heartbeat

7:6

3

3

3

3

¿

3

> ¿

ä œ K œo œo

7:6

ä œ K œo œo

3

ä ¿

f

ä œo œo

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä œ œo œo ¿

ä œ œo œo

3

-¿

7:6

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

ä ¿

7:6

¿ ¿

¿ ¿ â

¿ ¿

Ŝ

#( n)Å˙ .

Å

Å

. K ˙˙ . -

œœ

K ˙˙ -

. K ˙˙ . -

œœ

K ˙˙ .. -

œœ

3

ä œo œo

œo

ä œo œo

œo

ä œo œo

œo

ä œo œo

œo

7:6

¿ ¿

Ŝ

3

7:6

7:6

œo äœo

3

3

7:6

7:6

¿

¿ ¿

ä œo œo

3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

¿

¿. ¿.

3

-¿

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo 3

ä ¿ p ä œo K œo

o ˙¿

œ äÅ

3

bow on the tailpiece a groaning premonition of thee heartbeat

œ ä ¿

3

3

Œ

7:6

sul III&IV together (until 3rd beat of mm 66); gliss up on IV continually while playing open III; bow as close as possible to the fingers (IV); op/asp; impure, grinding, noisy, gorgeous, translucent, incisive

?

3

3

ƒ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

F œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo 3

Å

¤ ·œ K œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

(senza vib) ord

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo 3

¿

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

œ

·

äœo

ä ¿

asp

j œ >

œ

7:6

œ

b œ-

> œ

œ.

Œ.

,

æ œ â F

—æ

œ

,

œ. J˙

Î poss sub ƒ

—æ â F

>· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · · · · · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · · · · · · · f 6:4> 6:4> 6:4 6:4>                 ƒ f

≈ Ó

,

œ

Œ

œ

—æ

b œ-

> œ ‰

œ

bœ P

—æ

b —æ â P œ

˙.

œ

œ

#äœ

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

äÅ

œ œ.  

œ

œ

7:6

7:6

¤-o œ P

f

– n– P

˙.

œ J

æ œ. ˙. â F

œ

œ

n–. π

æ œ-

Heartbeat

Œ

—æ

Œ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

œ œo äœo œo äœo œo Käœo œo äœo œo äœo äœo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo Käœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

7:6

¿

(¤) & ˙ B ≈

f

ä ≈ b ·œ

Heartbeat

√ ä œo œo

,

œ. ◊> œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

,

—-æ p

äœ

9:6

>· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · > > 6:4 6:4 6:4 6:4 ¤>              

¤> œ (ord) ≈ œœœ

˙.

&

˙

œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

‰ ..

œæ ˙ P

æ≈ ‰ — > f œ nœ.

bœ fâ œ J

9:6

Ó.

# ä˙ .

œ ‰

&

&

œ

9:6

Œ

˙.

F

,

—æ F

œ

äœ

9:6

æ œ

3

œæ â

F

b —æ

b ˙-

> œ Kœ ‰

 

œœ œœ œœ œ

æ —

,

Ͼ

—æ

π

p

˙

œ

&  

œœ œœ œœ œ

Œ

expresssive

æ —p

Ͼ f

—æ

b —æ P ˙.

b ˙-

œ

y >y Ó æ f >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · · · > > 6:4 > 6:4 6:4 √              

œœ œœ œœ œ

Œ

≈ Œ – Ø poss

œ.

œ

æ œ œ œ.

,

æ — P

Œ.

,

>y y . y ã y æ æ P æ sub >· · · >· · · >· π · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · ? ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· > 6:4 > 6:4 6:4>   54           &

œ b œœ & b œœœ œ

,

Œ.

œ.

Vcs.

II

– –

˙- .

Pno. I

Pno. II

– –.

ä˙ . ,

> œ ‰

P

æ —-

p poss sub

æ‰ œ

≈ ‰ —æ F> œ œ œ æ F

µœ œ nœ

Œ

j â˙ . f

œ

ã

æ b —p œ

œ

> œ ‰

œ ˜œ J f p sub

Ó

—æ

œ nœ

Œ

æ ˙

—æ P

—æ

˙

Œ.

œ œ

– P

æ œ

œ P

—æ

j œ

œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

#œ Ø poss

—æ b —æ pâ

æ — â P

Hum

Perc. I

b —-æ p

œ œ J æ P

œ.

9:6

Solo cantabile

Œ

æ —

˙-

? ‰ äœ F

?

Ó

æ ≈‰ — > F œ œ

æ —

? Œ

—æ

9:6

Tnr. Tbn.

æ —

& Œ

?

æ — pâ

?

Sop. Sx.

Bs. Sx.

F

Œ

≈ . œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

K ˙˙ K ˙˙ -


61

Picc.

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

Sop. Sx.

Bs. Sx.

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

& ?

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ æ œ

,

& ˙. â

œæ â

? ? & ? ?

æ ≈ ‰ — > ƒ œHeartbeat äœ J F

—æ œ

—æ

—æ f

? Œ

? ? ã

,

b —-æ P

˙ ∑

Perc. III

ã

œ

Perc. IV

ã

œ ƒ

—æ

—æ

—æ

äœ

,œ J ,

œ œ ‰ Œ.

Œ.

œ

> œ jœ ‰

> œ ‰

Ó

—æ

—æ

æ —

æ —

˙. â , ƒ

œ

Œ

f

œ

> œ bœ ‰

œ

> œ ‰

œ

&

ƒ

6:4

6:4

Pno. I

& &

¤ bœ

œ

6:4

6:4

¤ œ

œ

6:4

¤ œ

œ

¤ œ

œ

6:4

> œ ‰

œ

Ó

ord

?

¤ œ

œ

6:4

œ

> œ

Ó œ

6:4

¤ œ

œ

—æ

˙.

F

œ

9:6

b ˙- .

äœ

œ ‰

K ˙-

˙

> œ bœ ‰

> œ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

> œ

Œ

œ

Acc.

Boy Sop.

¤ œ

œ

6:4

6:4

6:4

6:4

œ

Vc. Ctrtnte.

& ·

Vln. I Solo

&

I

&

Vlns. I II

Vln. II Solo

œ

>

œ ◊

œ

# äœ

I

II

II

Vc. Solo

3

3

(¤) ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo & & ¿

3

> ¿

(√) ä ä k œo œo œo &

(¤) ä ä k œo œo œo & (¤) ä ä œo œo œo & B ¿

ä ¿

(¤) ä ä œo œo œo & ?

Vcs.

II

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

? ? ? ?

¿ ¿ # Å˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙

¿ ¿ â

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo 3

3

3

3

3

3

ä ä œo œo œo œo œ

7:6

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

œ

·

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

ä ¿

>

# äœ

œ

# äœ

œ

>

œ ◊ œœ œœ œœ œ

·

œ

¤ œ

œ

œ

·

>

œ ◊ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

>

¤ œ

œ

bœ >

¤ bœ

œ

‰ ‰

j œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ Œ

œ ◊

>

äœ

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œ

œ

äœ

œ

·

·

·

·

·

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

œ

> œ bœ ‰

> œ Jœ ‰

> œ ‰

œ

y y æ æ f #>· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · ······· ·· ··· ······· ·· ···

œ > ◊

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ fl

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

b ˘œ

˘œ

œ

œ

œ

‰ ‰

œ fl

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

Ï

6:4

j ˙- . j ˙- .

6:4

t

œ

œ b œœœ b œœœ

œ

œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

>œ #äœ

·

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

äœ

œœ œœ œœ œ

·

> œ

œ

6:4

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

Œ

œ

6:4

Ï

Œ

b ˘œ

œ

> œ ‰

œ

y y y æ æ æ #>· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · ·· ·· ··· · · ·· · · ··· ·· ·· ·· ··· · · ·· · · ··· ··

˘œ

œ

œ

> œ ‰

6:4

Œ

œ

6:4

bœ > f

Ó

y æ >· · >· · >· · · · ·· · · · · ·· · ·

Œ.

9:6

> œ Jœ ‰

Œ

œ

Ï

œ.

œ œ ‰

œ > œ

—æ P

9:6 ä ‰ œ f

with 4-ft dowling rods: one to depress all black notes on instrument simultaneously, one to depress all white notes on instrument simultaneously; as firece as possible

>

œ ◊

œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

Œ

œ

—æ

bœ ˘œ

œ

œ

œ > ˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

œ

œ Jj œ

dispense with dowling rods; put on gloves or mittens for cluster glisses

œ fl

œ

œ

œ

ä ˙

transition smoothly from harmonic to ord fingering

œ

Œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

#äœ

äœo œoäœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œoäœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

3

3

3

3

3

ä k œo œo ä k œo œo ä œo œo

3

> ¿

ä œo œo

3

ä ¿

7:6

ä œo œo

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

3

ä œo œo

œo äœo

¿

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œk œo œo

7:6

ä œk œo œo ä œ œo œo

œo äœo

ä ¿

ä œ œo œo

7:6

Å

Ŝ

# Ŝ

Ŝ

Ŝ

3

3

ä ¿

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

3

-¿

7:6

7:6

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

äœo œoäœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

3

3

¿

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä ¿

3

3

3

3

3

> ¿

¿

3

3

3

ä ¿

ä ä ä ä œo k œo œo œo œo n œo œ œo œ 7:6

7:6

7:6

ä ä ä ä œo k œo œo œo œo n œo œ œo œ œo

ä ä œo œo k œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

œo

¿

ä ä œo œo k œo

7:6

3

3

¿

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä k œo œo

7:6

ä ¿

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

¿

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä k œo œo

¿ ¿

¿ ¿ â

¿ ¿

¿ ¿

Ŝ

Ŝ

Ŝ

Ŝ

# Å˙

œœ

j ˙˙ -

˙˙

j ˙˙ -

˙˙

. j ˙˙ . â

œœ

j ˙˙ -

œœ

13

3

> ¿

3

3

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ƒ ä œo œo

7:6

3

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ƒ ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

3

3

3

3

-¿

3

ä œo œo 7:6

ä œo œo

œo äœo œo äœo

7:6

ä œo œo

3

¿

3

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä ¿

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

3

> ¿

ä œ œo œo

7:6

ä œ œo œo

7:6

œo äœo

ä œk œo œo

7:6

7:6

¿ ¿ >

. j ˙˙ . â . j ˙˙ . â

3

7:6

7:6

¿ ¿ â

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

ä œo œo

7:6

Ï äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œoäœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

-¿

7:6

ä œo œo

3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

7:6

¿ ¿ â f

3

3

7:6

¿

¿ ¿

3

3

> ¿

7:6

ä œo œo

¿ ¿ â

˙˙ ..

œo äœo

7:6

¿ ¿ â

j œœ -

œo äœo

7:6

¿ ¿

˙˙ ..

3

¿

ä œo œo

3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

-¿

¿ ¿ â

˙˙ ..

3

7:6

7:6

j œœ -

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

j œœ -

œ

>

œ b œœœ b œœœ

·

7:6

ä œo œo

œ ◊

get both 4ft sticks (if you need more time, drop this eighth in mm. 64)

≈ ‰

,œ J

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

ä ¿

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

œ

>

6:4

—æ

Œ.

,

—æ

äœ

œ J

˙.

,

Œ

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

¿

ä œo œo

7:6

œ

3

-¿

ä ä œo œo œo œo œ

œ ◊

3

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

ä ¿

7:6

I

·

œ

>

œ ◊

œœ œœ œœ œ

äœ

œ

(¤)ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo

&

7:6

Vlas.

>

(¤) K äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo n äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

I

(¤) ä ä ä ä ä ä K œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo n œo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

7:6

Vla. Solo

œ

>

œ ◊ œœ œœ œœ œ

·

3

Vlns. II

œ

>

K œ-

> œ

—æ

œ.

6:4

Ó

b œ-

˙.

K œ-

> œ ‰

œ

Ó

œ

œ J

f

œ

> œ ‰

#œ J

˙ b ˙˙ & b ˙˙˙ ˙ &

œ

> œ ‰

? ?

, ∑

& Pno. II

,

Œ

—æ â f

æ — > f

—æ P ∑

äœ

9:6

,

—æ > ƒ

— > ƒ

—æ â f äœ

,œ J

Œ

œ

—æ

Œ

—æ

æ≈ ‰ — > F

œ Œ J

9:6

œ

—æ

—æ p

—æ

æ ≈ ‰ — > Ï œ äœ J

äœ

—-æ F

∑ œ

,œ J

˙. â

—æ

—æ

,

Ó. ˙

œ

äœ

—æ > ƒ Œ

æ ≈ ‰ — > F

9:6

—æ

˙ â

—æ

y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · #>· · · >· · · · · · · · · b· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · b· · · · · · · · · · · · n · · · · · · · · · · · · b · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · b · · · · · · · · · · · · n· · · · · ·

6:4

ƒ

f

—æ p Œ

—-æ F

—æ â f œ J

äœ

K ˙-

œ

Œ

Ó

bœ ◊¤> bœ

,

œ >

> bœ

,

œ

y y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ πæ P >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · · >· · · >· · >· · >· · >· · ? b b ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· b b ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· b b ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· 61

æ≈ ‰ — > P

Œ

Œ

—æ

—-æ F Œ

œ.

Œ

æ ≈‰ — > ƒ , œ J

œ äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

‰ ..

Ó

,

—æ â ƒ

ƒ

˙. â

äœ

œ J

œ.

œ

äœ

ä˙ . ,

> œ ‰

,œ J

—æ

Œ.

˙. â ƒ

œ

—æ

˙

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈ ∑

Œ.

∑ œ

äœ

˙ â f

—æ â F

œ äœ œ

∑ Œ

— p

œ J

äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

œp

Œ

—æ â F

œ.

k œ-

Œ

—æ

œ.

ä ‰ œ

> œ

—æ > ƒ

b˙ ƒ â. œ

> œ ‰

æ œ

—æ > p poss

Π9:6

k œ-

œ

—æ > ƒ

æ≈ ‰ — > ƒ äœ

—æ â f

9:6

œ

œ J

˙

,

> œ ‰

—æ

,

( )

äœ œœä œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

˙. â

I and II together

,

? > œ jœ ‰

E. Gtr.

,œ J

˙

˙ â

b —æ â F äœ

≈. œ

‰ æ œ

Ͼ

Œ

? ˙.

œ

Perc. II: Timp.

œ

Œ

b ˙-

?

?

f

œ

Perc. I

Ͼ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

3

ä ¿

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

œo äœo

¿

ä œk œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

7:6

7:6

7:6

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

3

3

¿ œo

ä ¿

¿ ¿

¿ ¿

¿ ¿

Å

Ŝ

# Å˙

Å

Å˙

Å

b œœ -

˙˙ ..

b œœ -

˙˙ ..

¿ ¿ ƒâ

3

> ¿

3

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

7:6

ä ä œo k œo œo œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo ƒ

7:6

ä œo œo

ä ä œo k œo œo œo

ä ¿

ƒ

ä ¿

7:6

¿ ¿

¿ ¿ â

¿ ¿

¿ -¿

Å Ï Œâ

Å

Å-

Å

b ˙˙ .. b ˙˙ .. -

ä œo K œo ä œo œo

7:6

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

7:6

b ˙˙ .. -

3

ä œo K œo

7:6

ä ä œo œo œo

¿

3

-¿ ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

œo

3

ä ¿

ä ä œo œo œo

7:6

¿ ¿

˙˙ ..

-¿

7:6

¿ ¿ â

b œœ -

3

7:6

¿ ¿

˙˙

3

ä œo œo


äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

68

Picc.

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

Sop. Sx.

Bs. Sx.

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

&

? Œ & Œ

? &

æ ≈ ‰ — > Ï äœ

?

—æ >

? Œ.

㠜

Mezzo-S.

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

,

I Vlns. II II

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

t

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

—æ

,

b˙ â

˙

˙ Pâ

œ > f

œ

> œ ‰

> œ

—æ â ƒ œ J

—æ

äœ

‰ œ , ,

Ó œ

> œ ‰ ‰

b œ-

J ˙.

œ > œ

œ.

œ.

œ

Œ.

Œ.

9:6

˙

Œ

> œ ‰

œ

> œ ‰

œ

Œ

6:4

œ

œ

6:4

œ

œ

œ

?

œœ œ & œœœ œ

# äœ

œ

&

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

œ

œ

œ

6:4

œ b œœœ b œœœ

6:4

œ

œ

œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ.

œ.

J ˙. â ,Ï

ƒ

œ > œ ‰

œ

œ

&

(¤) ä K œo œo (¤) ä œo œo

7:6

&k

7:6

B ¿

Œ

(¤) ä œo œo &k ¿ ¿

? Å œœ

? Œ

œœ Ï

œ

œ

6:4

œ

œ

œ

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

6:4

œ

œ

œ

6:4

œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙

˙.

>œ ≈ ‰

Œ

˙. â Î

˙.

œ ≈ ‰ >

Œ

Œ

>œ Ï

˙

6:4

˙

œ

˙

œ-

˘œ

Î

œo äœo

3

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

œo äœo 3

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

ä œo œo

Ï ä œo œo 7:6

Ï ä œo œo 7:6

3

7:6

ä œo œo

ä ¿

ä œo œo

3

œo äœo ä œo œo ä œoJ œo

3

ä œoJ œo

Å â

b ˙˙ Ïâ Å â Ï

œ

6:4

œ

œ

œ

œ √œ

3

7:6

ä œ K œo œo

7:6

ä œ J œo œo

ä œo œo ä œo œo

œo äœo 3

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

7:6

¿

ä ¿

ä œ J œo œo

œo äœo 3

œo 3

œo äœo 3

3

œo 3

Œ

7:6

7:6

ä œo œo ä œo œo ä œo œo

œo œo œo

7:6

¿

ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

-¿

7:6

ä œo œo

œo

œo äœo 3

äœo œo äœo œo äœo √ äo ˙

ord vib ord

3

Î K œäo ä K œo

ä J œo

Ï ¿

ä J œo

Ï

3

3

3

ä œo œo

3

Î œo äœo œo äœo Î äo œ

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ

7:6

7:6

ä œo œo

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

7:6

ä ¿

ä ä œo œo œ œo œo

7:6

¿

¿ ¿

¿ ¿

¿ -¿

¿ ¿

Å

Å

Å-

Å

Å

Å

Å-

œœ

J ˙˙ -

Å-

Å

Œ

œ œÏ

œ œ

Å

œo äœo 3

Å

Å

œ œ

œ œ

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

3

ä œo œo ä œo œo

ä Kœo œo ä Kœo œo ä J œo b œo

7:6

ä œo j œo

ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä J œo œo

Ï ä œo œo

ä œo œo

Å

>œ J

œ

Œ

> œ ‰

œ

> œ

œ J

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

#œ œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

6:4

œ

œ b œœœ b œœœ

œœ œœ œœ œ

6:4

œ

œ

œ

Ï

œ

#œ œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

6:4

ƒ

f

F

œ

œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œœ œœ œœ œ

œ

ä ˙.

œ

œo äœo

œo äœo 3

œo äœo

œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo äœo

œo

äœo

3

œo äœo

Î ä ä œo œo œo œo 7:6

œo äœo

œo äœo

¿

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

äo œ

ä œo œo

ä˙

œo äœo 3

˙-

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

3

œ J

œ äœ J

ä œo j œo

7:6

ä ¿ Î

7:6

ä œo œo

¿ ¿ 7:6

ä œo œo

Î

œo äœo 3

3

3

¿ ¿ âä œo J œo

œo äœo 3

3

œ

ä œo œo

9:6

œ

ä ä œo œo œ œo œ ¿

ä œo œo

¿ ¿

¿

ä ä œo œo œ œo b œo

7:6

¿ ¿

7:6

¿ ¿ â

¿ ¿

¿ ¿

¿ -¿

¿ ¿

Å

Å

Å-

Å

Å

Å

Å Îâ

Å

œœ

˙ k˙ â Å â

œ œ

œ œ Îâ

Å

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

Å-

Å

Å

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

Å

œ ä œo œo

¿ ¿

Å

3

7:6

¿ -¿

Å

3

œo äœo œo

trem as fast and crazy as possible

¿ ¿

. J ˙˙ . -

œo äœo œo 3

œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo æ 3

ä ¿

¿

bow on strings behind bridge

3

7:6

bow on string behind tailpiece

¿ Î â¿ ä ä œ J œo œo œo œo

3

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo

ä œo œo

7:6

3

3

äœ

œ

9:6

Œ

7:6

œo äœo 3

äo œ

ä œ j œo œo

Ó

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

3

Î äo œ œo äœo B Œ

7:6

œo

œo äœo 3

˘œ

Î

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

äo ˙ äo œ

œo

äœo œo äœo œo äœo

3

œo äœo 3

œo

œ

˙.

˙˙ ..

14

> œ ‰

œ ≈ ‰ >

J œœ -

ÅÎ

> œ ‰

œ

œ

˙

7:6

¿ ¿ â Î

7:6

ä ¿

>

œ

˙.

7:6

¿

k œ-

œ â

3

ä œo œo

k œ,

>œ ≈ ‰

äo œ ä œo j œo

,

œ J

ƒ

˙

3

œo äœo

äœ

9:6

˙.

œ

Ï

äo ˙

7:6

¿ -¿

Å

œo äœo 3

7:6

¿ ¿

˙˙

3

œo äœo 3

ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

œo äœo

œo äœo

3

Ó.

Œ

äœ

˙.

œo äœo 3

œ â œ J

9:6

œ

6:4 6:4 (please note: chord shape changes at this point)

6:4

œ œ b œœœ b œœœ

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

¿ ¿

bow as close as possible to the fingers; op/asp; grinding, noisy, gorgeous and ugly, dense and translucent

b ˙˙ â

3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo

> > ¿ ¿ ¿ Î ä ä œ K œo œo œo œo

7:6

¿ ¿ â Ï

œo äœo 3

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo

7:6

¿

3

Œ

˙æ. â

> œ ‰

œ

œ

—æ â ƒ

˙

œ

> œ ‰

—-æ ƒ

y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ >· · >· · >· · Ï >· · >· · >· · n n>·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· n · · · · · · · · · · · · b · · · · · · n· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

äœo œo äœo œo äœo

œo äœo

3

œ

Ï ‰

äœo

Î œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

ä œo œo

œ

,œ J

,

—æ > Ï Œ

˙

k ˙-

> œ ‰

œ

äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

ä œo œo

ä ¿

>

œ

9:6

—æ ƒ

Ï

˙.

f

Œ

äœ

œ J

œ

äœ

9:6

— â Î Œ

æ ≈ ‰ — > Î

—æ â ƒ

æ —

—æ â ƒ

—æ

,

œ

> œ ‰

œ

—æ

k ˙-

≈ ‰

≈ ‰

—æ > Î äœ

,œ J

,

ä˙ .

œ

Ï (¤) äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo & 3 3 3 3 Ï ä > -¿ ¿ ¿ & ¿

7:6

œ

6:4

—æ â f Œ

ä˙ .

Ó

æ —

—æ

äœ

,

˙- .

œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œo äœo œ œo äœo œo äœo œo

3

(√) ä K œo œo &

œœ œœ œœ œ

Ó

ä ˙

(¤) ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo & (¤) ä ä ä œo œo œo œo œo & (¤) äœo œo äœo œo &

—æ

œ J

æ ≈ ‰ — > Ï

cluster glissandi: with gloved hands, gliss clusters (black and white notes simultaneously, preferably); marked pitches are only approximate indicators of lower ambitus of the cluster(s) in the upper line, and upper ambitus of the cluster(s) in the lower line, respectively; messy and violent (though last strikes on the downbeat of mm. 79 should end as clean and as abruptly as possible)

œœ œœ œœ œ

6:4

Î

& œ

?

wailing scream howl; please scream at this pitch or higher (preferably on or around a C, though not necessarily so); highly unstable, crazy, piercing

&

?

œ

?

?

6:4

—æ

— > Î ˙. â

—æ

—æ > Ï

—æ â f Œ

—æ

˙ â Ï

—æ â äœ

œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

—æ â ƒ

Œ.

œ > Ï > œ ‰

>

≈ ‰

Œ.

,

œ

ƒ

—æ

Œ

œ äœ œ äœ ≈

Ï

—æ ,œ J

—æ

J ˙. â Ï

œ

> œ ‰

—æ > f

æ ≈ ‰ — > Ï

> œ ‰

œ

œ

J ˙.

œ

> œ ‰

b œ-

œ

,

—æ f

9:6

f

äœ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ

— > Ï Œ

—æ â ƒ Œ

æ ≈ ‰ — > Î äœ œ J

—æ

,œ J

—æ ƒ

˙-

—æ

Ó

ƒ

Œ

—æ â f

˙. â

—æ

äœ

≈ ‰

— > ƒ

Œ

—æ

æ ≈ ‰ — > ƒ Œ

—æ F ∑

œ

> œ ‰

œ

Œ

œ

Œ

— > Ï

äœ

—æ â

—æ

˙ â

Œ

≈ . œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

—æ â F

—æ

˙. ˙

—æ >

≈ ‰

— > f Œ

æ ≈ ‰ — > Ï , œ J

äœ

œ J

˙.

f

&

Vcs.

II

—æ

æ ≈ ‰ — > ƒ

Œ.

œ

3

Vln. II Solo

—æ

b˙ â

,

B

—æ

äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ ≈

y y y y y y y y y y ã y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ ƒ # · >· · · >· · >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· # #>·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ·· >·· ·· ? ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · # · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 68

Boy Sop.

—æ

—æ

ä˙ .

9:6

? Œ

Perc. III

Acc.

—æ

äœ

—æ F

˙ Ï â œ9:6 Œ J

? > œ ‰

Pno. II

,œ J

—æ

Œ

Perc. II: Timp.

Pno. I

—æ fâ

? œ.

㠜

E. Gtr.

,

æ ≈ ‰ — > f ? Œ

?

—æ â f

äœ

œ J

—æ â P

˙. â ƒ

—æ â f

Œ

≈ ‰

— > F

...screaming...

?

?

—æ

˙ â

? Ó

Perc. I

Perc. IV

—-æ p

œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ äœ œ œ äœ œ äœ œ

Å œ œ

ä œo œo


Like a Sound at the Center of the Spiral äœ

74

Picc.

Picc. Vox.

Cb. Fl.

Cb. Fl. Vox

Ob.

Ob. Vox.

Bs. Cl.

Bs. Cl. Vox

Cb. Cl.

Cbs. Cl. Vox

Sop. Sx.

Sop. Sx. Vox

Bs. Sx.

Bs. Sx. Vox

& ÷

œ äœ

œ äœ

œ äœ

– Î poss

?

— > Î ÷ –

Œ

æ —

æ —

æ Ï —â

&

? ÷

æ —

Bsn. Vox

C. Bsn.

CBsn. Vox

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tpt. I

Tpt. II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

?

æ ≈ — > Î ÷ Ó ? ÷

Œ

? ? ˙.

& ? ? ?

,

k ˙.

,

k ˙.

Œ œ

Perc. II: Timp.

? > œ‰

> œ‰

> œ‰

E. Gtr.

Acc.

Boy Sop.

B

Mezzo-S.

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. I Solo

I Vlns. I II

I Vlns. II II

Vla. Solo

œ (√)œ

?

œ œœ œœ œœœ

& Œ ? Œ

& ˙ (¤) äœo & (¤) äœo

I Cbs. II

6:4

œ

(both sticks together: all notes on the instrument at once!)

œ

œ

(¤) ä œo &

(√) & ˙. æ (√) o œ &

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

Œ

—æ

—æ

—æ

æ —

Œ

æ — ƒ

æ —

æ —

?

œ äœ

äœ

œ J

–.

— > Î

Œ

æ ≈ — > Î – ≈

Œ. œ.

œ

äœ

ƒ œ

9:6

Ï

œ.

Œ.

Œ.

n -˙ .

œ

œ

œ

> œ‰

> œ‰

> œ‰

œ

œ

œ

œ

Œ

Œ

– J

–.

Œ

—æ

>

        æ æ ≈ æ æ ƒ> 5:4       æ æ æ ≈ ƒ ,

>

>

 

 

æ

5:4

æ

 

æ

Œ

äœ

œ J

– J

–.

˙æ â Ï œ > Î > œ‰

˙æ

,

c c c œ J

Œ

Œ

æ — â ƒ –

äœ

œ J > Î

c c c c c c

c

œ.

œ.

c

9:6

Ï

c

– J

˙-æ

œ.

œ. >                     æ æ> æ æ æ >æ ≈ æ æ æ æ

Œ >     ≈ æ æ ≈ > 5:4     æ ≈ æ

  æ

c

—æ Î –

Œ

  æ

c

—æ

Œ –

c

äœ

≈ —æ > Î – ≈

æ — ƒâ ä –

c

c

9:6

  æ

  æ

 

  æ

5:4

æ

  æ

  æ

 

5:4

c

  æ

æ

c c

˙.

œ

c

( ) (breathe if necessary)

˙

œ >

> œ‰

œ

œ

œ >

> œ‰

œ

˙.

œ >

æ ˙. > Î œ >

Œ

œ >

>

œ

> œ‰

œ

œ

œ

> œ‰

>

œ

c œ >

> œ‰

œ

Î œ>

œ

œ>

> œ‰

œ

Î

c

œ >

> œ‰

>

c

œ

c

y y y y Î æ æ æ æ >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

y y y y y y y y æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· >· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

œ

œ

œ

6:4

œ

6:4

Î

6:4

œ

6:4

œ

6:4

œ

6:4

œ

6:4

œ

6:4

6:4

œ

œ

3

(¤) ä b œo œo

>œ œ œ

œ > œ b œœœ b œœœ

œœ œœ œœœ

ä˙

˙.

˙ â

˙.

>œ œ

œœ œœ œœœ

�� œ J Î

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo œ œo äœo

œo äœo

œ

œo äœo

œo

œo äœo œ œo œo äœo œo äœo œo œo

äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

œ

œo äœo

œ-

œ

œo äœo

œo äœo œ œo äœo

trem as fast ˙o . and crazy as possible æ

3

œo

3

œo äœo 3

œo

3

äo œ

œo œo œo œo œo œo œo œo æ 3 œo

äo œ

ä œo b œo

7:6

äœo

3

œo äœo 3

¿ ¿ äo â œ

œo

äœo

äo œ

œo

¿ ¿

7:6

3

ä œ b œo œo

ä œo œo

œo äœo 3

ä œo œo

œo

äœo

¿ ¿ â ä œ b œo œo

7:6

Œ

œ

œ >

Œ

œo äœo

œo 3

3

¿ ¿ ä œo œo

ä œo œo

œo

¿ ¿

7:6

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo œ œo äœo

œo äœo

˙o . æ

ä b œo

3

œo äœo 3

œo

Œ

ä b œo

7:6

œo äœo

œ

œ

œ

œ> bœ

œ

>œ >œ

œ

œ

6:4

6:4

œ

œ

œ

œ √ >> œ

>œ œ

œ > œœ œœ œœœ

6:4

œ

œo

ä œo

ä œo

œo

ä œo œ

œo

ä œo

œo

œo äœo

œo äœo

ä˙

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo

ä œo œ

œo

ä œo

¿ ¿

ä œo

œo äœo 3

˙. æ

ä b œo œo

¿ ¿ â ä b œo œo

7:6

¿¿ â Î

c

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

äœ

c

œ∏ sub oœ äœo œ œo äœo senza vib

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo

˙o . æ ˙. œo äœo 3

œo œäo 3

œo äœo

œo

3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo äœo 3

œo 3

˙. æ

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

äœo

ä œ b œo œo

¿ ¿

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

ä œo œo

œo

äœo

Œ

œ b œo

7:6

¿ ¿ âä œo œo

äo œ

c œo

7:6

ä ¿

Œ

¿ ¿ ä œo œo

7:6

ä œo œo 7:6

¿

c c

˙. æ

7:6

¿

ä œo œo

œo

c

c

ϊo

3

c

c

æ

œo äœo 3

Œ

¿

ä œo œo

¿ ¿

7:6

c c

ä œo œo 7:6

œo

c c

¿¿

¿¿

¿¿ -

¿¿

¿¿

¿¿ -

¿¿

c

Å

Å

Å-

Å

Å-

Å

Å

c

œœ

Å

n˙ n˙ Å-

Å

˙. ˙. Å-

Å

Å

c

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ

c

¿¿

¿¿ â

¿¿

¿ -¿

¿¿

? Å

Å

Å-

Å

Å

Å

Å-

? Å

Å

œ kœ Å-

˙˙ . . Å

Å

Å

˙. k ˙. Å-

Å

Å

? œ œ

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

œ œ

œ œ-

Å

c

c

äœ

˙o æ

ä ¿

œo

c

c

˘ œ J

œ

œo äœo œ œo äœo

7:6

¿

7:6

15

ä œo

œ > œœ œœ œœœ

œ b œœœ b œœœ

œ

7:6

¿ ¿ â

œœ œœ œœœ

˙. æ

ä ¿

œo

œ

c

c

˙.

œ

3

c

c

˙.

œo äœo

3

¿ -¿

˙˙

œo äœo

˙o æ

Œ

ä œo œo

œo äœo

7:6

¿

ä œo œo

ä˙

3

œœ œœ œœœ

œ æ œo äœo

œ >

˙o . æ

äœo

œ>

˙

molto vib ord

œo äœo

˙. â

>˙ Î

7:6

¿

ä˙ .

œ

œ æ

˙. æ

ä ¿

äo œ

3

œ b œœœ b œœœ

˙. æ

œo äœo

7:6

¿

œo

3

œo œäo

œœ œœ œœœ

œœ œœ œœœ

˙o . æ

œo æ œo äœo

œ

œo äœo

˙. æ

7:6

ä ¿

œo

œo äœo

trem as fast and crazy as possible

œo œo

œo äœo

œ >

œ b œœœ b œœœ

œ

œo äœo

œ

Œ

˙ æ œo äœo

>œ œ

œ

œ

œœ œœ œœœ

œ. äœ

c c

—æ

œ

c

,œ J

œ äœ

—æ

æ —Ï –

,

—æ

—æ

,

—æ â ƒ –

—æ ƒ

( ) (breathe if necessary)

˙ â Î

œ

Œ

˙ â

—æ

æ ≈ — > Î äœ

œ äœ œ œ äœ

—æ

> >                       ≈ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ æ ≈ æ æ ≈ æ > > > 5:4 5:4 5:4                 æ æ ≈ æ æ ≈ æ ≈ æ æ æ ˙

œ äœ

—æ

˙.

˙ Î, â

œ äœ

        æ> æ ≈ > æ æ

œ äœ

Œ.

Œ

ä˙ . >

œ

˙æ. Î –

œ J

Œ

æ — > Î –

æ ≈ — > Î – ≈

œ-æ

≈ — > Î – ≈

—æ â ƒ –

œ äœ

œ J

æ —

¿¿

?

äœ

—æ

9:6

9:6

,œ J

Œ

> œ‰

œ

äœ

—æ â ƒ –

œ >

æ — ƒ

œ äœ

Œ

œ

œ äœ

Î

Œ

˙. â

æ —

Œ

œ

—æ

æ —

Œ

n -˙ .

—æ â ƒ –

Œ

highest register possible, gliss between all notes; quasi-liberamente, crazy, screaming

œ äœ œ œ äœ –

Ó

highest register possible, gliss between all notes; quasi-liberamente, crazy, screaming

≈ — > Î – ≈

œ äœ

œ.

—æ â Ï –

œ

œ äœ

Œ

,

æ — â ƒ –

œ äœ

Ó

–.

Œ

œ äœ

Î

9:6

œ J

—æ > Î –

œ äœ

—æ

æ ≈ — > Î

æ —

œ äœ

æ —

æ — ƒâ –

˙ â

äœ

– J

—æ â ƒ –

,œ J

œ äœ

–.

–.

Î

œœ œœ œœœ

œo äœo

œo äœo

œo äœo

(¤) ä j œo œo &

&

œ äœ

≈ — > Î – ≈

>œ (loco) > œ

˙o . & æ

Vcs.

Cb. Solo

—æ

œ äœ

(loco)

B Œ

II

>˙ Ï

& Œ

II

I

œ

œ

œ

œ b œœ & b œœœœ

&

6:4

œ

œ

B Œ

Vc. Solo

—æ â ƒ –

œ äœ

Î

I Vlas.

>

œ

6:4

trem as fast and crazy as possible

Vln. II Solo

œ

œ

t &

œ äœ

˙æ.

y y ã y æ æ æ >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· · >· >· >· >· >· >· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ? †

Pno. II

ã ‰

74

Pno. I

Ͼ

œ äœ œ œ äœ

&

œ äœ

Œ

˙- .

œ äœ

.

æ ≈ — > Î – ≈

Œ

㠜

Perc. IV

,

Œ

˙

Œ

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

äœ

æ — â ƒ –

Perc. I

Perc. III

,œ J – J

œæ â ƒ œ

Tuba

æ — > Î –

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

Bsn.

æ — > Î

æ —

œ äœ

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

–.

÷

äœ

œ J

Î â˙

—æ

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

äœ

≈ — > Î – ≈

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

œ äœ

˙ â

Œ

—æ

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

? ÷

‰ ..

äœ

œ

‰ ..

æ — â ƒ –

? Œ ÷

–.

& Œ ÷

œ äœ

scream, growl, howl through instrument, whatever voice range is ideal for the performer to gain maximum volume and noise; scream with phrases as much as possible, same dynamics, etc.; quasi-liberamente

c


&c

79

Picc.

Cb. Fl.

Ob.

E. Hn.

Bs. Cl.

Cb. Cl.

?c

— > Î &c œ >

Bs. Sx.

Bsn.

C. Bsn.

I & II Hn. III & IV

Tpt. I

Tpt. II

Tnr. Tbn.

B. Tbn.

Tuba

Perc. I

to Alto Flute

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

&c Ó ?c ?c

— > Î

Î

Sop. Sx.

&c ?c ?c ?c

>— >œ

— > — > Î

œ > ? c >œ

Î ? c >œ

?c ?c

œ > œ > œ >

Perc. III

˙ f

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

E. Gtr.

release object holding pedal

Acc.

Boy Sop.

B

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

to Crotales (with beater)

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Ó

to Wood Blocks

w

w

Œ

Ó

w

?c

œ ◊ * >> œ b œœ & c b œœœœ Î poss >œ &c ?c œ >

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

Ó

o ˙- .

II

Vla. Solo

I Vlas. II

Vc. Solo

I

Vcs.

II

Cb. Solo

I Cbs. II

(¤) > œo &c (¤) o œ &c œo

(¤) > œo &c (√) o &c œ (√) œo &c

(¤) > n œo &c > Bc ¿ Bc ¿ ¿ (¤) >>o nœ &c ?c

˙

(continue to hold pedal into next movement)

œ

I

w

&c w

Vlns. II

˙

Ó

relinquish gloves/mittens

Vc. Ctrtnte.

Vln. II Solo

w

relinquish sticks

tc

&c

œ

II

Œ

œ

I

œ ‰ Ø poss

&c w

Vlns. I

œ J

Mezzo-S.

Vln. I Solo

œ.

to Glock. and Marimba >+ Œ Ó ã c œ ˘· (volume off as quickly as possible) · ≈ to Acoustic Guitar ‰ ?c · Œ Ó

w ¤ >> œ &c Pno. II

˙ .. π sub

?c œ œ fl > ã c œ

†c

Pno. I

∑ ord vib

ã c œ >

79

Œ

dead!

Perc. IV

œ P

(dead)

Perc. II: Timp.

œ

senza vib

> ¨ (highest pitch possible) ≈ ‰ &c > Î poss ¨ (highest pitch possible) ≈ ‰ &c Î poss ?c

œ p sub

(ord vib)

U

≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈ ≈

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

nœ π

˙

˙

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Œ

∑ U w F

˙

ord vib

∑ ∑

o ˙-

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Œ

∑ Solo senza vib

œ Ø poss

∑ ∑

Œ

(ord vib)

Ó

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

o wB (· ) π sub

senza vib ast

∑ ˙

ord

ord vib

œ

Œ

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Ó

F

Ø poss

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

¿¿

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

?c Å >

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

Ó

Œ

con sordina (lead practice mutes, if available)

?c œ œ â

?c Å > ?c œ œ >

≈ ≈ ≈

‰ ‰ ‰

Ó

u ∑ ∑

ca. 3:21

16


Ib. Collapse of the Strangest Animals [boy soprano, chamber orchestra, and chorus]

17


instrumentation Alto Flute Oboe Bass Clarinet Bass Saxophone Contrabassoon Horn in F Trumpet in C Tenor Trombone Percussion I: crotales Percussion IV: glockenspiel, marimba Two Pianos Boy Soprano Chorus (SATBBs) Violin I Solo Violin II Solo Viola Solo Cello Solo (Cello Concertante) Contrabass Solo

18


Ib. Collapse of the Strangest Animals boy sopranoe, chamber orchestra, and chorus

Still resonating some aftermath Alto Flute

&c

Oboe

&c

Bass Clarinet

Bass Saxophone

Contrabassoon

Horn in F

Trumpet in C

Tenor Trombone

‰ ≈ n œ- œ œ R ∏ π

Piano I

Piano II

Boy Soprano (Jonathan's Double)

Soprano

Alto

Œ ‰ ≈ n œ- œ≈≈œ œ R π

œ

œ ∏ ∑

?c

?c

?c

&c

?c

&c Ó

œ. œ œ. ≈ J R ≈‰ π P π sub

Ó

&c

&c

∑ (ord)

?c

?c

tc

‰ . œ- œ R ∏ °

Œ

with Beater

Ó

Marimba

œ π

85

j j 85 n œ œ p F

j œ œ œ œœ c â fl ƒ

ã

Ó