Page 1


2


INTRODUCTION We proudly present Building Our Future, our plan for the future of the Alma Mater Society of Queen's University. With our platform, we set out to develop a strategy to deal with all the pressing issues facing the AMS today. With the dramatic changes taking place at Queen's, it is more important than ever that you have an AMS that acts as a strong voice for student concerns. Students are understandably apprehensive about the future value of their degree and the quality of their education in the face of these changes. It's time to take a stand. We are running on three core values: 1. that increasing enrolment should not reduce the quality of your education or student experience, and the AMS should take a leadership role in keeping class sizes small and student services accessible; 2. that Queen's ought to be a welcoming and supportive community for every student, the AMS should play a major role in supporting the health of its members and the wellness of the community; 3. that the rapidly increasing cost of tuition is making it harder than ever to afford university, and the AMS should ensure that you are getting the most value for your student dollars. Significant changes have already started to reshape the Queen's landscape. Students need to make their voices heard, and we believe that the AMS has a critical role to play in representing student voices. It also means that we need to be open and accountable to our members. It is only with active student involvement that we can promote a healthy and safe environment for all students. The AMS should seek to empower the diversity of students at Queen's to support each other and strengthen our community. To keep the AMS open for everyone, it is crucial that we eliminate the financial and social barriers to student involvement. The AMS should maximize opportunities for student employment and engagement while also being socially and environmentally responsible. It is important to us personally to build upon the AMS so that it can continue to provide valuable services and opportunities far into the future. As a student government, we need to keep our focus on what really matters: students. The AMS must get the big things right: services, advocacy, and governance. We hope you will lend us your support and help make the AMS an institution every student at Queen's can be proud of. Cha Gheill! - Peter, Kanivanan, and John

3


CONTENTS Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 3 Contents ................................................................................................................................................. 4 Meet Team PCS ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Peter Pakalnis .................................................................................................................................... 5 Kanivanan Chinniah ........................................................................................................................... 6 John Stanley ....................................................................................................................................... 7 Student Government that Works for You .............................................................................................. 8 1) A Quality Education and Academic Experience ............................................................................. 9 2) Value For Your Money ................................................................................................................. 11 3) Student Life in a Supportive Community ..................................................................................... 14 Commissions ........................................................................................................................................ 16 Academic Affairs Commission (AAC) ............................................................................................... 16 Campus Activities Commission (CAC) .............................................................................................. 17 Commission of Internal Affairs (CIA) ............................................................................................... 17 Commission of the Environment and Sustainability (CES) .............................................................. 18 Municipal Affairs Commission (MAC) .............................................................................................. 18 Social Issues Commission (SIC) ........................................................................................................ 19 Services ................................................................................................................................................ 20 The AMS Pub Services (TAPS) .......................................................................................................... 20 Common Ground ............................................................................................................................. 20 Convocation Services ....................................................................................................................... 21 The Queen's Journal ........................................................................................................................ 21 Queen’s Student Constables (QSC) .................................................................................................. 21 Queen's TV (QTV) ............................................................................................................................. 22 Publishing and Copy Centre (P&CC) ................................................................................................ 22 Tricolour Retail Outlet (TRO) ........................................................................................................... 22 Walkhome ........................................................................................................................................ 22 Yearbook and Design Services (YDS)................................................................................................ 23 Offices and Support Services ............................................................................................................... 24 AMS Food Centre ............................................................................................................................. 24 Communications/Marketing Office ................................................................................................. 24 Human Resources (HR) Office.......................................................................................................... 24 Information Technology (IT) Office.................................................................................................. 24 Peer Support Centre (PSC) ............................................................................................................... 24 Student Centre Office ...................................................................................................................... 25 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................ 26

4


MEET TEAM PCS PETER PAKALNIS - PRESIDENT My name is Peter Pakalnis and I am running to be the President of your Alma Mater Society. I was born in Uxbridge, and grew up in North Gower and Barrhaven near Ottawa. I decided to come to Queen's in 2009 after my father was hired as a professor of Mining Engineering here. We share a home in Kingston just off campus along with our cat, Janeway. My time here has been life-changing. Upon arriving at Queen’s, I became swept up in the excitement and tradition of our one-of-a-kind culture. The abundance of fantastic opportunities to get engaged in the community has also given me a unique appreciation for the exceptional Queen's experience. As a FYNIR, I had to push myself to seek out ways to get involved. This led me to get into activities like Queen's Model Parliament, Queen's International Affairs Association, and the Queen's Lithuanian Club. I have also had the privilege of volunteering at a community based crisis, distress, and befriending service for the past few years. It has been deeply fulfilling to help Kingstonians and students in need and has given me a real appreciation for the mental health needs in our community. Like an increasing number of students, I took some time off in the middle of my academic career in order to gain work experience and pursue diverse opportunities outside of the academic bubble. Queen's can and should be doing more to support students pursuing unconventional academic careers by providing increased resources and career guidance. The entrepreneurial spirit at this university helped me to start my own management consulting partnership two-and-a-half years ago with other Queen's students. This experience has taught me the importance of hard work and dedication, and inspired me to take a leadership role in fostering an entrepreneurial community at Queen's. I know Queen's as a place that has helped me develop both personally and professionally. Queen's is a place where the culture of tradition and the spirit of innovation go hand-in-hand. If you also believe in a Queen's that is greater than the sum of its parts, join us in this adventure. Together, we can do anything. With warm regards,

5


MEET TEAM PCS KANIVANAN CHINNIAH – VP OPERATIONS My name is Kanivanan Chinniah, and I am running to be the Vice President (Operations) of your AMS. After moving to Sydney, Nova Scotia from Malaysia, I have recently earned Canadian citizenship–a fact of which I am, of course, very proud. I came to Queen's University to study Economics; now in my fourth year of study, I've shared in numerous experiences as a member of this community. During my time with the Hotel Dieu Student Auxiliary, I had the great opportunity to work with my fellow Queen’s students to organize and run fundraisers for this critical Kingston community resource. I found my time with the Auxiliary to be a fulfilling experience, as it exposed me to life, culture, and problems in Kingston outside of the campus “bubble,” and altogether cemented my pride as a new member of this diverse and beautiful city. Within student life, I participated actively in the Queen's Debating Union. The QDU presented an opportunity for me to meet ambitious students with a strong spirit of togetherness. I was challenged to develop my critical thinking skills, and intrigued by my teammates as their wit and competitive spirit forced me to think dynamically on my feet. I decided to get more involved by running for ASUS rep to the AMS. It has taught me the capacity of the AMS to act in students' best interests. I have seen the bold and passionate discourse that takes place between different representatives of our community as we navigate the waters of student leadership together. My time as a representative has led me to run for Vice President (Operations) of the AMS. It is important that we continue the tradition of this student government by representing students effectively, respectfully, and transparently. I feel that I will be a welcoming face in the AMS offices, while doing the work necessary to shape this organization into an effective voice for all students. It is also very important to me that your executive is respectful to you as stakeholders in this government. I look forward to seeing you on the campaign trail, and throughout the election. All the best,

6


MEET TEAM PCS JOHN STANLEY – VP UNIVERSITY AFFAIRS My name is John Stanley and I am proud to be running as the Vice-President (University Affairs) candidate for Team PCS. Growing up in Cambridge, Ontario, I was one of only three students in my graduating class to come to Queen's. Now, in my fourth year of Political Studies, I have had amazing, unforgettable experiences that have truly been life-changing. As soon as I arrived on campus in the fall of my first year, I knew that I had made the right choice: Queen’s was the place for me. The sheer amounts of enthusiasm and pride that all of the students had for their university blew me away, and immediately I was inspired to get involved in the university community and make the most of my time here. That led me to such fantastic events as Queen’s Model Parliament and Queen’s Model United Nations, but also rewarding experiences in the Kingston community as well. Amongst these opportunities was the chance to work with the Municipal Affairs Commission and develop a student-run yard maintenance service, now known as the Student Maintenance and Resource Team (SMART). Developing SMART truly opened my eyes not only to the brilliant people with amazing ideas that we have at Queen’s, but also the role of the AMS in helping develop those ideas into tangible products. It was this experience that stoked my interest in student government and led me to run to become an Arts and Science Senator last year. As a Senator, my primary responsibility is to ensure that students’ interests are fairly accounted for and considered in the deliberations of the University Senate. The discussions that happen at Senate– potential program closures and specialization, the direction of enrolment growth, and the future of peer-administered non-academic discipline, to name a few–greatly affect the student experience. Building knowledge within the student body of these issues and their repercussions has further motivated me to continue my community involvement as an effective advocate for students. That’s why I am running to be the next Vice President (University Affairs) of your AMS. I love Queen’s and the vibrant, welcoming atmosphere of the Queen’s community, and I want to make sure that each and every student has as great an experience here as I have. I will be a strong voice for you to the faculties, the administration, and the City. Those are the qualities that I bring to the table, and they are exactly what you should expect from your AMS executive. Cha gheill!

7


STUDENT GOVERNMENT THAT WORKS FOR YOU We are proud to present our plan for revitalizing the AMS and improving undergraduate student life at Queen's. Throughout our platform, we present our ideas to make the AMS a more active and accountable organization for its membership. We will never forget who we work for and we will always strive to provide you with an AMS that you can be proud of and that truly represents your voices on the most important issues: educational quality, value for your money, and a supportive learning environment.

8


STUDENT GOVERNMENT THAT WORKS FOR YOU A QUALITY EDUCATION AND ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE Academic Quality Our university has changed drastically in the past five years. A student entering Queen's today will find a very different school from the one that greeted the Class of 2014 when they first stepped on campus just four short years ago. The AMS must stand up to ensure that growing student enrolment and administrative reorganization does not diminish the quality of education you expect, and that a Queen's degree will be just as valuable in ten years as it is right now. Our AMS will always fight for:  More professors in the classroom and better student/teacher ratios  Better student/TA ratios so all students have access to interactive tutorials and one-on-one learning  More access to time in labs and workshops for engineering and sciences students  A balanced approach to new "blended learning" strategies to maintain in-classroom course components  A comprehensive offering of Continuing and Distance Studies online and correspondence courses  A real plan to control enrolment growth in the next five years and beyond We will also take the university to task on their bloated administration and ensure that they devote revenue from rising tuition and new grants to teaching and learning resources rather than any more unnecessary executives. We pledge to look closely at the student award system to study how money is being awarded and what could be done to increase accessibility for economically disadvantaged students at Queen's. We will also push for more support from the administration for vital student resources like Health, Counselling, and Disability Services and Career Services. It is going to be critical that we adapt to our new learning environment together and with an eye toward the future. We believe that the AMS must have a seat at the table in representing student interests in the field of academic quality, in order to ensure that Queen's never loses its standing as a leader in academic excellence.

AMS Community Leadership Grants Queen's is renowned as a first-rate university with excellent research facilities, some of the country's best professors, and a brilliant student community of vibrant and upcoming scholars and athletes. We cannot deprive any of our students of the opportunity to thrive in this incredible environment simply due to a lack of financial resources. We all academically benefit from the diversity of thought

9


we have access to at Queen's, and we can't afford to risk this element of our great school by excluding those who will surely contribute so much if provided with the proper resources. Currently, the AMS Board of Directors provides $15,000 in Special Projects Grants; unfortunately these valuable and innovate grants have been greatly underused in the past, and much of these funds remain completed unclaimed, simply due to a lack of applicants. We want to effectively serve our membership using all available resources, and in response to real and apparent needs. As such, we propose allocating two-thirds of the Special Projects Grant to an AMS Community Leadership Grant: ten $1,000 grants to returning undergraduate students demonstrating financial need and an interest in uplifting and developing our community. All returning students will be encouraged to submit a written application, and successful first-round applicants will be assessed through interviews with a panel consisting of Board representatives and other members as appointed by Assembly. We hope to collaborate with the university to make sure that these grants are clarified and made available on the same platforms as university scholarships and bursaries–though the funds would be allocated and controlled by the AMS. These grants would be drawn from the Board of Directors' budget, and so would not come from any student fees. For some students, an extra $1,000 is a semester's worth of books, or tuition for a full-year course. We want to give you an AMS that provides significant and sustained support to those of our members who need a student government for exactly that purpose.

SOLUS Course Waitlist The implementation of SOLUS has proven valuable in many ways, and symbolized a significant upgrade in the way that our school manages course registration, fees, and academic services. Students have consistently expressed an interest in a SOLUS waitlist, yet it still lacks such a feature– something that was available on the previous registration system. We’ve all dealt with the frustration of repeatedly checking into SOLUS only to confirm that a course still has no available seats. We need a better option for our course registration. We will work with the University to implement a SOLUS waitlist that will allow students to place their name in a queue that will register them in classes automatically when a space opens up. This will also ensure that the administration is aware of the evolving needs of SOLUS users as it is refined and updated. We will ensure that this project is completed in a timely and efficient manner and is made available to students as soon as possible.

10


STUDENT GOVERNMENT THAT WORKS FOR YOU VALUE FOR YOUR MONEY More Jobs for Students Through our 13 services, the AMS employs hundreds of students as front-line customer service representatives and dozens more gain valuable executive experience as service managers or assistant managers. We know how important campus jobs are to students. Enhancing and broadening student employment opportunities is one of our top priorities for the AMS. Our plan involves three steps: 1. Increasing employment opportunities by hiring more seasonal staff at high-volume services a. After changes to AMS human resources policies this year, our managers are now empowered to conduct hiring year-round. We will further amend these rules to allow the hiring of students for short-term positions at services that experience a high volume of sales in September and January and then lower volumes the rest of the year. We feel that this will serve both the needs of the AMS and those of students who wish to make some spending money but cannot commit to eight months of weekly shifts. This will create over 50 new student jobs. 2. Establishing a portal for campus jobs outside the AMS a. Many students work for the university, whether in the library, as a resident employee or in one of many other opportunities. We will set up an online portal for nonacademically related campus jobs. This will serve as a one-stop shop for job listings as they become available, both during the school year and in the summer months. 3. Creating a new ombudsperson position to ensure fair adjudication of workplace disputes a. Disputes with fellow employees are one of the leading reasons for dissatisfaction and early termination in AMS service jobs. By creating a process for elevating disagreements between service staff (including disagreements involving managers), we will mitigate the friction that too often exists between staff and managers. The AMS Human Resources Officer (who would usually handle such issues) would have discretion to elevate disputes to the ombudsperson, who would serve at the pleasure of the Board of Directors. The vast majority of AMS employees work in services, but there are also almost 20 salaried staff on the "government" side of the AMS—the commissions and offices. These staff receive a set weekly paycheque regardless of the amount of work they actually complete in any given pay period. We will revisit every job description before conducting hiring in order to align prospective employees' expectations of jobs with the realities of past years, so that our staff are adequately compensated and nobody is being grossly overworked and underpaid. We will also reserve within general cash flow a 5% stipend on every contract, and release this money as performance bonuses for productive salaried employees. We will reject the salary restructuring

11


proposed by the current AMS executive in favour of this alternative plan because we do not think it is fair to give raises to the three AMS executives while leaving the rest of our employees out in the cold.

Athletics and Recreation Fees and Service Queen's undergrads are getting a bad deal from Queen's Athletics and Recreation (A&R) and it's time for a change. Between 2008 and 2012, the Athletics Fee paid by AMS members more than doubled. This huge fee increase was passed at the Annual General Meeting of the AMS in 2008 as part of the preparation for the opening of a three-stage Queen's Centre which, sadly, will never happen now. Members of the SGPS pay significantly less for the privilege of using A&R facilities for a whole 12 months than AMS members pay for 8 months of use. We can't go on like this. While we appreciate the revival of the PEC in the past 18 months, we are still being underserved and overcharged. It's time to take a tougher line with Queen's A&R and demand that we either receive greater services, or pay a much lower fee. We will seek the following changes:     

Longer hours of operation for the ARC More operational gym space and more fitness classes Summer access to the ARC for a reasonable price, discounted from the general public rate Renovation and re-opening of more workout and gym facilities in the PEC Better workout equipment and more frequent maintenance schedule

Failing a reasonable accommodation of these requests, we will seek to lower the Athletics Fee to a level on par with the services provided. We will also investigate the possibility of splitting the Athletics Fee into two separate fees: a mandatory fee paid by every student to support the operations of varsity teams, and an opt-out fee paid by students who wish to use ARC facilities and attend home games. We support Queen's Athletics, as we understand the important role that these activities play in the undergraduate experience of many students. We also value quality fitness facilities and opportunities to take part in competitive sports, and have taken advantage of these opportunities ourselves. However, it is completely unreasonable for students to keep paying a fee that was approved based on promised facilities that were never built. It's time to take a stand for more services or lower fees.

SUMMER CHILDCARE SERVICE Working for the AMS should be a rewarding and meaningful experience. Furthermore, the AMS should provide valuable services for the Queen's and Kingston communities. As such, we propose to re-open a seasonal AMS childcare service, which will run from June-September, finishing before the beginning of the academic year. This service will provide jobs for students, while also employing seasoned childcare professionals as supervisors. These jobs will provide valuable experience for those students interested in future careers in childhood development, education, primary care, community and/or public service, particularly given the competitive climate of these career fields.

12


This service will operate out of the underused MacGillivray-Brown Hall on Barrie Street, effectively revitalizing this under-utilized AMS property. It will operate on a break-even budget, while creating at least five well-paying new summer jobs for students and providing a low-cost childcare option for students and non-students alike. Even as this service fiscally mobilizes a historically underutilized space and creates valuable employment opportunities for students, it will further serve the greater Kingston community. Gender equity in the workplace has been historically hindered by childcare issues, and though Queen’s operates admirably as an equal-opportunity employer, our surrounding area still lacks affordable and convenient childcare options. We believe that childcare is a vital touchstone in the campaign for gender equity in the workplace, and as an executive, we endeavour to actively participate in this campaign. As a service designed to run a sustainable break-even budget with a focus on employment opportunities for AMS members, we will offer a fairly-priced service, thereby uplifting our extended community by providing an affordable and essential service. The MacGillivray-Brown Hall childcare service will engage our communities in response to a clear and significant need, allocating AMS space resources during a time in which they would not otherwise be used.

Financial Accountability Working for the AMS should provide everyone the opportunity to make lasting relationships, and staff appreciation events are an important opportunity for this kind of bonding. That is why we will ensure all AMS staff receive their fair opportunity in staff appreciation activities. We will guarantee all students employed at AMS services for at least one full semester the right to participate in a staff party or complimentary dinner. If they work for a service in both the fall and winter terms, they will have the right to attend two such events–one before the holiday break and another at the end of the school year. We only think it is fair that those who choose to devote an entire year to serving their fellow students should be rewarded with a fun experience both inside and outside the workplace. We will hold ourselves to the same standard, limiting AMS office staff to one employee appreciation event per semester worked (three events for most staff and two events for those working SeptemberApril). Following established practice for all other AMS employees, the amounts to be spent to “appreciate” each office staff member will be budgeted in advance and approved by the AMS Board of Directors. We will also make these amounts (along with associated receipts) publicly available in the AMS Annual Report at the end of the year.

13


STUDENT GOVERNMENT THAT WORKS FOR YOU STUDENT LIFE IN A SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY City of Kingston Relations Our relationship with the City of Kingston and community stakeholders has never been more important. In the past two years, the disconnect between student voices and municipal decisionmakers has led to an electoral redistricting that excluded students, a multiple-garbage bag surcharge that disproportionately harms students, and numerous other anti-student policies. We will work hard to mend the relationship with the City of Kingston after the successful electoral boundaries appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board. What we need now more than anything is a more proactive approach to our relationship with the City, so that we can prevent anti-student policies from ever coming into force, rather than constantly playing catch-up. The next Kingston municipal election will occur during our term in office, and we have every intention of making our voices heard and bringing student issues to the forefront of the debate. We will aggressively pursue the following municipal policy goals as AMS executive:  Additional bus services for students o Pushing to establish a bus transfer point on campus to make cross-Kingston travel more accessible for students. o Encouraging the creation of more bus routes that serve student communities.  Repeal the "one garbage bag" policy that discriminates against students in high-density houses  New bike lanes on University Ave., Union St., and Division St.  Better street lighting in the University District  Create cross-walks on campus  Sensible zoning laws for safe, affordable housing expansion as the University District expands north The AMS has been able to work with the City to accomplish our goals in the past.

Financial Support for Students in Need As university life becomes more expensive every year, and financial resources fail to increase proportionately, the AMS needs to work on behalf of its membership to increase the financial accessibility of undergraduate life at Queen's. We will assess the various bursaries available through the AMS and make sure that they increase each year proportionately to any increases to AMS fees–after all, these bursaries are designed to mitigate the expenses of AMS membership for those in positions of financial hardship, so it is important to ensure that these resources keep up with growing costs.

14


As a leadership organization, we also need to recognize our members' struggles with mental and physical health issues. These difficulties are not only medical in nature, but also pose real financial hardship to many students, and we believe that the AMS has a responsibility to address this hardship. As an executive, we will upgrade our insurance plan to secure adequate and affordable coverage for all students. Those who have access to alternative options will still be able to opt out of the plan; however, those who rely entirely upon the AMS will be provided with more comprehensive and specialized options. Students who live with chronic illnesses or invisible (dis)Abilities, as well as those who require psychiatric care will be accommodated better, more thoroughly, and more affordably. We're all aware of our community's need for mental health services, and this is an area where we simply cannot afford to cut corners just to minimize expenses. We need an insurance plan that offers, for those students who may need it, an option for enhanced coverage of mental health services. As an executive, we look forward to putting in the work with our insurance provider and collaborating with our council to implement this plan at minimum additional expense to our general membership.

More Support for Clubs and Student Groups More than any other aspect of what we do as a student government, clubs represent the core of our mandate to support student activities. More Queen's students become involved in club-based extracurricular activity than either athletics or AMS committee involvement. Our support structure for clubs is one of our most important responsibilities. We will increase the awareness of AMS insurance coverage for clubs and share our internal booking codes with Queen’s Hospitality Services with the clubs community. This will allow some of our most active clubs to reinvest money they may have spent on additional fees into student activities instead. Furthermore, we will increase funding opportunities available to clubs by instituting an opt-out fee of $5.00 to fund the Clubs Grant system. This will raise the total amount of funding available from the present level of $30,000 per year to an estimated $50,000+. The Clubs Office currently receives far more applications for funding than the amount of funds available. This funding boost will give AMS Clubs access to more resources to enhance your student experience. To enhance the potential of our Clubs Office, we will move the Clubs Office from the oversight of the Commission of Internal Affairs to the Campus Activities Commission. This is a much more natural fit for the office and move the Clubs Manager closer to the people and committees with whom they ought to collaborate with.

15


COMMISSIONS ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMISSION (AAC) Our Academic Affairs Commission will work to support and engage with students on Queen’s academic policies and services. Our AAC will lobby the university and other policy-makers on issues including academic quality, the cost of tuition fees, and the accessibility of a university education. Our Academic Affairs Commission will be devoted to the following projects and initiatives:  More professors in the classroom and better student/teacher ratios o Larger classes lead to fewer personal learning opportunities. We will fight back on behalf of students by lobbying for a firm commitment from university administration to cap the size of first-year classes across faculties and departments.  Better student/TA ratios so all students have access to interactive tutorials and one-on-one learning o Especially in large first-year classes, many students never get the chance to speak with their instructor, making the student-TA relationship even more important. Our AAC will work toward preserving regular tutorial session for classes large and small.  More access to time in labs and workshops for engineering and sciences students  Balance "blended learning" strategies to maintain in-classroom course components o We must adapt to our new learning environment together and with an eye toward the future, and out AAC with ensure the AMS has a seat at the table in representing student interests so that Queen's never loses its standing as a leader in academic excellence.  A greater selection of Continuing and Distance Studies online and correspondence courses o Online courses make up an important part of the academic experience for many students, and provide a valuable tool to increase the accessibility of Queen’s courses to those unable to attend class in person. Our AAC will work with faculties to increase their selection, while preserving a full slate of in-classroom course offerings.  Complete and publish “What’s What?” o We will ensure the completion of “What’s What?” an academic website that has been promised by the AMS since 1996. “What’s What” will include a course syllabus bank and online services for students from all faculties. o We will make the completion of “What’s What?” an executive priority.  Increasing aid for students in financial need o Rising tuition has been outpacing student aid in recent years. We will lobby for student bursaries that can adequately address the rising cost of a Queen's education. No student should be denied an education due to financial hardship. Our Academic Affairs Commission will work every day to preserve the quality of your education and the value of your degree. We pledge to work closely with university administration to help students feel comfortable with their academic experience at Queen’s and confident in the quality of the education they are receiving.

16


CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COMMISSION (CAC) Your time at Queen’s should be just as enjoyable as it is educational. If you had to describe the Campus Activities Commission in one word, that word would be “fun.” The CAC reaches out to a broad range of AMS members who participate in their committees, but the integration of the Clubs Office will allow them to foster even more inclusive campus activities and events. We will encourage our CAC to nurture popular activities like Queen’s Model Parliament while exploring new activities that a whole new generation of students can enjoy. Working with the AMS Communications and Marketing Office, our CAC will poll students to find out where their interests lie and what new activities we could develop to maximize student engagement. We will increase funding opportunities for clubs by increasing the Clubs Grant fund and extending the AMS’s insurance and space bookings coverage to clubs. One of our CAC's top priorities will be reaching out to students through social media to join a club or take part in an activity. We will ensure that our Campus Activities Commission is consistently fostering inclusivity and supporting events at Queen’s that enhance student life.

COMMISSION OF INTERNAL AFFAIRS (CIA) The Commission of Internal Affairs helps to keep the AMS running smoothly by overseeing elections, AMS Assembly, and the non-academic discipline system. The Clubs Office operates under the CIA, but we strongly believe that the Campus Activities Commission will be better able to accommodate the unique challenges and opportunities the Clubs Office presents and help it to reach its full potential.  Elections and referenda o Our CIA will maximize awareness of AMS elections through creative marketing and infromational campaigns. Voter turnout has increased since the introduction of online balloting, but there are always possible improvements to be made in AMS outreach.  AMS Assembly o Our CIA will ensure that policy is followed and Assembly documents are published to members three days in advance of the next meeting in order to ensure that representatives are well-informed.  Clubs o The Clubs Office will become part of the Campus Activities Commission. This will allow them a greater capacity to cooperate with students involved in extracurriculars and provide the CIA time to pursue new initiatives and focus on issues of policy and operations.  Non-academic discipline o We will ensure that AMS members fully understand the Queen's Student Code of Conduct. We will also contribute to initiatives that target malicious blue-light activations.

17


COMMISSION OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY (CES) The Commission of the Environment and Sustainability is the newest commission within the AMS. Our team will not merely silo sustainability into a single commission, but also treat it as a Societywide priority. Our CES will pursue the following goals and initiatives:  We will cut 20% of our annual AMS-wide paper waste by moving more documents online.  Our CES will ensure that services like the Room of Requirement and the Bike Shop are publicized and well used.  Our CES will work with the MAC to make sustainability a top priority for SMART.

MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS COMMISSION (MAC) The Municipal Affairs Commission must work to improve the lines of communication between students and the City of Kingston. Our MAC will yield a great deal of lobbying influence with the City and use this power to emphasize how Queen’s students can affect their communities in a positive way. In turn, the Kingston community has a lot to offer Queen's students, and we will make certain that that municipal services and opportunities are made apparent to students.  Fostering connections with the municipality o The MAC must establish good working relationships with municipal policy makers. The MAC should use these relationships to the benefit of students, on issues like improving municipal services and influence plans for the future of student housing.  Student housing o The AMS needs to be a strong voice for safer, affordable student housing. While the University is building two new residence buildings, the MAC needs to address issues in post-residence student accommodations. Our MAC will compose a policy document that outlines the AMS's position regarding town-gown relations and the strain on student living hubs.  Municipal services o The MAC will continue to work with City of Kingston on policies related to student living environments, such as increased accessibility to Kingston Transit, the installation of bike lanes in the University District, more street lighting in student neighbourhoods, and the expansion of the blue light system beyond campus. We will also insist on the repeal of the garbage collection policy that disproportionately affects students.  Municipal employment and volunteer opportunities database o Our MAC will work with community stakeholders to implement an online database for available jobs and volunteer opportunities in the city of Kingston, with a planned release date within two years.  2014 municipal election o Our MAC will ensure that the AMS is an influential force in the 2014 Kingston municipal election and that student issues are brought to the forefront by hosting an on-campus mayoral debate, generating student interest in the election through information campaigns on social media, and pushing for an on-campus polling station.

18


SOCIAL ISSUES COMMISSION (SIC) The Social Issues Commission is a critical voice for marginalized students at Queen’s. In addition to their numerous committees, the SIC administers the Peer Support Centre, the Food Centre, and a variety of publications. An effective Social Issues Commissioner must hold the university and the AMS alike accountable for their actions and fight for the fair and equitable treatment of students. Our SIC will ensure that more students are aware of mental health issues, invisible (dis)Abilities, and resources available for those struggling. Some of our priorities for this year include:  Renewed emphasis on SIC publications o SIC publications have tremendous impact on communities at Queen’s, and the AMS can do more to assist with production in order to get them out earlier in the school year so more students can read them.  Advocacy for students o We will continue the SIC's record of effective advocacy and awareness campaigns regarding social issues and oppression on our campus.  Anti-oppression o Our SIC will make anti-oppression training available to any student group that would like to take part, and advertise this service through cooperation with the Clubs Office and the CAC.  Improved support for the AMS Food Centre o We are proud of the AMS Food Centre for providing year-round access to nonperishable food items. We will reduce the administrative fee charged to this service from $2,500 to $1,000 and continue exempting them from paying cost-recovery fees to the Student Life Centre, leaving them with more money to provide for the basic human right of having enough to eat.  New initiatives in the Peer Support Centre o Our SIC will work closely with the PSC Director to expand programs to target mental health issues that have not been addressed in the past. In particular, we will develop an action plan for students dealing with addiction and substance abuse issues– problems that are rampant yet often undiscussed on campuses. We are familiar with “drinking culture,” and yet our campus needs a strategy for effectively addressing the needs of students truly struggling with their relationships with drugs and/or alcohol. o Our SIC will expand access to animal therapy, “buddy systems,” fitness programs specifically designed for those dealing with depression and/or anxiety–we will leave no stone unturned. Where mental health is concerned, we simply can’t afford to settle for the status quo or shy away from new ideas.  Expanding access to equity grants o Each year, the SIC struggles to administer the full amount of money allocated to the Equity Grants pool. The SIC budgets to give away $5,000 annually, but only $1,560 was actually distributed last year, and only $2,750 the year before. We will reverse this trend by vigorously advertising two applications windows in the fall and winter semesters and allow groups and individuals opportunities to apply during both periods to fund their project or event.

19


SERVICES The state of AMS services is very strong. The biggest long-term issue facing our services is how they will adjust to increasing enrolment numbers in the years to come. We have already seen them evolve (like QP expanding their seating area to fit more patrons in 2011), but logistical issues and scarce space may pose difficulties. We will hire service managers with the best ideas on how to meet and overcome the challenges unique to their service.

THE AMS PUB SERVICES (TAPS) This has been a big year for our campus bars, with the renaming of “Alfie’s” and the aggressive marketing campaign that has come with it. TAPS really has two distinct identities: QP and the Underground. A key challenge for both establishments in the coming year will be finding ways to capitalize on increasing numbers of students at Queen's and building a loyal customer base within the incoming class that will last for years to come. QP needs to do more to balance out patron visits between peak and off-peak times, in order to increase revenue during slower periods. We will introduce daily food specials and other promotions to drive traffic into the bar during dead hours. We will also study options to change serving practices or institute "team service" so that patrons don't have to pay their bill every time their server finishes her or his shift, and can thus stay in the bar for longer. The Underground has a very different set of challenges. For many years, this service has struggled to find an identity with which customers engage. It is time to ask students what they want from this service and what will bring their business back to us. We will conduct research on students' desires and expectations, utilizing the resources of the new Communications and Marketing Office. This will be a long-term project, but it starts with asking questions. It's not enough to change the name and leave it at that. We need to consult students on what they want and then act on that information.

COMMON GROUND Common Ground's relocation from the JDUC to the Queen's Centre in 2009 was the biggest shake-up the service has experienced in memory, but it has since found a foothold and a refreshed identity in its new space. One frequently-heard complaint about Common Ground’s new location is that it feels "sanitary" or lacks character, but this situation has been improving every year as new works of art take shape, and customizable spaces have been introduced. We will develop this initiative further by asking artists and designers to display their work on the walls that remain bare, in an effort to make this service an ever more inviting space for customers. The opinion we hear most often from average students about Common Ground is that they have a positive impression of the service overall, but wish that the employees wore gloves as they prepared food or drinks for customers.

20


We will issue a policy requiring employees to wear gloves at the service and look for ways to make Common Ground more responsive to patron preferences like this one in the future. AMS services rely on student patronage, so we place the highest value upon student feedback and will solicit and incorporate this feedback wherever possible.

CONVOCATION SERVICES Convocation Services is a unique service in that it operates for only a very short spans of time each year, renting convocation hoods and gowns to graduating Queen’s students. It is also unique in that involves a lot of conversation and consultation with our supplier. For these reasons, we will move Convocation Services from the management of the Media and Student Services Director to the oversight of the Vice-President (Operations). Questions from students will be answered by the front-desk assistant or the VP (Ops) directly, much like the Bus-It system and the Health and Dental Plan. This will serve as a more natural fit for the service and will free up the Director to devote more time to other AMS services.

THE QUEEN'S JOURNAL The Queen's Journal provides a valuable service to their employers, volunteers, and readers. Queen's does not offer a journalism program, so students interested in pursuing jobs in publishing after graduation are lucky to have a student publication with the Journal’s storied history and alumni (including Globe and Mail editor-in-chief John Stackhouse among others). Maintaining and building on ad revenue is important to the continued financial success of the Journal. We will help the Journal business manager and their team to adapt to a changing industry environment and access new local, national, and online revenue streams.

QUEEN’S STUDENT CONSTABLES (QSC) The “StuCons” are the AMS security service for every campus bar and nightclub, major sporting events, and a resource for student groups hosting special events. This service is valuable not only for providing opportunities for student employment and management experience, but also as a costsaving mechanism—if we were not able to utilize the StuCons, we would be forced to hire private security guards for QP and the Underground, and this would be much more expensive. It is important to continue addressing the staffing issues at this service, which has faced a severe shortage of employees in recent years. To address this issue, we will hire more staff, retain a greater number of them for full-year terms, and increase the number of re-hires. Since Ontario security guard licenses last for two years, it is important to re-hire well-performing staff who will not need to be re-trained and re-licensed for their second year with the service. Therefore, we will empower our Student Constables Head Manager to give preference to re-hiring high-quality employees for a second year with the service over prospective new employees in this service. We will also require that, in the pool of new applicants, no preference be given to students who are earlier in their academic career over those who are entering their final year, in order to ensure that all AMS members still have an equal opportunity to work for this service.

21


QUEEN'S TV (QTV) QTV has been a prime example of an AMS greatest success story. It has flourished into a respected source of news and a reliable provider of entertainment on campus. At the same time, it has become financially stable, but they are the only AMS service supported by an opt-out (rather than mandatory) student fee. We support making the QTV fee mandatory in order to provide financial stability to this service and to assist with its continued prosperity.

PUBLISHING AND COPY CENTRE (P&CC) The P&CC sits in the lower ceilidh of the JDUC as an important and easily recognizable service used by thousands of students every year. This service has always been self-sustaining, running significant surpluses, even in an increasingly paperless academic environment. As with any long-term institution, of course, there are opportunities for proactive management and creative innovation to ensure that this service continues to thrive in coming years. The P&CC experiences high customer traffic for spans of time through the year. We will utilize upgrades to HR policy to better accommodate these needs and streamline the service that we are able to offer to students.

TRICOLOUR RETAIL OUTLET (TRO) Tricolour Outlet remains one of the largest and most visited AMS services. By selling clothing, used books, Tricolour Express tickets, and much more, Tricolour serves countless student needs. It also employs many students, and our plan will create dozens of new job opportunities. By creating new seasonal positions for floor-walkers and shelf-stockers, we will be able to employ dozens more students who are only available or willing to work for four to six weeks at the beginning of each semester, without significantly raising labour costs at the service. We will redesign the layout of the store to be more customer-friendly. Furthermore, we will invest in an online Tricolour Shop and market it to students, alumni, parents, and other potential customers near and far. This will raise service revenue for years to come.

WALKHOME We are proud of managing one of Canada's best university walk programs. Walkhome's name recognition amongst Queen’s students is one of its strongest assets, and we will work hard to maintain and build on this success. In order to give Walkhome employees equal opportunity to celebrate the holidays and the end of the year with staff appreciation events together, we will recruit occasional volunteers by providing coupons redeemable at our services to students who would like to volunteer for an evening or even for a couple hours. This would give every student an opportunity to contribute to Walkhome without a weekly commitment, and provide yet another way to market Walkhome as a service and employer, especially to first-year students.

22


YEARBOOK AND DESIGN SERVICES (YDS) YDS is the service that produces the annual Tricolour Yearbook. A major factor in the service's financial success is their ability to make their design and production deadlines. As part of our performance bonus plan, we will link a small portion of the managers’ salary to their ability to meet deadlines and avoid fines from the printing company. Another issue that has plagued YDS for many years is a large surplus of old yearbooks. A number of creative solutions have been attempted already—from opening more satellite pick-up sites to driving through student neighbourhoods in a cargo truck and distributing them directly. We will address the problem of annual overprinting through mandatory viewing of the opt-out page, so that we can print a number of yearbooks more representative of actual student interest. Every year, the AMS throws hundreds of unclaimed yearbooks in a dumpster. We will never just throw out the stock of old yearbooks—we will recycle, donate, or creatively re-purpose them.

23


OFFICES AND SUPPORT SERVICES AMS FOOD CENTRE The AMS Food Centre serves members of Queen's and Kingston communities with year-round access to non-perishable food items. To support the Food Centre, we will reduce the administrative fee charged to this service from the present rate of $2,500 this year to $1,000 during our year as executive. The Food Centre is already exempt from paying cost-recovery fees to the Student Life Centre, and reducing the administrative charge will help to put the Centre on an even stronger footing moving forward.

COMMUNICATIONS/MARKETING OFFICE We support the recent consolidation of the Communications and Marketing Offices into a single office. This will enable a more efficient and effective intermediary between students and the AMS. The Communications Officer drafts press releases, informational campaigns, and undergraduate outreach efforts while also maintaining the AMS's presence on social media. We will build on communications between the AMS and students by writing more posts as an executive on the successful AMS blog. The incorporation of the Marketing Office (and the addition of the new Brand Coordinator and Market Research Coordinator) will help the AMS to receive more input and feedback from students. This will include customer satisfaction reviews, product tests, and focus groups. It will also allow the Communications/Marketing Officer to support the head managers of services that do not have summer marketing managers.

HUMAN RESOURCES (HR) OFFICE The role of the AMS Human Resources Office will not change during our year as executive, but the addition of a Talent Acquisition Manager will supplement our recruitment efforts. This will be especially important as we create new job opportunities for students within our services.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) OFFICE The IT Office is crucial to the functioning of the AMS. They also provide useful resources to students in the form of AMS IT Rentals. We support the proposal from this year’s executive to hire a permanent IT Officer, but will ensure that it is budgeted appropriately and responsibly by finding savings throughout the office.

PEER SUPPORT CENTRE (PSC) The Social Issues Commission (SIC) is a multifaceted commission in the breadth of services, committees, and events that it facilitates, and we are excited to continue and further develop this valuable legacy. One such service is the Peer Support Centre (PSC), which operates out of the JDUC and offers a peer-oriented mental health service for students in crisis.

24


We will work closely with the PSC Director to elaborate upon existing programs to target mental health issues that have not been addressed in the past. In particular, we will develop an action plan for students dealing with addiction and substance abuse issues–problems that are rampant yet often undiscussed on campuses. We’re all familiar with “drinking culture,” and yet our campus needs a strategy for effectively addressing the needs of students truly struggling with their relationships with drugs and/or alcohol. In addition to the improved coverage we will offer through the AMS insurance plan, we will work with HCDS and the PSC to support all students dealing with mental health issues. We will keep an open mind to any new and innovative ideas, and recruit creative managers in these fields to develop new strategies for addressing mental health issues on campus–we will investigate animal therapy, a “buddy system,” fitness programs specifically designed for those dealing with depression and/or anxiety–we will leave no stone unturned. Where mental health is concerned, we simply can’t afford to accept the status quo or shy away from new ideas.

STUDENT CENTRE OFFICE The Student Centre Office oversees the Student Life Centre buildings: the JDUC, the Queen's Centre, MacGillivray-Brown Hall, and 51 Bader Lane ("The Grey House"), and has enjoyed management control of these facilities since the signing of the Operations & Management Agreement (O&M) in 2011. It is only appropriate that the Student Life Centre is now finally being operated and managed by and for students–these are student buildings and they need a student-run mandate. We would like to extend this student influence even further, by taking into account the feedback of any interested AMS members in project-planning initiatives in these buildings. We want all four buildings to reflect what we want as a Society. We will work closely with Student Affairs and the SGPS (our partners in the buildings) to represent and advocate for AMS interests in these buildings, uphold our responsibilities as landlords, and uplift the facilities to live up to their full potential. We currently have two severely underutilized buildings with absolutely no brand recognition linking them to the overall Student Life Centre, a well-used building that is too often used as a traffic corridor and requires significant and chronic maintenance, and a new building with a very high volume of variable traffic. As an executive, we will take stock of these resources to effectively, efficiently, and faithfully serve our constituents.

25


CONCLUSION We hope you enjoyed Building Our Future, our roadmap to a more accessible, accountable, and supportive AMS. This election is your opportunity to select a team that values you as a member of this community. We all belong to one of the greatest educational institutions in this country and it is important that we keep it that way. With the changes facing our university, you need an AMS that always puts you first, an AMS that understands and advocates for your interests. We believe that our plan is the one that best fulfils your needs in these turbulent times. It is centred on three principles that we recognize the AMS must take a leadership role in: 1) PRESERVING the value of your degree for years to come; 2) PROVIDING the best value for the money you entrust in us; and 3) BUILDING a supportive and member-driven learning environment. It is by focussing on these three convictions that we can build an even better community at Queen's together. As students ourselves, we genuinely relate to the value that you place in your degree, and understand that we must work hard to preserve the quality of our education. We also greatly respect the responsibility bestowed upon us as an executive, and appreciate that the funds that you contribute each year in the form of student fees must be used wisely and effectively to uplift and support our ever-evolving community. We will serve as the paragons of adaptability, versatility, and responsibility that this undergraduate student body so deserves, as we create an environment that supports your learning and development during one of the most memorable and transformative periods of your life. We will work for proactive, meaningful, and tangible reforms to serve a member-driven Society with a brilliant diversity of evolving needs. We will work to empower this membership with improved health services, greater financial resources, and streamlined academic processes. We will work to improve the relationships and lines of communication with university administration and the municipal government to better serve students. In some cases, this will require an honest and straightforward dialogue with these external parties. In other cases, we will take a hard line to represent and serve your interests. In all cases, we pledge to work hard, work passionately, and work for you. Cha Gheill!

26

Team pcs platform