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CHRISTINE ROBILLARD Design Portfolio | 2014-2018 e chrobill@syr.edu


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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

CONTENTS . . . [01] . . . [02] . . . [03] . . . [04] . . . [05] . . . [06] . . . [07] . . . [08]

light breeze tower 5 O21OO 21 safe light 35 gray mirror 43 + light breeze 53 tanda 63 bulbous 71 machine for meat 81

Animations | www.christinerobillard.com/animations

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Light Breeze Tower

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

modular housing // comprehensive

Instructor | Bess Krietemeyer, David Shanks Term | Spring 2016 - ARC 607 Site | Brooklyn, New York -- Design and production done in collaboration with SĂŠbastien Simonnet --

Following the recent rapid densification of Brooklyn, NY, this project investigates the potential housing development of the church yard of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church. The church seeks to develop its church yard for housing development as well as providing updated Parish and Community facilities. Light Breeze seeks to develop a 150 unit modular housing tower while simultaneously maintaining and enhancing the strong presence of the church in the local community. The formal strategy of this tower engages both the sidewalk level and the elevated brownstone level to programmatically service both the rental management and the Parish/Community facilities respectively. This project combines the high efficiency and economic benefits of prefabricated units with a panelized dynamic skin system. This combination allows for the individual customization and mediation of sun and wind through the manipulation of the mechanical skin system. The modular components are streamlined to produce 3 unit types (studio, 1 bedroom, and 2 bedroom) with the minimum number of parts while applying the louver system panels for individual unit control. The dynamic skin system blends together to produce a unified façade while encouraging a cellular change reflecting the community within.

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66

S E C T I O N A-A

L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

SITE STRATEGIES

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2 1

2

[01] adjacent site conditions

[02] exposure and visibility

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2

1

[03] massing split and shift

[04] spatial buffers

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2

1

1

[05] surface articulation

[06] wind and sun exposure 7


L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R

A

A

Plan 00: Ground Floor 88

Primary Residential Entries Primary Rectory Entry


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

3

3

A

A 2

2 1

1

Plan 02: Typical Residential 9


PRE-FABRICATED MODULAR UNITS

L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R

[a] The project develops four base elements for modular construction: (1) kitchen/bathroom, (2) living space, (3) master bedroom, and (4) secondary bedroom. These elements are composed to constructs three primary residential units which can be infinitely customized

through the use of user-controlled dynamic facade. By standardizing the elements for all of the units construction, transportation, and installation can be completed efficiently while still providing opportunity for user and orientation modification.

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2 a

1 a

2 b

1 a

3

2 b

4

1 b

10 10


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

S T U D I O //

S T U D I O //

1 B E D R O O M //

1 B E D R O O M //

2 B E D R O O M //

2 B E D R O O M //

SOUTH TOWER

SOUTH TOWER

SOUTH TOWER

NORTH TOWER

NORTH TOWER

NORTH TOWER

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L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R 12 12

S E C T I O N 3-3 South Tower // Studio Section

Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

S E C T I O N 2- 2 South Tower // 1 Bedroom Section

Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

S E C T I O N 1-1 South Tower // 2 Bedroom Section

Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

MODULAR UNIT SECTIONS & PLANS

Sample Unit Configuration . . .

10’ - 0”

30’ - 4”

15’ - 2”

5’ - 0”

The placement of the dynamic façade louver system allow each unit to control light and breeze exposure to the unit. The active “twisting” of the flexible louvers allows for localized or globalized modulation of sun and wind. The strategic placement of the panels addresses not only unit type conditions, but also site-specific orientation. From the exterior, the façade becomes a live display of user control, with pixelated unit transformations.

NorthTower // 2 Bedroom Plan Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0” SF: 855 sq. ft. 15’ - 2”

9’ - 3”

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1

Solid with Louvers Glazing with Louvers Offset Louvers Glazing Only

1 2 3

L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R

Exterior Wall Types

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2

2 3

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1 11

2

2

2

1

2

11

11 2

2

2

180 Degree Rotation Radius 6.66 Degree Point Rotation for 3� Opening

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2 2

3

2

1 2

2

Exterior Operational Glazing

1 2 2 2 2

2

2 1

2 2

2

2

1

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

1 [1] Dynamic Facade Panels

D Y N A M I C F A C A D E // user controlled panels

[1] Studio [2] One Bedroom [3] Two Bedroom

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29

28

27 26 25 24

[4] Module Unit Frame [5] On-Site Podium & Cores

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2

21 20

3 4

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18 17

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1

16 15

14

3

13 12

2

11 10 9

8 7 6 5 4

3 2 1

5

U N I T A G G R E G A T I O N //

S T R U C T U R A L S Y S T E M S //

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L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R

[a] L O U V E R S // iteration 01

[d] L O U V E R S // user controlled panel operation 16 16

[b] L O U V E R


R S // iteration 02

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

DYNAMIC FACADE SYSTEM

[c] L O U V E R S // iteration 03

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L I G HT B R E E Z E T OW E R

[a] T O W E R C O N T E X T // 18 18


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

[b] C H U R C H P R O X I M I T Y // 19


O21OO

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

urbanism & infrastructure // master plan

Instructor | Julien De Smedt & Julia Czerniak Term | Spring 2017 - ARC 609 Site | Oslo, Norway -- Design and production done in collaboration with Anu Desai, Yuchi Kuo, and Kat Truluck --

By 2100 Norway’s population is expected to increase by 2.5 million people. It is expected that based on historical trends, approximately 60% of this growth will occur in the city of Oslo causing the population to more than double. The city is currently not equipped to handle this large surge in population. The physical constraints of the city due to protected green zone and unsuitable topography prohibit city expansion much further than its current boundaries. Additionally, the transportation infrastructure of Oslo is at its limits and will not be suitable to support its projected growth. O21OO predicts that the future is the water. This project proposes to utilize the structural potential of Norway’s oil rig platforms to extend the city of Oslo into the water through a connective ring. This ring will support metro and tram transportation for the developing water communities along the ring. This connective ring better connects the city of Oslo, provides a more developed and accessible transportation, as well as opens up the possibility for future growth and development of the water.

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O21OO

Master Plan Strategy . . . The strategic expansion of the city of Oslo looks to the potential of the water. Through a primary infrastructure development to loop and connect the East and West areas of Oslo, new water-based districts emerge. Built on Norway’s reclaimed oil rig platforms, the Rig City provides a sustainable armature for the city.

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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Ullern

Area | 9.4 km2 (3.6 sq. mi) Population | 28,898 Residents 6

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10

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Area | 8.3 km2 (3.2 sq. mi) Population | 47,618 Residents

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Frogner 6

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4

12

7

10

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9

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11

8 9 15

15 14

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O21OO

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Grünerløkka

Area | 4.8 km2 (1.83 sq. mi) Population | 42,129 Residents 6

1 2

3

4 5

12

7

10

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8 9

Gamle Oslo

Area | 7.5 km2 (2.88 sq. mi) Population | 39,500 Residents

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6

1 2

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4 5

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10

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15 14

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16

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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Type 01 - HOUSING + COMMERCIAL Multi Dwelling w/ Commerical at Ground Level 4 - 6 Levels

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Type 05 - HOUSING Multi Dwelling Complexes 4 Levels

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Type 02 - HOUSING Multi Dwelling Complexes 4 - 5 Levels

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Type 06 - HOUSING Small Multi Dwelling Complexes 4 Levels

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Type 03 - HOUSING Small Multi Dwelling Complexes 2 - 3 Levels

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Type 07 - HOUSING Single Family Homes 1 - 2 Levels

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Type 04 - HOUSING Multi Dwelling Complexes 4 Levels

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Type 08 - COMMERCIAL Shops

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8 7 4 2 1 3

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H O U S I N G A N A L Y S I S // by urban district

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O21OO


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

P I X E L A T E D H O U S I N G // existing condition inspiration 27


O21OO

[01] TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCURE // compiled systems OSLO LOOP - INFRASTRUCTURE

OSLO LOOP - INFRASTRUCTURE

[a] High Speed Rail

[b] Metro

OSLO LOOP - INFRASTRUCTURE

[a]

LEGEND

LEGEND

Transportation Infrastructure

Transportation Infrastructure

OSLO LOOP - INFRASTRUCTURE High Speed Rail

[b]

High Speed Rail Metro Metro (Underground)

[c] Metro & Tram Extension

[d] Hub & Stop Distribution

[c]

LEGEND

LEGEND

Transportation Infrastructure

Transportation Infrastructure

High Speed Rail

[d]

High Speed Rail

Metro

Metro

Metro (Underground)

Metro (Underground)

Rail

Rail

Rail (Underground)

Rail (Underground)

Tram

Tram

[02] TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE // sequence of extension and expansion 28


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

RIG CITY // typologies & land extension

BLUE-GREEN CITY / extension & integration of natural landscapes 29


D E N S I T Y 01 // 10 sq. miles Approximate condition of 20,000 people/sq. mile. The necessary land development to support this density.

D E N S I T Y 02 // 17.5 sq. miles Approximate condition of 11,428 people/sq. mile. The necessary land development to support this density.

O21OO

Approximate condition of 8,000 people/sq. mile. The necessary land development to support this density.

D I S T R I C T 03

Transportation Hub Metro Stop 30

D I S T R I C T 05

Transportation Hub Proposed “Land”

Metro Stop

Proposed “Land”


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018 T Y P E 01 // stacking

T Y P E 02 // enclosing

T Y P E 03 // hanging

T Y P E 04 // puncturing

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O21OO

R I G C I T Y 04 // hub centered expansion O21OO extends the transportation infrastructure through a direct connection of a Metra system and a localized connection of a tram system. These networks provide centralized hubs for potential development. The hub connections provide a vertical connection between the Metra, Tram, and Water networks.

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

R I G C I T Y 04 // activity -- infrastructure -- housing The layered condition of various infrastructural systems provide both a BLUE – water and a GREEN – park zone which are now operating together. Public activity flows seamless between the two for a new hybrid condition.

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Safe Light

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

public installation // daylighting

Instructor | Daekwon Park Term | Spring 2015 - ARC 622 Site | Chicago, Illinois -- Design and production done in collaboration with SĂŠbastien Simonnet --

Due to an increase in violence throughout many neighborhoods of Chicago, the city created a Safe Passage program which is currently implemented throughout 138 Chicago Public Schools. Safe Passage is a program aimed to ensure the safe commute of children to and from neighborhood schools without having to fear violence. These passages typically stem from a public school out along pedestrian paths within the attendance zone. While these passages are generally effective during the day, many crimes and violence still occur at night. The goal of this project is to integrate a daylighting/night lighting strategy within this passage through the use of Safe Light. Throughout the day, the Safe Light project seeks to modulate daylighting conditions through an active screen/louver system which allows for shading and interaction along the Safe Passage. The three module typologies (interactive, protective, and guidance) adjust position by rotating to maximize exposure to the sun. This positioning allows the applied phosphorescent coating to collect and store maximum solar energy throughout the day. At night, the phosphorescent material releases the stored energy allowing the screen system to better illuminate and protect the streets and sidewalks along the Safe Passage route. By providing better illumination at night and more community centered engagement during the day, Safe Light creates safer and more secure community neighborhoods for the city of Chicago.

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// T Y P E 01 - MARKER // Single plane illuminating screens between to replace crosswalk stripes

SAFE LIGHT

// T Y P E 02 - S C R E E N // Single plane illuminating screens between curb and sidewalks

// T Y P E 03 - C O V E R // Multiple plane illuminating barriers to be interactive and protect

36 PASSAGE SAFE

day . . .


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

TRANSITIONAL PERFORMANCE

Shading & Solar Collection/Storage . . . Throughout the day, the Safe Light project seeks to modulate daylighting conditions through an active screen/louver system which allows for shading and interaction along the Safe Passage. The three module typologies (interactive, protective, and guidance) adjust position by rotating to maximize exposure to the sun. This positioning allows the applied phosphorescent coating to collect and store maximum solar energy throughout the day.

37 SAFE LIGHT

. . . night


SAFE LIGHT

Night Illumination and Passage . . . At night, the screens/markers release the stored energy to provide lighting for the passage. This illumination provides a safer environment and offers an interactive installation for the neighborhood. 38


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES

Shading & Solar Collection/Storage . . . By analyzing and studying the solar exposure on the various configurations, we can being to predict what areas will collect the most energy throughout the day. By optimizing the angles and orientations of specific zones, we can target certain areas such as intersections, bus stops, etc. to provide more illumination at night. Simultaneously providing shading or interaction potential during the day.

[a-1] Play

[a-2] Shade

[c] Blended Geographic-AbstractTransit Map // New York 40


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

SOLAR RADIATION SCALE

MAX

MIN

[a-3] Collect

[a-4] Guide

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Gray Mirror

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

media explorations // animation & graphics

Instructor | Maya Alam Term | Spring 2015 - ARC 500 Site | Siteless For this project series, the original image, a scene selection from Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan (2010), evolves through the exploration of isolated instances of movement, beginning at the origin of the instability and projecting back outward through the embedded layers. The layering of palettes in motion constantly alter the palettes and environment (figure/ground) and the relationships among the various layers. This layering, continued through other mediums, further explores the idea of environment and its influence on the perception of color. By activating the environment through both 2D and 3D maneuvers, the standard concept of figure/ground is further destabilized, resulting in an altered understanding of color and space. Through the destabilization between figure and ground, this series attempts to bring about and question new perceptions of the gray. Through explorations in digital 2D, 2.5D and 3D and further in physical iterations, the testing and experience of these environments is examined. Additionally, integration of animation existing digitally and embedded within the physical artifacts, allows for moments of an active environment. For the series, this fading zone of gray implies a zone in motion, motion which is present in this image. There exists an instability in the abnormal movements of the conflating projection of realities. This series analyzes and exploits this instability to question the presence and role of “gray.”

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GRAY MIRROR

[01] COLOR PALETTE // selection of dark, medium, light [02] BECKETT BLUR // initial layering and blurring

[03] PALETTE BLUR // color and environment mixing

[04] LAYERED ENVIRONEMNT // active environment

[05] 2.5 D LAYERING // extension to other dimensions

[06] CONFLATION // environment layering

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

[a] The initial scene selection the presumptive realities of the from Darren Aronofsky’s Black image. Swan (2010) captures the main character looking into a double mirror and having one of her reflections move, isolated from her physical being. This isolated movement generates “graying” both in the color palette, as well as in

[b] The series evolution deploys this notion of layering to generate new relationships between foreground and background, where subject and setting blur generating a flickering presence. Albers discusses color mixture and the idea that gray comes from its parents of WHITE and

BLACK with a middle gray being “the middle mixture which presupposes equidistance from the color parents.” Through the use of the parent colors of BLACK and WHITE, the constantly altered mixing generates a large gamut of grays.

[c] This layering of palettes in motion further explores Albers’s idea of environment and its influence on the perception of color, no longer is the environment static, but ACTIVE. There is the common notion that gray is PASSIVE; however, this series investigate the ACTIVE qualities of gray

where BLACK and WHITE become more passive and stable while gray becomes what activates. Through the series, the animated/changing layers and environment alters one’s presumptive understanding of color and space.

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[a]

GRAY MIRROR

[b]

[c]

QUESTIONS OF FLATNESS // 3-Dimensionalized instances of movement.

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

[a]

[b]

[c]

FLICKERING DIMENSIONS // 3-Dimensionalized extension of digital 2-D. Adaptive surface and responsive transparency.

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GRAY MIRROR [a] Environment Layering and Projections // color - movement - flicker

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

[b] Environment Layering and Projections // color - movement - flicker

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GRAY MIRROR [a] Physical Reflection and Flickering // reflection - animation - active envrionment The physical model incorporated reflective elements on various surfaces layered upon static images and active environment in the form of an animation.

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

[b] Physical Semi-static Realities // transparency - blurring - active layers The physical model incorporated semitransparent layers of gray-blur which could rotate independently to produce an active and ever-changing condition of gray.

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Light Breeze +

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

solar decathlon house // daylighting

Instructor | Bess Krietemeyer, David Shanks Term | Spring 2016 - ARC 607 Site | Brooklyn, New York -- Design and production done in collaboration with Emerson Ortiz Carrera and SĂŠbastien Simonnet --

For this Solar Decathlon House schematic design, the primary organizational strategy allows for the use of an operable louver system to modulate both sun and wind. By implementing this flexible system, which can be responsive to the environmental conditions or reflect user preferences, the house is adaptable to the changing environment. Through the L-shaped form, the house can be zoned off to distinguish private and public spaces. When zoned, the public space opens up to the environment. The louver system allows for protection from the sun while allowing air to flow which creates an indoor/outdoor public space. Additionally, with the independent twisting of the louvers, the façade can also be zoned to produce a more specific mediation strategy for sun and wind.

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+14’ - 2” +11’ - 0”

S E C T I O N 3-3

+14’ - 2” +11’ - 0”

S E C T I O N 2- 2

+14’ - 2” +11’ - 0”

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S E C T I O N 1-1


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

HOUSE SECTIONS & PLAN

Modulation of Sun & Wind . . . The proposal for the Solar Decathlon house implements a system of operational zoning paired with a dynamic exterior screen to modulate both light and wind. These systems pair together to support functioning and adaptive servicing of the house. The responsive systems allow for user control to address constantly changing environmental conditions. B A

C A

B

C

FLOOR PLAN

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L O U V E R C O N F I G U R A T I O N 02

LO

LIGHT BREEZE+

L O U V E R C O N F I G U R A T I O N 01

S H A D O W S T U D Y // summer -- noon

S H A D O W S T U D Y // winter -- noon 56

S H A D O W S T U D Y // summer -- noon

S H A D O W S T U D Y // winter -- noon

SH

SH


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

O U V E R C O N F I G U R A T I O N 03

H A D O W S T U D Y // summer -- noon

H A D O W S T U D Y // winter -- noon

Screen Performance & Simulation . . . Through the L-shaped form, the house can be zoned off to distinguish private and public spaces. When zoned, the public space opens up to the environment. The louver system allows for protection from the sun while allowing air to flow which creates an indoor/outdoor public space. Additionally, with the independent twisting of the louvers, the faรงade can also be zoned to produce a more specific mediation strategy for sun and wind.

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LIGHT BREEZE+

STATIC LOUVER CONFIGURATION

ACTIVE LOUVER CONFIGURATION

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ACTIVE LOUVER CONFIGURATION


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018 N

W

E

S N

W

E

S N

W

E

S N

ZONING & WIND CONDITIONS W

E

S

WIND ROSE STUDIES

ZONING & WIND CONDITIONS

OPERATIONAL ZONING

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LIGHT BREEZE+

OPEN

CLOSED

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018 Z O N E O P E N // Opening of public space to extend and generate an indoor/outdoor condition. Operable louvers modulate the sun and wind exposure to produce an optimal environment of light and breeze.

Z O N E C L O S E D // Closing of house allow for selective mechanical system usage. By pairing with the dynamic facade system, the house can limit the usage of mechanical systems to service the home.

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Tanda

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

adaptive reuse // reprogramming

Instructor | JuliĂĄn Manriquez Botello Term | Fall 2016 - ARC 608 Site | Sevilla, Spain -- Design done in collaboration with SĂŠbastien Simonnet and Yenhsi Tung --

Bullfighting and the icon of the bull is historically tied to the cultural identity of Spain. However, in recent years, the sport of bullfighting is questioned and morally opposed by many Spanish citizens and activists worldwide. How does the uncertainty of bullfighting alter the existing architecture which supports this cultural event? This project, Tanda, looks to the future. This projection embraces the art of bullfighting. By looking at the essence of bullfighting, the power struggle between the bull and the matador, Tanda visualizes this power by modeling the dynamic flow. Eventually, this power flow is released into the bullring structure where a new form emerges as a rough cast of the original structure, bounded by the exterior wall. This new form, generated from the power flow, is represented through a gradient of intensity paired with an art form which embraces and recreates the essence of bullfighting. Dance, theater, film, and painting zones emerge once the cast is set. The new form is an evolved version of the original. With the introduction of the new programmatic spaces of dance, theater, film, and painting the sport and art of bullfighting will similarly evolve. Sevilla’s art forms can collapse into a single space where they can creatively enhance the sport while allowing the cultural significance remain.

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P OW E R F L OW C A ST I N G

Power Gradient . . .

TANDA

By projecting the dynamic power flow from the bullfight into the existing structure, the gradient produces a cast of the original. This gradient is translated from colors and associated to artistic programmatic zones. The volumetric condition of this cast generates a new frame for the bullring.

B U L L F I G H T I N G -- power

DANCE

P O W E R F L O W 01 // 64

THEATER

FILM

PAINTING

P O W E R F L O W 02 //

POWER F


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

V O L U M E T R I C I N T E R V E N T I O N // formal manifestation of power flow

L O W 03 //

P O W E R F L O W 04 //

P O W E R F L O W 05 // 65


S E C T I O N -- dance

S E C T I O N -- theater

TANDA

S E C T I O N -- film

S E C T I O N -- compiled programs

P L A N -- dance 66

P L A N -- theater


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

P L A N -- film

P L A N -- compiled programs 67


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TANDA


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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Bulbous

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

natural history museum // competition

Instructor | Brian Vesely Term | Spring 2014 Site | Berlin, Germany -- Design and production done in collaboration with Katarina Marjanovic --

Berlin is a timeless city with deep historical roots as well as a continuous strive towards new and innovative technologies and designs. The site, embedded within a dense fabric comprised of a University, Zoo, and train station, offers the opportunity to connect these various programs composed of unique historical roots. Through the exploration of fabric deformation in concrete casts, we have used our findings to combine common found construction materials and concrete to create a new surface typology. Through the use of excavated rock and construction site rubble as formwork, Bulbous produces an extruded series of organized program blended with a continuous surface to connect the city to the museum. Through a mixed use of rock climbing, gardening, and city viewing, a new dialogue for the modern museum is established. A sense of exploration is created on both the building’s surface as well as within the form. -- Work featured in Speculative Visions of Pragmatic Architectures exhibition at the Krannert Art Museum and Modulated Architectures highlighting investigations in form-finding methodologies, details, and fabrication techniques through both physical and digital methods. --

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BULBOUS


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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View

Public Gardening

BULBOUS

Bivouac

Admin

Research

Education

Cafe

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

Beginner

Medium

Difficult

Exhibition

Ticket Office

Coat Check

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BULBOUS

-1

0

+1

76

+2


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

FORM FINDING METHODOLOGIES

Surface Deformation . . . By deforming surface and form, the museum creates and extends the natural environment. This amorphous surface provides an environment of exploration and play both within the museum and outside the museum.

Void

Surface

Extrude

Intersect

Boolean

Result

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C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

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Machine for Meat

C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

public installation // daylighting

Instructor | Brian Vesely Term | Spring 2014 Site | Siteless -- Design and production done in collaboration with Katarina Marjanovic --

The population of the world is exponentially increasing and one of the biggest fears is how we plan on supporting such a large amount of people, so we wonder how can we optimize our input to maximize our output. With that mentality it’s no wonder places like the U.S. and China have driven companies to industrial scales that strive toward this exact goal. But to what ends? How far are we willing to quantify and systematize things such as nature for our own commodity? Step by step we have organized nature for our personal gain including animals. From meat to milk we have created large systems that have strive toward optimization in production to feed the ever growing demand and consumption. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are defined by the EPA where animals are confined for more than 45 days during a growing season in an area that does not produce vegetation, and meets certain size thresholds. These operations are growing at an alarming rate as traditional family farms are being pushed out of the picture. But what these CAFOs create in addition to animal by-products are environment, human and future damages beyond repair. Projects such as MVRDV’s Pig City started to explore this idea of where to place farm animals and how to accommodate them better. Through analysis of the CAFOs we foresee that a more probable future for our meat production is one of compactness, efficiency and disregard for animals as organisms and more as a cog in a machine.

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1950

1900

MACHINE FOR MEAT

UNNATURAL GROWT

HORMONE MODIFICATION

SOIL EROSION

POLLUTION

GREEN HOUSE GASES

ANIMAL CRUELTY

DEFORESTATION

POOR M

MEAT CONTA

E

HEALT ISSUE

FAMILY FARM

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CAFO


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018 [a] By tracking the evolution and environmental, social, and cultural impacts of the traditional farm, we begin to speculate and critique and trajectory for the future.

2000

MASS CONSUMPTION

TH

BACTERIA DEVELOPMENT

T AMINATION

WATER CONTAMINATION

LTH ES

HEALTH ISSUES

SHORT ANIMAL LIFE SPAN

MANAGEMENT

E.COLI

2050

E.COLI

ECOLOGICAL ISSUES

PIG CITY

COW MACHINE 83


MACHINE FOR MEAT

I wonder if these cows lived happy! moo-oo what’s your name??

Don’t get fresher than this!

Speculations on future interactions with farms – through production and consumption.

D

DEVELOPMENT

N LA

INEF GREEN WATER FICI ENT HOUSE POLLUTION GASES BACTERIA

E

US

Visualizing the impacts of the meat industry.

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MANURE

ISSUES

CRUELTY

MASS CONSUMPTION

ANIMAL LAND HEALTH EROSION

HIGHER

FOOD PRICES


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

PROPOSAL FOR EFFICIENCY

H Y P E R - E F F I C I E N T M A C H I N E // generate - grow - distribute

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MACHINE FOR MEAT

C A L F C L O N I N G S T A T I O N // unlimited reproduction

H O R M O N E I N J E C T I O N S // rapid animal growth and development

C H E C K U P // rapid vertical cow transport

C O W E L E V A T O R // rapid animal growth and development 86


C. Robillard // portfolio 2014-2018

M A C H I N E F O R M E A T // prototype 87


CHRISTINE ROBILLARD Design Portfolio | 2014-2018

e chrobill@syr.edu | p 847.308.9473

C. Robillard Portfolio | 2014-2018  
C. Robillard Portfolio | 2014-2018  
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