Page 1

01 June 2014

HMN MONTHLY

Big Ideas for Play By Kate Turner

The Big Play Box first opened its doors in January 2013. Inspired by visiting UK play worker Marc Armitage, The Big Play Box is a shipping container full of natural and recycled loose parts for children and families to play and create with; think of tyres, cardboard boxes, mud, tubes, milk bottle lids,…the list is endless! Located next to the Hobart Rivulet in South Hobart, The Big Play Box is a relaxed and fun way to engage with your children, devoting time in the week to focus on play. Each session is facilitated by volunteer educators and parents, and operates on Saturdays throughout the spring and summer months from 10am-2pm. The Big Play Box is also available for events and was proud to be a part of the Hobart City Council’s “Kids in the Park” activities on Parliament Lawns

1

during the Taste of Tasmania last year.

strengthen the community’s concept of learning in the early years and provide support for I am a Kindergarten teacher learning through play from both currently working at The Hutchins local and national leaders in School and have been the project education. I am passionate about manager for The Big Play Box since the benefits of play for children and before it opened its doors in 2013. am excited about the potential I credit the success of this project to these new segments on the the calibre of volunteers we have Facebook page hold. The managed to attract. I feel that the interviews not only explain the concept, although simple, provides importance and value of play to a wonderful educational experience parents, they also offer free and for children which has attracted easily accessible professional some of Hobart’s most highly development to educators amongst regarded teachers and educators to the online community. What we volunteer to facilitate the play can learn from each other through experience. networking is vast. “The Play Room” interviews are posted on My latest project is titled “The Play The Big Play Box Facebook page as Room”. Capitalising on the success picture files, and when they are of The Big Play Box Facebook opened and read contain ideas for page, I envisioned a way to parents and educators alike from advocate for play amongst the leaders in the field of Early online community. The goal is to Childhood Education.

!

!


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

We have published four exciting interviews to date, three of which are from innovative educators here in Tasmania. They are definitely worth the read, offering wonderfully reflective answers to my questions. If you know of an innovative Early Childhood educator please feel free to contact me via The Big Play Box page to recommend them for an interview! Other exciting educators are lined up for future interviews including the original inspiration himself, Marc Armitage.

!

If you haven’t ‘liked’ The Big Play Box on Facebook, then do so to keep up with the new segments from in “The Play Room”. Supporting The Big Play Box is supporting the play movement here in Hobart and beyond; advocating for the child’s right to learn naturally through play in the early years.

!

Stay tuned for more from Kate in future editions of HMN Monthly. She will be contributing a regular article about how parents can properly prepare their little ones for Kindergarten.

From a Young Mother By Bronte Roper

All mothers carry battle scars and experience the joys children bring to their lives. There is no doubt that mothers are truly incredible beings. But mothers like anyone are not all the same (Thank God!).

!

Unfortunately we live in a world of stereotypes and mothers are just another group who are not immune to the old stereotype. Young mothers are just one example of a sub-group who are often stereotyped in the community.

!

Sadly I have experienced stereotyping and have been judged but also have met some amazingly supportive people.

!

I am now 27 and have 3 lovely little monsters but it still surprises me

!

Go on. Think about a young mum… what comes to mind?

2

!

I recently read an article on “Age and Fertility: Getting Pregnant in Your 20s” on the popular babycentre.com website. The author said, “many couples in their 20s are simply not ready to be parents. Raising children can be emotionally and physically taxing and many parents – especially young ones – aren’t completely prepared for the sacrifice and patience it often requires.”

!

!

I had my first child at 23 and felt like a failure. I was embarrassed to be in public with my baby. I was afraid people would judge me. All this came from my own past views of young mothers. I strongly believed people would think I was uneducated, from a bad family, single, on welfare, and worst of all question my ability to be a good parent.

like I need to tell them my life story just to justify my choice to become a young mother.

every time I get comments from strangers, like the good old “you look too young to be a mother! How old are you?”. I am sorry to say it, but I often find myself replying, “I’m in my 30s”, just to avoid any further judgement. The majority of these remarks are said with no harm intended, but it still makes me feel

The article then goes on to say that… children of women aged 15 to 24 are significantly more apt to behave disruptively. The researchers attributed this behaviour to young mums' “underdeveloped parenting skills”.

!

I understand fully that the researchers don’t just pluck this information out of thin air and that there are unfortunately young families that do go through some


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

tough times in learning parenting skills. Luckily there are some really amazing programs to help these people. It is a huge feat becoming a parent no matter your age and I for one will never say it was an easy transition.

meet the right man until I was 35. We really questioned whether we should have a child due to the health risks but in the end we both realised no matter what happened our child would be loved. There were many time in my pregnancy I was questioned about why I was I simply find it hard to own this label! having my baby, people would tell I am educated. I am from a loving me about the risks involved as if I family. I know I am an amazing had no idea! I felt everyone was an mother of three, and I am 27 years expert and I had to justify my life old. But I also know I am not alone choice.” in this! I am not the only young mother with developed parenting I wanted to find out from people skills, great kids and a supportive what they really think the best age is hunky partner. to have kids, so I asked a few unsuspecting people to define the I have many mummy friends that are right and proper age for breeding, all different ages and I find it odd without criticism. that older mothers also get their fair share of judgement in the • Tim, 21: Probably around 30 community. The right age to have a • David, 50: late 20s child without scrutiny is a very hard • Mary, 70: I had my first child at 18 age to define. but now people are having kids at 40 things have sternly changed. Olive, age 40, with her daughter • Sarah, 25: I am not having kids Elizabeth, 6 months, told me this: until I’m marred so around 30 “I have always longed to something. experience motherhood but didn’t

!

!

!

!

!

All you lovely women out there, if you wish to be a mother, it seems you must be between 28-35. Sorry if you’re older or younger, this is the only time you can breed without having funny looks and criticism from the public. If you stray from this age cut off, you will create children with behavioural problems or children with genetic glitches. Sorry!!

!

Doesn’t this all sound a bit crazy! Why have we created disgrace and fear? No matter what age, new mothers should never feel judged and ashamed to be a mother. Young mothers should not be seen as a charity cases or disadvantaged and older mothers don’t all put their career first and hire nannies.

!

Call me crazy but I thought love, support and guidance is all a child needs to become a successful happy person, that’s what I will be teaching my three children, anyway.

!

Have I Married the Right Person By Hans Kelder

A couple can be a good relationship and both can at times wonder whether they are with the right person. Such a doubt can often arise after a heated argument, or a longer than normal period of feeling annoyed with each other, ongoing unresolved conflict, or meeting a person who they imagine would be better than your current partner. It is not unusual for these thoughts to enter the minds of most in long term relationships.

!

Thoughts of another person who easier to get on with, who is more understanding, more encouraging, more loving, fills their imaginative mind. It easy for us to muse over our perfect partner, one who offers more romantic moments, one who can introduce us to a new

world of friends, who is successful, our imagination can take us to person with whom our current spouse has no chance to compete. The reality is, very few, if any, find the perfect match. Everybody has some or more flaws. What may change your perception is focussing on the good qualities of your partner. Remembering how you met and what your initial attraction was. Trying to resolve issues and discussing what you would both like from the relationship. The reality is all relationships take hard work if they are to be good. The right person is the one who is willing to work on what they have and potentially could have in a relationship.

!

See this and more marriage tips go to www.youtube.com search ‘marriage tips, talk to the Hans.

!

Hans is a marriage counsellor, husband, father, stepfather, and local minister. You can contact him via www.hobartmarriagecounselling.com.au. He also writes a regular Marriage Q&A for HMN Monthly. You can ask him any question to be answered by emailing info@hobartmarriagecounselling.com.au .


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Andyman

A HMN Business Connect Interview

By Kate Sward, HMN Business Connect Coordinator

Who is Bonnie Tuttle? I’m a driven woman, who doesn’t buy into labels nor expectations. I work three jobs, raise two amazing kids, and have a wonderful husband. I’m in training to play Roller Derby, I love cooking, and I am happiest with a bottle of red, a group of friends, and Sing Star.

!

Tell us) about Andyman and what you do. My husband and I work together to run our own business, Andyman. My title is Business Manager and Andywife. I handle the marketing for the business, along with administrative tasks such as strategic planning, customer service and account management.

!

What were you doing prior to developing Andyman? I have a background in marketing and communications, and have primarily worked in the financial services industry until this year. I have also had some experience in Property Management in both public housing and privately owned investments.

!

Inspiration behind starting Andyman? Andrew used to be a graphic designer, and when I was around 6 months pregnant with our second child, his hours were cut back significantly as a result of the GFC. He had never been satisfied with his career, and every chance he got he was renovating or gardening. We had toyed with the idea of starting a business in that area for a while. That’s what they say, isn’t it? It’s what you do when you are procrastinating that you should do for your career… We looked at this as the perfect opportunity to have a go at it, whilst Andrew maintained some regular income through his graphic design position, ‘just in case’. I was working full time at the time, and Andrew was still working three days a week in his other role.

!

What was your first step in setting up Andyman? I started answering emails before and after work, and at lunch time; and Andrew would put on his khakis at lunch time and go do quotes before he had to go back to work. He started doing jobs two days a week and on weekends until demand increased so rapidly that he needed to choose between graphic design and Andyman. I remember his grin and the pop of the bottle of bubbles the day that he decided to resign and become fully selfemployed.

!

Your biggest achievement to date? Having such high demand that we had to put on an employee. To realise that we had become so successful that we were not only supporting ourselves, but that we

could give someone else opportunities too was fantastic. And surreal.

! !

Being awarded the Clarence City Council/Business East, runner up Best New Business was great too. Best lesson you’ve learnt along the way? Be proud of your achievements but never complacent. Treat your customers with respect, because you never know where the relationship might take you.

!

Which person or brand do you admire, why? Whilst they are our major competitor, we really admire Jim’s Mowing. Although in recent years Jim’s has faced some controversy, we think it’s great that Jim started the business and is still highly involved. He has shown that a local business like ours, with the proper management, can become a household name. At the moment, Andyman consists of me, Andrew, and my father-in-law, Stephen. Next step, world domination!

!

You're a business woman- how do you balance home/ work life? This is my greatest challenge. I don’t sleep much, and apart from Roller Derby and walking the dog I don’t exercise. I do a lot of work from the couch and I drink a bucketload of coffee around 20 mins before my toddler naps on my only day ‘off’ so I can smash out as much as possible in that 2-3 hour block. We try to do something ‘family’ once a week, like drive down to the Apple Shed for lunch as we did today.

!

What do you do to relax? I love love love to cook. Many people wouldn’t understand that I look forward to leaving my office job so I can come home and cook dinner for my family. If I don’t get to cook, I get quite stressed out. And I love to go out for dinner and drinks with my girlfriends. Andrew and I are also mad keen on a few TV shows, Game of Thrones is the poison of choice at the moment. Everyone knows not to call me on GoT night!

!

Finish this line. If I could accomplish… Better work/life balance I would suffer far less from Mama/Wifey guilt. And I’d have a smaller bum.

!

Any hot tips for aspiring Mumpreneurs? • Remember that we live in a small and vocal community. That can work for or against you. Choose your words carefully. Be respectful to yourself and others. • Listen and learn from everyone, but make your own decisions. This is YOUR business. • Don’t sell yourself short. Pricing is the most difficult concept to master, but always remember that you need to value yourself. Value your offering, and value your time. • Play by the rules. Pay your tax. Do it right or not at all. • Make sure you are passionate about what you are doing before you do it. Would you do it for free? If not, walk away. Running a business will consume you, and if you don’t want to eat, sleep and breathe it, then you won’t be successful.


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Children and Families Activities in June City of Hobart

By Amanda Midgley, Community Development Officer- Children and Families, City of Hobart.

The inaugural Hobart Family Expo was held on Saturday 17th May at Mathers Place Hobart. Thank you to those families who supported this event, it was well attended and there has been a lot of positive feedback. Thank you also to the volunteers from the Hobart Mums Network who helped with setup, clean up and Katrina Driessen for her super star MC role!

!

11 June City of Hobart Immunisation Clinic Morning Clinic: 10.00 - 11.30 am
 Infants/pre school children
 Afternoon Clinic: 11.30 - 12.00noon
 Adults (65 years and over) and school aged children Elizabeth Street Conference Room, Elizabeth St off the Town Hall.

!

15 June, 2pm The Graduates Tasmanian youth Choirs in Concert www.tasyouthchoirs.com.au Hobart North Uniting Church, Swan Street

!

15-21 June Refugee Week The theme for Refugee Week from 2012 to 2014 is Restoring Hope. Find out more here about local eventsL www.refugeeweek.org.au/about/theme.php

!

Even though the days are getting colder, there is so 29 June much to do in Hobart! My focus on this section is to Family Fun Day promote City of Hobart activities and local community Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery events. There are also great things on for children and families this month and early July at Dark Mofo and the Festival of Voices. The TSO and the Theatre Royal are also having great child friendly productions in June., maybe you could write a review about one of these events for the July edition!

!

Please contact me on midgleya@hobartcity.com.au if you would like to promote anything for the July what’s on.

!

June 5-29 City of Hobart Bush Adventures • Joey Pouch Making for World Environment Day (for the family) • Leon the Long-Tailed Mouse (for 2-5 year olds) • The Lives and Tribulations of Tasmanian Beetles • Where Our Wild Things Are (for the family) • Possums in Pyjamas • Step into History at Cornelian Bay (for adults) There is a cost for this program and bookings must be made see www.hobartcity.com.au/bushadventures

!

Various Dates in June Bushcare Groups These operate on a volunteer basis. Local residents and the City of Hobart work together to tackle bushcare issues in their local reserves. You may attend the scheduled activity in your local area or further afield. For further information contact: Anna Greig, Bushcare Coordinator, City of Hobart Ph: 6238 2884 Email: bushcare@hobartcity.com.au www.hobartcity.com.au/Recreation/Bushland/Bushcare

!!


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Number 2 By Richard Casey

No, not that kind of number 2, get your mind out of the toilet! The number 2 I am talking about is our second child, Miss Two. I remember years ago, well before Miss Two and not long after our Miss Five was born that I was discussing having a second child with a work colleague. She had raised a family and all her children had grown up, and she was telling me about the joys of raising kids and seeing them grow. I opened up to her and told her about my fears about having a second child, about how I couldn’t imagine loving another child as much as I loved our first. She just smiled at me and said “Your love doesn’t divide, it multiplies”. These words have always stuck with me. Since Miss Two has been born there has been no doubt that my love has multiplied.... unfortunately the thing that can’t multiply with your second child is time. As much as I love Miss Two, I can’t help feel the nagging guilt that we just can’t spend as much time with her as we did with her sister. Unfortunately I have no reference as to the experiences of being a second child; I am an eldest child, my wife is an eldest child, and by some strange coincidence our other daughter is also an eldest child. I remember growing up what it was like to have a younger sibling, how they seemed to be able to get away with murder while I always should have known better because I was older. I know how our Miss Five feels when she does something and gets in trouble, while watching Miss Two do the same thing and receive only a (metaphorical) slap on the wrist. I just don’t know what it’s like to be a younger child, but Miss Two is doing an excellent job to try and educate me.

!

One of the most used phrases that Miss Two has used since she has begun speaking is “Me too?”. Pretty much from when she first started to communicate she has always wanted to know that

she will be involved with whatever is happening. We could all be driving in the car discussing how we might go to the park later in the day, and her first response would be “Me too?”, to which we would assure her “Yes, you too?” which would always make her smile. A recent development is her also telling us in no uncertain terms that she is “too big” to do whatever it is we are trying to get her to do. “Ok, time to put your socks on” “No, too big!”, “Let’s have a cuddle” “No, too big!”, “Let me do up your seat belt” “No, too big!”. It’s quite a clever bit of reverse psychology: They keep telling me I’m too little to do things, so whenever they want me to do something I’ll just tell them I can’t do it because I’m too big... that should mess with their heads!

!

It’s hard to accept that you just can’t spend as much one on one time with your second child as you did your first, but that’s just the facts. Although there are definite benefits of being a second child. Miss Two has always become capable of tasks at an earlier age than our Miss Five. She started using cutlery earlier, she started asking to use the potty earlier and she learned how to use the TV remote WAY earlier than Miss Five. She is exposed to games and activities that are advanced for her age, yet she gives them a go and more often than not does a pretty good job (if not hold her own). While with our eldest new experiences were introduced as she grew, Miss Two has all these things ready from the get go and she is more than happy to get stuck in and try them out. Having a big sister to learn from is something that I never realised would play such a big part in a Miss Two’s development. Finally, I’m proud to say, that Miss Two has reached what is arguably the most important milestone of any younger child...... knowing how to annoy the crap out of your big sister! “Stop pulling your sister’s hair!” “No, too big!”.

The “No Poo” Method By Alice Burdon

I haven’t used shampoo or conditioner in over a year. When people find out, I usually get reactions ranging from disgust to genuine curiosity. Commercial shampoo wasn’t invented until the late 1920s & the ‘need’ to shampoo so often really only took hold because of clever marketing, but it isn’t actually necessary. So, let me tell you about no poo hair care.

No poo is about cleaning your hair without the use of shampoo and conditioner. Your body will thank you for making the switch & so will the earth because you won’t be washing chemicals down the drain. There are various ways to no poo & different ‘tips & tricks’ depending on your specific requirements (e.g. a drop or 2 of tea tree or eucalyptus oil can help dandruff), but the most


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

popular (and the one that I use) is to use • 1 teaspoon of bicarb mixed in 1 cup of water as your shampoo, • followed by 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed in one cup of water as your conditioner. • Rub the bicarb mixture on your scalp only & leave for a few minutes before rinsing. • Saturate your entire hair (scalp & length) with the vinegar. You can either rinse this out after a minute or so or you can leave it in, this comes down to what works best for you. I find it a lot easier to premix the apple cider vinegar mixture in a spray bottle. That way it lasts a couple of washes too. And a lot of

people find it easier to put the bicarb mixture in an applicator type bottle (like a ketchup or mustard squirt bottle) but I haven’t got around to trying that yet. No poo is about experimenting. What works for one person may not work for another. It’s best to go at least four days between washes. I try to go a week, but sometimes I just can’t resist that extra wash. The main point of no poo is to return the natural oil balance to the hair. Shampoo and conditioner strip the hair of natural oils that actually serve to help keep the hair clean. It’s very important to give your hair a really good brush each day to

distribute the oils evenly throughout your hair. A lot of people use a boar bristle brush but I use a bamboo brush that I absolutely love, which I bought from The Body Shop. Plastic brushes can rip, but personally I think it comes down to whatever brush works best for you. You will most likely have a transition period of your hair being greasier while your scalp adjusts to producing less oil. There are so many benefits of the no poo method; my husband got rid of his dandruff which he’d had most of his life by going no poo, & I have a lot less hair breakage & my scalp is so much less itchy. Just try it. You’ll save money too!

So What If Your Mother’s Day Was Crap?! By Jessica Schmidt

My Mother’s Day was great, from the perspective that I got to spend it with my two children who I am very lucky to have. It also was a bit crap because I spent it with my two children who I love very much but sometimes they drive me crazy…and unfortunately yesterday was one of those days.

!

It occurred to me, while I was fuming to myself that I should have gone running instead, that other people must be having this same experience and so I thought I would share. As my husband pointed out, our kids don’t hold the patent on annoying – though in my opinion, they are experts in their field. My husband didn’t go unscathed in the rants but as this isn’t marriage therapy, I’ll keep them to myself.

!

SOoo what went wrong? Last year I planned mother’s day with military precision and we went for breakfast and I forced everyone to celebrate me! This year I thought, I’d just let things go and see what happens. And guess what? Nothing happened. Apart from the youngest one throwing lots of tantrums and the oldest one getting all teenagerish (eye rolling and door slamming) about who knows what. I tried to find out but it seems that was enough to send him of into another spin so I decided to give him some space – Happy mothers day to me, anyone? Anyone? No nothing.

!

worrying about everyone else and I had made myself happy.

!

I think this is a skill and as mothers we need to make sure we are practising it regularly. If you want flowers, buy them yourself, if you need space, take yourself out of the situation, if you need time to exercise, build it into the family routine.

!

People are unlikely to know what you want or you need unless you speak up. Find your voice and make changes to make you happy. And if you need it I can recommend a great yoga teacher… and an awesome personal trainer, now I come to think of it.

So what did I learn, other than my family are annoying (nothing new) I learnt that if I really want something I need to ask for it. If I want the breakfast, I do need to book it and they’ll happily go along. But there’s no use It’s our wedding anniversary in a few weeks….better just wishing things to happen. You need to take control book a restaurant. of your own life.

!

I did eventually figure this one out and took myself off to a blissful hour of yoga from which I returned happy and restored. I had made time for myself instead of

! !

Jess Schmidt is a qualified personal trainer and owner of mamafirst fitness based in Hobart, Tasmania. She also is mum to two crazy, wonderful boys and is slowly mastering the fine art of Lego. When not sword fighting or playing hide and seek she writes and runs and escapes on a yoga mat. You can get in touch at www.mamafirstfitness.com or email


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Community and Charity By Katrina Driessen

Why would you do it? How do you fit it in? Why?

party. Before I knew it I was organising a High Tea with a theme (Mad Hatter) and I was talking with The Leukaemia Foundation organising to have all the proceeds from the event go to The Leukaemia These are the most Foundation. And the next thing I knew I was being popular questions I asked to be interviewed on the radio about it. It was get asked all the such a success it is now going to be an Annual Event time. on The Leukaemia Foundation's calendar.

! !

Hello my name is Katrina and I love organising events..... I studied events many years ago and it hasn't been until recent the passion has reignited. Although the events I organise is never paid work for me. I do it because I love it! I love the stress (although my husband would tell you otherwise), I love that the events I organise are for the community, and I love that I am helping people.

!

I am a mum to a beautiful little girl and I am so so Blessed she is fit and healthy. It is challenging organising these events with a little two year old in toe and also running my own business and keeping the house in order. Yes it is challenging! Yes it is fun! Most of all for me is knowing what I do helps families who need it most and at the time they need it most.

!

!

Knowing my business would be quiet in the Winter months, I got thinking (again...) and thought "why sit around" so off I went again and before I knew it I was organising another event to raise money for The Leukaemia Foundation. This one has certainly had is stresses and plenty of ups and downs. The thing that helps me is working so many wonderful local business. Many of whom have donated some amazing prizes. The upcoming event is happening on June 21 and is a Step Back to the 80's Cocktail Event at Rydges Hobart. Tickets are $60 pp or if you book a group of 5 or more tickets are $50 pp.

!

I love that the money raised is going to a great cause and helps keep the services free for the patients and carers suffering from any blood cancer.

!

I don't know how I manage to do, I just do. If I'm feeling tired I always think of the families that have/are being affected by blood cancer and the money I can raise and know where it will go helps me power on. And it's all not without support from my amazing friends, and family.

!

To find out more about Step Back to the 80's Cocktail It all started last year when my business turned one. I Event go to Hobart Charity Events on Facebook or wanted to do what I know best, and is to celebrate and email enquiries@ulb.net.au


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Lessons from the Beach By Sonja Preston

I had a mini-holiday this week, in a beautiful little seaside town. Daily I would walk to the beach, to absorb the sunshine and heat, as well as hear the sounds of the waves crashing, and the smell the scent of the sea and the bush surrounds.

!

On the beach were so many families from India, Asian, the Middle East and Anglos. There were Mums with kids, families with cousins & Grandparents, group of friends, surfers, and couples walking hand in hand.

!

What they all had in common, was a day of fun. There were so many smiles and the sound of laughter, and it was wonderful to participate in this event.

!

It made me reflect on all the amazing messages which were intentionally and unintentionally being shared with the children present. They were messages about:

!

• Family – having fun together, and the different combinations of people which make up our families. • Play – having fun together through walking, swimming, playing cricket or footie, building sandcastles, cooking and eating. • Water – the power of the water, the sound of the crashing waves, the ability to stem the flow of water from a small stream by building a ‘dam’ wall of sand, and then breaking the wall to allow it to flow again, into the ocean. • Beach safety – holding hands with the young children as they jump the waves, and seeing the presence of the Lifesavers

and understanding what they do. • Nature – appreciating the beauty of the place – the beach, the sand, the bush approaches, and the tended picnic grounds. • Language – children heard the different languages of the the cultures presnt, relaising that there is more than one way to speak. • Sharing – sharing the ball, the games, the space, the food and the picnic tables. • Taking ‘risks’ – showing younger children how to traverse the rocks, or jump across the small stream, to ‘dare’ to get your clothes wet whilst exploring the waters edge. Watching the older adults who safely surf or parasail. • Rubbish – ensuring that your rubbish is taken away or placed in the bins – as well as many collecting any stray pieces which have blown there. • Hygiene – re-inforcing washing your hands after using the public toilets or after collecting the rubbish. • Exercise – participating in running, climbing, walking or swimming. Watching the people surfing or parasailing, with the idea that when the children are older that they can join in. Noticing that people exercising are having fun! • Humanitarianism – the ethnicity of people wasn’t relevant….. everyone shared the space equally and enjoyed all it had to offer.

!

• Shared work – after a fun day, there are sand toys and bags to carry back to the car, and then unpacked and cleaned at home.

So many amazing lessons on the beach – many of them unspoken messages, but equally absorbed by the children.

!

We expose our child to these sort of spoken and subtle messages whichever environment they are in – be it the beach, the supermarket or movie theatre. It helps children to learn the ‘rules’ of their environments, through us as parents, and by the others who use the same space.

! !! !! !

Happy learning one and all!

Sonja is a Senior Parenting Consultant, with 14 years parenting experience, on top of a 20 year teaching background. She is also a Life Coach. Sonja can be found at www.theparentingcafe.com.au or via email: sonja@theparentingcafe.com.au


HMNMONTHLY 1 June 2014

Child Health Association Tasmania By Alison Wood

I am pleased to have this opportunity to touch base with Hobart Mums Network members in the lead up to 1 July 2014. The Child Health Association is very excited about the future with HMN joining our organisation and the opportunities this will afford all our members across the State. While HMN is based in the south, we would very much like to see some of the groups and activities running so successfully here, launch in other regions where there is an interest.

!

Please note that the Child Health Association Tasmania website is currently under redevelopment and contains no information at this time.

In the meantime, I urge members to contact our staff with any questions they may have, or to find out information on what groups are currently running, or to discuss the creation of new groups where there is an interest:

Kelly Rechtin North West Regional Coordinator e: kellyrechtin@gmail.com m: 0474114784

Alison Wood Acting State Executive Officer e: seo@chatas.com.au m: 0448982627

! !! !

! !

Christine Jolly Southern Regional Coordinator (HMN Director) e: hobartmumsnetwork@gmail.com m: 0400518154

!

!

Vacant Northern Regional Coordinator (enquiries can be made to Alison Wood while this role is vacant) We look forward to providing an update in the August issue.

Cheers, Alison Wood A/State Executive Officer Child Health Association Tasmania

Why Should I Join? from the Director

By Christine Jolly

My kids are all teenagers. I opted out of Child Health Nurse visits. I don’t think I would use any of the benefits apart from visiting The Haven.

!

As Hobart Mums Network transitions to become a part of Child Health Association Tasmania (CHAT), this is some of the feedback we’ve been hearing. Over the month of June we hope to shed some more light on CHAT as an organisation, its history, and activities across the state. We also aim to highlight the various benefits of becoming a member. In addition, we hope to expound on why this partnership between HMN and CHAT is such a perfect fit.

!

Stay tuned to our Facebook page as we feature different people from CHAT. Meet the regional coordinators, local pram walking group leaders, volunteers, and some members.

!

We are convinced that whether you • Are trying to conceive, • Have experienced loss, • Are currently pregnant, • Have a newborn or teenagers, • Or are a grandparent, ... CHAT is for you!

!

Our membership package is so reasonable that you could only take part in only one benefit over the financial year and you would easily get your money’s worth.

!

Start enjoying the benefits of membership today! • Join a group, • Visit The Haven,

• Borrow from our resource library, • Enjoy reading our monthly online magazine, • Learn from guest speakers, • Make new friends, • Have real input into local health services, • and Know that we will stand up for family interests on both local and state levels

!

Sign up for membership today at www.hobartmums.net.


Business Classifieds !

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed within HMN Monthly are those of the writers only and do not reflect the views and opinions of the Hobart Mums Network.

!!

To submit content for future editions of HMN Monthly, please follow our Content Guidelines.

!

To advertise in our monthly online magazine please read our Advertising Guidelines for various opportunities.

! !

NEW! Newborn Announcements Email the following: • • • •

Photo, Name, Birthdate, Up to 21 words

2014 June  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you