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Christina Khouri christina.khouri@aiesec.net

WRITING PORTFOLIO

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri

Contents CV………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………2 Blog Posts……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4 1 Life, 2 Lives…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4 Ships Out of the Harbor………………………………………………………………………………………………………….6 Slow Realizations……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………8 Newspaper Articles…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….9 AIESEC Oman Welcomes Back 83 Students from International Exchanges………………………………9 AIESEC Conference: Youth Means Business……………………………………………………………………………10 The Youth Platform……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….12 Press Releases…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..14 AIESEC Oman & Aramex Announce Partnership…………………………………………………………………….14 AIESEC Oman Celebrates 5 Years…………………………………………………………………………………………16

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri OBJECTIVE Seeking an entry level position in general reporting or copy-writing where I can enhance my writing abilities, while contributing my international experience and project & team management skills. EDUCATION The University of Georgia Bachelor of Arts Major: International Affairs Cumulative GPA: 3.42/4.00 The American University of Beirut (Study Abroad) Course work in Arabic and Middle Eastern Politics

Athens, GA, USA May 2012

Beirut, Lebanon Fall 2010-Spring 2011

EMPLOYMENT AIESEC Oman. Vice President of Talent Management& Public Relations July 2013-Present  Draft and ensure publication of articles and press releases on AIESEC Oman’s activities to local publications (including: Muscat Daily, Y-Magazine, Times of Oman, etc.)  Manage & write content of AIESEC Oman’s blog (shipsoutoftheharbor.wordpress.com) and website (aiesecoman.org)  Main responsible for managing the organization of 6 annual conferences.  Facilitate trainings on leadership and soft skills to university students and members of AIESEC I.T. Solutions, Inc. Communications and Account Manager December 2012-June 2013  Main responsible for the tracking and processing of account of 7 consultants at Electronic Arts, Inc.  Manage payroll and organization and tracking of timesheets and documentation  Responsible for the drafting and creation of promotional and legal materials as needed I.T. Solutions, Inc. Project Coordinator Intern at Gilead Sciences June 2012-August 2012  Shadow Project Manager on IT helpdesk sourcing project  Prepare presentations, take meeting minutes, schedule meetings  Manage project documentation and storage via Sharepoint LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AIESEC University of Georgia, Local Committee President January 2012-December 2012  Lead a team of 6 Executive Board members and 40 general members to: o Increase UGA student exchange abroad by 600% and generate revenue of over $17,000 o To sign a contract with US companies to sponsor 2 international interns  Work with the sponsorship and guidance of AIESEC UGA’s Board of Advisors to: o Sustain and grow the Local Committee’s leadership pipeline, and instill AIESEC’s culture o Increase AIESEC brand awareness on UGA campus and among Georgia business community  Coordinate the organization of networking and speaking events for business and community leaders as well as students in Athens and Atlanta, including a Youth Leadership Forum and Business Luncheon at the Gwinnett Chamber of Commerce AIESEC University of Georgia, Vice President of Outgoing Exchange January 2010-August 2010  Promote and market international internships provided by AIESEC to UGA students  Lead information sessions to UGA Career Center staff and UGA students about internship opportunities abroad through AIESEC  Coordinate with internship managers abroad to advertise and promote their internship opportunities  Lead and Manage and assist exchange participants in securing internships abroad  Lead team of 4 students to generate a revenue of approximately $4000 for the Local Committee

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri LANGUAGE SKILLS  English (Native),  Spanish (Intermediate)  Arabic, Modern Standard (Intermediate); Arabic Lebanese, Colloquial (Advanced) CERTIFICATIONS & SEMINARS Attended National Train-the-Trainers Seminar held by AIESEC United States February 2013 Attended National Business Development & Sales Summit held by AIESEC United States September 2011

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: Ships Out of the Harbor Official Blog of AIESEC Oman Date of Publication: 10/12/2013

1 Life, 2 Lives… I recently went home to the US for the holidays. Even after six months away, in most ways it was like I had never left. Aside from a few newly constructed shops and restaurants or minor renovations my parents had made on our house, everything was exactly as I had left it. My friends and family seemed exactly the same. But something was off, and I guess it was me. As normal as it was to be back, it was somehow incredibly odd. It was as if I had lived two entirely different lives. I couldn’t quite explain my experience Oman to everyone at home. But sometimes, I just couldn’t keep myself from blurting out some story or fact about Oman. Moments when I forgot that I didn’t need directions to a new place through landmarks and roundabouts, instead I could use a GPS with street names and addresses to get me where I needed. Or when I joked with a friend about using “wasta” to get something done, and then remembered she didn’t know the meaning of “wasta”. Probably most difficult to describe to friends and family at home were the individuals have I met in Oman, the people who have truly made my experience here. I know others living the expat-life face a similar challenge. I spoke with my friend Mohammed Abou Baker about returning home from his 6-week internship in China: “I was teaching kindergarten students and small kids between two and three years old at a school in Nanjing, China. I could talk for hours about it!” said Abou Baker. Surprisingly, he told me nothing was too difficult about life in China. His students had a way of understanding him without knowing English, he learned a lot of Chinese, and the biggest culture shock was the food. “There was lots of new kinds of foods. Lots of sea grass—not animals—sea grass!” What Abou Baker missed most when he returned to Oman was how kind people were to him, “there were a lot of kind people in China, I really miss them”. He described his two Chinese “mothers”, his hostfamily mom and one of his colleagues at the school. Between the two of them looking after him, making sure he had home-made food, taking him out, and inviting him into their homes; he said “I didn’t miss anything from Oman! I’m sorry it was a weird and unique experience, but I had a made new friends and I had a new family.”

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri I find his statement to be totally relate-able. I miss home; I miss those friends and family members I’ve known forever. But in this new place I, too, have found a home. I have my real family in the US, but I also have a new, make-shift family among my colleagues and flat-mates. I know that when I stop leading this double-life and have to call just one place home, leaving behind my new family will be incredibly difficult. But I can’t me more thankful for having this new family in my life.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: Ships Out of the Harbor Official Blog of AIESEC Oman Date of Publication: December 10, 2013 Ships Out of the Harbor I guess I’ve always been a bit of a dreamer, an idealist who somehow wants to travel and change the world. Looking back at an email I had sent myself when I was entering university, the goals I had for my future looked a like this: -Getting to know my father’s family in Lebanon -Volunteering on an organic farm in California -Studying abroad (in an Arabic or Spanish-speaking country) -Interning in Washington DC -Visiting and volunteering in Palestinian refugee camps -Joining a friend’s expedition in Southeast Asia to promote a zero-emissions campaign -Interning abroad There is a theme here: positively impacting society and discovering new places, cultures, and people in the process. I actually accomplished a few of these goals, and somehow that theme has turned into some kind of an addiction.

“A ship in the harbor is safe, but that’s not what ships are built for.”-John Augustus Shedd

I feel I’m not meant to stay in the harbor, there is nothing more thrilling and terrifying than setting sail to some new destination or taking on a challenge I’m not sure I can handle. Staying in one place for longer than 2 years sounds boring, working on a project or for an organization I’m not passionate or I don’t feel is important about seems impossible. My heart beats faster when I think about what new adventure is next; the places I’ll go, the people I’ll meet. I can blame my addiction on starting that list, once you start setting sail it’s impossible to go back to the harbor. But I also need to place some of the blame on AIESEC, the world’s largest, youth-run social enterprise, which I stumbled upon during my first year or university. From my time in AIESEC, I’ve met and worked with some of the most inspiring and empowered people on the planet, I’ve traveled, I’ve learned a lot about myself, I’ve learned that positively impacting society can be achieved through a variety of methods (and I think a lot comes through empowering others), and I believe I’ve helped others have lifechanging experiences. My current adventure is working full-time for AIESEC’s national office in Oman. In this blog you can join me as I explore Omani culture and lifestyle, navigate through culture shock, understand and share Omanis’ perspective on the Sultanate and outside world, travel, and the world.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Through this blog I hope to provide tips on how to become a citizen of the world, travel smart, and step outside your comfort zone. It’s time to set sail!

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: The Sweet Whatever (Personal Blog) Date of Publication: 26/11/2013

Slow Realizations Freedom. It’s word my home country loves to throw around often, something that every citizen is taught to pride in our nation on since elementary school. I can’t say it’s something I really understood or personally valued, but I think I’m beginning to understand what this freedom is. And it’s mostly in some of the tiniest details, where I am starting to notice it. I recently came to the realization that in Oman alcohol (outside of bars) can only be purchased with a liquor permit (which can only be granted to non-Muslims), and even the 2 Liters of liquor purchased upon arrival in Oman at Duty Free can only be bought by non-Muslims. When my Pakistani friend told me she would not be allowed to purchase any liquor from Duty Free because her passport said she was Muslim. I was shocked that she was not allowed the opportunity to decide whether or not she would adhere to the rules of her religion. Similarly during the month of Ramadhan, no restaurants are open, and consuming food and water is prohibited in public. Regardless of your sense of religion, at least in public everyone is required to fast. I’ve always viewed religion as a personal choice. I’ve always assumed that only you can decide whether or not to follow the rules of the religion you were born into, or even to choose to be religious at all. Here it is actually more or less required by law. Marriage is also under regulation. As I understand it, Omani women are not allowed to marry foreigners, and risk losing their citizenship for doing so. Omani men, however, are allowed to marry foreigners, pending government approval. Here, again, I find a shock in realizing that a government can determine who its citizens can and cannot marry. Even more so, a person’s citizenship can be jeopardized by a marrying a foreigner. It’s not that I’m complaining about any of these things, it’s just that some of these situations and rules around them are vastly different than the ways I would have imagined them. And on a daily basis I don’t notice these differences so much. In many ways people here are open-minded and tolerant, numerous religions are practiced and respected. But in terms of personal choice, I am only truly beginning to understand it and how much freedom in personal choice I have been allowed in my own life and how much I value it.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: Muscat Daily Date of Publication: 3/10/2013 AIESEC Oman Welcomes Back Oman’s Students from International Exchanges Teaching English at a summer camp in Ukraine, working on an environmental awareness campaign in Indonesia, assisting at a Montessori preschool in Sri Lanka, facilitating soft-skills workshops on entrepreneurship and leadership for high school students in Bahrain and India; these are all volunteer projects in which 83 Omani university students participated this winter and summer through the international youth organization, AIESEC. When asked what they learned and how they grew from their experiences at AIESEC’s Welcome Back Seminar this Saturday, the returned Exchange Participants blurted out answers like “leadership” and “communication skills”. One happily responded, “I now have friends in so many countries around the world that I can visit and stay with for free!” The learning points were not limited to soft skills and professional development, many expressed how they learned how to cook for themselves or do their own laundry. They described the culture shocks they experienced, the independence they felt, and the people they met in their travels. Saturday’s Welcome Back Seminar was a series of workshops aimed at allowing the returned Exchange Participants to share their exchanges, learn how to cope with reverse culture shock, relate their experiences to employers, and set personal goals for the future. Many of the workshops were led by the members of AIESEC, who helped the Exchange Participants find and apply to their projects abroad. Zubaida Al Nadhairi, one of AIESEC’s student-members and former Exchange Participant to both Bahrain and India, facilitated portions of the seminar. “My chance to mentor others and lead them throughout the sessions that I delivered was life-developing for both me and the participants. I’m so glad that I have had the chance to make people explore the world around us,” said Al Nadhairi. Helen Sayers of Oasis Training Services also facilitated a workshop on positioning the exchange experience to employers spoke about her years of travel all over the African continent and Middle East. “Travelling is one of the greatest forms of education and self-development. People are thrown out of their comfort zones and adapting to difficult circumstances this brings out a range of qualities, values, and personal skills. These skills are transferable when the young person finds themselves in a new job.” Sayers referred to the successes of corporate heroes, Richard Branson and Steve Jobs; provided tips on goal-setting and approaching organizations for employment. In a day of education, reflection, and discussion; Basma Abid, organizer of the Welcome Back Seminar, said “We really wanted to celebrate these experiences and the impact of the exchanges. We so excited to hear the stories and welcome the Exchange Participants back!”

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: Muscat Daily Date of Publication: 21/08/2013 AIESEC Conference: Youth Means Business

AIESEC’s 65th International Congress, which began on August 16 with over 800 delegates, continues with the international organisation’s youth leaders discussing AIESEC’s relevance today and delivering on the promises it makes to its members. “International Congress is where AIESEC as a global organisation can analyze our performance, and determine what ways we should be seeking to improve,” says Fayas Fazil, president of AIESEC Oman. Founded in 1948, AIESEC aims to foster empowerment and global understanding among the world’s youth about its two primary products. The first is its Team Member and Team Leader Program, which allows university students to learn-bydoing as they work in teams to facilitate AIESEC’s second product, its exchange programmes. The Global Internship Program offers the opportunity to intern abroad in a professional setting while the Global Community Development Programs provide short-term volunteer projects centered on a theme that benefits society. In its 65th year of operation, AIESEC has offered more than 20,000 students and graduates the opportunity to work or volunteer abroad, and AIESEC has provided its 80,000 members worldwide the ability to be either a team member or team leader. At the International Congress on Sunday, president of AIESEC International, Rolf Schmachtenberg, addressed the plenary saying, “The time has come where we have to ensure the quality of the experiences we are delivering. We will make sure that every single person that experiences an AIESEC programme can say ‘I’m actually impacting the world’ or ‘I lived an internship that changed my perspective’.” During the first three days of sessions, delegates came to understand the growth of the organisation, in addition to the feedback from AIESEC members. Through small discussion groups and presentations that explore corporations’ best case practices, these young leaders were abuzz with inspiration and ideas. The collaboration and brainstorming won’t end in the first three days either. Day four of the conference was the most anticipated event, the Global Youth to Business Forum. Commonly referred to as Y2B, the forum draws corporate leaders from some of the world’s most popular companies, for conversation between the youth and businesses on issues like corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship, up-and-coming technologies, and the need for skilled youth entering the world job market.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Nataly Fedchenko, AIESEC Oman’s vice president communications, watching the forum through livestream said, “Y2B really makes young people feel like they are being heard. At this event you can see the youth influencing major decisions.”

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Publication Source: Muscat Daily Date of Publication: August 19, 2013 The Youth Platform Today and for the next eight days, leaders from nearly every country will be congregated in one place hosting discussions with the world’s largest companies and big names in leadership, fostering intercountry partnerships and exchanges, and collaborating with each other to brainstorm solutions to problems facing the world today. This isn’t a United Nations meeting – it is AIESEC’s 65th International Congress in Egypt. For the next two weeks, Muscat Daily will be following the ideas, events, and stories coming from AIESEC’s International Congress, in which Oman is represented amongst the 125 countries attending the event. This year’s 65th International Congress, began on August 16 with the opening ceremony chaired by the governor of South Sinai. In his speech, he congratulated AIESEC on achieving 40 years’ presence in Egypt and endorsed the organisation’s potential for instilling leadership in the Egyptian youth. To demonstrate this support of the youth organisation and the Congress, he promised to have the South Sinai’s first minister present at International Congress’ closing ceremony. The opening ceremony was followed by Egyptian Talks, a forum for collaboration between Egyptian and international businesses, representatives from NGOs, and more than 800 conference delegates. The forum aimed to provide delegates a non-political overview of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, the role the youth in the revolution, and the need for youth leadership today. Egypt Talks included performances of the Egyptian protest songs, sung in Egypt’s 2011 Revolution, and illustrative storytelling of the protests and conditions during 2011 by activists who had been heavily involved on the streets of Cairo. The opening day of the conference concluded with delegations representing their own countries at the International Congress’s Global Village. Donning cultural garb and sharing snacks and treats from every part the world, AIESEC delegates celebrated diversity and cultural understanding with each other and the Egyptian attendees. Stefany Araya, vice president of business development and head of the Omani delegation, AIESEC Oman said, “One of AIESEC Oman’s main goals at this conference is to put Oman on the map! I really want people to know where Oman is, and know of its natural beauty, and the kind-hearted people who live there.”

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri The remainder of the conference will reflect the relevance of the AIESEC for today’s youth, new initiatives and good case practices in social entrepreneurship, and empowering the organisation’s leaders. A delegate representing Oman, Ahmed Samara, said, “ I’m really looking forward to the meaningful conversations I will have with so many new people, and I’m sure I will leave this conference inspired and motivated”.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Press Release December 25, 2013 AIESEC Oman and Aramex Announce Partnership for Development of Oman’s Youth Muscat, Oman -- AIESEC Oman has partnered with global transportation and logistics services company, Aramex in hopes of empowering Oman’s young people. Through the partnership, AIESEC’s student-members will receive regular trainings and workshops delivered by Aramex aimed at developing the students’ soft skills as well as preparing for their professional careers. These workshops will be featured as a part of AIESEC Oman’s regular conferences open to all members of the organization, and Aramex will train attendees on topics like: project management, public-speaking, personal presentation, event-planning, and marketing. “Aramex supports [AIESEC’s] mission to help students explore their leadership potential in addition to helping them develop various professional and personal skills. Investing in education and training as a means for youth empowerment is a key sustainability priority for us”, said a representative from Aramex on the motivation for the partnership. As an organization run by students, for students, AIESEC works to partner globally with corporations and organizations that focus ensuring the youth of today will be the leaders of tomorrow. Stefany Araya, AIESEC Oman’s Vice President of Business Development said, “We are really pleased to be able to provide our members with more exposure to corporations with strong values and focus on the potential of young people. And we know that Aramex’s workshops coupled with the hands-on leadership experiences in AIESEC will allow our members to develop a skill set they don’t often have time to practice in the classroom.” On the company’s corporate social responsibility goals Aramex’s representative said, “This partnership with AIESEC supports our goals as our top-most sustainability focus area is Education and Youth Empowerment. We believe in partnering with young people as change agents, and working with them to become fully engaged and active citizens in their communities – something AIESEC exemplifies as well.” About AIESEC AIESEC is the world’s largest youth-run organization, present in over 120 countries and territories. Focused on developing leadership and global understanding in university students and recent graduates, AIESEC strives towards its vision “Peace and fulfillment of humankind’s potential”. AIESEC’s presence in Oman started in 2008, and currently has a over 100 student members and is on 13 colleges and university campuses in Muscat and Sohar.

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri About Aramex Aramex is a global transportation and logistics services company providing a variety of express, logistics, freight forwarding and domestic distribution services. Aramex was established in 1982 and is headquartered in Amman, Jordan. Contact Christina Khouri christinak@aiesecoman.org

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WRITING PORTFOLIO Christina Khouri Press Release June 18, 2013

AIESEC Oman Celebrates Five Years Muscat, Oman--AIESEC in Oman is organizing a gala dinner to be held on June 18th in the Prince Palace to commemorate 5 years of presence in Oman, since the organization’s founding in 2008. Around 200 guests are anticipated to attend the event, including family and friends of the organization’s student-members; alumni; and national partners, such as Pricewaterhouse Coopers, AMIDEAST, and Knowledge Oman. The evening’s agenda will recount the AIESEC in Oman’s 2008 founding and showcase the organization’s goals and accomplishments. The gala dinner will also feature presentations from members who have traveled and worked abroad through AIESEC, company partners that have sourced talent through AIESEC, and student members who have developed soft-skills by enrolling in AIESEC’s Team Leader Programs. With sponsorship from PricewaterhouseCoopers and Enhance; and organization of the event by AIESEC in Oman’s student-members, the 5th anniversary celebration will allow members to display their accomplishments the Muscat community. “It's an absolute honor to host such a prestigious event, I'm excited to showcase what AIESEC in Oman has achieved throughout these Amazing 5 years, and hopefully our honorable guests will have a night to remember.” said Organizing Committee President of the event, Adil Al Jadhani. About AIESEC AIESEC is the world’s largest student-run, nonprofit organization, focused on developing leadership and global understanding in university students and recent graduates. AIESEC is present at 15 colleges and universities across Muscat and Sohar.

For more information: Christina Khouri christinak@aiesecoman.org

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Writing portfolio