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Christina I. Abrams

2017

Undergraduate Portfolio


Christina I. Abrams 2787 W Anklam Rd APT D Tucson Arizona, 85745

Education

Experience + Skills

(623) 377 – 5944 christinaiabrams@gmail.com

University of Arizona – Tucson, Arizona

2012 – 2017 GPA: 3.252

Estrella Foothills High School – Goodyear, Arizona

2008 – 2012 GPA: 4.15

College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Bachelor of Architecture Awards - Dean’s list spring 2014 and spring 2015 Activities - AIAS, Tau Sigma Delta, 2015 Scandinavia Study Abroad

Swaim Associates

Tucson, Arizona February 2016 – Present • Prepare specifications • Signage • Site analysis • Zoning reviews • Staff Meetings • RFQ’s • Design alternatives • As-built drawings • Code analysis • Construction drawings • Project Scope • TI’s Projects: AC Hotel, Tucson Road Runners, Health Science Innovation Building (HSIB), St. Johns Catholic School Addition, and Banner Tenant Improvements.

Hunt & Caraway Architects

Phoenix, Arizona May 2012 – August 2015 • Pre-construction meetings • Construction documents • Community activities • FFE installation • Request for information • Obtaining permits • Construction administration • Marketing documents • Spatial diagrams Projects: Peoria High School Old Main, Sossaman Middle School, Cooley Middle School, Pathfinder Academy, 2828 N Central, and Wilson Elementary.

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Architectural Experience

U C TIO N +

Skills

Competitions, Conferences, + Awards

References

adobe illustrator

autodesk revit

microsoft office

adobe photoshop

autodesk autocad

lumion

adobe indesign

rhinoceros

sketchup

AIAS Fourm Conference 2015, 2016 AIA Arizona State Conference 2015, 2016 AIA Southern Arizona Perspective Student Interview August 2016 Co-Author of Student Success: UA’s Net Zero Energy + Water District May 2016 AIAS National Chapter Honor Awards Runner-Up May 2016 Net Positive Energy + Water Conference February 2016 Richärd+Bauer Competition - College of Architecture December 2015 Archon Competition - College of Architecture May 2015 Second place for business graphics - FBLA April 2012 2nd place Westside Impact Bowl August 2011 Arizona Board of Regent’s High Honor Tuition Scholarship 2012 - 2016

Mary Hardin

University of Arizona Interim Dean (520) 621 - 6751 mchardin@email.arizona.edu

Eduardo Guerro

University of Arizona Assistant Lecturer (520) 621 - 6751 eduardoguerrero@email.arizona.edu

Brad Lang

University of Arizona Professor (520) 621 - 6751 bradlang@email.arizona.edu


04 06 10 14 18 20 22 24 26 28 30

STUDIO Connecting to the Colorado Sentinel House Woven The Gardens Pivotal Courtyard

STRUCTURES Hex-a-pod Hex-a-grid Gradient

PROFESSIONAL Road Runners Old Main Higley Middle Schools


Connection to the Colorado Class: Senior Capstone Professor: Brian Farling and Maria Salenger Location: Lake Mead Date: August 2016 - May 2017 Program: 40,000 sqft of kayak stations, swimming pools, picnic stations, children pool, fire pits, meeting spaces, staff offices,

Water is the connective tissue that brings life together, it was, and is the reason why people came out west; however, due to the arid landscapes and the overuse of this resource, this has created the water scarcity. To counteract this measure, the Colorado River should be highlighted and celebrated. The citizens of this region should take ownership of the river, and reclaim it as an amenity for the City of Las Vegas, Boulder City, and the surrounding regions. The problem about water conservation is not the extra research that is needed to make water use more efficient, but the lack of communication between the water users and the ones that distribute the water. Currently, the visitors at the Hoover Dam are disconnected from the natural environment. They stand above the water, to learn about the great measures that were taken in the 1930’s, to tame the mighty river below, while ignoring the problems of today. Both residents and tourists, will be able to learn about solutions that will have a positive effect on the bath-tub ring above.


Binging people to the level of the water problem – directly on Lake Mead, will allow people to have a different perspective about water and the Hoover Dam itself. As the water levels change every day, there is a need for future flexibility as “you cannot predict the future, but [you can] allow for the options to be open…” (Denise Scoot Brown). The building will be able to move with Lake Mead, as the water levels rise and fall in the future. We are all working towards a greater future, where all living beings are connected and are in harmony with each other. There is a need for a place that celebrates the hope for tomorrow, embraces the intimate connections that we have with the nature of today, and acknowledges the accomplishments of yesterday that got us to today. With the integration of a learning and a recreation center, there is a duality of work and play balance that we all strive for.


sentinel house Class: Design Studio 7 Professor: Mary Hardin and Michael Esser Location: Tucson, Arizona Date: August 2016 - December 2016 Program: 1,200 sqft 3 bed room single family house. Role: involved in the donation team, and the take-off lists. I assigned in the build of the house and not the design Team members: Alex Basler, Alex Lomard, Andrew Marriott, Bareeq Bahman, Caitlin Kessler, Christina Abrams, Collin Palen, Dalton Fatt, Kyle Bogasky, Liam Leonard, Maria Camacho, Matt Bone, Max Sobin, Miguel Solorio, Tasanee Durrett, Valeria Moraga, and Van Escobar. Drachman Design-Build Coalition (DDBC) is building a low income single family house in the sentinel mountain neighbourhood, using material that resembles the volcanic material of the region. This is a 1,200 SF residence with two bathrooms, and three bedrooms that is wood framed. Fiber cement panels are used in a unique way to clad the exterior and create a breathable ventilated rain-screen. The roof and the carport are sloped to two cisterns located on the site and drip irrigation and low- flow fixtures are utilized. The residence will be selected by a family that qualifies through the HUD-approved home-ownership program.


north elevation

south elevation


east elevation

west elevation


Woven Class: Design Studio 6 Professor: Courtney Crosson Location: University of Arizona Date: January 2016 - May 2016 Program: net positive energy and water housing for 800 students, bike lockers, offices, study spaces, and dining services. Role: As a collaborative effort, I designed the dormitory, while my partner designed the master plan for the student success district.

214,247 sqft OF PV PANELS IN THE STUDENT SUCCESS DISTRICT.

Team members: Christina Abrams, and Matt Sprout

LED LIGHTS THAT RUN OFF OF DC POWER

AC POWER FOR THE OCCUPANTS TO USE

DC POWER TO AC POWER INVERTER

EXCESS POWER IS SUPPLIED TO THE U OF A GRID

BATTERY STORAGE

Climate change, water crisis, social connections, and economic factors - these issues are all intertwined. We must consider how these issues weave together, in order to promote positive change. Removing the vehicle helps to interlace the pedestrian and the cyclist back into the University, while certain dormitory enhancements implement sustainable teaching methods into residence life. These changes create a fabric that adapts to the environment over time. The overall design will introduce the historic fiber into the modern design. The concept of “Student Success� is enhanced throughout the district by replacing two low density dorms, with an efficient high density living option. The form of the building responding to behavior changes, such as the bike routes that stitch the campus together, allowing the residents to move and collaborate freely among the district. Connecting the project back to the campus, weaving the new sustainable neighborhood back to the historic campus that surrounds it.


1. SITE CONSTRAINTS

2. SUBTRACTION

3. SHIFT

4. CARVE


SHADING DEVICES

each dorm will have operable exterior shading that can be controlled by the users.

SHADING BASED ON SOLAR ORIENTATION CROSS VENTILATION

shifting

the building is shifted toward the football stadium to have pre-game funictions, and green space to the north. learning lab 1

learning lab 2

multipurpose

PRE-GAME tv/lounge

multi

multipurpose

office

office

GREEN AREAS

The curved facade allows views to the stadium.

SECTION A

res. lobby

mail room front desk

commuter lobby


Water filtration Systems

Black water filtration system including sewer mining and shading for pedestrian passerby.

typical room layout TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL FLOOR PLAN

Water infiltration system Grey and storm water sent here is used to recharge the sustainable well.

UP

learning kitchen

commuter amenities

service station

4' - 0"

8’ - 0"

typical floor plan

GROUND LEVEL


The Gardens Class: Land Ethics Studio Professor: Luis Ibarra Location: Oro Valley, Arizona Date: January 2015 - May 2015 Program: administration, school, church, function space and reception hall. Role: As a collaborative effort, I designed the dormitory, while my partner designed the master plan for the student success district. Competions: Archon Competition 2015

The campus for the Unitarian Universalist is about the discovery of nature and oneself, creating a community with the assistance of nature, as well as respecting the land and the traditions of the people that came before us. The entry to the campus has several layers of land through terraced landscapes: that help one reflect outwards, reflect inwards, overlooking the past while looking forward, a place to play, a chance to grow, and an opportunity create a community. The campus is combined to lessen the impact of the site, pocketed between two existing ridges within the site. The buildings are angled to take advantage of the northern light, through following the existing topography to shed, collect, and divert water for additional landscaping, while having views inwards on the campus.


BUILDING A PLAN 1

BUILDING B PLAN 1

WATER CISTERN

N ATURE CHAPEL

SAN


BUILDING B PLAN 2

N CT U A RY A ND SOCAIL HALL

EDUCATION CENTER AND I NF ORM AT I ON CE NT E R


Pivotal courtyard Class: Dwelling Studio Professor: Eduardo Guerrero Location: Downtown Tucson, Arizona Date: March 2014 - May 2014 Program: administration, school, church, gymnasium, and garden.

6 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

MATERIAL STUDIO

7 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

10 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

TEACHERS LOUNGE

KITCHEN, EATING AND MULTIPURPOSE ADMIN

2 - 3 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

SOUND STUDIO

4 - 5 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

TECH STUDIO

OUT DOOR GARDEN SPACE

8 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

TECH STUDIO

11 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

OUT DOOR LEARNING SPACE

9 YEAR OLD CLASSROOMS

2ND LEVEL PROGRAM

1ST LEVEL PROGRAM WALL THICKNESS 5% STORAGE 6%

Early childhood education is the foundation to success in the enrichmentTEACHER of children’s lives.1,748 In SQ. the FT. notion SPACES CIRCULATION 6% CLEANSEaccess 4% that every child should have to art materials, advancing technology, and the freedom1,785toSQ.explore, KITCHEN FT. the school is centered around the philosophy of the Reggio Emilia approach. INDOOR LEARNING SPACES

8,784 SQ. FT

TARE 21%

TEACHER SPACES 5% 15,227 SQ. FT. OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACES The school’s classrooms are centered around a courtyard where the children, ages 2 - 9, can spill out NET 79% KITCHEN 5% SQ. FT. as the activity or teacher sees fit. In the courtyard there are many chancesCLEANSE for the children to1,514 explore INDOOR LEARNING while learning - activity tables, play ground structures, plants of the sonoran desert, shaded 2,156 patios, and SQ. FT. CIRCULATION SPACES 25% vegetable gardens. 1,934 SQ. FT. STORAGE

OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACES 44%

WALL THICKNESS

1,515 SQ. FT.

TOTAL SQ. FT.

34,663 SQ. FT.


SECTION A

Section A

Section B

4’

ARC 202

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SPRING 2014 I

PROJECT 3

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4.30.2014

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CHRISTINA ABRAMS I

PROFESSOR GUERRERO

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Hex - a - pod Class: Building Technology 4 Professor: Will Peterson Location: University of Arizona Date: March 2016 - May 2016 Program: Half scale model of a concrete shade pavilion using folded plates. Role: In a team of four, I came up with the design and the documents for construction. Team effort to create a quarter scale and half scale models. Team members: Christina Abrams, John Geroges, Juliana Sorrell and Ciara Gunter

The earliest folded plate solutions originated in their close resemblance to corrugated plate and cylindrical shells. The simple underlying method consists of the following: longer spans can be assisted with a small increase in weight by enlarging the lever arm of the structure; the main reinforcements are at the top and bottom joints of each slanted slab while the shear stresses are absorbed across the folded planes. The design for the project is embedded in the geometry of the hexagon. One of the advantages to a hexagonal lattice is its compressive and tensile strength and efficiency when compared to other options. We propose that through the manipulation of that geometric lattice, an elegant form-resistant structure that resists loads through it’s geometry rather than through large amounts of material.


Concrete /

An Empirical Approach

FORCE

*diagram

Geometry. Hexagon

FORCES. Isometric

n 16 ell

ology III spring 2016 rges_Gunter_Sorrell 016

FORCES. Isometric *diagrams not to scale

Tension

*diagrams not to scale

Tension Compression

FORCES. plan

Compression

FORCE

*diagram

uniform load applied

Geometry. Hexagon

FORCES. isometric

FORCE

*diagram

Te

C

FORCE

*diagram


Hex - a - grid

TAKE OFF LIST TOTAL ROD LENGTH: 1372” (3) 4 1/8” (3) 1’- 0 5/16” (3) 1’- 0 15/16”

6”

5 1/2”

Class: Building Technology 4 Professor: Will Peterson Location: University of Arizona Date: Jan 2016 - March 2016 Program: Full scale model of a concrete shade pavilion using folded plates. 6 1/2”

(3) 4 1/2” (3) 1’- 0 3/8” (3) 1’- 1 1/16”

7 1/2”

7”

(6) 2 13/16” (6) 1’- 0 7/16” (6) 1’- 1/4”

(6) 3 1/16” (6) 1’- 1 7/16” (6) 1’- 1/2”

8”

Role: In a team of four, I came up with the design and the documents for construction. Team effort to create a quarter scale and half scale models. 8 1/2”

(6) 1 7/8” (6) 3 1/4” (6) 1’- 0 9/16” (6) 1’- 1 5/8”

9”

(6) 2” (6) 3 7/16” (6) 1’- 0 5/8” (6) 1’- 1 7/8”

Team members: Christina Abrams, John Geroges, Juliana Sorrell and Ciara Gunter

(6) 2 3/8” (6) 3 11/16” (6) 2 1/2” (6) 3 13/16” (6) 1’- 0 3/4” (6) 1’- 2 1/16”

1’8”

(6) 2 11/16” (6) 4” (6) 2 1/2” (6) 3 15/16” (6) 1’- 0 13/16“ (6) 1’- 2 5/16”

P LA NS

2

A X ON OME TRI C S C A L E = 1’ -0 ” = 1 1/ 2 ”

Through the derivation of the hexagon from the circle, our given cross-sectional geometry, a hexagrid was implemented for strength, stiffness, and ductility. The design intent combines geometry and structure to maximize structural shear capacity, to increase the axial stiffness and strength, and to ultimately optimize seismic performance.


1’8”

9”

8 1/2”

8”

7 1/2”

7”

6 1/2”

6”

5 1/2”

PL A N S 2


gradient Class: Building Technology Professor: Chris Trumble Location: University of Arizona Date: March 2015 - May 2015 Program: Scale model of a bird tower located in the Santa Cruz River bed. Role: In a team of five, I was in charge of the digital revit model, and the construction documents. Team members: Christina Abrams, Jessica Cuadra, Reana Solanga, Sabrina Vining, and Ciara Gunter

The concept of the project is for it to serve as a gradient in the natural landscape, the side columns are more spaced apart as you go up. Because of the nature of the overlapping the second floor has very limited visibility, which gives it an entirely different experience. The first floor has an earth floor where your visibility is lost and therefore heightens your other senses, it is here that the full impact of the rain chain is realized, finally as you reach the top it is more porous and you are open to the sky. The structure ties into these concepts because the joinery allows for smooth transition. Also the perimeter of small columns also function as louvres and help to mitigate the East and West exposure.


MNATERIAL LIST:

#1 TYPICAL BEAM TO BEAM CONNECTION WITH 90O SIMPSON TIE

#2 TYPICAL ROOF BEAM TO ROOF BEAM CONNECTION WITH 45O SIMPSON TIE

#1 TYPICAL BEAM TO BEAM CONNECTION WITH 90O SIMPSON TIE

#2 TYPICAL ROOF BEAM TO ROOF BEAM CONNECTION WITH 45O SIMPSON TIE

#3 TYPICAL BEAM TO COLUMN CONNECTION WITH 45O SIMPSON TIE #3 TYPICAL BEAM TO COLUMN CONNECTION WITH 45O SIMPSON TIE

COLUMNS 4 X 4 (3.5" X 3.5") BEAMS PRIMARY 3 X 6 (2.5" X MNATERIAL LIST: SECONDARY 1 X 4 (.5 COLUMNS HANDRAILS41 X 41 (3.5" 3.5") (.5" XX.5") BEAMS RAIN CHAIN PRIMARY X 6 (2.5" X 12) 1" X 2"3 CHAIN SECONDARY 1 XAND 4 (.5 WOOD FLOORING HANDRAILS Simpson Strong Ties 90O 1 X 1 (.5" X .5") KEY RAINNOTES: CHAIN 12) 1" X 2"CONNECCHAIN TYPICAL WOOD TIONSFLOORING FOUND AND THOUGHTOUT THE O Simpson Strong PROJECT. Ties 90 KEY NOTES:

TYPICAL CONNECTIONS FOUND THOUGHTOUT THE PROJECT.


road runners Location: Tucson, Arizona Date: June 2016 - October 2016 Program: University of Arizona + Tucson Road Runners locker rooms, infrastructure improvements, press box, and weight room. Role: In charge of the construction documents for the demolition, tenate improvements and the as-builts. Helped with color, material selection, and casework details. Team members: Swaim Associates, and Concord General Contracting

Swaim Associates teamed with the Rio Nuevo District and the City of Tucson to renovate the TCC Arena to update and improve behind the scene support spaces for the Arena. With the American Hockey League team of the Tucson Road Runners moving to downtown Tucson, Arizona in the summer of 2016, there was little time to give the Tucson Convention Center a facelift. In less than 18 weeks, the schematic design, site demolition, construction documents, and construction of the new support spaces had to be complete for the first game in October.


Old Main Location: Peoria, Arizona Date: July 2013 - July 2014 Program: Medical, Engineering and Technology (MET) Professional Academy

BEFORE

Team members: Hunt & Caraway Architects, and CORE Construction.

BEFORE

Role: Involved from the first site visit, the project varification, material selection, RFI’s + ASI, and construction adminstration.

Peoria Old Main is an adaptive reuse and renovation of a historic building originally built in 1922 on the Peoria High School campus. This three-story building has been developed to accommodate a separate non-traditional high school and advanced specialized training center. The design utilized existing infrastructure and site utilities to minimize site costs and was able to remediate drainage issues with enhanced site improvements. The facility includes the most modern collaborative computer environments, open classroom learning pods and flexible science classrooms. This Design/Build project includes renovation to the central plant, creation of administrative offices and restroom remodels. The design concept was interwoven with the curriculum development for the spaces, creating a hand tailored facility to meet needs of the students within the learning space.


Dedication plaques were made with original 1922 floor joists, and 92 years later the first building in the Peoria High School building was rededicated as the medical, engineering and technology professional academy.

The hallways were lined with photos from past year books to celebrate the history and people that called Old Main their home.


Higley Middle Schools Location: Gilbert, Arizona and Queen Creek, Arizona Date: May 2012 - August 2013 Program: 7th - 8th grade classrooms, early childhood centers, administration, student center, and play fields. Role: Involved from the first site visit, the project varification, material selection, RFI’s + ASI, and construction adminstration. Team members: Hunt & Caraway Architects, and CORE Construction.

The main structure is a two-story design with the middle school housed on the second floor with a connecting student activity bridge. The theory was to isolate the middle school classrooms on the second floor thus enabling the early childhood classrooms to inhabit the entire first floor while still allowing access to secured play areas both indoors and outdoors. Each 25 acre site hosts high school level athletic facilities that service fully illuminated baseball, softball, soccer and football fields. The design and construction team were under a fast-track schedule (14 months total) to meet the school district’s financial and hyper growth needs.



Abrams portfolio