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CHRISTINA HEFFERAN HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN PORTFOLIO IN ARCHITECTURE


CONTENTS ARTIST TOWER - 03 -

WATERFRONT LIBRARY - 11 -

HIDDEN ROOM - 15 -

DANGER - 19 -

DORMITORY - 23 -

NASSAU STREET - 27 -

JAY STREET -29 -

BERN - 31 -


ARTIST TOWER Fall 2016 Academic Studio Critic | Maryann Thompson Nominated for Platform 10 This three week investigation sought to create a four-story dormitory using 960 linear feet of continuous façade per level. Beginning with a formal investigation of the bolt, ideas of seeming self-similarity and symmetry were explored. The final form’s exterior is symmetric and uniform. From the interior, however, an imbalance is formed as a resultant of various programmatic components required by the brief. Two staircases, with different trajectories, landing heights, and overall shape, are inserted into the building at opposite ends, creating a duality of interior conditions that vie for territory. Though the building is a single enclosed form, its interior is distinctly segmented. Two lobes of space have uniquely different floors heights, creating moments of visual interconnectedness within the interior. The meeting of these two systems manifests in a central rift in the floor plates, creating an opening within that acts to flood the building with light from its central corridor, compensating for the shade produced by its cantilevered form. Ultimately, the two distinct lobes are connected at the fourth floor via a large, shared common space. The appearance of the common rooms indicates a stitching of space, either laterally or vertically. These zones register on the façade as moments of fusion, and their removal is indicated by a feathering between levels.

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04


The tower begins as a single, stepped, self-shading module, oriented about a vertical datum. The interlocking forms of the module grow to encapsulate the programmatic demands of the tower. The form is then placed into site, where its geometries are distorted in response to demands placed upon it by building codes and environmental necessities.

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The tower’s form is linked through a series of artist studios that spiral around the tower’s shaft. These double height studio spaces receive ample natural light, and aggregate to create a topographic landscape above. These stacked outdoor spaces are open to the public, and provide access to the gallery network.

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Level 30

The tower’s hotel floors (left) are organized around a central, two-level gallery space. The gallery is populated by the floor’s artist-in-residence. Guest rooms, offset by a sectional displacement, open to the gallery while ensuring privacy. The hotel plans (right) stack to create an interiorized exterior circulation system. The path shown in red shows the linkage of each individual guest floor, while the path in orange reveals how each gallery is connected as part of a larger, porous network of galleries and artist studios.

Level 29

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WATERFRONT LIBRARY Spring 2016 Academic Studio Critic | Jennifer Bonner The library began as a formal investigation of axial intersection. Uniform bars collide to create a series of interior courtyard conditions and moments of linear extension. Upon reconciling the form’s perimeter composition, select bars were rotated in two dimensions. These extended halls create a monumental procession of orthogonal stepping that visually relate to the geometries of different axes in plan. These stepped halls signal major avenues of circulation, and connect the project’s bookstore, reading spaces, theater, and rare books collection. The bars intersect at key moments that allow for visitors to slip between halls through entries not visible from the library’s central hall. Through this operational series, the library becomes quieter, and more secluded, as one makes ones way through the space. The bars ultimately terminate in a vast window wall, providing optimal views of the site’s waterfront.

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Level 01

Level 02

Level 03

Level 04


The library’s elongated wings intersect at key moments that allow for visitors to slip between halls. Secluded pathways reveal themselves as one travels from the library’s public main artery into a secluded reading destination. Circulation itself becomes a participatory process of reveal and discovery.

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HIDDEN ROOM Fall 2015 Academic Studio Critic | Megan Panzano This two week study investigates the idea of hidden as an element that is hidden in plain sight. The concept of hidden was extrapolated to assume the definition of an element that is both concealed by and camouflaged as a path of exploration. From its exterior, the form reveals little of its interior complexity with no visual cues apart from each façade’s matching dual apertures and entrance. Plans and sections are composed of self-similar proportions, distorting the overall comprehension of space. The interior is created by the arrangement of four nesting modular rooms that are compartmentalized, lofted, and subdivided to create a spatial labyrinth. Each module has a spatial element that is wholly revealed, and one that is wholly concealed. As the modules stack onto one another, a circulation system emerges. Though one could navigate the entire space without encountering the other, the opportunity to enter the hidden exists in a concealed entryway at the building’s top level, and at a key moment in the landscape of the form. One may enter the hidden without immediately realizing, as this bizarre alternate state is similar to the rhythmic and proportional identity of the familiar interior, with key moments of spatial distortion creating a wholly other experience.

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Revealed Condition

Concealed Condition

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The hidden form is represented in a darker chip board, whereas the normal condition is represented in white museum board. The interlocking modular nest is contained within a facade sleeve that conceals the interlocking labyrinth within.

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D // 270째

Level 02 C // 180 째

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04

03

B // 90 째

02 01

A // 0 째 Section

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DANGER Spring 2016 Academic Critic | Robert Pietrusko In collaboration with Caroline Chao + Taylor Halamka Nominated for Platform 9 This map explores the dichotomy of safety and danger in three dimensional form. Site is represented as two discs that are punctured and bolstered by formal aggregates of data sets. One face of this artifact graphically annotates the location of open spaces in the Cambridge and Boston area, and is punctured by dowels noting the location of hospitals. This disc segments a three dimensional mesh which represents population density. The mesh recedes into the disc at moments of pure isolation that are located beyond a walking distance to the hospitals, eliminating the underlying surface, and signifying true danger. This idea is reinterpreted upon the artifact’s other face, which is physically stitched by the hospitals. This disc is etched with a study of commonly explored paths. These pathways have been shaped by our own class participation. The disc is intersected by a composite three dimensional mesh which represents population density correlated with the physical distance from hospitals. Their relationship is extrapolated to suggest that those injured in isolated areas of low population density, far from hospitals, are less likely to find rescue or be capable of walking to a medical center to seek help. The site itself erodes in zones wherein this distance and isolation proves to be life threatening.

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The object illustrates zones of safety at its peaks and erodes complete at zones of danger

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Manifest

tangible zones of safety

Abstract

perceived zones of safety

Map

gridded city

Spatial Reality

isolated zones v. hospital location

Spatial Inversion

common pathways v. hospital location

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DORMITORY Fall 2015 Academic Studio Critic | Megan Panzano This three week investigation sought to create a four-story dormitory using 960 linear feet of continuous façade per level. Beginning with a formal investigation of the bolt, ideas of seeming self-similarity and symmetry were explored. The final form’s exterior is symmetric and uniform. From the interior, however, an imbalance is formed as a resultant of various programmatic components required by the brief. Two staircases, with different trajectories, landing heights, and overall shape, are inserted into the building at opposite ends, creating a duality of interior conditions that vie for territory. Though the building is a single enclosed form, its interior is distinctly segmented. Two lobes of space have uniquely different floors heights, creating moments of visual interconnectedness within the interior. The meeting of these two systems manifests in a central rift in the floor plates, creating an opening within that acts to flood the building with light from its central corridor, compensating for the shade produced by its cantilevered form. Ultimately, the two distinct lobes are connected at the fourth floor via a large, shared common space. The appearance of the common rooms indicates a stitching of space, either laterally or vertically. These zones register on the façade as moments of fusion, and their removal is indicated by a feathering between levels.

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Level 4

Level 3

Level 1

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NASSAU STREET Winter 2014 Professional In collaboration with Eran Chen, Kyriakos Kyriakou, + MOSO Studio The design of this 230,000 square foot mixed-use residential tower began in late winter 2014. The form’s columns create a dense mass from which terraces are carved away to create three dimension undulations along the facade surface. Within the towers recessed voids, micro-communities of users emerge. The tower itself is comprised of luxury rental apartments and condominiums while its base is populated by commercial and office spaces. Renters and buyers will have access to a full floor of residential amenities and the rooftop garden. Standing at over forty-stories high, the tower will provide residents with views of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Freedom Tower, and unique vantage points of lower Manhattan.

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JAY STREET Spring 2014 Professional In collaboration with Eran Chen, Kyriakos Kyriakou, Mark Bearak, + MOSO Studio Built in 1897, this former factory was once home to the Arbuckle Sugar refinery. The building is situated along the East River waterfront in Dumbo and is adjacent to the Manhattan Bridge. In the 1950s, the building’s original north facade was demolished. While it’s remaining three faces have been designated as city landmarks, its north facade will be transformed. While still in development, this new design aims to evoke the building’s rich history as it is converted into luxury condominiums. Crystalline modules extend from the existing structure as an homage to the building’s roots as a sugar refinery. These jagged modules also convey the idea that this building is all that remains from something that was partially demolished. Inside these modules are winter gardens, extensions of living rooms separated by nanawalls that can be furnished as interior or exterior space. The mullions that support these garden zones form geometries reminiscent of the iconic trusses of the neighboring Manhattan Bridge, binding it to its surrounding context.

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Typical Plan

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BERN Summer 2012 Personal Excerpt taken from my publication, Tradition & Modernity, produced for the Wendy Evans Joseph Traveling Scholarship: As the field of architecture grows to encompass greater feats of engineering, a delicate relationship emerges between tradition and modernity. Advancements in technology and construction have empowered architects to introduce foreign and innovative elements to the field of design, however their use sometimes fosters a disconnect with the past. Switzerland excels in honoring its architectural history while advancing towards the vanguard of design. Using the Wendy Evans Joseph Traveling Scholarship, I spent two weeks in the Canton of Bern to study the manner through which Switzerland’s finds inspiration in tradition as it establishes a modern architectural language Switzerland is a diverse land greatly influenced by the many countries and cultures that surround it. While there is no single identity or architectural style that can characterize the land and its inhabitants, the significance of the natural landscape permeates Swiss culture. Mountain ranges and vast hills, though sometimes sheathed in a cloudy haze, are an omnipresent force in both the urban and rural environment. Nature has shaped traditional Swiss architecture both physically, through harvested wood, and aesthetically, though form. As the field of architecture progresses alongside the advancement of technologies and materials, the country’s landscape, tradition, and cultural identity influence the development of its architectural style.

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Hefferan Portfolio  

2017 Harvard GSD

Hefferan Portfolio  

2017 Harvard GSD

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