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Christi Farrell Portfolio | 2009 - 2013


Table of Contents

Brooklyn Heights Row House Delson or Sherman Architects | 2009

05

Floating Library Prof. Laurie Hawkinson & Christian Uhl | Spring 2013 | Advanced Studio IV

11

Woven Prof. Robert Heintges | Spring 2013 | Advanced Curtain Wall

29

Visualizing Infrastructure Prof. Laura Kurgan | Fall 2012 | Advanced Studio V

Artist Foundry Prof. Jay Hibbs | Spring 2012 | Architectural Technology V

Vocational School Prof. Janette Kim | Spring 2012 | Advanced Studio IV

33

45

53


North Carolina Museum of Art Prof. Chris Andreacola | Fall 2011 | Architectural Technology IV

69

Surface Area Ratio Prof. Hilary Sample | Fall 2011 | Core Studio III

73

Declassified / Classified Library Prof.Mark Wasiuta | Spring 2011 | Core Studio II

91

Dissolved Prof. Kutan Ayata | Spring 2011 | Architectural Drawing and Representation II

99

Science Lab Prof. Janette Kim | Fall 2010 | Core Studio I

101

3


Brooklyn Heights Row House Delson or Sherman Architects

open to below roof deck

As Project Manager for this five floor gut renovation, I was involved in all phases of the project, from schematic design through construction administration. I worked directly under the principal architect and collaborated closely with the clients, contractor and vendors. Because this residence is located on an historic block, I was responsible for preparing drawings and presentations for approval of a rear yard addition from Landmarks Preservation Commission. Additionally, I managed and specified the fixtures, materials, and equipment within the home, as well as reviewed and corrected the shop drawings for the custom cabinetry. Throughout the construction process, I attended weekly site visits and managed all change order agreements and updates to the project budget.

family room dining roof deck sitting bath

library kitchen

playroom

dressing

laundry

bath bath

living

foyer vestibule

Back Exterior

CellarCELLAR Floor

1ST FLOOR 1st Floor

master bedroom

FLOOR 2nd 2ND Floor

bedroom

3RD FLOOR 3rd Floor

bedroom

bedroom

FLOOR 4th 4TH Floor

(Photography by Catherine Tighe)

Brooklyn Heights Row House | Delson or Sherman Architects

5


2X3 WOOD HANDRAIL

2X2 POST HUNG FROM BRACKET 1/2” DIA. STEEL ROD

SOLID HARDWOOD TREAD STEEL CLIP RECESSED FLUSH

2X2 STEEL ANGLE PLAYROOM

BEDROOM

4TH BEDROOM 3RD STUDY

DRESSING

M. BATH

MASTER BEDROOM

2ND

DINING

KITCHEN

LIVING

1ST

DEN

BATH

LNDRY WINE CL.

CL.

VESTIBULE

CELLAR

CELLAR STAIR AXONOMETRIC

BUILDING SECTION Brooklyn Heights Row House | Delson or Sherman Architects

7


4 3

1

2

OVEN

MICROWAVE

1 NORTH INTERIOR ELEVATION

G

2

F EAST INTERIOR ELEVATION

E

A COUNTER EDGE

DETAIL PLAN

PLAYROOM

BEDROOM

4TH BEDROOM

B A

3RD STUDY

DRESSING

M. BATH

MASTER BEDROOM

2ND

COOKTOP

KITCHEN

DINING

LIVING

1ST

3 SOUTH INTERIOR ELEVATION

D

4 WEST INTERIOR ELEVATION

C

DEN

BATH

LNDRY WINE CL.

CELLAR

B BACKSPLASH

BUILDING SECTION

CL.

VESTIBULE


B

G F

A

2 1

C E

3 4

D Brooklyn Heights Row House | Delson or Sherman Architects

9


Floating Library Advanced Studio VI Profs. Laurie Hawkinson & Christian Uhl

The proposal then operates as a library with an extended definition that answers the question “What other forms of knowledge can be created, cataloged, and distributed via the public domain of the library?” Organized through six platforms that rise and fall with the tides via a structural system that works together to be both buoyant and flexible spatially, this new floating library also operates as a transit hub for the local population and a fabrication facility for the community. A differentiated roof system comprised of cantilevered vaults both codifies the program via atmospheric affects and offers large spaces where flexibity is a priority.

A B C D E F G H J K L M N P Q R S 7.5 120

60

30

15

7.5

45'-0" 30'-0"

15

Situated on the Flushing Bay, the proposal for this studio negotiated a series of anticipatory assumptions about the future of New York City and the library as public institution. With the rise of sea levels, +2’ by 2040, the future of the library will undoubtably resonate with a cultural condition that favors flexibility, hybridity, and logistics as dominant logics.

15'-0" 0'-0" -15'-0"

Potential Range of Height Change

Potential Range of Height Change

Potential Range of Height Change

Potential Range of Height Change

Vault Scale and Density Matrix

Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

11


Model of Building


Study Models

Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

13


Mary Schwartz

Derek Yang

32 years old Temp Worker 9 am / 7 pm

16 years old Student 7 pm - 9 pm

“Being able to check out an ebook for a brief period of time is great because I have a dedicated time to read on the ferry and its free!”

“I come here whenever we have assignments where I need a lot of concentration. Its easy to get distracted everywhere else.”

Ernesto Meza 46 years old Night Security 9 pm / 5 am

“I like being able to unwind when I’m coming back home from work. I also enjoy seeing the sunrise from the deck of the ferry.”

READING / WAITING ROOM

FERRY ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES

REFERENCE + COMPUTERS

TICKETING + CL ASSROOMS

Helen Samie 75 years old Retired 11 am - 3 pm

“I come here to spend the day with my friends. We have social events and we walk laps in the building while we people-watch.”

CIRCUL ATION SPINE

QUIET

LOADING AND UNLOADING

PRODUCTION

LOUD Amy Todhunter 24 years old Furniture Designer Various

“I come here at odd hours to work on ideas I’ve been thinking about all day. I love that all these resources are readily available.”

20'

24'

PRODUCTION

LOW TIDE

16' 6'

25'

22' 7’

14'

14' 8' 16' 49'

32'

CIRCUL ATION SPINE

TICKETING + CL ASSROOMS

33'

REFERENCE + COMPUTERS

79'

READING / WAITING ROOM

PROGRAM FLOW MAP 1/16” = 1’-0”

HIGH TIDE

Flushing, Queens Site Map

10'

Program Flow


1

3

1

3

CAFE

5

5

ENTRY

5

5

READING AND WAITING ROOM

FERRY ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE

4

4

REFERENCE DESK AND STACKS

4

COMPUTER AREA

4

MEETING ROOMS

CLASSROOMS CUSTOMER SERVICE AND TICKETING

2

2

2

MAIN ENTRY

2

BREAK AREA

PRODUCTION LOADING DOCK

PRODUCTION

ENTRY

1

Roof Plan

3

1

3

First Floor Plan

Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

15


SEA LEVEL 2040 SEA LEVEL 2013

Section at Ferry Arrival + Departure | 5:00 AM | Low Tide: 4’


Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

17


SEA LEVEL 2040

SEA LEVEL 2013

Section at Circulation Spine | 10:00 AM | High Tide: 12’


Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

19


SEA LEVEL 2040

SEA LEVEL 2013

Section of Overall Building | 1:00 PM | Mid Tide: 8’


Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

21


SEA LEVEL 2040 SEA LEVEL 2013

Section at Computer Area | 5:00 PM | Low Tide: 4’


Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

23


Section at Reading / Waiting Room | 10:00 PM | High Tide: 12’


SEA LEVEL 2040

SEA LEVEL 2013

Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

25


View of Circulation Spine


Floating Library | Advanced Studio VI

27


Woven Advanced Curtain Wall Prof. Robert Heingtes

12’-0”

Because rare books require specific lighting conditions to maintain their quality, the facade of my proposed Rare Book Library works to diffuse incoming daylight. The facade system is a doubleskin system composed of both a unitized glass curtain wall towards the interior of the building and a layer of stainless steel mesh screens towards the exterior. The two layers have a 5’ clear separation to allow for maintenance to the facade. The stainless steel mesh panels are orthogonal and range in size from floor to floor height to a third of the floor to floor height. The stainless steel mesh panels use this variation in size to create a gradient effect that becomes more pronounced towards the center of the building facade. Additionally, the stainless steel mesh panels are setback from one another according to an overall pattern that creates a weaving effect across the facade. To lend further to this weaving effect, the stainless steel strips comprising the screens are anodized in varying colors. Structurally, the entire screen facade is hung from a beam located at the top of the building.

Partial Elevation

Partial Section

1/2” = 1’-0”

1/2” = 1’-0”

Building Elevation Building Elevation 1/8” = 1’-0”

Partial Plan 1/2” = 1’-0”

Curtain Wall Roadmap

Woven | Advanced Curtain Wall

29


S.S. MESH ALUMINUM FRAME TENSION ROD OUTRIGGER HANGER

3”

2-3/4”

7-3/8”

3”

1-3/4”

1-3/4”

1-1/4”

Screen - Section Detail 9-1/2”

6” = 1’-0”

Stack Joint Detail 6” = 1’-0”

Section Details at Mullion and Screen


1-1/8”

1-1/4”

7-3/8”

1-1/4”

S.S. MESH ALUMINUM FRAME Mullion - Plan Detail

TENSION ROD

6” = 1’-0”

OUTRIGGER HANGER

S.S. MESH ALUMINUM FRAME OUTRIGGER HANGER TENSION ROD Screen - Elevation Detail 6” = 1’-0”

Screen - Plan Detail 6” = 1’-0”

Plan Details at Mullion and Screen

Woven | Advanced Curtain Wall

31


Visualizing Infrastructure Advanced Studio V Prof. Laura Kurgan In this Data Visualization studio, I developed a robust tool that would enable planners to visualize ownership, both private and public, of city streets. This tool spatialized previously unseen boundaries explicated in zoning law and exposed new opportunities for scenario planning at the scale of a neighborhood. These opportunities were framed by a careful analysis of geospatial information that identified the untapped resources for entrepreneurship, economic and social, latent in temporary events such as street fairs as well as the vacant buildings and lots in the city and weighed them through proximity of key resources such as educational buildings, non-profit organizations, commercial areas as well as public transit. As a triage system and design tool, the use cases for such an application are varied and range from the urban planner to the new entrepreneur who wants to understand the protocols of commerce in the public sphere. As a final exercise, I developed four different scenarios through which the tools utility could be visualized and manifested. Frames from Planning Tool Animation

Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

33


NYCEDC Ponte Properties, Llc

CD 10

BH West 128

125th St. BID

79 West 127th Realty

NYC Dot

Dept. Of Citywide Admin. Services

Harlem Grown Heritage Health + Housing

1992 Madison Llc Chiffon Chapman 4515 Realty Associate 49 West 126th Street, Llc Benton Funeral Services

Pentecostal Faith Church

Lars A. Westvind 436 Lenox Ave Corp Lloyds Funding Corp

Zoning Lot Merger

Incentive Zoning

Dept. Of Housing Preservation + Development

Non-profit

NYCHA

Public

Dept. Of Education

Lenox #777 Assoc, ltd.

Private

The Center For An Urban Future (New Visions For NYC Street Fairs)

NYC Parks Dept.

459 Lenox Ave Corp

Vacant Lots Potential Actors + Operations for Temporary Structures

Vacant Buildings

Unused F.A.R.

Transfer Of Development Rights Fresh Food Stores Inclusionary Housing Privately Owned Public Space


Vacant Lots + Vacant Buildings in Central Harlem

Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

35


200ft

STREET FAIRS

EDUCATION FACILITIES

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

COMMERCIAL AREAS

PUBLIC TRANSIT

PROVIDES PLATFORM FOR LOCAL ENTREPRENEURS & ARTISTS.

GREATER ACCESS TO EDUCATIONAL SERVICES AND RESOURCES.

GREATER ACCESS TO SOCIAL SERVICES AND RESOURCES.

COMMERCIAL OVERLAY ZONING ALLOWS FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES TO BE EMBEDDED WITHIN RESIDENTIAL AREAS.

GREATER PUBLIC ACCESS TO INCUBATOR SITES.

MORE AFFORDABLE TO RENT BOOTH THAN RENT OFFICE.

INDEX: E1 - 5 E2 - 5 E3 - 5 E4 - 5 E7 - 5 E9 - 5 V5 - 5 W1 - 5 W5 - 5 W6 - 4.5 V0 - 4.5 V1 - 4.5 V2 - 4.5

PROVIDES AN EVENT FOR LOCAL BUSINESSES TO DIRECTLY ENGAGE WITH COMMUNITY.

Value Index for Incubator Sites

V3 - 4.5 V4 - 4.5 V6 - 4.5 V7 - 4.5 V8 - 4.5 V9 - 4.5 F1 - 4.5 F2 - 4.5 F4 - 4.5 F5 - 4.5 F8 - 4.5 F9 - 4.5 K1 - 4

INDEX: BUSINESS CHILDCARE COMMUNITY HEALTH LEGAL YOUTH CULTURE HOMELESSNESS HOUSING SPORTS RELIGIOUS SENIOR

5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2

INDEX: C2-4/R7-2 C2-4/R7A C2-4/R8 C2-4/R8A C1-2/R7-2 C1-4/R7-2 C1-4/R8 PARK C8-3 M1-1 C4-4

5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 2


Pluto Database

Temporary Structures

Shape Area Land Use Zoning Building Class Commercial Area Ownership Built F.A.R. Max. Allowable F.A.R. Building Height

Street Fairs Vacant Buildings Vacant Lots Unused F.A.R.

GIS

Existing Buildings

NYC Open Data

Excel

Street Activity Locations

Transit Database

(Output Data)

NYC Subway Stations

Vacant NYC Vacant Building Address

NYC Non-Profits Project Non-Profit Name Non-Profit Address Non-Profit Type

(Input Data)

Cad

Rhino

GIS Vray

AfterEffects

Excel Excel Collect Data

Cull + Merge Data

Grasshopper Analyze + Search + Distribute Data

Data Representation

Data Inputs, Workflow, + Existing Site Conditions

Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

37


PUBLIC

PRIVATE

10’ VENDOR BUFFER

NO VENDOR ZONE

CART / CARD TABLE

SIDEWALK EDGE

CURB BUFFER

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

10’ VENDOR BUFFER

Sidewalk Code for Vendor Locations

Planning Tool as an Overlay for Google Street View

NO VENDOR


Planning Tool Animation + Dashboard

Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

39


VENDORS ON ROOF

VENDOR STORAGE AREA

FOOD TRUCK

FRUIT CART VENDOR AT WALL STREET FAIR YARD SALE

FLYER HANDOUTS

NEWSPAPER STANDS BICYCLE DELIVERY FOOD CART SIDEWALK COOK-OUT

Deregulated Street Scenario

VENDOR CARD TABLE

CAN COLLECTOR

OUTDOOR CAFE


STREET LIGHTS

LUXURY POP-UP STORES

SECURITY CAMERAS

STREET TREES

ART SCULPTURES

RESTRICTION SIGNS

SIDEWALK W WALK CAFE

PLAY A GROUND AY

BOLLARDS SHOPPER Privatized Street Scenario

BIKE LANES

Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

41


ROOF GARDEN

STREET ART INSTALLATION

MURAL LOCAL ART VENDORS MOBILE HEALTH TRUCK LOCAL PERFORMERS OUTDOOR CLASSES

FRESH FOOD STAND

URBAN FARM

DAYCARE Networked Non-Profits Street Scenario


STREET LIGHTS

HOLIDAY AY DECORATIONS A A ATIONS

BANNERS STREET TREES HANGING FLOWER BASKETS

SECURITY GUARDS

MAINTENANCE WORKERS BENCHES

FLOWER PLANTERS

TRASH CANS

Business Improvement District Scenario

GREEN MEDIANS

BIKE LANES Visualizing Infrastructure | Advanced Studio V

43


Artist Foundry

9 8

6

10 7

5

4

2

AIR HANDLING UNIT 1 3 OUTSIDE AIR

2

RETURN DUCTS EXHAUST LOUVER

3

MIXING BOX

4

PRE-FILTERS

5 1

SUPPLY AIR FAN

6

FINAL FILTER

7

HEATING & COOLING COILS

8

HOT DECK, DAMPER

9

COLD DECK DAMPER

10

SUPPLY DUCTS

Architectural Technology V Prof. Jay Hibbs w / Gabriel Burkett Luis Felip Paris Margaret Zyro Our intention for this industrial arts building is to create a mass that matches the industrial operations within while presenting an elegant presence to the community. Comprised of a six story concrete structural grid that is clad by a unitized facade system with glazed panels on the lower two levels, the building has a monolithic presence during the day and reveals its programmatic diversity at night. Ground floor and second level are open to public viewing while the upper levels are kept more discrete and accessible to students and staff. The north and south sides of the building are laid out in accordance with the program, ranging from workshops and studios in the south and computer labs and offices in the more narrow north portion. An atrium in the middle of these two sides serves as a buffer allowing a light, air, sound and circulation to travel through the space. Two cores located in the east and west wings of the building give the building structural stability.

N/A 10.04.2012 LFP EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

1

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

Exploded Axonometric of Building

S4

Artist Foundry | Architectural Technology V

45


EVITCEPSREP HTRON

Building in the Day

Building at Night


1 A3.1

BATH

MECH. ROOM

BATH

MECH. ROOM FREIGHT ELEVATOR

CAFE STAIRWELL

BATH

STAIRWELL

71’

BATH

1 A3.1

23’8”

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

/

/ 6’10”

/

B GALLERY

VESTIBULE

VESTIBULE

2’9”

2 A3.2

1 A3.2

SOUTH ENTERANCE

/ /

32’4”

GALLERY

22’10”

1 A3.0

1 A3.0

/

/

A

SOUTH ENTERANCE

BI-FOLD DOORS

3/32"=1'0" 30.04.2012

N

MAZ

SHADING TREES

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 2 A3.2

1 A3.2 1

2

3

4

5

/ 31’11”

/

30���

/

30’

/

/

30’

/

6

270’

7

8

9

1

10

/

30’

/

30’

/

30’

30’

/

/

31’11”

A1.0

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

/

1

2

3

4

5

/

BI-FOLD DOORS

31’11”

/ NORTH ENTERANCE

30’

/

/

/

9

10

/ /

/

30’

/

/

31’11”

/

/

/

/

/ 6’10”

C

STUDY LOUNGE

/ 1 A3.1

BATH

MECH. ROOM

C

/ 1 A3.1

BATH

MECH. ROOM FREIGHT ELEVATOR

/

23’8”

1 A3.1

23’8”

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

71’

CAFE STAIRWELL

BATH

STAIRWELL

BATH

71’

BATH

8

30’

2 A3.2

A3.2

BATH

MECH. ROOM FREIGHT ELEVATOR

7

30’

8’3”

6’10”

MECH. ROOM

/

30’

14’11”

8’3”

BATH

/

6

270’

14’11”

/

1 A3.1

30’

/ 1

NORTH ENTERANCE

EGRESS

30’

/

/

/

/

/ 6’10”

6’10”

/

BATH

STAIRWELL

STAIRWELL

/

B

B

/

/ /

A

SOUTH ENTERANCE

1

BI-FOLD DOORS

2’9”

2’9”

/

1 A3.2

2 A3.2

1 A3.2

SOUTH ENTERANCE

/ /

SOCIAL AREA

1 A3.0

1 A3.0

32’4”

VESTIBULE

VESTIBULE

SOCIAL AREA

22’10”

1 A3.0

GALLERY

32’4”

GALLERY

22’10”

1 A3.0

A /

/

/

/

2 A3.2

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1

2

3

4

5

/ 32’10”

/

30’

/

30’

/

30’

/

/

6

270’

/

30’

/

8 30’

9 30’

/

/

10 32’10”

/

10”X14” HSS FACADE REINFORCEMENT

2 A3.2

1 A3.2

7

/

30’

3/32"=1'0" 30.04.2012

N

/ 8’3” /

1 A3.1

BATH

MECH. ROOM

MECH. ROOM FREIGHT ELEVATOR

BATH

1 A3.1

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

71’

A1.0

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

BATH

STAIRWELL

STAIRWELL

BATH /

2

3

4

5

/ /

31’11”

30’

/

30’

/ A3.2

/

30’

/

30’

8

9

/

30’

/

30’

/

30’

/

31’11”

/

1 A3.0

2 A3.2

8’3” 6’10”

MECH. ROOM

14’11”

STUDY LOUNGE MECH. ROOM

Artist Foundry | Architectural Technology V 2 A3.2

1 A3.2

C

1 A3.1

2

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN- FLOORS 3-6

1 A3.0

WORKSHOPS

/

/

BATH

First Floor Plan

A /

3/32"=1'0" 30.04.2012

/

MAZ

47

FLOOR PLAN

WALKWAY N INSULATION

2 A2.3

/ /

2’9”

/

/

BATH

B

/

/

1 A3.1

/

10

32’4”

/ 1

7

22’10”

Site Plan

270’

6

6’10”

/ 1

C

/

23’8”

1

6’10”

OFFICE/COMPUTER LAB/STUDIOS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

14’11”

MAZ

SHADING TREES

SCREEN

A1.2

23’


LEVEL 4: 46’-0”

LEVEL 3: 32’-0”

LEVEL 2: 18’-0”

2 A3.2

1 A3.2

3/32"=1'0" 30.04.2012 GDB NORTH ELEVATION

1

A2.1

NORTH ELEVATION 3/32"=1'0"

1 A3.2 1

/

3

2

/ 31’11”

/

2 A3.2

30’

4 30’

/

/

2 A3.2 5

30’

/

270’ 30’

6

/

7 30’

/

8 30’

/

10

9 30’

/

31’11”

10

/

8

9

7

6

/

/

31’11”

/

/

30’

30’

/

/

30’

/

270’ 30’

1 A3.2

5

4 30’

/

/

3 30’

/

1

2 30’

/

31’11”

/ /

ROOF: 116’-0” T.O.S.

ROOF: 116’-0”

LEVEL 7: 88’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 7: 88’-0”

LEVEL 6: 74’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 6: 74’-0”

LEVEL 5: 60’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 5: 60’-0”

UNITIZED FACADE EXPANDED ALUMNINUM MESH DOUBLE-PANE ARGON FILLED GLASS

LEVEL 4: 46’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 4: 46’-0”

9 A2.4

AUTOMATED SMOKE CONTROL DEVICE DOUBLE-PANE ARGON FILLED GLASS STOREFRONT SYSTEM

1 A3.2

LEVEL 3: 32’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 3: 32’-0”

LEVEL 2: 18’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 2: 18’-0”

2 A3.2

2 A3.2

1 A3.2

3/32"=1'0"

3/32"=1'0"

30.04.2012

30.04.2012

GDB

GDB

SOUTH ELEVATION

1

SOUTH ELEVATION 3/32"=1'0"

NORTH ELEVATION

A2.0 1

A2.1

NORTH ELEVATION 3/32"=1'0"

1 A3.2 1

North Elevation

3

2

/

/

31’11”

/

2 A3.2

30’

/

4 30’

/

5 30’

/

270’ 30’

6

/

7 30’

/

8 30’

/

10

9 30’

/

31’11”

/

/

South Elevation ROOF: 116’-0” T.O.S.

LEVEL 7: 88’-0” T.O.S.


STUDY LOUNGE LEVEL 2: 18’-0” T.O.S.

MECH. ROOM

BATH

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

GALLERY

MECH. ROOM

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

GALLERY

CAFE

STAIRWELL

BATH

STAIRWELL

1 A3.2

2 A3.2

3/32"=1'0" 30.04.2012 MAZ LONG SECTION ATRIUM

A3.1

LONG SECTION AT ATRIUM

1

3/32"=1'0"

1 A3.2 1

2

2 A3.2

3

4

5

/ 32’10”

/

/

30’

30’

/

/

30’

/

6

270’

7

8

9

10

/

30’

/

30’

30’

/

/

30’

/

32’10”

/

SMOKE EXHAUST AHU

CONCRETE FINISH FLOOR

EXHAUST

ROOF: 116’-0” T.O.S.

2” RIGID INSULATION

HALFEN CHANNEL

METAL SHOP

LEVEL 7: 88’-0” T.O.S

ADJUSTABLE STEEL ANCHOR

WOOD SHOP

INTERIOR FINISH

LEVEL 6: 74’-0” T.O.S.

8” BATT INSULATION GLASS BLOWING

LEVEL 5: 60’-0” T.O.S.

ADJUSTABLE HANGER

PRINT MAKING LEVEL 4: 46’-0” T.O.S.

STRUCTURAL UNIT EXTRUSION CERAMICS STUDIO 3 A2.3

LEVEL 3: 32’-0” T.O.S.

STUDY LOUNGE

ALUMINUM ANGLE

LEVEL 2: 18’-0” T.O.S.

1” RIGID INSULATION

CAFE

GALLERY

GALLERY

1/16” ALUMINUM FASCIA MULLION CAP 1 A3.2

2 A3.2

3/32"=1'0" 10.04.2012 MAZ

N/A 30.04.2012

ALUMINUM SCREEN ANCHOR

LONG SECTION SOUTH

GDB

1

EXPANDED ALUMINUM MESH

1

FACADE UNIT ASSEMBLY

Facade Components

A3.0

LONG SECTION AT SOUTH 3/32"=1'0"

FACADE UNIT ASSEMBLY

A2.5 Building Section

Artist Foundry | Architectural Technology V

49


GROUP B

GROUP F

SMOKE CONTROL SYSTEM

AHU

GROUP F

GROUP B

SUPPLY DUCTS

RETURN DUCTS

BATHROOM EXHAUST TO ROOF

PLUMBING VENT

METAL SHOP AND WOOD SHOP EXHAUST TO ROOF

HOT WATER SUPPLY

GROUP A

CHILLED WATER SUPPLY

CHILLED WATER RETURN

GROUP A

GROUP A

GROUP A

HOT WATER RETURN

NTS 29.04.2012

NTS

CAF

29.04.2012 CAF

ADDITIONAL EXHAUST

ADDITIONAL EXHAUST

PASSIVE AIR FLOW

1

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS DIAGRAM 1 NTS SYSTEMS DIAGRAM MECHANICAL NTS

SMOKE EXHAUST

Mechanical Systems

1

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

M1.0

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AXON NTS

PASSIVE AIR FLOW

SMOKE EXHAUST

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

M1.0

MECHANICAL S AXON

M1.


ATRIUM PERSPECTIVE

Interior of Building in Workshops and Atrium

Artist Foundry | Architectural Technology V

51


Vocational School Advanced Studio IV Prof. Janette Kim Located on an existing Superfund site in Phoenix, Arizona, the Research and Manufacturing Center of Sustainable Technology negotiates the demands and necessities of various stakeholders by tapping into resources that are either currently marginalized or overlooked. The proposal is designed to localize and provide space to local manufacturing and other forms of blue-collar work that promote renewable resources and will provide a model for successful cities that cannot rely on the arrival of the creative class. In identifying Phoenix’s inability to maintain a viable creative class I also explicated the need to create systems of support for the unemployed, the nondegree holders, and the rehabilitation of pre-released prison inmates. By using the state trust land system in Phoenix as a model, leasing air rights to private industries and providing the resulting ground rights to beneficiaries, my proposal creates a new institution that offers the community free forms of leisure, job training and a sense of shared responsibility within publicprivate partnerships. The strategic

instrumentation of air as a private resource will create accountability and responsibility between public institutions and private industries. By taking advantage of the hybrid realities of these institutions -- public and private institutions are almost inseparable and hardly maintain independent definitions, tax money goes to public institutions, but citizens seldom see the benefits while some private institutions rely on government support for survival -- the building through its program renders the exchanges of costs and benefits between private and public institutions visible. As a new institution, the proposed building provides free forms of leisure to residents living within contaminated areas as well as feeds back energy into the grid in order to lower home energy costs.

Exploded Axonometric of Building on Site

Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

53


ARIZONA LAND OWNERSHIP

STATE TRUST LAND LEASE TYPES

STATE TRUST LAND BENEFICIARIES

PHOENIX

ARIZONA LAND OWNERSHIP:

AGRICULTURE ARIZONA STATE TRUST LAND EXPLORATION PERMITS BENEFICIARIES:

PRIVATE LAND INDIAN TRUST LAND FEDERAL LAND

GRAZING

STATE TRUST LAND

OIL + GAS

COMMON SCHOOLS UNIVERSITY LAND CODE LEG/EXEC/JUD BUILDING PENITENTIARY STATE HOSPITAL SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF + BLIND NORMAL SCHOOL REFORMATORY INSTITUTION AG. + MECH. COLLEGE SCHOOL OF MINES MILITARY INSTITUTION UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MINERS’ HOSPITAL

ARIZONA LAND OWNERSHIP

REVENUE

POP.

REVENUE

TUCSON

STATE TRUST LAND LEASE TYPES

AC R

ES

ES

ARIZONA LAND OWNERSHIP:

STATE TRUST LAND BENEFICIARIES

AC R

AC R

ES

AGRICULTURE ARIZONA STATE TRUST LAND EXPLORATION PERMITS BENEFICIARIES:

PRIVATE LAND INDIAN TRUST LAND FEDERAL LAND

GRAZING

STATE TRUST LAND

OIL + GAS

Lease Types

AC R

Beneficiaries

REVENUE

POP.

REVENUE

State Land Trust

Arizona State Land Trust Data and Maps

COMMON SCHOOLS

AC R

E

UNIVERSITY LAND CODE LEG/EXEC/JUD BUILDING PENITENTIARY STATE HOSPITAL SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF + BLIND NORMAL SCHOOL REFORMATORY INSTITUTION AG. + MECH. COLLEGE SCHOOL OF MINES MILITARY INSTITUTION UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MINERS’ HOSPITAL


COMMON SCHOOLS BENEFIT

PENITENTIARIES BENEFIT

GRAZING LEASE

ARIZONA

GRAZING LEASE

ARIZONA SUPERSTITION VISTAS

SUPERSTITION VISTAS

Arizona State Land Trust Process

Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

55


site ownership

beneficiaries

hospital

sub-surface ownership buildings + top 1’ of soil owned by o.n. semiconductor

surface ownership

superfund remediation by motorola

hospital

national guard state regulated groundwater

public school

state park

public school public school

courthouse hospital prison

Existing Site Conditions

private


turbine height

site ownership proposal

air rights are leased to private institutions superfund becomes state trust land 167m = 7.5m/s

134m = 7.2m/s

air use timeline

100m = 6.7m/s 67m = 6.1m/s 33m = 5.4m/s

Height to Speed Ratio for Wind Turbines

Site Proposal

tuberculosis

Air Use Timeline sanatorium

industrial production

vapor intrusion

renewable energy production

Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

57


Airflow Massing Studies


Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

59


Airflow Massing Studies


Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

61


FREE LEISURE EXTERIOR

CIRCULATION

FREE LEISURE EXTERIOR

CIRCULATION

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

ROOF FLOOR SCHOOL CLASSROOM

SCHOOL

SCHOOL

14TH FLOOR SCHOOL CLASSROOM

SCHOOL

PRISON CLASSROOM

WIND

13TH FLOOR

SCHOOL CLASSROOM 12TH FLOOR WIND

WIND

WIND

11TH FLOOR

10TH FLOOR PRISON CLASSROOM

SCHOOL CLASSROOM

9TH FLOOR

8TH FLOOR WIND

PRISON CLASSROOM

WIND

7TH FLOOR 6TH FLOOR 5TH FLOOR

PRISON

PRISON

4TH FLOOR

PRISON

3RD FLOOR 2ND FLOOR 1ST FLOOR

PROGRAM PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE

Building Systems

STRUCTURE PRIVATELY ACCESSIBLE

AIRFLOW EXCHANGES


Building on Site

Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

63


2

circulation

lecture seating

computer lab

workshop

open-air classroom

Programmatic Uses

Section Details

3

4

1


2

3

4

1

1

1

400’

350’

300’

250’

225’

200’

175’

150’

125’ 112’-6” 100’ 87’-6” 75’ 62’-6” 50’

Building Section

Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

65


View from Open-air Classroom


Vocational School | Advanced Studio V

67


Roof Level

North Carolina Museum of Art

High Performance Glazing

Louvers Block Direct Light

Photocells Control Interior Lighting

W30 Castellated Skylight Beam

Structural System

Operable Shades

Native Grass

Bioswale

Diffuse Daylight

Minimal Track Lighting

Continuously Curved Anodized Aluminum Plate

Shade Reflection Pool

Louver - Anodized Aluminum Extrusion

Permeable Pavers

Adjustable Slip Connection to Structural Support

Ground Level

Mechanical Crawl Space

90,000 gallon Cistern

Enthalpy Wheel

Air Handler

Aluminum Coping

Basement

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

Parking Lot

Skylight Screen Support Assembly Formed Aluminum Flashing

Roofing System Fastener Hot Air Welded Flashing Strip

Light Fixture

Conduit Raceway Spray-on Fire Proofing

Continuous Light Gauge Angle Light Control Fabric

Facade Substructure - Continuous Steel Angle

W8 Steel Member

Batt Insulation Opaque Fabric Light Baffle Wood Blocking/Framing W30 Castellated Skylight Beam Rigid Insulation

Roof Assembly Single Ply Waterproofing Membrane Insulation Board Sloped to Drain 1 1/2” Metal Deck Spray-on Fire Proofing Structural Steel Roof Storm Drain

Architectural Technology IV Prof. Chris Andreacola w / Gabriel Burkett Tom Heltzel Margaret Zyro

Skylight IGU Extruded Aluminum Rafter Metal Framed Skylight

W18 Steel Girder Web Bracing

Steel Knee Brace

Structural Steel SECTION 1

Light Gauge Framing Braced to Structural Steel

10.75” diam. Steel Column, typ. Light Gauge Framing Steel Bracing

SECTION 2

Vertical Substructure Hanger - Field Bolted to Precast Concrete Panels

Field-welded Hanger Bolts Polished Stainless Steel Infill Panel Shop-welded Panel Frame Anodized Aluminum Facade Panel

The building we studied is the North Carolina Museum of Art designed by Thomas Phifer Architects. It is set within a grassy field in a mountainous region of Raleigh, North Carolina. The museum is a one story 127,000 square foot rectangular building that is an extension of an existing museum designed SmithMiller Hawkinson Architects. These two buildings are connected via a service tunnel.

FRP Ceiling Panel Coffer Ceiling Coffer Suspensions System -

STRU ANAL

FRP Ceiling Panel Coffer Formed Plastic Filler Strip

Continuous Slot within Reveal Connected to Linear Diffuser Supply Air Plenum

10” Reinforced Concrete 2-Way Slab

Reinforced Concrete Pier Precast Insulated Core Concrete Wall Panel

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART The North Carolina Museum of Art designed by Thomas Phifer Architects is set within a grassy field in a mountainous region of Raleigh, North Carolina. The museum is a one story 127,000 sf rectangular building that is an extension

Reflection Pool

breaks within the rectangular form create a sinuous floor plan that allow a visitor to seamlessly wander between galleries and courtyards that display work ranging from ancient to contemporary art. The museum is carefully situated within the

Supply Duct with Insulation

Open Framing for Air Movement within Plenum

TYPICAL STEEL STRUCTURE DETAIL

Concealed Duct Work

site, taking into consideration its impact and relationship to the surrounding environment.

Vertical Steel Channel Facade Substructure

2

Existing Building Underground Service Tunnel

of an existing museum. These two buildings are connected via a service tunnel. Because the museum is free and open to the public, there are multiple entrances set within five courtyards that puncture the rectangular form. These

Reinforced Concrete Spread Footing

Light Gauge Framing

Slotted Hanging Connection from Panel Frame to Vertical Substructure

1

Architect: Thomas Phifer AIA Location: Raleigh, North Carolina Structural Engineer: SOM Mechanical Engineer: AltieriSeborWieber LLC Landscape Architect: Lappas + Havener, PA Lighting Design: Fisher Marantz Stone Project Area: 136,000 sf Project Year: 2010 Leed: Silver

Int. Wall Assembly 5/8” Gyp Bd. with Plaster Skim Coat, Level 5 Finish 3/4” Plywood Sheathing Light Gauge Framing

BUILDING EXPLODED AXON + SITE PLAN

Insulated Overflow Storm Drain Pipe

The museum is free and open to the public, so there are multiple entrances set within five courtyards that punctured the rectangular form. This creates a sinuous floor plan that allows a visitor to seamlessly wander between galleries that range from ancient to contemporary art

Return Air Plenum - Int. of Wall Acts As Large Plenum

Counter Flashing Scupper - Overflow Storm Drain System Sealant Over Backer Rod and Foam Spacer Spray Applied Polyicynene Insulation

Rigid Insulation

FACADE SYSTEMS

Structural Steel

Motorized Drape

Motorized Opaque Rolling Shade

Structural Steel

Precast Concrete Panel Angle and Anchor Bolt Continuous Metal Flashing

Return Air Duct - Stub Up Through Gallery Level Slab Continuous Slot Within Reveal - At Vertical Joint As Well

Wood Floor Assembly

W8 Steel Member

Sealant with Backer Rod

The project is composed of two types of facade systems. The first system, encompassing the entire retangular perimeter, is a pleated anodized aluminum rainscreen set over precast insulated core concrete panels. Set within the reveal of each pleat is polished stainless steel panel, set 90 degrees to the aluminum panels. When viewed at an oblique, the stainless steel panels reflect the ladscape, desolving the mass of the facade. The second system is an aluminum storefront system with custom extruded profiles. While allowing light into the main gallery spaces, the system is visually defined by the many systems used to mitigate and control direct sunlight - fritted and opaque insulated glass, black out roller shades, and three types of horizontal shades.

Permeable Concrete with Wire Mesh Reinforcing, Over 4” min Compacted Gravel Foundation Insulation Board Below Grade Waterproofing

Cast-in-Place Concrete Foundation Drainage Board and Filter Fabric Composite Compacted Gravel

Embedded Mechanical Tie - Supplied on 4’x4’ Grid Conc. Pier Bynd

Mechanical Crawl Space

Two Primary Systems: Aluminum Rainscreen

Sealant Slab On Grade - Reinforcing and 4” Compacted Gravel Bed

Storefront Glazing

Foundation Drain with Geotech Filter Fabric

Continuous Vapor Barrier

Column Footing Bynd Strip Footing

Mechanical Trough

Base Angle Continuous Angle

Structural Foundation

Facade Substructure Custom Aluminum Profile

Facade Substructure

Mirrored Inner Panel

Aluminum Extrusion

MOTORIZED DRAPE

Anodized Aluminum Panel

TYPE 1 suncontrol (15,000 FTCH/annum) extremely light sensitive artwork

Building Section

TYPE 3 suncontrol (90,000 FTCH/annum) typical light level at circulation

ALUMINUM RAINSCREEN SYSTEM

Due to the museums open plan and multiple entrances, a adaptive climate control system is necessary to handle solar gains and overall environmental exposure. In order to regulate the interior environment for a range of art artifacts, a forced air, single duct, multi zone system is used. The refrigerant cycle consists of two chillers and an off site cooling tower that runs partly underground in the service tunnel. Chilled water is provided to air handling units that service nine groups of 1 to 10 zones that divide the museums collections accordingly. A variable volume fan serves each zone, heating the air to proper temperature. To seamlessly integrate the system into the minimal aesthetic of the museum, the supply ducts run from below to the tops of interior and exterior walls and are pumped out through slot diffusers embedded in the top edge of the walls. The rest of the wall acts as a large return air plenum with slots in the reveal and base that allow air into the wall cavity.

North Carolina Museum of Art | Architectural Technology IV WALL SECTION

TYPE 2 suncontrol (60,000 FTCH/annum) light sensitive artwork

STOREFRONT FACADE SYSTEM

MECHANICAL SYSTEM

Precast Insulated Core Concrete Panel

IGU

Low Iron Glass Custom Ceramic Frit Opaque Top Unit

Forced air single duct multi zone system Plan division into 9 groups of 1 to 10 zones

69

The structural system remains largely hidde daylighting system to supports a modular r W30 skylight beams metal roof deck span of the roof, rectangul are anchored deep in by the floor slab - the sure that no moment ness is further provid


Roof Level

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS Additional lateral stiffness and strength is provided by partial trusses, or “knee braces” between the roof girders and the columns.

Structural System

W30 Castellated Skylight Beam

Ground Level

The structural system o NCMA is a relatively s system that remains l hidden, allowing for an e facade and supreme day ing system to stand out. of steel columns spaced supports a modular roo tem of W18 steel girder support deep W30 sk beams. Secondary W8 members support sloping al roof deck spanning be skylight members.

Mechanical Crawl Space

Basement

Parking Lot

W8 Steel Member

W18 Steel Girder Web Bracing

Steel Knee Brace

Existing Building

Gross Envelope: 468’ x 208’ excluding courtyards Foundation System: R.C. 10.75”spread diam. footing at each column Steel Column, typ. with strip footings along the perimeter Ground Floor Framing: 2-way R.C. flat plate system supported by R.C. columns and pilasters Roof Framing: Steel column grid at 26’ supporting a primary system of W18 girders

The cantilevered columns are anchored deep into the concrete columns which are braced laterally by the first floor 2-way slab, the basement slab-on-grade, and passive pressure on the sides of the footings such that the column footings do not see moment imparted by the steel columns.

FREE BODY DIAGRAM

10” Reinforced Concrete 2-Way Slab

Underground Service Tunnel

Reflection Pool

Reinforced Concrete Pier

Reinforced Concrete Spread Footing

BUILDING EXPLODED AXON + SITE PLAN

Exploded Axonometric of Building

Structural System

TYPICAL STEEL STRUCTURE DETAIL COLUMN CONNECTION DETAIL

LATERAL FORCE DIAGRAM

At the perimeter of the rectangular HSS tubes port exterior walls. Stee umns are anchored dee concrete piers, acting single member braced b floor slab - these com members resist lateral and assure that no mom imparted on the column ing. Lateral stiffness is f provided by braces at th connection.


The project is composed of two types of facade systems. The first is an aluminum storefront system with custom extruded profiles. While allowing light into the main gallery spaces, the system is visually defined by the many systems used to mitigate and control direct sunlight - fritted and opaque insulated glass, black out roller shades, and three types of horizontal shades.

Structural Steel Motorized Drape Motorized Opaque Rolling Shade

Structural Steel

Two Primary Systems: Aluminum Rainscreen Storefront Glazing

Mechanical Trough Structural Foundation Facade Substructure

Base Angle

Custom Aluminum Profile

Continuous Angle

IGU

Low Iron Glass Custom Ceramic Frit Opaque Top Unit

Precast Insulated Core Concrete Panel Facade Substructure

Aluminum Extrusion MOTORIZED DRAPE

Mirrored Inner Panel

TYPE 1 suncontrol (15,000 FTCH/annum) extremely light sensitive artwork TYPE 2 suncontrol (60,000 FTCH/annum) light sensitive artwork

Anodized Aluminum Panel

TYPE 3 suncontrol (90,000 FTCH/annum) typical light level at circulation

Facade System The second facade system is an aluminum storefront system with custom extruded profiles. While allowing light into the

ALUMINUM RAINSCREEN SYSTEM

North Carolina Museum of Art | Architectural Technology IV

71


Surface Area Ratio Core III Studio Prof. Hilary Sample w/ Gabriel Burkett Situated in Harlem, New York, on the historic 125th Street, our housing proposal addressed zoning as an avenue to express cultural values by adapting a fundamental component of New York zoning law, the instrument of Floor Area Ratio (FAR) and attributing it to the surface of buildings as a new instrument that could incentivize the use of media walls in mixed-use housing developments where cultural expression was deemed a priority. Through a careful analysis of visibility of the site, from the site and through the cultural artifacts of informal media -- i.e. advertisements promoting small businesses, locally produced events, murals, etc. -- we were able to tease out a demand for expression in service of cultural and economic capital. Our concept and research thus influenced our representational strategy which exploited the use of projections. Site lines, dimensions and presentations where animations were literally projected onto the surfaces of an ⅛ model reinforced our design and its intentions. The building’s organization favored shared public

spaces and incentivized the expression of individual and communal identities in order to empower users and encourage upward mobility.

Striver’s Row Analysis

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

73


PRODUCTS + SERVICES

ARTS

RESIDUE LEGAL HEALTH Advertisements Collected on Site

SHOWS

POLITICS

COMMUNITY

EDUCATION AUTO

JOBS REAL ESTATE


Advertisements found on site

Existing Elevations on Site

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

75


18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1

-2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7

-8

-9

-10

-11

-12

-13

-14

-15

-16

-17

-18

-19

-20

-21

-11

-10

-9

-8

-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Visibility Study from Metro North in Harlem


125

124

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121

77 Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

123

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125

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Proposed Scenarios Proposed and Existing Surface Zoning


First Floor Plan


Work work

work

Live live

live

Terrace terrace

terrace

Park park

light projection Light Projection

park

led LED mesh Mesh

light projection led mesh

Sixth Floor Plan

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

79


Unit Floor Plans


Interior Views

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

81


Day and Night Elevations


Longitudinal Building Sections

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

83


Building Section


View onto Interior Park

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

85


View from 125th Street


Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

87


Animation of Building with Illuminated Screen Facade


Model with Projected Image on Facade

Surface Area Ratio | Core Studio III

89


Declassified / Classified Library Core Studio II Prof. Mark Wasiuta The current method for containment and classification of classified documents is one of concealment and acute security. This intense secrecy tends to spawn buildings that shelter the documents in a sequence of nondescript nested monoliths. Once deemed declassified, the document is thoroughly sanitized before it can be publicly accessed in the National Archives or through a Freedom of Information Act request. Document sanitization is largely achieved through redaction. Redacting information removes the critical content of the document, rendering the comprehension of the document dependent upon the interpretation of the reader, resulting in a new understanding of the information. Redaction also groups certain types of information together that might be seemingly disparate. As a organizational strategy, redaction can help generate a system by which the typology of secured governmental buildings (like the NSA) can begin to be sanitized and

at times, made legible. My proposal for a new Government Library in the heart of Chinatown, a site already historically associated with strategies of concealment and security, implements redaction as its operative logic. Beginning with a conceptual analysis of boundary conditions mediated through a rigorous analysis of moire effects, the proposal deploys a system of enclosures at times transparent, at times redacted. The library here is seen as a negotiation between two forms of knowledge, one that is highly tactical and actionable and one that is highly reflective and inert -- one is a weapon, the other is bureaucratic.

Charcoal Drawing of Spatial Redaction

Declassified / Classified Library | Core Studio II

91


Redacted Documents

Moire Redaction Study


10

2 345 6 7 8

9 8 7 6 5

7 8 9

4

150’

3

10

9 9

135’

8 7 6 5 4 3 2

7 6 5 4 3

6 2 3 4 5

150’ 3

5

9

6 78

32

10

150’ 7

8 7 6 5 4 3

6

9 8 7

135’

10 9 8 7 6 5

150’

5

3

6 67 8 9

2

4 5 6

7

8 9

9 8 7

3

135’ 150’

3

120’

2

8 6 5 4 3 2

120’

3 3

150’ 3 87 6

7 6 5 4

3 2

3

4 5 67 89

8

120’

4 2

8 7 6 5 4

3 2

3 2

75’ 7

120’

150’

90’

7 6 5

4

105’ 7 6 5 4

135’

5 4

2

9

90’

8

2

6 5 4

8 7 6 5 4 3 2

3 2 1

4 3

7

75’

105’

7 6

135’

6 5 4 9

90’

105’ 6 5

75’

4

15’

105’

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

6 5 4

4 3 2

9

45’

120’

7

6 5 5

43 2

105’ 3 2

65 4 3

2

45’

2 3 4

4 3 2

5 4 3

6

1

45’

6 5 4

1

5

2

8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

1

2

3

2 3 4 56 7 8

45 6

1 2

6 5 4

6 5 4

9 8 7

7 6

2 4 5

4 3

2

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345

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8 7 6 5 4 3

2 3 4

5

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45’

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5 6

60’

32

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7 6 5 4 3 2 1

3 2

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30’

5

75’

45’ 8 7 6 5 4

4 5 6 7

45’

4

7

2 3

2

7 65 4 3 2

2

4 3 2 1

2

60’ 5 4 3

2

30’

9 8 7

75’ 6 5 4 3 2

3 4 5 6 78 1

3

90’

6

1 4 3 2 1

3

105’

7 6 5 4 3

3 2

90’

2

6 3 5 1

7

3

120’

105’

76 5 4 3 2

120’

2

8 7 6 5 4

2 3 4 56 7 4

9

7 6 5 4 3

4

9

3

150’ 9

4

135’

5

150’

10

135’

10

75’

1 2

8

3

3

8 7 6 5 4 3

4

8

7

105’

9

150’ 7

8

150’ 135’

150’ 6 5 4

2

4 56 7

7 6 5 4

150’

6 7 6 5

7 6 5 4 3 2

150’

120’

6 98 7

4

23 4 5

5 4 3 2

9

1

15’

1

2

1

1 2 3 4

162°

30’ 6 43 2

3 21

1

1

1

2 1

7 4 3 2

45’

1 3 2 1 1

1 6 5 4 2

14 4°

12

15’ 150’ 135’ 120’ 105’ 90’

108° 90°

75’

18°

36 °

72° ° 54

60’ 45’ 30’ 15’

Interweaving of Varied Floor Heights

Declassified / Classified Library | Core Studio II

93


Building Sections


View of Entrance

Declassified / Classified Library | Core Studio II

95


View of Reading Room


View of Meeting Rooms

Declassified / Classified Library | Core Studio II

97


Dissolved Architectural Drawing and Representation II Prof. Kutan Ayata Initiated with an analysis of a bas relief piece from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, these investigations of representation presented an iterative process that focused on reinterpreting the relief. After the initial attempts to describe the piece through contours, a methodology and interest emerged that refocused the project on disintegrating the original image using just lines. The build up of line across the page help to move beyond the original image into a new territory that was self referential and purely about its own logic.

Dissolved | Architectural Drawing and Representation II

99


Science Lab Core Studio I Prof. Janette Kim I approached the project of a climate lab within the city by first exploring the question of how is science portrayed to the public and more specifically, how can a climate lab within New York City create an awareness of current climate studies and issues to visitors and residents of the city. Through an analysis of climate proxies and the various mediums scientists work to draw conclusions on the past and present of climatology, I designed a lab that creates a visual awareness of the city’s cycles of ecology and the human role within this cycle. Currently within science, there are a number of ways scientific data and discoveries are communicated to the public in real-time, ie. blogs, museum exhibits, documentaries, art/photography, and radio. To create an immediacy and larger awareness of scientific climate findings and data the current method of scientific publicity could be transformed into climate proxies themselves. Through the use of media proxies. Media proxies could record in real-time data that is collected within the city, in particular the East River, and through the functions

of a lab, be broadcasted through the form of the building. In time, the media proxies will begin to create a collection that serves as an archive of climate. This archive can then be analyzed through the individual and society allowing them to create a more informed opinion of science and the effects one has on past and current climate conditions.

Proposed Programmatic Actions

Science Lab | Core Studio I

101


Iterations of an Evolving Cell


Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

Stage 5

Water absorbing membrane

Cell Designed to Gradually Collect Algae Samples

Science Lab | Core Studio I

103


1763: delivery at slip by boat = fish

Timeline of Industry at the Peck Slip Waterfront

1800: delivery at barge by boat slip filled in

1822: delivery at barge by boat fish market

1822: delivery by truck fish market

2005: no deliveries vacant market

2010: delivery by truck farmers market


LDEO: research + repository

DIGITAL MEDIA

CK

NYC: science projects

PE

PE

A

R

L

ST

R

EE

IP

T

SL

ET

RE

R

E AT

ST

W

ET

RE

ST

N

LY

K

O

O R

T

ON FR

B E

G

ID

R

B

REAL-TIME DATA: communication

2400

ET

RE

H

UT

SO

ST

E

IV

R

FD

DR

PECK SLIP: testing ground

dry lab

2400

monitoring station

1100

digital data graphs recording devices (visual/audio) measurement instruments

SOUTH STREET SEAPORT SCALE 1” = 100’

700

data storage hub digital data

wet lab

2400

library

2000

reception

fish specimens river/ocean/lake sediment water ice cores tree rings bore holes corals

digital data graphs qualities quantities papers to be published email communication database access

1000

SOCIAL MEDIA

TACTILE MEDIA

1000

material storage photography media from wet lab

outdoor observation area recording devices (visual/audio) measurement instruments collection tanks

1000

people speech books published papers

people speech printed media projected media

deck animals

SCIENCE MUSEUM: gathering place

Influences on Science Lab

Program

Science Lab | Core Studio I

105


Building Sketches


data storage

data storage

outdoor observation

outdoor observation monitoring station

library

library

wet lab

monitoring station

wet lab deck

deck

dry lab

material storage

material storage reception

dry lab

reception

Building Sections

2

Science Lab |action Core Studio I and 107 media types media sections action t


Building Elevations


Science Lab | Core Studio I

109


Christi Farrell Portfolio 2013