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CHRISTIAN NICHOLAS HUNN Professional Architecture Portfolio Academic Year 3 2018 - 2020


CHRISTIAN N IC H OLAS HUNN

Education University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas Fall 2018 - Spring 2023

Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England Spring 2021

Masters in Architecture 5-year accelerated program Minor in Global & International Studies German Language GPA: 3.95

Graduation date: May 2023 Secondary Education: Wentzville Holt High School GPA: 4.34

Graduation date: June 2018

Academic Distinctions University of Kansas Deans List Fall 2018 - Fall 2020 University of Kansas Global Scholars Program

Conducting in an independent international research project

University of Kansas Honors Program University of Kansas Global Awareness Program (GAP) The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi University of Kansas Scholarship

Merit Based Honors Opportunity Award OSA Award

Battenfeld Scholarship Hall Missouri A+ Program 2


christianhunn@gmail.com christianhunn@ku.edu (636)697-0430 Christian Hunn

Work Experience Wentzville Dairy Queen - Manager, Cake Decorator April 2016 - July 2019 Managed and operated store, supervised employees, and ensured customer satisfaction Made and decorated cakes for both customer order and inventory expressing artistic authority when needed

University of Kansas Department of Film and Media - Actor December 2018 - November 2019 Ishan Parikh, Director, writer, University of Kansas student Lead actor in student produced film EGO as private investigator Owen Kaple

Bruno’s Draft Kits - Production, Lamination, Printing May 2020 - August 2020 Brian Bruno (314) 562-4072 Printed Fantasy Football draft boards to order, kept labels in stock, laminated and produced boards to completion

University of Kansas - Teaching Assistant, ARCH 524 Structures I August 2020 - December 2020 Jason Hascall jasonhascall@ku.edu Homework and test grader, scheduled office hours for content assistance

University of Kansas - Teaching Assistant, ARCH 624 Structures II January 2021 - May 2021 Jason Hascall jasonhascall@ku.edu Homework and test grader, scheduled office hours for content assistance

Volunteer Work National Honors Society 2016 - 2018 Wentzville School District Summer School Tutor Summer 2017

Tutored 7th and 8th grade students in math and science, assisted with class supervision

University of Kansas Department of Architecture Student Mentor Fall 2020 3


quindaro pavilion

light box sculpture

rub el hazb community mosque

a balanced home

wyandotte community center

polaris pavilion

4


contents

01 pg.6-13

02 pg.14-21

03 pg.22-29

04 pg.30-37

05 pg.38-59

06 pg.60-73

5


6


QUINDARO PAVILION - Spring 2020 Instructor - Professor Thom Allen

The Underground Railroads at Quindaro is situated on the Missouri River Northwest of Kansas City, MO. Slaves escaped from Missouri crossing the river in small boats and secret runs where they would hide with local farmers. Quindaro is a National Commemorative Site, one step short of a landmark, and still has existing paths and ruins from the time of slavery. The site is also seen as the first free port alongside the Missouri River. To build off of the sites existing goals, such as building off of the existing paths, I wanted to choose path based off of what appeared to be a ridge on my rock (site). In addition to this, along the path, I want to install benches for resting points and put in educational signs and monuments that will teach the history and significance of the people in the area and the history of the Underground Railroad. While at a commemorative speech, Rep. Sharice Davids was quoted saying, “Quindaro means bundles of sticks...like bundles, in union there is strength.� This imagery is where I drew a lot of my first inspirations: bundles of sticks or bushels of wheat. I want the pavilion to reflect a certain aspect of this concept of bundling. I also wanted to focus on the river for the main view of my pavilion to reflect back on the significance of this specific point on the river.

7


starting from rock bottom EXTRACTED TOPOGRAPHY

N

N

Missouri River

DESIGN CHARRETTE

EXISTING PATH PROPOSED PATH

Existing Path

Proposed Path

Wetlands

N

EXISTING CONDITION 8


SEASONAL WINDS

Missouri River RI MISSOURI

Wetlands

Missouri River

Wetlands

N

N

Missouri River

Missouri River

PROPOSED SITE

Chosen Site/ Proposed Site

PROPOSED PAUSE POINT

Chosen Pause Point/ Proposed Point

Wetlands

VIEWS

Wetlands

N

N

MISSOURI

SITE

MO

KCKS

KA

N

SA

S

RI

KS

RI

KCMO

TOPOGRAPHY ADJUSTMENTS 9


precedents

The landscape view for my site was influenced by Lawrence’s Baker Wetlands. The souther exposure of my rock was low in elevation and quite porous so this is where I created this zone.

WINTER MONTHS

The location for the pavilion was chosen on a spot near a sloping portion of the river. For the design of the space, I wanted to create a pier platform space surrounded by both unnatural materials, such as metal and concrete, but overgrown with nature. This platform would then branch off into a pierlike structure that would cantilever above the river to give both an optimal view but also allow the viewer to witness the dangers and courage it would have taken a runaway slave to journey across this mighty river.

SUMMER MONTHS

The pavilion was influence by a factory bridge found in Newcastle, England where the walls were built out of a light cylindrical exposed framing. This case study was used for me to further explore the design context I was looking for, such as industrial overgrown. 10


a journey through the seasons

11


NORTH SECTION PLAN

EAST ELEVATION

drawn representation

12


13


14


LIGHT BOX SCULPTURE - Fall 2018 Instructor - Professor Thom Allen

When developing the concept for the light box, I was assigned two distinct words to incorporate into the project: threshold and centralized. I interpreted threshold as one would do with a door-- a transition into another space through a defined plane. This is displayed with the overlapping planes and outlined squares. The planes are also used as a blank canvas to catch the shadows casted my the shapes in front of it. I defined centralized in this project as a way to draw attention to a certain point. This is shown with the voided space within all of the outlined geometry, getting smaller as you go towards the back.

*Project construction in collaboration with Tyler Koory, M. Arch 15


developing the threshold

CONTRACTING GEOMETRY TO ALLOW THE PANES AND FRAMES TO CATCH THE CAST SHADOWS

Front View Scale: 1/2” = 1”

16


Piece Designs

x2

x2

x2

Back

Front

Each 16”x16” square was cut in half, and then had the appropriate sized rectangle cut out of each half in the center. The front two INVERSE SIZEopening, RELATION THE inFRAMES AND PLANES pieces have the largest each layer going BETWEEN back getting smaller (smallest the back) with seven layers in total.

Base BASE

Right Side Exploded View Sacale: 1/2” = 1”

Bracings

BRACING 17


realization of construction

INTERACTIVE EXHIBIT SPACE AND GALLERY

After constructing the form,

the massing was put through a lighting test in various angles and positions. The form that was created was made in a way to be versatile in how it connected to the ground. There is no defined top or bottom, nor front or back. This allowed us to play with the orientations and the different light modulation we could create.

The

frames

were

utilized

to cast shadows and lines while the planes worked as canvases to

capture

the

shadows.

The form was then placed

in an interactive environment and conceptualized as built form in the environment. People could interact with the structure as a shelter or monument of sorts. This also helped to highlight the depth of the planes in

18

relation

to

their

placement.


19


a splash of color After the structure was run through white lighting, an experiment with colored lighting was then ran. This time, multiple colored light sources were used in opposing directions. This was done to showcase the layering and angling of the different forms. Rather than highlighting the shadows created, this rendition showcases that different colored lights can be captured at the same time. This created an effect where one half of the form would capture one color, and the other half would capture an opposing color.

LAYERING THROUGH COLOR AND SHADOWS

20


21


RUB EL

22


L HAZB COMMUNITY MOSQUE - Fall 2019 Instructor - Professor Farhan Karim

This project was designed as a not for profit community mosque and Qur’anic community center. This structure, located in Wheaton, Maryland, is home to many Muslim Immigrants of the Wheaton and Silver Spring area. The client, who is a friend of professor Farhan Karim, has purchased two adjacent resident lots, which are close to the commercial hubs. The center is financed by the local mosque community. The objective of the Rub el Hazb Mosque and school is to provide a communal identity to the heterogeneous immigrant population who come from a diverse cultural, linguistic, and economic background. Currently, the school and the mosque are located at two different houses at two adjacent plots. The mosque committee will demolish the current structures, merge the two plots, and will construct this three-story building in phases.

23


analysis of wheaton FUNCTION 1. Daily prayer, weekly prayer (Jummah), Eid prayer 2. Qur’anic school (Madrasa) 3. A community place for Ifar during the Ramadan

WHEATON Site

O AC AN

4. Lectures and seminars 5. Weekend farmers market/cafe at the empty parking lot (will not design this

A STI

aspect)

E RIV

6. Commercial kitchen for catering service

R

(will not design the commercial kitchen) PROGRAM

SILVER SPRING

1. Front Office (total 1000 sft)

a. Waiting area

b. Office area

c. Storage

d. Restrooms

MD

2. Main Prayer Hall (separate entry for male and female) 6000 sft - 7000 sft

a. Ablution area (separate spaces

for male and female)

b. Shoe racks

3. Classrooms (6 classrooms, 4 male and 2 female - 800 sft each) design one big room with demountable walls 4. Multipurpose Hall (3000 sft)

WASHINGTON

5. Commercial Kitchen (700 sft) 6. Outdoor seating area/play area 7. Parking space for 60 cars

D.C.

8. Two main stairs, circulation no more than 20% of floor area 9. Restrooms STATISTICS Population (2010): 48,284

VA

Climate: Temperate Climate zone Vegetation: Deciduous Topography: Flat site Traffic: High traffic on Veirs Mill Rd Altitude: 66ft 24

POTOMAC RIVER

Density: 6998/sq mi


RACE

PERCENTAGE

WHITE

26%

HISPANIC/LATINO

42%

ASIAN

12%

BLACK

18% 5%

MULTIRACIAL

Pa

rki

5ft

17

12

15

0ft

20

0ft

EXISTING BUILDINGS TO BE DEMOLISHED

ng

5ft

SUN PATH

EXISTING BUILDINGS

VEGETATION 25


translation of faith

A

9

2

9

4

RUB EL HAZB - SYMBOL OF ISLAM 3

Through the digital modeling phase, I designed three different versions of the eight pointed star plan. For my first design, my goal was to create a contemporary traditional design (postmodern) but the end result came across as using too many different styles and the look was in-cohesive. For the second design, I moved to a more modern simplistic form in my approach and encased the entirety of the building. In the center of the building, I came up with an organic shape that I would designate to my ablution space. After further contemplation of my design, I came to the consensus that my prayer hall was no longer the main focal point, or area of interest of my design. At this point, I started to develop design three. I stuck to the sleek, modern, humble, design of the exterior. I also reintroduced the central courtyard and repositioned the front entrance of the building to build an axial circulation path to the prayer hall. This building works best because its form in its star expression is clear, the exterior design is quite simplistic, and the circulation is easy to follow.

26

3

B

6

C

7 1

FIRST FLOOR

9

9

8

5

D

SECOND FLOOR

SOUTHEAST SECTION


C

B

D

WOOD CRENELATION

CONCRETE

Front Office Main Prayer Hall Ablution area Shoe racks Classrooms (6 spaces, 4 male and 2 female each) Multipurpose Hall Commercial Kitchen Outdoor seating area/play area Restrooms

BURNT WOOD CLADDING

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

A

27


LIGHT SPECTACLE

VEIRS

MILL

DR

RIS R D

NOR

28


pillars of design

PILLARS OF ISLAM

PILGRIMAGE HAJJ FASTING SAWM ALMS ZAKAT PRAYER SALAT FAITH SHAHADA

TIERING OF ROVES

29


A BALANCED HOME - Fall 2019 Instructor - Professor Farhan Karim

When developing the concept for the design, the objectives for the form were to express gravity in a simple yet natural way and create a suitable functional environment for a modern family. In the development of the form, inspiration was drawn from the concept of stacked balancing stones and a reference to primitive design. Stemming from this idea, an integration of nature was an integral aspect in the building and site design. To portray this in tandem with the theme of gravity, the building was lifted on stilts upon a natural stream below. A flowing waterfall was thus incorporated, trickling from the top of the building on a glass roof to then pour back into the stream below. Since the building was built over water, to access the structure, one must enter onto a bridge, which the building is sat upon. After achieving the basic form of the building, inspiration was drawn from traditional Japanese architecture: tiered systems, incorporation and flow of nature, and naturally light materials.

30


31


STACKING EFFECT

FIRST CHARRETTE

32


abstracting the idea

OPEN LAYOUT

Journeying into the first floor from the bridge, one can enter into the foyer space of the home. From here, one can access the kitchen, dining space, and a half bath; one may also traverse to the second floor via the elevator of staircase. Once on the second floor, one will have access to the two children’s bedrooms on the eastern and southern portion of the floor. There is also a full wheelchair accessible bathroom located on this floor, a communal sitting and living space, a screened veranda, and exterior rooftop deck.

WATERFALL FEATURE

Transcending to the third floor, one will first enter into an enclosed sun-room where one will be able to access a large rooftop deck or processed into the rest of the building. On this floor, one will find the main living room for the family which will inhabit the home. Adjacent to this living room on the southern portion of the floor is the master bedroom which features a master bath.

SUN ROOMS AND DECKS 33


THIRD FLOOR

LIVING ROOM

FIRST FLOOR

NORTH SECTION

34

RANGE N.I.C.

SECOND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

AXIS OF CIRCULATION

35


42 36


east section

TIERING OF SPACE

1

WEST SECTION 3/16" = 1'-0"

37


WYAND

38


DOTTE COMMUNITY CENTER - Spring 2020 Instructor - Professor Thom Allen

The site is located in Kansas City, Kansas on a historic commercial avenue in the center of town. Much of the surrounding areas of the site have seen an increase in poverty in the preceding decades. A goal of the Wyandotte Community Center, in accordance with many of the mayors priorities, is to invigorate this area of Kansas City, Kansas and promote growth, beauty, and prosperity in the region. In the design of the community center, the spaces were overlapped on different levels to allow diffusion of light throughout the different levels and depths of the building. The different programs are all relatively closed off from one another but the usage of glass allows the rooms to expand visually into one another. When entering in through Minnesota Avenue, one is greeted by the mural that has been preserved on the neighboring building. From this entry point, one has access to the gift shop, or can continue on and up the upstairs, downstairs, or across the bridge to the second building.

39


INITIAL EMPTY LOT UTILIZED FOR POP-UP TESTING AND SUPPLY DEPOT

40


coronavirus relief In the wake of a global pandemic, a facility to aid society is what is needed most. The initial use of the site is to serve as a temporary COVID-19 relief center. The location will focus on getting essential supplies to the Kansas City, Kansas area and to test individuals that may be infected with the virus. The site was designed to ensure that members in the community can visit the site to pick up their goods and get tested all without leaving their vehicles. Many aspects of the site were influenced by CDC recommendations that were steadily developing in the making of the design. Currently, the United States, in areas with Coronavirus outbreaks, are finding it hard to keep up with the influx of patients. This has caused a delay in testing being done in these areas and is making it harder to get people treated. This is why pop-up alternative testing sites will be beneficial. Once the pandemic is under control, the site will be used as a community multipurpose space that is geared towards telling the stories of the community. However, the temporary aspect will not be forgotten. In times like the one we are facing, the new permanent building will be able to transform into an emergency relief center to aid in any ongoing crisis.

41


a walk around wyandotte A site visit was conducted in February of 2020 and a lot of information was collected from the site location and its surrounding area. The design of the building needed to respond to the existing buildings around it since our location was in a relatively dense area of town. The back of the site was mostly in shade for the majority of the day due to the tall buildings of the surroundings. I had also met with a member of Wyandotte County’s Park and Recreation to discuss the location that we would be building in. She stated that the area, and more specifically Minnesota Avenue were up and coming areas that the mayor wanted to see revitalized and beautified in order to attract more visitors. I took this into account for my building design and wanted to make sure that the forms and facades were designed in a way that would attract people to come to the area and would overall advance the look of the street. Bringing in visitor to the area is an important factor to the project since people are a main factor in the success of a community center. Using architecture to bring people together will be a main focus on this project and will be integral for its success.

BUS STOPS

BUS TERMINAL

NEW CONSTRUCTIONS

PARKING GARAGE

BUS ROUTES

2 Miles

KCK

KCMO

42


Cafe/Kitchen

Must Connect

Multicultural Cafe/Kitchen

Multipurpose Gym Multipurpose Gym

Should Connect

Storage GymGym Storage

Can Connect

Workshop/Maker Space Workshop/Maker Space Supply Resource Center Supply Resource Center (3)Artist-in-Residence Offices (3) Artists-in-Residence Bathrooms/Locker Rooms Bathrooms/Locker Rooms Mech Systems Mechanical Systems Storage/Janitor Space Storage/Janitorial Space

MINNESOTA AVE.

Reception Reception

Exhibit Gallery

Exhibit Gallery/Amphitheatre

Shop GiftGiftShop

Lot 1

Conference Room Conference Room

Employee Room

N. 8TH ST.

Volunteer/Employee Room

Story Corps Space Story Telling Space Recording Room Recording Room

Lot 2

Radio Station Radio Station Faculty Management Office Management Office Card’ Childcare ‘Wild Center

MUST CONNECT ARMSTRONG AVE.

SHOULD CONNECT CAN CONNECT

HIGHWAY ROUTES 35

69

635

169

269 210 29

435

SITE 435

KCK 70

KCMO 670 32

169 35

70

69

43


a closer look Population (2018): 152,958 Density: 1168/sq mi Climate: Humid Climate zone Vegetation: Deciduous Topography: Relatively flat, existing parking lot Traffic: High on Minnesota Ave. Race: White - 52.2%

Black - 26.8%

Hispanic/Latino - 27.8%

Asian - 2.7%

N. 8TH ST.

MINNESOTA AVE.

ARMSTRONG AVE.

44


responding to the sun

SKYLIGHT ATRIUM

LIGHT BOX

SOLAR PANELS

45


flexible programming

Gym Storage

Mechanical

2

2

from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Half Court Gym

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Janitorial

Existing Building

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

1 from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Outdoor Garden

Rec Room up

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

FIRST FLOOR

46

up

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

B ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Reception

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

o alc

Workshop

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

ny

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Exhibit Gallery

up

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

SECOND FLOOR

3


up

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

Patio

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Gift Shop from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Cafe Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

5 up

up

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Play Roof

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

4

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

4 ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

4

Created by Aidan Cooke from the Noun Project

from the Noun Project Created by Aidan Cooke

up

up

up

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

up

ekooC nadiA yb detaerC tcejorP nuoN eht morf

3

up

Podcast Station

THIRD FLOOR 1 2 3 4 5

Faculty Office Locker Room Employee Room Artists-N-R Child Learning Center 47


PRIVATE 48

SEMI-PRIVATE

PUBLIC

CIRCULATION


Patio Diner Kitchen Storage Learning Center

SQUARE-FOOTAGE

PROGRAM

third floor

962 580 144 595

Podcast Station Artist-in-Residence Conference Room Roof Top Play Area Gift Shop

SQUARE-FOOTAGE

PROGRAM

second floor

684 540 731 764 896 888

Reception Gallery Workshop Rec Room Gym Manager’s Office Janitorial Storage Maintenance Locker Rooms Gym Storage

SQUARE-FOOTAGE

PROGRAM

first floor 962 3264 975 858 2150 165 418 462 1036 555 18,000 SQFT USABLE PROGRAMMING 49


north elevation

50 50


51 51


west elevation

58

52


53


west section

INTERIOR GREENERY

MINNESOTA AVE 54


BUILDING BRIDGE

55


north section

AUDITORIUM

56


OPEN GALLERY

N 8TH STREET

ADJUSTABLE GALLERY WITH MOVABLE BLEACHER FLOOR

57


a walk through with the community Upon entering through Minnesota Avenue, upstairs, you will have access to the Cafe as well as the child learning center. Both of these facilities have their own access to exterior patio space, in addition, the cafe has a secondary staircase that leads back downwards to Minnesota Avenue. If one ventures downwards from the main entrance, this will lead you to the gym and half-court recreation room. These spaces are kept very open and feature tall ceilings to allow an array of activities and functions. Crossing from here, outside to the second building on the site, you will enter into the workshop maker space or in the back entrance of the gallery. However, the main entrance to the gallery can be found on 8th Street. The gallery sees the room split into three transcending levels on the first floor and then a balcony level on the second floor. Also on the second floor is the Artist-in-residence spaces and the radio podcast centers. From this point, one can also cross over the bridge and back to the first building.

PLAY ROOF

TALL CEILINGS, OVERLAPPING SPACES, AND WINDOWS TO ALLOW EXPANSIVE VIEWS AND DAYLIGHTING

GIFT SHOP 58


GYM

CAFE 59


POLARIS PAVILION - Fall 2020 Instructor - Professor Chad Kraus, Dirt Works Studio Director

During the third year in the Masters in Architecture program, one must take the design build studio. Due to the ongoing global pandemic caused by Covid-19, this semester was like no other; however, we persevered. With a team of seventeen, the Dirt Works Studio was tasked with designing, then constructing a pavilion for Douglas County Public Works in Wells Overlook Park. This was the first time any of us had worked with a team this large and a lot was learned about how to negotiate, compromise, and delegate work. My role on the team was as project manager, along with my colleague Lydia Juengling. In addition to coming up with ideas and concepts for the pavilion, my tasks included keeping track of project progression and studio work delegation, keeping close contact with the client and structural engineer, and aiding in the development of the construction documents— which had been my first time working with. I found this role to suit me quite nicely. I believe I excel at management and organization and love being able to communicate first hand with clients. In addition to this, the studio and I were able to gain practical construction and fabrication skills at the East Hills warehouse where we advanced the fabrication of the Passerine Pavilion.

60


DIRT WORKS STUDIO TEAM DAKODA ASH - ALEXA BALKEMA - CAMDEN BRODDLE - ANNA HAMPTON - KALYN HENDERSON - CHRISTIAN HUNN - HANNA JUELFS - LYDIA JUENGLING - JENNIFER JURADO - TYLER KOORY - NOLAN LODHOLZ - ANNEMARIE LOYD - MADISYN MELLEMA - KATRINA MILLS - KATIE NEYER - RAPHEAL PREVOT - JAKE RAJEWSKI

61


WIND AND SUN

WATER

RAIN

HILL RUNOFF

E

G NA

I

A DR

CULVERT

VEGETATION

RING

CLEA

62

POLARIS SITE


EXISTING PAVILION AND OVERLOOK TOWER

PASSERINE PAVILION

E 1400 RD

US 59 N 1000 RD

WELLS OVERLOOK PARK

63


evolution of concepts

07

06

VERTICALITY

01

64

0

PRIVATE

0


SCALE UP PUSH BACK

SEPARATE

FLIP

SCALE UP

INSPIRATION FROM PASSERINE PAVILION

5

E PODS

2

PAVILION ROOF EVOLUTION

POLARIS PAVILION ROOF

04

INTIMACY + COMMUNITY

03

65


POLARIS - “NORTH STAR”

HSS ROUND STEEL TUBE EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE

URSA MAJOR

URSA MINOR

CAMELOPARDALIS

SCORPIUS

CEPHEU

SCUTUM

66


ad astra, connecting it to the stars N

Ursa Minor, part of the “The Little Dipper,� is home to the star Polaris, otherwise know as the North Star. For centuries, this star has been an integral navigation tool because of its close proximity to exact north - a naturally occurring compass in the sky.

DATUM LINE

The Polaris Pavilion is inspired by these concepts of navigation and journey, adjusting to the north/south Cartesian grid and serving as a beacon point for the park. As you near the pavilion, the structure shifts 15 degrees to align precisely with the North Star. The shape and journey of the Polaris Pavilion was also draws inspired from the constellation. The handle of the Little Dipper represents the journey to the structure. The shelter of the picnic pavilion represents the ladle of the Little Dipper, and the shelter and intimacy which it represents.

US

BOOTES

CASSIOPEIA

SERPENS CAPUT

LACERTA

N/S CONCRETE DATUM LINE 67


ROOF

TIMBER SCREENS

CUSTOM FURNITURE

CONCRETE SLAB

IMPRESSED CONCRETE

68


breaking ground

FALL 2020

PHASE I: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

SPRING 2021

PHASE II: PROJECT DOCUMENTATION & APPROVAL

PHASE III: CONSTRUCTION

Following phase one of the project design, the project was transitioned into phase two: approval and documentation. In addition to conceptual and rendered designs, the pavilion was simultaneously developed on construction documents that were detailed and sent over to Douglas County Public Works for approval. Several other colleagues and I were in charge of the completion of these schematic and construction documentations. This was my first experience with this type of work. As one of the project managers of the studio team, it was also my job to send over official notices to Douglas County and relay messages both to the studio and to the County on development of the pavilion. Starting in Spring 2021, the pavilion will break ground and see its completed construction in phase three. Due to the ongoing pandemic, the entirety of the project was spaced out over an entire academic year rather than one semester.

69


north elevation

70


*Render in collaboration with Rapheal Prevot, M. Arch

71


east elevation

72


*Render in collaboration with Rapheal Prevot, M. Arch

73


74


academic references

Kapila D. Silva, Ph.D., AIA(SL) Professor of Architecture School of Architecture & Design The University of Kansas 1465 Jayhawk Blvd Lawrence, KS 66045 USA. (W) +1-785-864-1150 (M) +1-414-334-1290 (E) kapilads@ku.edu Thomas J. Allen Professor of Architecture School of Architecture & Design The University of Kansas 1465 Jayhawk Blvd Lawrence, KS 66045 USA. (E) t273a306@ku.edu Jason Hascall Chief Engineer Black & Veatch Federal Division 6800 W 115th Street, Suite 2200 Overland Park, KS 66211 (E) hascallj@bv.com Adjunct Lecturer, Structures School of Architecture & Design University of Kansas (E) jasonhascall@ku.edu Chad Kraus, Architect Associate Professor School of Architecture & Design Dirt Works Studio, Director TAD Journal, Associate Editor The University of Kansas 1465 Jayhawk Blvd Lawrence, KS 66045 USA. (W) +1-785-864-4129 (M) +1-785-393-6183 (E) ckraus@ku.edu 75

Profile for Christian Hunn

KU Architecture Student Portfolio  

University of Kansas Architecture Undergraduate Student Portfolio -- a collection of works from 2018 to 2020

KU Architecture Student Portfolio  

University of Kansas Architecture Undergraduate Student Portfolio -- a collection of works from 2018 to 2020

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