Page 1

FREE

IDAHO

JANUARY 2015

MAGAZINE

HAPPY

LEAVING

12 months of fun

Will your kids eat OK?

2015 Home

MAKE

Icicles

Family science project

GOODBYE

‘Rock-a-bye’ Singing baby a new song

FAMILY

Histories

More than boring facts

Skiing has opened at several Idaho resorts, and skiers remain hopeful more snow is coming to the mountains. Want your Family photo on next month’s cover?

Check inside for details!


IDAHO

Contents January 2015

MAGAZINE

Features Columns Happy 2015: A year of fun

4

6

Irene’s Insights: New year, new colors

Color selection tips

9 Shakespeare classes: More than theater

Simple science: Make icicles

Storytellers Jeanette Ross: Outrageous tales

Ambra Allgood: Storytelling’s value

Family histories: Not just dull details

Trip to Alaska:

Traveling with Grandpa

8 10

20 Family Business With Daphne: Four options 25 Ang’s Antics: A different resolution

Departments

16 17

11 Social Skills:

18

24 Crafts on A Dime:

Thank-you notes

23 All in Good Taste: Chinese Veggies & Rice

Stair post snowman

21 In Each Edition 22

3

Mommy bliss:

26

12-15

Leaving the nest:

28

Finding the joy Preparing kids

7

MoMENts: What I saw

New baby song: Goodbye ‘rock-a-bye’

Volume 3, Number 1

Editor’s Intro Our roots

Family Events Calendar: Family friendly activities & events for January & Early February!

IDAHO

MAGAZINE

29-48

 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

Publisher Sterling Media Ltd. Editor Gaye Bunderson gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com 208-639-8301 Sales & Marketing Melva Bade melvab@sterlingmedialtd.com 208-631-3779 Graphic Design Denice King Contributors Steve Davala, Susan Evans, Justin Farrell, Angela Hayes, Genny Heikka, Patrick Hempfing, Amy Larson, Daphne Mallory, Samantha Stillman, Claudia Weathermon Tester & Irene Woodworth Distribution Specialists Idaho Distribution Services

Idaho Family Magazine, published monthly by Sterling Media Ltd., is committed to providing readers with informative and entertaining information to help them in maintaining healthy families and positive lifestyles. It is distributed throughout the valley as a free publication. Idaho Family Magazine does not assume responsibility for statements or opinions expressed by editorial contributors or advertisers. The acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement of the products, services or information. Idaho Family Magazine does not knowingly present any product or service which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without express written consent of the publisher. Reader correspondence and editorial submissions are welcome. Idaho Family Magazine reserves the right to edit or reject all materials submitted. All rights reserved. Copyright 2015 by Sterling Media Ltd.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


EDITOR’S Intro

Where our families come from People who were around in the 1970s will remember the immense popularity of the TV show “Roots.” It was, what they called back then, a miniseries and was adapted from a book by Alex Haley about his ancestry. The story covered America’s slave trade years and stretched back to West Africa in 1750. The book, titled “Roots: The Saga of an American Family,” and the subsequent miniseries sparked an interest among both whites and blacks to explore their genealogy. Over the years, people on both sides of my family have compiled genealogical “family tree”-type charts of ancestors who emigrated from Europe to the U.S. But I particularly enjoy the few written accounts by the immigrants themselves, among them my great-grandmother, Mary Olsen Williams. During the summer of 2014, Americans watched on TV as children from Latin American countries to the south of us flooded across the U.S. border in search of a safer and more promising life. One little girl in particular got my attention: a 7-year-old traveling alone with only a plastic bag full of possessions and a handwritten note that told her where she could find her mother in America. “South Carolina” was all the note said. But the little girl had the kind of sweet and endearing look that only a 7-year-old unaware of the difficulty that lay ahead of her could have. My great-grandmother also came to the U.S. at age 7. Also very much alone. She came a long way from her home in Denmark, first via ship, then by rail to our neighboring state of Utah. “I have wept many times when I think of that trip alone from Denmark to Utah,” she wrote. Her story, in brief, starts out: “My parents were poor working people. My mother would take lunch to Father out on the road where his work was gathering stones and rubbish from the highway to keep it clear.” How’s that for some proud family roots? My great-greatgrandfather was a road debris clearer. Take that, all you descendants of royalty and such! But I will say this: for all appearances, my ancestors seem to have been honest, hardworking folks. When the decision was made for the whole family to come to America, they sent the youngest child first — something I never entirely understood, unless there was a need for the older children to contribute to the family income. From my great-grandmother’s narrative: “We could only afford to come one at a time. Since I was the youngest of eight children I was to come first. I was very small for my age and passed as a 4-year-old instead of a 7-year-old. I wasn’t very tall and pretty weazel (sic) faced and thin.

“My heart was most nigh broke that day and I was pretty sad. When I bid the folks farewell, not to see them again for three years, I was sad. I was 7 years old, going alone with strangers to an unknown country. I cried myself to sleep. I had about two cents in American money. After two weeks of sailing the ocean we landed in New York and went to the immigration office on Ellis Island. My first thought of America was ‘This must be heaven,’ and I still think so.” To make a long story short, this little girl eventually became the mother of my grandmother, Leah, who was the mother of my father, Keith, more commonly known as Bundy. Like everyone else, my great-grandmother experienced ups and downs in her life. At one point in her narrative, in reference to the post-rail trip to her new home in Utah, she wrote, “My but that was a long ride with a slow ox team.” (Imagine what that must have been like; I sometimes can’t even stand the commute from Nampa to Boise in a car.) Still, she eventually came to love traveling — ultimately by plane or automobile — and was ready to go at a moment’s notice, according to others’ accounts of her. So what do we learn when we study our roots? Though there were allegations about the validity of some of Alex Haley’s claims in his book, nonetheless knowing that his ancestors overcame the degradation of slavery after a very long and arduous struggle must have affected him deeply. My own ancestors’ stories are far less full of turmoil than his, but their personal histories still inspire me. I wonder if they would have been proud of what their descendants have become, and of the gift they gave us all by making the long trip from Europe to America and allowing us to enjoy lives of overwhelming opportunity. While I’m sure modern Denmark is a remarkable nation, my great-grandmother saw a profound contrast in her new life in the U.S. as opposed to her life in the Old World: “I soon found there was some differences of this country and Denmark. Here I could have all I could eat, plenty of good milk, fresh water, fruits and vegetables. Also in this blessed land mothers could stay home with their children. I had been used to roaming around alone while my mother worked.” She came to a flawed country, as all countries are, but I’m sure glad that little 7-year-old girl made the trip. n (See the story about genealogist and archivist Steve Barrett in this issue.) — Gaye Bunderson, Editor

Family photos wanted Idaho Family Magazine is now featuring families on its cover in order to encompass everyone: moms, dads, kids. They may be posed photos, but we’d also very much like active shots: photos of families engaged in sports, games, eating together, attending cultural events. In other words, “all things family.” If space is available, we may use some of the photos inside the magazine too. The same rules still apply as for our Cover Kids Contest. Send photos to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com. All photos should be high quality, meaning clear not blurry, and high resolution of around 300 dpi. They must also be in color; no black and white photos will be accepted. They need to be vertical, not horizontal. Please provide names for all family members in the photo and the community the family resides in.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 


HAPPY 2015!

Enjoy 12 months of fun in Idaho

By Amy Larson Are you excited about the New Year? Anticipation is half the enjoyment, so to help out with that, here are 12 activities to look forward to in the coming months: • January: The McCall Winter Carnival (January 30February 8) has incredible snow sculptures, parades, art auctions, live music, comedy shows, snow bike races, the Monster Dog Pull, and more. The Carnival’s been going for 50 years and is an event that makes families excited to see its joyful celebration of winter. • February: Steamboat Gulch sledding (providing there’s plenty of snowfall). Located a mile north of Idaho City on Highway 21, you can follow the signs to where parking attendants are on duty (weekends) to help you park. There’s a $10 fee per car, but for a day full of play, it’s very worth it. There are portable “facilities,” and the big thing to know is that this is like a giant tailgate party. You can bring up your barbecue grills, fire pits, camp chairs, goodies and hot chocolate thermos.

• March: Suggested activity — movie trilogy and sleepover with the kids. Break out the popcorn, pizza, ice cream, root beer floats, and spend some quality time winding down a long winter’s hibernation while making a memory. • April: A great time to visit the outdoor markets, both the Capital City Public Market on Eighth Street (opens April 18), and the Boise Farmers Market on 8th and Fulton. There’s usually live music of some kind, samples, and a groovy downtown community vibe. Lots to see and the kids will love it. • May: Parade America (should be happening this year around Saturday, May 16). Red, white and blue all down 12th Avenue in Nampa, hosting spectators by the thousands as patriotism runs high. Floats, vintage cars, marching bands, horses, fire trucks and school buses with an Americana theme. • June: National Old Time Fiddle Festival (always the third full week in June). Competition, random jamming

 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


in Stickerville and other places, bluegrass, carnival, events, and kids’ activities. Weiser pulls out all the stops when hosting this event. • July: Snake River Stampede Parade (July 11 at 11 a.m.) There’s usually a pancake breakfast available from 7-11 a.m. in downtown Nampa on 13th Avenue South between 1st and 2nd streets before the non-motorized, all-horse and wagon parade. Parade begins on 3rd Street South near the Civic Center. • August: Movie Night in Meridian. On Fridays at Settlers Park (Meridian and Ustick roads). Bring your family and friends, lawn chairs, blankets, and snacks. All movies are free and familyfriendly, begin at dusk, and are played on the huge Cable One inflatable screen. • September: Art in the Park (around September 4-6). Called one of the premiere cultural events in the Northwest, it inspires young minds to become artists, or continue in their art. The three-day

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

art show has plenty of hands-on art activities for children. • October: Hiking at Hulls Gulch. Enjoy the reserve that features 289-acres of Boise Foothills splendor, part of the Ridge to Rivers trails system. Mountain biking, dog walking, and even horseback paths available. See great horned owls, kestrels, coyotes, mule deer, and red fox. • November: Veteran’s Parade (first Saturday on or before Veterans Day at around 9:30 a.m., check for updates). Route on Jefferson and Bannock between 4th and 11th streets. • December: Winter Wonderland. Stroll along Indian Creek in Caldwell and see the lights carefully strung everywhere, glistening and reflecting near the water. There is nothing better to get you and your family in the holiday mood. Getting together with your loved ones for an adventure is crucial. Plot out your year, put the dates on the calendar, and smile with the thought of fun family days to come. n

Amy Larson is a Treasure Valley writer, editor, author, blogger and food reviewer. She shares family-friendly, mostly free weekend events Fridays on WOW104.3 FM’s Randy & Alana Morning Show. Her first book in a series, “Appetite for Idaho,” was released this year and can be found in local eateries and other places of Idaho fun.

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 


IRENE’S Insights

New decorating colors for a new year

The Woodworth home when the family bought it in 2004, at right, looked “drab and lifeless.” After being painted last summer in shades of green with a red door, it brightened the residence. The photo above includes Irene, her husband Dan, their son Chris and their two pet dogs standing together in front of their newly painted home. (Courtesy photos)

By Irene Woodworth Color trends come and go. Color forecasting affects every major industry in our lives in many ways from the “go to” colors for kids’ backpacks to the latest color trend in home décor accessories. For every major purchase made by consumers, 70 percent of the time it is by color choice first. Color is everywhere: nature, food, marketing, fashion, interiors, vehicles, furnishings, etc. Color combinations also are important. How do you know where to find the color trends? The Color Marketing Group, a nonprofit organization for designers, chooses colors by the economy, world influences and several trends that impact our lives every day. They are usually predicted two years in advance. I will never forget when one of my mentors from the Color Marketing Group told us in training that in the upcoming two years the major color would be gray and the major illness would be depression. That is exactly what happened when the economy tanked in 2008 and 2009. Many people lost their jobs, their homes and their comfortable way of life. It changed all of us in one way or another. The color trends for 2015 were predicted in the year 2013. Some of the colors on the horizon are similar to some of the colors of the 1960s. Perhaps it is to remind us of simpler and more memorable times.

As I work with my color consulting clients in their homes and businesses, they wonder if their color choices are going to work. They also often wonder about the importance of following color trends. The trends are important on some levels. You will have colors come and go. It is often the shade of a color that will be important in that year. I often tell my clients that if they like some of the trendy colors, use them in smaller doses rather than in their larger purchases. A smaller purchase of an accent pillow is easier to change out than a larger purchase such as a sofa. Of course our checkbook will also appreciate the wiser investment! I have found that when I do custom color palettes for clients, the colors will be unique to them depending on how they live, what kind of furnishings they have, and other criteria. All of those factors will be part of the research that I do to make sure we get the colors right. It is also interesting to see how the Dewey Color Test is the first scientific color test that predicts your personality and mood. I enjoy it because the clients can actually

 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


see the color groups they are more drawn

to and how certain colors make them feel alive. When we first moved into our home more than 10 years ago, the exterior color had been painted a “rosy taupe” color popular about 20 years ago in our neighborhood. It was a very safe and neutral color back then. The color has always bothered all of us as we felt it looked drab and lifeless. Finally, last summer, we were able to paint the exterior. We specialize more in interior painting so this was going to be another experiment and learning curve for all of us. We brightened up our home with a medium palm green color, with an accent of a darker shade of palm green. And finally, after all of these years, we got the red door that I wanted to welcome our visitors. So what are the color trends coming in 2015? According to the Pantone Color Institute, the color for 2015 is “Marsala.” “It is a wine-influenced, red-kissed color. This color is hardy, robust, satisfying, and fulfilling. At the same time there’s a certain

glamour that’s attached to this color,” Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, said. However, the top color of the year selected by Benjamin Moore is Guilford Green #HC-116. Other colors in the 2015 palette seem to be going towards the colors of the ‘60s — or some prefer to call them the Tuscan colors. So where do you go to see the upcoming color trends for the New Year? There are two stores that display the color trends earlier than others: Target and Pier One Imports. They have a real pulse on what is coming down the line. It is good to make a trip and see what color trends are awaiting you. One of the things being seen with color trends is instead of a quick come-andgo for just a few months, they are lasting longer than before. It could be that we are more budget-conscious and are not able to change our color schemes as much as before. n

Irene Woodworth is known as “Idaho’s Color Lady” and is founder and CEO of Redesign Boise. She is a national redesign award winner, motivational speaker, certified redesigner and color consultant, and instructor on redesign and color. She has a degree in education and interior design. She has taught various decorating and color classes throughout the country. She may be reached at Irene@RedesignBoise. com. For more information, visit wwwRedesignBoise.com.

Color Selection Tips By Irene Woodworth When selecting colors, a great factor is the lighting in your environment. The color will react differently in a paint store’s fluorescent lighting than in your home’s natural lighting. You need to see how a color “reads” or reacts in your interior spaces. Get a sample and put it against a white piece of cardstock and see how much the color changes within a 24-hour period in your room. (White is important because it does not distract from other colors in your space.) Sometimes just buying a small accent piece in the newer color trend palette is a great way to test that color in your home. If you like a certain color, it is important to be aware that color tones will be changing within six months, so do not delay in getting those accessories in that particular shade. The color green has become a new neutral and is still one of the best-selling colors to date. Perhaps the influence on being more eco-friendly or closer to nature is here to stay. Here is a case study for you: Clients had a harder time making end-of-life decisions — such as their living wills, wills or trusts — and would find they would get stressed and end up procrastinating in making these important life decisions in an office that had white or “builder beige” walls. However, when the color was changed to a more subtle green, all of a sudden the clients could finally relax and make those hard life decisions.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

From a medical standpoint, colors like red and orange stimulate you more while the greens and blues relax you more. Your blood pressure even goes up in those brighter, warmer-colored rooms such as the reds and oranges. In rooms that are painted in more greens and blues your blood pressure goes down. Color affects our emotions in several ways. What color prompts couples to fight more? What color make babies in nurseries cry more? Any guesses? The answer to both is the color yellow, especially the brighter yellows. Our eyes have the hardest time assimilating the color yellow. Yellow makes our eyes blink more than other colors, which stresses us out more. Actually 80 percent of us are affected in this way. If you are on a diet, do not paint your kitchen red. The color red stimulates you and results in you wanting to eat more. What if you really like the color red? Then use it in smaller doses, like an accent color in your kitchen, instead. However, if you paint your dining room red, it will actually cause your guests to interact more while they eat in your entertaining space. There are some rooms where you need to dial the color down, such as in your bedrooms with the tried and true greens, blues or neutrals. You can always use a couple of other accent colors to add some spark to the décor. n For more information, contact Irene Woodworth at Irene@RedesignBoise.com.

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 


IDAHO Shakespeare Festival

Teaching youngsters more than theater

Children in Idaho Shakespeare Festival classes not only benefit from learning about Shakespeare and various forms of theater, they also learn the value of teamwork, among other things. (Photo courtesy of ISF)

By Gaye Bunderson The Idaho Shakespeare Festival hosts classes and events for young people every year, and not just to teach them about Shakespeare. “Theater classes are always good,” Renee Vomocil, director of education at IFS, said. “Kids learn teamwork, it’s noncompetitive, and it instills confidence. They’re also working on linguistics, reading, and memorization, all in a safe and fun atmosphere in front of people.” Classes offered to children 3 and up in 2015 include the following (for fees, registration and other information, and a complete schedule, go to idahoshakespeare.org): • Spring School of Theater – January 12-March 15; classes are held after school at Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton Street in downtown Boise; includes improv, Broadway-based singing and dancing, and other classes • Shakespearience — February 2-April 3; school presentations performed by a company of professional actors, with fully staged sets and costumes; this year’s presentation will be “The Comedy of Errors” • Idaho Theater for Youth — February 23-May 1; school presentations of a play for students in K-6th grades, “Maggie Lemiere and the Ghost Train,” written by Dwayne Blackaller and Tracy Sunderland “No school or student is ever turned away,” Vomocil said. “We have a scholarship fund. Shakespearience and Idaho Theater for Youth are the only times for some students to see the performing arts.”

Christine Zimowsky, a mother whose children have been exposed to ISF classes, said: “I have had both my son and daughter take a class at different times, and they each wanted to take it twice it was so much fun. … I think it is good to have a class for kids that are pre-reading but that focuses on stories and creating imaginative play around the stories. I thought the teachers were supportive and kind with kids that are probably having one of their earliest experiences with interaction in a classroom setting and socialization with other kids. “I appreciated that every time both of my children marched out of the class at the end, they had grins on their faces and couldn’t wait to tell me about the stories they had read and experienced — with the added bonus of wanting to search those stories out at the library to read them again.” During its regular season, this year from May 29-September 27, the Shakespeare Festival also holds Family Nights. Held the first Sunday after a play’s opening night, Family Nights are an opportunity for parents to bring children to see a show at discounted prices. The plays are revised to be familyfriendly. Though plays presented on Family Night and in schools are sometimes cut for brevity, they’re not dumbed down in any way. “(Shakespeare’s) words are written as poetry. Kids wrap their heads around it a lot faster than adults,” Vomocil said. ISF also holds a summer camp for youth. More information will be available on the website at a later date. n

 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


moMENts

Why did I have to see that? Later on Christmas Day, Jessie opened a By Patrick Hempfing special gift — a pair of roller skates. The Why did I have to see that when I peered next day we went to the park to break them out from my in-laws’ patio on Christmas in. Mattie was on one side holding her hand morning? It could have been anything, a while I was a steady force on the other side. rambunctious squirrel, a trespassing dog, or Even though Jessie had on her helmet and low-flying vultures. Instead I saw a teenage elbow and knee pads, it was still stressful girl run across my in-laws’ backyard to the for me. We went back to the park to pracrear window of her house. She paused at the tice again on the following two days. Jessie window and looked toward the street. She improved dramatically each day. On the third blew two kisses to, I’m guessing, the friend day, Mattie just watched while I held my who dropped her off. Then she carefully daughter’s hand. Then Jessie said it. “Daddy, lifted the window from the outside, crawled you need to let go.” Reluctantly, I released into her house, and closed the window and her hand but remained within catching disblinds behind her. tance behind her. Mattie’s brother, who was As a parent, I had trouble swallowing what Patrick Hempfing had a 20-year with us, laughed at me as I zoomed in ready I had just witnessed. If my daughter was professional career in banking, for the catch each time Jessie flailed her arms. sneaking out of the house for who knows what accounting and auditing before he His laughter didn’t bother me, though, because kind of get-together, I’d want to know about became a father in 2004 at age 44. I was right where I needed to be. it. I’d certainly rather deal with it now than 9 He is now a full-time husband, Later, I again thought about the teenage girl stay-at-home dad, and writer. months later when there could be additional in the window, knowing that Jessie’s teenage issues. However, I didn’t know the people, and years aren’t that far away. I realize that more wouldn’t want to cause trouble between my “letting go” times are ahead. I also know it’s not possible to in-laws and their new neighbors. I decided to mind my own catch all the falls. I’m hoping that because I’ve stood beside business; yet, I couldn’t get it out of my head. Jessie when she learns to skate, and for many of the other About an hour later, I was helping my 8-year-old daughter, important times of her childhood, that I’ll never have to stand Jessie, with her new purple dress. As I buttoned it up in the guard outside her bedroom window. back and tied the bow around her waist, I flashed back to the I’ve concluded that parenting requires seeing your child teenage girl I had seen earlier that morning. It feels like I was through a series of wheels — stroller, wagon, tricycle, trainjust changing Jessie’s diaper. Now she’s wearing size 10 dresses ing, bicycle, scooter, and now roller skate wheels. I’m going and stands as tall as her mother’s chin. I felt it was time for to enjoy the pink skate wheels stage to the fullest. Something a talk. No, not “the talk” as her mother, Mattie, will cover tells me that seeing Jessie behind the wheel of a car will be that one. This one I could handle. I told Jessie that she must much harder. When that time comes, I’ll be beside her in the never sneak out of the house. Her response didn’t put me front seat. Then it will be time for Daddy to let go again, and completely at ease, though I accepted it. She said, “I’ll check Mattie and I will find ourselves peering out the window, waitwith Momma.” Maybe she knows that Dad will say no more ing for her safe return home. quickly when it comes to dating decisions. Until next month, remember to cherish the moments. n

ROY H ROGERS, DDS, MS

Board Certif ied in Pediatric Dentistry

• Qualified Teachers • Low Ratios • Video Monitoring • 3 weeks to 12 years Developmentally Appropriate Preschool Curriculum • Open 6 am to 6 pm

V

P

D

Call for an appointment!

1-2015

www.tvpdsmiles.com

1564 South Times Square Lane • Boise, Idaho

CARING FOR IDAHO’S “LITTLE GEMS” www.idahofamilymagazine.com

HAPPY NEW YEAR! $20.15 Registration Fee!

888-7540

www.MyKidsChoice.com

2210 W. Everest Lane • Meridian

1-2015

376-8873 T

Meridian’s only NAEYC Accredited Preschool

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 


SIMPLE Science

Make your own icicles (minus the chill) By Steve Davala Editor’s note: The science project below can be done by the kids alone or as an activity for the whole family. It is designed to be simple, fun and educational all at the same time.

Materials: Two tall glasses, 2 feet of cotton string (thicker than thread), 2 paper clips, water, a plate, Epsom salts or baking soda, a deep bowl.

Procedure: 1. Pour about 1 cup of Epsom salts or baking soda into a bowl. Add about 2 cups of warm water and stir. 2. You should still see the chunks floating in the water. If it all dissolves, then add some more and stir it in. 3. Tie the paper clips to either end of the string. (Make sure this is a thick string… more than thread, less than a shoelace). 4. Put the string in the bowl of water and let it soak there for an hour. 5. Put two glasses about a foot apart with a small plate in between. I used a small piece of plywood to hold all these on in case I had to move it. 6. After an hour, pour the water from the bowl into the two glasses. Hang the string between the two glasses with the paper clips inside them. You want the string to loop down so the lowest level is below the water level in the glasses. 7. If there is no more Epsom salts or baking soda in the water, add a spoonful now. 8. Wait a few days to see your icicles form!

Winter is upon us and with it some freezing weather. (Well, that depends on where you are.) Some kids rarely have a chance to see snow or the iconic icicles. This simple science experiment will have your child creating homemade icicles. Sure, it won’t be the actual way icicles form; in fact, this is how stalactites and stalagmites are created. It will, however, create a wintery feel in any house, without the actual cold.

Explanation:

When you dissolve the solid in the water it will flow with it (much like when you put sugar or salt in water). We “saturated” the water in the bowl with Epsom salts or baking soda, meaning the water dissolved as much material as it could. We soaked the string in the liquid so that when we hung it across the two glasses, water would continue to flow up and through the string. The water carrying the dissolved material then dripped from the lowest part of the string, but left little bits of the solid behind. This built up over time and formed the icicle shape. On the plate, the solid material also collected into little mounds. This is how stalactites and stalagmites form. Material inside rocks called “calcium carbonate” dissolves into water and then drips out of the ceiling of caves. The stalactites form from the ceiling and stalagmites form on the ground as the material solidifies.

Experiment further:

Will other materials form solid “icicles”? Will sugar do the same thing? Think about other materials that dissolve in water that might work. My kids had the idea to color the water (they try to put food coloring in everything). Does that change the color of the substance? What if you put red on one side and blue on the other? I hope you enjoyed this simple experiment. If you have more questions about this, or need tips about science fair ideas around this topic (or others), contact me. n Steve Davala is a high school chemistry and physics teacher who likes to write. He’s got two kids of his own and subjects them to these science activities as guinea pigs. Follow him on Twitter, on stevedavala.blogspot.com or email him at steve.davala@gmail.com.

10 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


SOCIAL Skills

The art of expressing gratitude By Susan Evans Why not resolve to have your family members improve their manners this year? Start by writing more thank-you notes. Why? It’s an opportunity to make someone feel wonderful and benefit you, as well, along the way. Here’s a little background and some great tips:

Background…

• If you’re not sure – write one! For gifts received via courier – piggyback, horseback, plane / train / automobile (notes aren’t necessary for presents given in person, but think of the bonus points…). Always write for hospitality provided, services rendered. • HAND WRITE (it will become a collectors’ item) the note AS SOON AS POSSIBLE (why suffer procrastination anxiety day after day?). Susan Evans owns Social Essence, Eagle-based company serving Choose a cute note card or high an the Treasure Valley. She offers youth quality stationery and use your culture and adult culture programs best hand writing. It personally designed to help participants improve reflects you. their professional and personal lives. • No – you don’t start with She may be reached at 631-0576, “Thank you for the gift”…in- susan@socialessence.com, or www.socialessence.com. stead charm them with chitchat. For example after a visit to the coast you might write: “You will never believe it, but on my flight home I ran into Prince William…” Then go onto: * For a gift, mention it by name – “Every girl in eighth grade wants my orange sweater.” * For the Big Buck$, say or make up something about how you are going to use it. * For hospitality, mention a special moment: “I was thrilled to be flipped head over heels by that 20-foot wave…” * If you don’t like the gift, don’t let the giver know! Avoid saying things like “the dog ate it,” or “I lost it in the park.” Remember, it’s the thought that counts, so just follow the rules above. Make it easy — ALWAYS have a supply of thank-you notes/ cards and stamps handy. Happy New Year! n

1-2015

The word gratitude is derived from the Latin word gratia, which means grace, graciousness, or gratefulness. Gratitude is a thankful appreciation for what an individual receives, whether tangible or intangible. With gratitude, people acknowledge the goodness in their lives. As a result, gratitude also helps people connect to something larger than themselves as individuals — whether to other people, nature, or a higher power. In positive psychology research, expressing gratitude is associated with greater happiness. Gratitude helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. To note one of many studies on this topic, research provided by Dr. Martin E. P. Seligman, a psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, tested the impact of various positive psychology interventions on 411 people. Each was compared with a control assignment of writing about early memories. When their week’s assignment was to write and personally deliver a letter of gratitude to someone who had never been properly thanked for his or her kindness, participants immediately exhibited a huge increase in happiness scores. This impact was greater than that from any other intervention, with benefits lasting for a month. Another study found that children and adolescents who wrote and delivered a thank-you letter to someone who made a difference in their lives may have made the other person happier...but did not improve their own well-being. This suggests an association with emotional maturity.

Tips…

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 11


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

CALENDAR o

Discovery Center Teen Club Every Saturday

Discovery Center Young Discoverers Every Wednesday, Thursday & Friday

The Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St. in Boise, holds a science club for high school students with free science-based activities on an ongoing basis Saturdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m. The club meets in the library at DCI. For more information, call Hannah Schaeffer at 287-4223.

DCI hosts programs for the preschool set — including a story, short science lesson and related craft — at 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. For more information, go to dcidaho.org.

Family Night at Idaho IceWorld Each Wednesday Night Family Night is held each Wednesday night at Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Rd. in Boise, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The $5 fee includes skate rentals. For more information, call 331-0044 or go to idahoiceworld.com.

Teen Movie Night Thursday, January 8 Teens in 7th through 12th grades are welcome to attend Teen Movie Night from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. January 8 at Nampa Public Library. The movie “Guardians of the Galaxy,” rated PG-13, will be shown.

Pasta Festa 2015 Sunday, January 11 The Bishop Kelly Annual Pasta Festa is set for 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, January 11, at Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 Franklin Rd. Louie’s Pizza and Italian Restaurant will cater the meal, and there will be live entertainment. Dinner includes meat or vegetarian pasta, salad, garlic bread, coffee and water. Cost is $7 for adults and $6 for seniors and children up to 10 years of age.

Family Fun Saturday Saturday, January 10 Nampa Public Library will host Family Fun Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to noon January 10. For more details, go to nampalibrary.org.

Girls Behaving Safely Saturday, January 10 A women’s self-defense class for ages 16 and up will be held from 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday, January 10, at The Dojo Meridian, 149 S. Adkins Way. Participants will be shown basic selfdefense techniques and how to use a stun gun, pepper spray and kubotan. Cost is $15. For more information, contact Hannah Yancey at 891-9700 or go to facebook.com/girlsbehavingsafely.

Reading at the Refuge First & Third Mondays Preschool and kindergarten children and their families may attend Reading at the Refuge every first and third Monday at 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. at the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. Each event features a wildliferelated story, making a craft (supplies provided), and exploring the Visitor Center. For more information, call 467-9278, email deerflat@fws.gov or visit fws.gov/deerflat.

Preschool STEAM Storytime Wednesdays January 7, 14, 21 & 28; Fridays, January 9, 16, 23 & 30 Nampa Public Library will host Preschool STEAM Storytime at 10:15 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Wednesdays January 7, 14, 21 and 28 and at 10:15 a.m. Fridays January 9, 16, 23 and 30.

Baby & Toddler Storytime Thursdays, January 8, 15, 22 & 29 The Nampa library will host Baby & Toddler Storytime at 10:15 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Thursdays January 8, 15, 22 and 29.

“Sweet Dream Catcher” Craft Saturday, January 10 A “Free Crafts for Kids” program is offered each Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lakeshore Learning Store in the Westpark Towne Plaza at 417 N. Milwaukee St. in Boise. Kids can create a “Sweet Dream Catcher” on January 10. For more information, call 377-1855.

Family Birding Walk Sunday, January 11 & Saturday, January 17 A Family Birding Walk, geared especially for children or “the child in you,” will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, January 11, at Kathryn Albertson Park, 1001 N. Americana Blvd. in Boise. Participants will walk the paved loop around the park looking for geese, ducks and herons on the water, as well as songbirds in the brush. The whole family is welcome, especially the youngsters. Binoculars and field guides will be available. For more information, contact Pam Conley at 869-0337 or pam_conley@q.com. Similar events include: How Gull-able Are You? — Join RL Rowland as he takes participants to the — yes! — Ada County Landfill to learn about gulls. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, January 17. Interested people should meet at the Northgate Plaza parking lot on State Street in Boise. For more information, contact RL at rlrowland@centurylink.net, 336-9808 or 297-9953.

12 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


of Events

Month of January & Early February

Genealogy: Interviewing Family Members Wednesday, January 14 Boise Public Library will host Steve Barrett, a reference archivist at the Idaho State Archives, who will speak on interviewing family members and finding your ancestors in federal censuses. This presentation, part of an ongoing series on genealogy, will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 14, in the Marion Bingham Room at the main library branch on Capitol Boulevard. For more information, email Jody at askalibrarian@cityofboise.org or call 384-4076.

Adult Night at the Discovery Center Thursday, January 15

Science Fair Saturday, January 17

January’s Adult Night at the Discovery Center of Idaho will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. Thursday, January 15. The featured topic will be “Chemistry of the Cocktail.” Cost is $12 for members and $15 for non-members. For more information, go to dcidaho.org.

The Lakeshore Learning Store will hold its annual Science Fair — a funfilled afternoon complete with free experiments and hands-on STEM activities for kids — from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, January 17, at its location in the Westpark Towne Plaza at 417 N. Milwaukee St. in Boise. For more information, call 377-1855.

2015 Winter Classic Chess Championship Saturday, January 17 This annual event for children ages 4-12 offers a trophy for every player and includes a pizza buffet and drinks. It is set for 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, January 17, at Smoky Mountain Pizzeria Grill, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. Participants are welcome to bring friends from school to win additional team awards. Beginners are welcome. All players must be pre-registered through SuccessInChess.com. For more information, call 713-2486 or email info@successinchess.com.

Tween Program – To the Moon! Thursday, January 15 Tweens may attend the Nampa Public Library program “To the Moon!” from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, January 15, and make moon sand, enjoy edible moon phases, and learn all about the Earth’s only natural satellite.

Historical European Swordsmanship Saturday, January 17 Historian, researcher and instructor of historical European martial arts, Ben Smith, will demonstrate the longsword, sword and buckler, and dagger fighting styles at 2 p.m. Saturday, January 17, in Hayes Auditorium at the main branch of Boise Public Library on Capitol Boulevard. The event is open to children, teens and adults. For more information, contact Kathy at kcallahan@cityofboise.org or call 384-4076.

Junior Duck Stamp Art Day Saturdays, January 17, 24 & 31; February 14, 21 & 28 Young artists and wildlife enthusiasts from kindergarten to high school are welcome to drop into the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. January 17, 24 and 31 and February 14, 21 and 28. Participants will learn about Idaho waterfowl and can create their own Junior Duck Stamp art contest entry. All necessary supplies will be provided, including instructions, field guides, and colored pencils and paints. Students may then submit their artwork into the statewide contest by the March 15 deadline. For more information or directions to the Visitor Center, go to fws.gov/deerflat, call 467-9278 or email deerflat@fws.gov.

The Science of Snow Family Day Saturday, January 17 A program titled “The Science of Snow” is set for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, January 17, at the Boise WaterShed and Bogus Basin Ski Resort. Morning activities include snow-themed crafts and games; then, registered participants will be taken to Bogus Basin for an afternoon of snowshoeing. Other events are scheduled as well, and beginners are welcome. Cost is $5 per person to help pay for the bus ride. There are only 44 spots available, so register soon by calling 608-7300.

Please send family-related calendar items to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com.

Zamzow’s Small Animal Presentation Tuesday, January 20 “Meet the Critters” will be held from 4:15 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, January 20, at Nampa Public Library. Jesse and Jehle blow snow from their hands after the area’s first snowfall last November. (Photo provided by Amber Wheeler)

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

More Events on Page 14

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 13


CALENDAR of Events

Teen Improv: Writing and Acting Thursday, January 22

Coding for Beginners Wednesday, January 21 After School Fun at the Library! at Collister will include lessons on computer coding from 4 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, January 21. The program is for children ages 6-12. For more information, contact Tamra at thawley@cityofboise.org or call 562-4995.

Art Endeavor Thursday, January 22 Nampa Public Library will host Art Endeavor for children ages 8 to 12 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. January 22.

Splash N’ Dash Friday, January 23 The Nampa Recreation Center will host Splash N’ Dash from 5:45 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. Friday, January 23. Parents may drop off their children ages 3-12 at the Rec Center and enjoy an evening alone while certified staff lead the children in swimming and water games. Cost is $13 for members and $18 for non-members, and pre-registration is required at nampaparksandrecreation.org.

American Red Cross Babysitter Training Saturday, January 24 This babysitter training for young people ages 11-15 will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, January 24, at the Nampa Recreation Center. Cost is $45 for members and $50 for non-members, and more information is available at nampaparksandrecreation.org.

“Frozen” Party Saturday, January 31 The Library! at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Rd. in Boise, will hold an afternoon of fun inspired by the movie “Frozen” from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, January 31. There will be crafts, games and a sing-along suitable for children ages 2-10. For more information, call Jennifer Redford at 562-4996.

Teen Anime Club Monday, January 26 Teen Anime Club will meet from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Monday, January 26, at Nampa Public Library.

Continued from page 13

The Library! at Cole & Ustick will bring back a popular event for teens who want to compose short scenes and act them out. This creative workshop will be held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Thursday, January 22. Snacks and drinks will be provided. For more information, call 570-6900.

“My Friends Photo Board” Craft Saturday, January 24 A “Free Crafts for Kids” program is offered each Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lakeshore Learning Store in the Westpark Towne Plaza at 417 N. Milwaukee St. in Boise. Kids can create a “My Friends Photo Board” on January 24. For more information, call 377-1855.

Bricks for Grownups 18 and Up Wednesday, January 28 Want to do something you did when you were a kid? Unwind at Boise Public Library with Lego bricks at 7 p.m. Wednesday, January 28. The event is free and open to anyone 18 years and older. For more information, contact Heidi at hlewis@cityofboise.org or call 384-4076.

Family Book & Movie Club Thursday, January 29

McCall Winter Carnival January 30 thru February 8

Nampa Public Library’s Family Book & Movie Club on Thursday, January 29, will feature the book “Moonshot” by Brian Floca and the G-rated movie “Fly Me to the Moon.” Come much on moon snacks, enjoy the book and see the movie from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

The theme of the 2015 McCall Winter Carnival is “50 Years of Memories,” and the annual event is set for January 30 through February 8 with a full schedule of activities. For more information, go to mccallchamber.org/winter-carnival/.

Jim Henson’s Dinosaur Train Saturday, January 31

“Masquerade Mask” Craft Saturday, January 31 A “Free Crafts for Kids” program is offered each Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lakeshore Learning Store in the Westpark Towne Plaza at 417 N. Milwaukee St. in Boise. Kids can create a “Masquerade Mask” on January 31. For more information, call 377-1855.

Jim Henson’s Dinosaur Train Live: Buddy’s Big Adventure is set for 1 p.m. Saturday, January 31, at the Morrison Center in Boise. This event is designed to appeal to preschoolers’ fascination with both dinosaurs and trains and seeks to encourage their scientific thinking skills. For more information, go to mc.boisestate.edu/education.

14 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Writing Personal and Family Histories Thursdays February 5 thru 26 Register by Monday, February 2 Local historian and writer Debbie Holm will offer a four-week class on writing your personal or family history from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Thursdays from February 5 through February 26 at the Nampa Rec Center. Cost is $40 for members and $45 for non-members. She will instruct participants in conducting oral history interviews and mining their own memories for compelling stories. Registration is required by February 2. For more information, go to nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Wild About Life Lecture Wednesday, February 4 The February Wild About Life lecture at the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge will be about the California condor, the recovery process, and the vital role played by the World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise. The lecture will start at 7 p.m. Wednesday, February 4, at the Refuge Visitor Center at the intersection of Roosevelt and Indiana streets in Nampa. The lecture series is sponsored by the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge and the Student Conservation Association AmeriCorps. For information, call 467-9278 or visit fws.gov/deerflat.

Missoula Children’s Theatre “The Princess & The Pea” Lock In for Kids Friday, February 6 & Saturday, February 7 Friday, February 13 & Missoula Children’s Theatre rolls into Caldwell Saturday, February 14 each year with everything needed to create a great show — except the cast. Local children audition on Monday and perform by Friday. This year’s show will be an adaptation of the classic tale “The Princess and the Pea.” Show times are 7:30 p.m. Friday, February 6, and 3 p.m. Saturday, February 7, at Jewett Auditorium on the College of Idaho campus. This event is a presentation of Caldwell Fine Arts. For more information, go to caldwellfinearts.org.

Parents, lock your kids in for a night of fun at the Nampa Recreation Center February 13-14. There will be movies, swimming, games and a pizza party. Cost is $20 for members and $25 for non-members. For more information, go to nampaparksandrecreation.org.

18th Annual Indoor Triathlon Saturday, February 7 This event features a 1/2-mile swim, a 10-mile ride on a stationary bike, and a 4-mile run on an indoor track. It will begin at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, February 7, at the Nampa Recreation Center. Cost is $30 for members and $36 for non-members; there are also team fees for those interested. Space is limited, and anyone wanting to participate should register early at the Rec Center or at nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Photo courtesy The Peregrine Fund / Chris Parish photographer

21st Annual Daddy Daughter Date Night Saturday, February 7 This annual event will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, February 7, at the Nampa Recreation Center. The Date Night is for fathers and their daughters ages 3-12. Cost is $9 per person for members and $11 per person for nonmembers. Participants may register online at nampaparksandrecreation.org, in advance at the Rec Center, or the night of the event at the Rec Center at 131 Constitution Way.

Doktor Kaboom Sunday, February 15 The “Doktor Kaboom! Look Out! Science Is Coming!” program will be presented at 2 p.m. Sunday, February 15, at the Morrison Center in Boise. The presentation is an interactive science comedy show for people of all ages. For more information, go to mc.boisestate.edu/education.

Join Idaho Family Magazine Become part of a growing, exciting valley wide publication. Join our team as an associate editor and help us expand our reach to Boise area families. For more information, email: publisher@sterlingmedialtd.com. IDAHO

MAGAZINE

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 15


STORYTELLERS JEANETTE Ross

Storyteller loves the outrageous in tales

Storyteller Jeanette Ross of Boise shows off some of the masks she uses to get children involved in her tales.

By Gaye Bunderson There are few things more enthralling than a great story, and some people have a knack for telling one. Treasure Valley Storytellers is a local organization dedicated to advancing the skill of storytelling as a performing art and teaching tool, according to its website at treasurevalleystorytellers.com. Members entertain at schools, libraries, bookstores, children’s hospitals, festivals, museums and other venues. Member Jeanette Ross recalls when the organization launched in 1990, after she met fellow storytelling enthusiast Joy Steiner. They put out the word through the Log Cabin in Boise that they were interested in starting a local storytellers group. Now there are about 20 active members. “The most natural audience was children,” said Ross, who has a teaching background and a master’s degree from the University of Idaho with an emphasis in folklore. Ross has performed versions of a Native American coyote and buffalo story, an Irish tale of two brothers and a magical colony of ants, and other tall but entertaining tales for youthful audiences. “I love having something outrageous happen in the story,” she said. She uses masks and props when she entertains children, and gets them involved in a way that turns storytelling into a learning opportunity. She and other Treasure Valley Storytellers work with refugee children, from

places such as Iran and Afghanistan. Frequently, the youngsters are invited to create and present their own tales, and through story, deal with their life struggles. “They look at the conflict and the challenge and come up with a way of solving it. They imagine a solution not limited by circumstance,” Ross said. The organization also entertains adults through storytelling, such as weaving spooky tales at the Old Idaho Penitentiary on Halloween night. There is a certain theatricality involved in being a storyteller worth his or her salt, according to Ross. “Two very important things are performance and narration,” she said. “You’re creating your own story: where do you want to take the audience and how do you bring it to life? … You have to know your audience and its interests.” Storytelling skills can be a basic component of good public speaking as well, and Treasure Valley Storytellers sometimes holds corporate workshops around the value of storytelling. CEOs and others can learn to enhance their presentations, impart information and hold listener attention through storytelling, Ross said. “It involves thinking on your feet,” she said. n For more information about joining the group or about scheduling a performance or storytelling workshop, go to treasurevalleystorytellers.com or email Jeanette Ross at jross@fortboise.org.

16 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


STORYTELLERS Q&A With Ambra Allgood

Fun stories with a serious purpose

Storyteller Ambra Allgood, shown with her horse and cat, sees storytelling as an art form that, if done right, teaches listeners about the best parts of being human.

By Gaye Bunderson Editor’s note: Ambra Allgood is a longtime member of Treasure Valley Storytellers. Though she enjoys telling fun tales, it’s nonetheless an activity she takes seriously...for children’s sakes. She answered the following questions during a recent phone interview. Q. What do you find so rewarding about storytelling? A. Words shape our reality, and it’s done through story — historically, within the tribe, within the small clans, within the family. To me, it’s what shapes who we are and who we have been and who we will become. It is huge and many times we are carrying stories within us about our history and past that we need to let go — let go into the world. There are stories inside us that need to be shared. As a storyteller you shape the story to your audience. Things happen when you’re on stage as a storyteller; the storyteller and the audience connect and that propels them into a creative sharing. You search for stories that lift up and inspire and heal. Q. Are children natural storytellers, do you think? A. Oh, absolutely, yes. We have a problem. Our kids are left to media, so that now their realities are shaped — unless they’re limited to what they watch — are shaped by violence and sex. Many parents do not edit or select what their children watch. Little kids come up to me in public school, and I’m so sorry they’ve been exposed to (what they see on TV) before their brain, body, emotions and mind can handle it.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Childhood is sacred; children must be sheltered. As mothers and grandmothers, we must be accountable to making sure our children are protected and safe and their inner creativity shaped. They’re being dumbed down by media. Studies are showing it interrupts the natural formation of the healthy creative brain. Children need to be creative, not in front of TV, the Xbox or computer games. We’ve got to allow that plant within them, that divine creation, that creativity to grow. If you tell them a story and they listen, you’re shaping their mind and their creativity. Q. What’s the primary thing children can learn from a good story? A. Values. That’s key. You’re teaching values in your story. You’re teaching about life, how to be courageous, resilient, charitable; you’re teaching faith, hope, charity, compassion. You’re teaching about the most beautiful parts of what it means to be human. There’s a protagonist and an antagonist. They’re different nuances of the archetypes; they’re part of our subconscious mind. Stories give us access to what’s passed down from generation to generation. They stimulate us to represent the highest expression of duty in humanity, and the things that are honorable. Q. What element or elements do stories have to have in order to keep an audience enthralled? A. It’s nice to have humor. There always needs to be some kind of conflict. For children it needs to be resolved. The mind has to resolve the conflict. n

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 17


STEVE Barrett

Archivist sees great value in family histories By Gaye Bunderson Is the average human life merely an experience in ordinariness? Just working and paying bills, leaving nothing behind of any substance? Perhaps people need to see themselves in the light of history. What were their forebears like, and what legacy will they leave their descendants? Lives become more valuable when judged through that long-view lens. Enter genealogy. The study of one’s origins can amount to more than the mere collection of documents such as birth records, marriage licenses, and tax receipts. It’s stories of adventure, hardship, sacrifice, and triumph. Steve Barrett, reference archivist at the Idaho State Archives in Boise, caught the genealogy bug when he was young. “There’s one person in every generation who gets the bug, the gene, experiences the existential crisis and becomes the storyteller for the family,” Barrett said. He claims his own family tree possesses a certain number of outlaws — outlaws, ministers and farmers, to be exact — but it also sheds light on a pivotal time in American history: the Civil War. Some of his Appalachian ancestors fought for the North, despite the fact Appalachia is largely a part of the southern United States. Their allegiance to the Union was borne out of financial necessity rather than altruism, according to Barrett. “They disliked the plantation owners,” he said, explaining that as poor farmers, they were economic adversaries with the wealthy, who benefited unfairly from the forced free labor of the enslaved. Desperation has frequently been a key motivator in ancesSteve Barrett is reference archivist at the Idaho State Archives in Boise. An avid tors’ actions. Just as many people came to the U.S. in search genealogist, he teaches classes on interviewing older family members and searching of liberty and prosperity, Barrett points out that people who federal censuses in order to create family histories. made the trip from east to west on the Oregon Trail were often reduced to enduring hardship to get to a better place. Barrett teaches classes at Boise Public Library on interview“They left what they knew behind, they left everybody they ing family members and finding ancestors in federal censuses. knew behind, and they didn’t always get what they wanted. He said people have a number of reasons for pursuing geneThey were poor and desperate. Most of us want to stay within alogy, including wanting to write a book, but sometimes the the reach of what’s familiar, but people had to feed and clothe motivation stems from something deeper. a family,” he said. “I see the highest interest in people in their 50s and 60s, But it must have taken courage and strength — as well as sometimes in their 40s. It’s an existential desire,” Barrett said. desperation — to make that decision, right? To get a sense of “People are forgotten within three generations of their death. the magnitude of that resolve, Barrett uses as an example the If there are no stories handed down, it’s the fate of most of possibility of colonizing Mars. us to be forgotten. It’s the hope of some researchers to be “What if the jobs there were extraordinary?” he asks — and remembered.” what if you needed a job? Would you leave the known behind There is a lot of family history that can be garnered from and brave the vast unknown? Perhaps...if you were otherwise the Internet, but there’s also data that cannot be found online hopeless. but is available in special collections at state archives, libraries, and universities. The hardiness of one’s predecessors can be beneficial to At the Idaho State Archives, for instance, there are 80,000 those who come after them. boxes of materials that would cost millions to digitize, accord“You may read of your great-grandparents going through ing to Barrett. “Anytime our lives intersect with government, hard times — say they lost everything in a flood, but they carthere’s a document,” he said. ried on. Stories like that can carry us through our own hard Those are the facts and figures part of genealogy. Special times,” Barrett said. collections may also hold letters, dairies and narratives that And how will the lives of modern people affect their progbroaden the picture of progenitors’ lives — information that eny? includes their emotions along with their details. “I think generations ahead. When you do genealogy, you It’s also important to interview older surviving family memmake different choices when you think like that,” Barrett said. In his own family, he was the first to go to college (he now has bers and get their stories on video or audio. “You both may be uncomfortable, but 20 years from now you’re going to be a Ph.D.) and saw that as an open door for his younger cousins, happy to have the information. When they go, their stories go as well as his own children and, ultimately, grandchildren and with them,” Barrett said. great-grandchildren.

18 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


It is also a good idea to write your own personal history for posterity’s sake, he advised. Don’t be discouraged if your immediate living family members seem disinterested in reading your history. Familiarity may breed the feeling there’s nothing notable about someone who already seems like an open book to them. However, further down the line there may be that certain someone who, like Barrett, finds a historical link or a special story that tells them more than they ever thought they’d know about who and where they came from. Steve Barrett will present part of his ongoing series on genealogy from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 14, in the Marion Bingham Room at the main branch of Boise Public Library on Capitol Boulevard. For more information, go to boisepubliclibrary. org. Also, local historian and writer Debbie Holm will offer a four-week class on writing your personal or family history from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Thursdays from February 5 through February 26 at the Nampa Rec Center. Cost is $40 for members and $45 for non-members. She will instruct participants in conducting oral history interviews and mining their own memories for compelling stories. Registration is required by February 2. For more information, go to nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SPANISH PRESCHOOL • All 18 mo - 6 year olds Welcome • Spanish Immersion Preschool High Scope method. No prior Spanish • Affordable Rates & Daycare Too

1605 S. Phillippi • Boise

1-2015

344-4270

www.puentes.biz

Across from Hillcrest Plaza on Overland

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 19


FAMILY Business with Daphne

Four key options for your own enterprise ment their businesses. For example, you may write and produce books or develop mobile apps for clients. You might invent cleaning products that clients purchase as part of your cleaning company. You can build a thriving family business that provides services, and sell products for additional revenue. Don’t buy the myth that only you can provide services and that you can’t pass it down to the next generation.

By Daphne Mallory

Are you thinking about starting a family business? Do you have an idea, too many ideas, or are not sure what to do? The key is to get clear on your values, know the problems you were created to solve together, and to understand the gifts and talents you have been blessed with. I’ll explain more in future columns. For now, here are some general ideas to explore:

A licensing business

Daphne Mallory

A family franchise

Think about the franchise businesses you frequent on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. Have you thought about who owns them? It may be owned and operated by a family. There are a range of franchise opportunities across industries, including health care, financial services, restaurants, art, grocery stores, cleaning, real estate, campgrounds, and laundromats. Sometimes, one family owns multiple locations throughout communities. That can be you. A franchise is one way to get your family business started. You pay an initial fee (although sometimes it’s waived) to use the trademarks, products and methods owned by the franchise. The franchisor often requires that you pay an ongoing royalty based on your sales as part of the agreement. As the franchisee, you benefit from not trying to figure it all out, as well as name recognition, location, and national advertising. You also get training, marketing plans, and real estate in exchange for your payments. You have to decide whether you want a proven and turn-key system to follow. If that’s the case, then a franchise may be a good option for your family. If you want to launch your own system and/or products and services into the marketplace and “make your own rules,” then a franchise is not a good fit. You can lose your business if you violate the terms of the franchise agreement. The agreement will require you to play by their rules.

A services company

Family business is sometime synonymous with a “mom and pop” corner store. Some people assume that you have to sell products, especially if you want to transfer the business to the next generation. That’s not the case. You can own and operate a family business that provides services. Some examples include legal, dental, financial, cleaning, catering and automotive services. Some service companies owned by families do sell products that comple-

You don’t have to do it all. Are you a creative family that can generate new ideas, or improve existing products and services? If yes, you may be a family of inventors. Your family business can create new systems, products and inventions and license them to other companies to do the work of selling and marketing it. They worry about employees, marketing and sales budgets, manufacturing and more. They pay you royalties and advancements. It’s a great option if you want to remain small, or have little interest in managing the number of employees and systems needed to bring your invention to the marketplace.

A manufacturing company

Making your own products is another great option for family business. Rather than license your ideas to someone else, you can create, make and distribute your own products. You may have all the talent you need to manage the various systems needed to operate a manufacturing company, and if not, you can hire workers in your community. You can also purchase parts and supplies from other distributors, who may also be family businesses. The key to running a family-owned manufacturing company is to master the art of cash flow management. Your customers may not be buying the same day the product is ready for sale. How do you operate your business and pay employees while you wait? Cash flow management is key for the survival and growth of your family business. Use this list to think about the big picture of your family business. It’s OK not to have all of the answers yet. Keep in mind, that you may decide to launch multiple businesses in different industries. n Daphne Mallory is a family business expert, owner, speaker and trainer. She runs family business challenge groups to help families start or grow a business. She blogs at daphnemallory.blogspot.com. For more information, call her at 208-731-4292 or email daphnemalloryesq@gmail.com.

20 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


MEMORIES Made

Road trip to Alaska with Grandpa work to compromise and say ‘Let’s try it.’ That way you’re both in it together versus being against each other.” We also began listening to the first of many Blue Collar Comedy Tour CDs. Git R Done! Day 2: Left Bellingham at 9 a.m. and arrived in MacKenzie, British Columbia at 11 p.m. Border crossing was fine, but do they have to be so stoic? And they stare you down after asking simple questions. It made me question whether my name was actually Justin Farrell, despite the fact I’ve never been called anything else. In the late afternoon, we drove through the worst thunderstorm I’ve ever been in. Lightning flashed all around us and hail the size of large marbles pelted the car for what seemed like an hour but was probably more like 10 minutes. I couldn’t believe the windshield didn’t crack. We spent the day talking about religion, politics and living trusts. Words of wisdom: “Men think more logically than women. If you’re helping a woman find something, look in places that seem illogical to you. You’ll find it there.” That would explain why my wife’s keys were in the refrigerator last week. But I guess it doesn’t explain why I left the milk in the pantry.... Continued on page 27

1-2015

By Justin Farrell According to the Legacy Project, children need between four and six involved, caring adults in their lives to fully develop emotionally and socially. I consider myself more than blessed to have had six grandparents (four grandparents and two great-grandmothers) who each played a unique role in shaping my life into my early 20s. This is in addition to my parents and numerous aunts, uncles, coaches and mentors. However, the relationships I cherish the most are those I have had with my grandparents. This is primarily due to the fact that most people don’t have the opportunity to know as many of their grandparents for as long as I have. I had the opportunity of a lifetime one year to travel from Vancouver, Wash. to Alaska with my 80-year-old grandpa. I learned a lot about faith, family and fishing, as you’ll see as you follow us on our trip. Day 1: After a long day’s work, I went home and met my grandpa to load the car and head to Bellingham, Wash. We left at 6:21 p.m. and arrived in Bellingham four hours later. Left with perfect timing to miss Seattle traffic. The day happened to be my grandparents’ 55th wedding anniversary, so within minutes of leaving the house, we were already talking about marriage and relationships. Grandpa’s words of wisdom for the day, regarding marriage: “Always

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 21


NO BOUGH Breaking

Songs beyond ‘Rock-a-bye Baby’

As my son’s eyes started to grow heavy, By Diane Louise Smith Years ago when my son was an infant, I quietly crooned the song. It is about a nighttime feedings were really popular at woman setting off to work, but still thinkour house, especially at 1 a.m. It would ing about her loved one throughout her have been enjoyable to sit and listen to workday. Though Burt Bacharach had the silence if I hadn’t been so dead tired. originally intended this to be a love song, The padded rocking chair was dangerthe words could easily apply to a parously too comfortable as I sat there with ent singing it to his or her child. I was a my infant son, feeding him his bottle. working mom and the lyrics really struck After he finished his formula, I held a chord with me. Also, it did the trick him against my shoulder and rubbed — my son drifted off to sleep. his small back, waiting for his contented It’s amazing how certain songs get stuck noise (read “burp”) to let me know he in your memory. This song had a simple was ready go back to blessed slumber. melody, so singing it a cappella didn’t However, the awaited noise came, but his sound half-bad. It had stood the test of bright, blue eyes stared back at me, no Diane Louise Smith has been married for time and I was doing my part in a small sign of going back to sleep. over 20 years and is a mom and bonus way in preserving history. I figured this was a good time to sing mom to three sons. She is a published Just when I thought I was entertaina lullaby to him, a nice quiet song, not a author, contributor to examiner.com, ing myself and my son didn’t remember toe-tapping Broadway melody. Besides, I under Meridian Parenting section, and the Middleton Gazette. Her blog is what I was singing to him, an incident was still in my pajamas. happened to make me change my mind. I had read many articles stating that it is www.writingsbydiane.blogspot.com. A few days later, we were all watching not the words that lull the baby to sleep, but your voice that is so soothing. I was beginning to sing “My Best Friend’s Wedding” on video. My son’s face lit up when the characters started to sing “I Say a Little the classic, “Rock-a-bye Baby,” but I was never a fan of the “bough breaking” part, so I stopped abruptly. Then Prayer.” He smiled at me and cooed at the lyrics. My my tired brain began to think back to all the songs that husband raised his eyebrows and gave me an “atta girl” I had heard throughout my life. From the recesses of nod. I looked down at my son on my lap and smiled. I my brain, I was able to remember the lyrics to “I Say a swear if he could talk, he would have said, “Hey MomLittle Prayer” sung by Dionne Warwick. my, they’re singing our song!” 22 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


ALL In Good Taste

Cooking Matters teaches low-income individuals and families in Idaho how to identify, shop for, and prepare delicious, simple, healthy meals on a budget. They are always looking for volunteer support to help teach these cooking-based nutrition courses. If you would like to get involved, contact Cooking Matters at (208) 577-2692.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 23


CRAFTS On A Dime

Stair post snowman an easy winter project By Samantha Stillman

One of my favorite places to shop (besides a thrift store) is Habitat for Humanity ReStore. It has tons of secondhand housing material. I was able to pick up my stairway post for $2 and two pieces of PVC pipe connectors for $1. This is a great, quick naptime craft for those of you who want some cute winter décor that’s not related to Christmas. n

Instructions:

1. If your post is like mine, it has some angled wood at the end. My wonderful husband used his saw to level it out for me. Take your sandpaper and give the whole pole a good sanding to remove any varnish. Use a damp rag to wipe off the dust. 2. Begin painting your pole white. It may take a few coats if you use acrylic paint like I did. If you own some spray paint, that would be the fastest route. Once dry, give your snowman some coal eyes and a carrot nose. Picture 2 and 3. 3. Wedge your PVC pipe connectors on tight and tie your scrap fabric around the snowman’s neck for a scarf. I used some sandpaper to rough up the edges and give it a more rustic look. Picture 4

Supplies needed: Picture 1 Stairway post PVC pipe connectors (for hat) Paint Brushes Sandpaper Fabric for scarf

Samantha Stillman is a Treasure Valley crafts instructor and freelance writer. She may be reached at craftsonadime10@gmail.com.

1

4 2

3

24 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


ANG’S Antics

A resolution for the inner woman

Lying, stealing, unfaithfulness, bitterness... By Angela Hayes I’m going to fall into the 50 percent categoall negative traits people in our world are ry when I dust off my treadmill, purchase a slowly succumbing to. I can’t fathom a day new set of Nikes, and order those Lululemon where genuine kindness for one another conworkout pants. Yes, I’m referring to my New tinually comes out ahead. Year’s resolution to get fit. So what’s a woman to do to help alleviate The statistics go as follows: 50 percent of the sting of the world’s shortcomings? I’ll tell American adults declare they will improve you this: it starts with one person, one woman their health by either exercising more or attempting to make this planet a better place. cease smoking and/or consuming alcohol. Pay for that person’s coffee behind you at My health isn’t so bad actually, so this deciStarbucks, buy an extra jar of spaghetti sauce sion I’ve made to improve my overall wellto drop into the food bank’s barrel, bite your being shouldn’t be too difficult. Taking a few tongue when you’d rather spill out unkind extra steps a day, getting a good sweat sesh words, give your neighbor that compliment in (yeah, I’m almost 40 and said sesh…so she’s dying to hear, smile more and grimace Angela Hayes is a resident of Eagle. what?), and getting my heart rate up is all less, speak highly of others, hand back that She’s a stay-at-home mom to five part of the New Year Plan. extra $5 the checker at Albertsons accidentally children and married to one lucky I’ll get up before the family, in the wee hours man. Visit her family’s blog at: gave you when returning your change (even if of the morning, to fit it all in; I can do this! Thehayesfamily6.blogspot.com. you could really use it), help the elderly lady Before too long, those skinny jeans that are high shovel her driveway and when she hands you atop my closet shelf will be mine once again, that tip, refuse it with a grin. and without the covering of a baggy shirt to hide my overflow As Gandhi has been quoted as saying, “Be the change you of signs I cook really well. Yes! Victory will be mine! wish to see in the world.” But unfortunately, most people fail in adhering to their I know it is far more popular to set resolutions that improve stated New Year’s resolutions, more than likely myself inyour health, that center on the physical aspect of who you cluded. Specifically, 22 percent fail after one week, 40 percent are. Those resolutions are great. They’re even wonderful! after one month, 50 percent after three months, 60 percent But once the svelte body ages and the outward appearance after six months, and 81 percent after 24 months. Just not changes, what will your inside look like? What will your heart good odds for the goals I’m setting for myself. resemble? I know for myself, I want it to resemble true (and So instead of making a firm decision that will more than lasting) beauty. I want to be filled with more than a strong likely end in failure, I’m going to make a promise towards heartbeat that shows up on my EKG test; I want a heart that something I know I can keep. No, it has nothing to do with the health of my body, but rather my mind and soul. To strive beats with gratitude. I know it starts with me. I can make a difference and so can to be a human being who has compassion, empathy, selflessyou, dear reader. ness, loyalty, grace, mercy, and tenderness is the real goal I I realize my attempts at fitting into my skinny jeans once want to set for myself in the New Year. again may put me into the percentage of people who fail, After having an experience with road rage where I was but I know my promise to uphold good human values won’t. cursed at, it really put into perspective humanity and its lack Heck, I may not be able to get those jeans past my calves, but of the quality character traits I want my children to model. What an awful world to have my children — and yours I’ll be one amazingly kind, grateful woman. And to me, that — grow up in. beats skinny jeans any day of the week! n

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 25


MOMMY Bliss

Tips for finding joy in motherhood By Genny Heikka 4. Cry, for you. Moms are experts Nobody has to tell us that being a at dealing. We’re pros at delaying stress mom can be stressful. We love our relief. But in the same way it’s imposkids— we do —but in spite of that sible to keep a teapot from eventually deep love, we can sometimes get impawhistling to let off steam, moms need to tient, frustrated, or just plain tired. So find ways to turn down the heat and get how do we keep the stresses and worries relief from pressure. Crying can help; it of motherhood from swallowing our joy not only releases toxins, it also releases and banishing our bliss? Here are five stress hormones. tips that may help. But crying isn’t just about tears; it’s 1. Identify where you are (or Who knew that being a mom also very much about strength, healing, would be like this?!). In the same and acknowledging your feelings. Being way you need to have a starting point a mom can remind you of when you when getting directions, it helps to were a child. When your daughter turns know where you are as a mom so you Genny Heikka is a mom, author, speaker 8, you might remember when you were can identify what changes you might and coffee lover. Stop by her blog at 8. When your son gets his first pet, you gennyheikka.com and share a cup or need to make. Slow down and take an might remember yours. Some childhood connect with her on Twitter at inventory of how you feel today. Are you @GennyHeikka. For more tips on being memories are good; others are not so anxious? Worried? Tired? Depressed? a more joyful mom, check out her latest good. It’s these hurts (if unresolved) that Are you already aware of some things book, “Finding Mommy Bliss – that you’d like to change about your per- Discovering Unexpected Joy in Everyday can affect your parenting today. Moments,” available wherever books spective or attitude? Write them down “Struggling with the past can prevent are sold. and let that be your starting point. you from experiencing joy as a mom in 2. Keep your laughter. When we can laugh at the present,” Laura Faudree, marriage and family therthose otherwise not-so-funny moments that inevitably apist and director of the Soulcare Center at Bridgeway come with being a mom, the stress level in us (and our Church in Roseville, Calif., said. family) can be lessened. A few years ago, I was having So what’s a mom to do? one of those nights — I was at that delirious mommy “Give yourself permission to acknowledge and acbreaking point where you’re either going to burst into cept your feelings because they’re real and legitimate,” laughter or tears at any second — when my daughter called me from her bedroom using the phone intercom Faudree said. “When you do that, you’re able to accept button and asked me to cook her bacon as a bedyour children’s ranges of emotions as legitimate too, time snack. (It was after 9 p.m. and she was serious!) and you’re able to accept them for who they are, and I laughed, then she laughed, and we both ended up not who you want them to be.” laughing so hard we couldn’t stop. I could have gotten When we acknowledge and work through our own angry; instead, it ended up being a funny memory we feelings and struggles as moms, we become healthier still talk about today. (And, no, I didn’t cook her the and happier, and so do our kids. bacon!) 5. Be grateful. With each year that our kids grow, 3. Love your dreams. Do you remember the we grow too — as women, wives, friends, sisters, aunts, dreams you had for your life... but barely? How many grandmas. It’s a beautiful bond we have, and it’s a of us, after becoming moms, lose sight of the passion that once stirred our hearts? (It can be hard to soar beautiful time in our lives if only we can remember to with piles of laundry blocking your runway.) Being see past the dishes, diapers, carpools and chaos. Somea mom is a beautiful sacrifice and it means you have times, that’s simply a matter of remembering to be more on your plate for sure, but it shouldn’t mean setthankful. ting your dreams on a shelf forever. Gratefulness, even when we’re cleaning up the third When I used to dream of being a writer, I once heard spilled glass of the day, lets us see things in a different a speaker say, “Just start, and then you are a writer.” So light. When we’re thankful for our kids — their tiny that’s what I did, even if it meant being able to write toes, their bright smiles, their sweet hugs — somehow for only 30 minutes a day while the kids were napping. Years later, my dream is a reality. If you’re in that place all the not-so-glamorous moments that come with being a mom don’t seem so bad. And that can help us I once was — longing for something, but not sure how to make it happen — just start. — and our kids — feel absolutely, positively blissful. n 26 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Alaska with Grandpa continued from page 21 Day 3: Slept in late and on the road at 10:45 a.m. Had a hard time sleeping as thoughts kept creeping in my head about what if something went wrong at home, how would I be notified? My cell phone was off through Canada due to international roaming fees and it was weird to not be able to have someone contact me in case of emergency or until I was able to check messages using a calling card in the evenings at the hotel. Arrived in Fort Nelson, B.C. at 7 p.m. and stayed at The Blue Bell Inn, which was a gas station, convenience store and hotel. Kind of an odd combination, but the price was reasonable and the room was nice. This was the only place we stayed at both coming and going. Day 4: Left Fort Nelson at 7:30 a.m. Saw more wildlife today than any other part of the trip. At least a dozen black bears eating dandelions right off the highway, moose, stone sheep and bison. Muncho Lake was the most beautiful color of turquoise I have ever seen. The Signpost Forest in Watson Lake was one of the most unique things I have ever seen. Over 72,000 signs put up from around the world in one place. Amazing. Arrived in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory at 8:45 p.m. Stayed at Stop Inn Family Hotel located at 314 Ray Street. Nice place to stay and reasonably priced. Angela at the front desk was very friendly and helpful. Day 5: Left Whitehorse at 9 a.m. Many of the gas pumps along the way didn’t have nozzles that kept the pump running while you went inside, washed your windows, etc. so I had to hold the pump the whole time. It was frustrating because I’m used to being able to multi-task. It forced me to not be in such a rush and take in things moment by moment. Crossed the border and made a comment to the Border Patrol agent about hoping he could do something about the mosquitoes that were obviously crossing the border without proper identification. He smiled, or maybe glared. I rolled up my window and just kept driving, hoping that having a sense of humor wasn’t a federal offense. Arrived at camping spot, where we met my cousin at 6:30 p.m. Alaska time just outside of Glennallen, Alaska, 2,364 miles later. Days 6-9: Fishing in the morning, nap in the afternoon, and time around the campfire at night were on the itinerary for the next few days. Good thing we weren’t counting on my fishing skills to survive. Fish were literally being caught at my feet, but somehow I only managed to catch two. There was a combined 130 years of marriage from the four of us who were camping. I’m now convinced the world’s problems can be solved around a campfire with S’mores. Peace in the Middle East? Pass the marshmallows, Mr. Rouhani. Poor economy? Ms. Pelosi, can you please pass Mr. Boehner the chocolate and graham crackers? Day 10: On the road again after a wonderful few days in the great outdoors. Left at 8:49 a.m. and stopped at an awesome gift shop in Tok, Alaska on our way back to Whitehorse. Arrived in Whitehorse and hoped to stay at the Stop Inn Family Hotel again, but it was full. However, the owners made some calls for us and were extremely helpful in getting us a place to stay a few hours away at Teslin, Yukon Territory. Arrived at 10:22 p.m. During the drive, I asked my grandpa about his mom. He said: “She was the most wonderful person in the world” with a tone of admiration I’ve never heard from him before. The fact that this amazing adventure will be coming to an end soon is starting to hit me.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Day 11: Left Teslin at 10:49 a.m. Stopped at Watson Lake again and wanted to put up our own sign in the Signpost Forest to commemorate our trip. Went to a hardware store across the street and bought a board. The total came to $1.31 and I didn’t want to use my debit card for such a small amount so I cleared out my ashtray and I had exactly $1.31 in it. No doubt it was meant to be. Made the sign and put it up so we will always have a physical reminder of our trip at Watson Lake. Starting to wonder how many people have an opportunity like this to spend with anyone who’s close to them, but especially a grandparent. Stopped to eat at Toad Lake. Really cool restaurant and gift shop that has a ceiling lined with over 8,000 baseball hats left by customers over the years. We didn’t stay there, but they have $89 rooms. Arrived in Fort Nelson shortly before 11 p.m. Long days of driving are getting us home faster than on our way up. The feeling of approaching home is bittersweet. Day 12: Left Fort Nelson at 8:14 a.m. Asked Grandpa what he hoped his legacy would be. He said: “That Grandpa was a nice man who taught me a thing or two along the way.” Simple, to the point, yet profound. He also said: “If you’re not learning something from everyone you come across, you’re either not listening or not paying attention.” He talked about the daily coffee groups he goes to and how he learns new things from the 90-year-olds in the group. Funny how my grandpa has little to no interest or knowledge of social media, but he is probably one of the most socially connected people I know. Arrived in Williams Lake, B.C. at 9:14 p.m. and stayed at the Lakeside Motel. Nicest room we stayed at on the entire trip and the cheapest too. Day 13: Vancouver or bust! Left Williams Lake at 8:28 a.m. Drove hard all day and 4,737 miles from when we started, we arrived home at 8:28 p.m. We both hadn’t shaved since we left and looked like mountain men. As he got in his car to head home, he summed up the trip perfectly by saying, “This was the most enjoyable trip I’ve ever had.” Sometimes the most wisdom comes from listening and observing the world around you. My grandpa’s philosophy is basically, “If you ask my opinion on something, I’ll tell you; but if you don’t ask, I won’t.” We spent many hours of our drive in silence just taking it all in, but when I asked him about things, he was happy to talk. I hope my generation of 30- and 40-somethings gets better at that. We don’t seem to take the time to ask the older generations, and when we do it doesn’t seem like we listen very well. Our biggest mistake and biggest regret may be not utilizing the wisdom of our parents and grandparents. Although this adventure lasted less than two weeks, the memories will last a lifetime. I am so thankful to have gone and experienced the life lessons that were shared by my grandpa and learned by me. Just as all the world’s problems could be solved around a campfire with S’mores, I think that, if only for a brief while, our own problems seem to fade away when there’s nothing but open road and mountain peaks ahead of us. n Justin Farrell is a married father of two who lives in Vancouver. He hopes that he is able to have as much of a positive impact on future generations as his parents and grandparents have had on him, and that when he is 80 his grandson will take him on a road trip to Alaska. He writes a blog that can be found at courageousvancouverdad.wordpress.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 27


SOMEDAY, they’ll leave...

Preparing kids to be on their own

“There’s nothing to eat!” … Maybe we need to rethink how we “role model” in the kitchen.

By Claudia Weathermon Tester Since my children are now teenagers, I can no longer consider myself a ‘newbie’ to this parenting thing. But I still occasionally find a gaping hole in my repertoire of those Important Things You Should be Teaching Your Kids Before They Leave Home. Yes, we’ve covered kindness, germ avoidance, ATM banking and the like. But I realized that if my son (he’s 16) were left to his own devices with a fistful of Benjamins in the grocery store, he would NOT come away with any semblance of healthful eating. Similarly, if his life depended on consuming only the food that currently resides in our refrigerator and pantry, he would perish. That’s because he lacks the desire and the skill for even the most basic cooking. Heating a can of soup would be an arduous task in his mind. He is much more adept at persuading his sister to prepare him something to eat based on a favor he will deliver later (but never does.) This is a pitiful confession from someone who is a certified health coach. But I suppose I am like many mothers who slog through the shopping-cutting-cooking-clean-up associated with thrice daily meals on auto pilot because, well, it’s just easier to do myself than wrangle the kids on one more thing. So, I’ve researched some ways to be better about this in order to prepare my little chickens for leaving the nest one day. Notice I’m not too hard on myself here because if I were really ‘just phoning it in’ we’d be eating a lot more fast food. But I draw the line because I do want health for my children. And childhood is the most important time to learn what is healthy. The tastes and the habits you develop as a youngster set you up for a lifetime of wellness or disease. This is important stuff.

You are your child’s best role model when it comes to eating well. So that’s a good place to start. Show respect for your body by eating fewer processed/prepared foods, including fast food. Make home-cooked meals the ‘gold standard.’ Here are a few ideas that will encourage our kids to love the right kinds of foods: Eat dinner as a family — I know it’s a challenge with lessons and sports, but shoot for at least four times per week. If getting everyone together is a challenge, you might consider providing a healthy snack, then eating a light meal together later than the usual dinner hour. Research shows children eat more fruits and veggies and fewer fried foods and soda when they dine with the family. And younger kids who eat more often with the family are less likely to be overweight than other children. Involve your kids in grocery shopping and dinner prep — This will create the opportunity to talk about what’s ‘in’ their food. While you’re chopping, stirring and steaming, you could be teaching them to read and compare food labels. For instance: how much protein is in regular oatmeal compared with a processed breakfast cereal? When at the store teach them to choose fresh produce. I used to reward my kids with a new fruit or veggie of their choice when they ventured to the store with me. We had a blast trying everything from dragonfruit to kumquats. Keep healthy snacks within reach — Once they’ve learned their way around the kitchen (and if old enough, how to safely use a knife), your children can help chop and store fresh veggies and boiled eggs. They can also measure appropriate serving sizes of nuts and whole grain snacks. You offload a chore and they eat better: everyone wins! Use supplements — Getting all the vitamins and minerals you need through your diet is often a challenge. Especially for teenagers who may have busy schedules and erratic eating habits. Make a good multi-vitamin part of the breakfast routine. There are many options in chewable or gummy form that make consumption more pleasant. I boost my kids’ fiber with two chewables daily as well. Pay attention to the dose that’s appropriate for your child’s size or age and look for brands without artificial colors, flavors or additives. I am not going to say it’s a New Year’s resolution (because I hate those), but I am going to be doing more of these things in 2015. While the endgame is to ensure my kids develop healthy habits that carry into adulthood, I am not completely unselfish in my motivation. Teaching more about food and using the kitchen will hopefully mean someone cooks for ME this year! n Claudia Weathermon Tester is a former TV news anchor, mother of two teenagers and certified health coach devoted to helping end the obesity epidemic among our children. If you have an idea or question for her column, send an email to healthcoachclaudia@ gmail.com.

28 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Inside the Guide 30 After-School

Activities & Arts

31 Baby & New Parents

2nd Annual – 2015 Edition

32 Birthday Parties 33 Camps

34 Education Babysitting Classes Academic Enrichment Breastfeeding Adult Education Car Seat Safety Child Care Childbirth & Early Education Early Learning Classes & Eduation Online Health & Child Safety Parenting Education Hospitals Private Schools Immunization Public School Districts Loss of a Baby Tutoring Midwifery Pediatric Dentists Playgroup & Moms’ Groups 41 Family Fun & Entertainment Postpartum Support Prevention & Crisis Assistance 41 Field Trips & Day Trips Rehabilitation Services Retail

42 Health & Wellness Chiropractors Dentistry Emergency Care Fitness Mental Health Midwifery Pediatric Dentists Pediatric Nutrition Rehabilitation Services Specialists

43 Special Needs 45 Sports

Gymnastics Martial Arts Swim Lessons Tennis Youth Sports

47 Ad Index

From the editor:

Welcome to Idaho Family Magazine’s 2015 Resource Guide. In it, we compiled information we felt our readers would find valuable. The guide is something to keep all year long as a reference tool, whether you’re looking for a good place for a child’s birthday party or seeking physicians, dentists, counselors and other professionals — and that’s just a little of what the guide offers. It’s all arranged in an alphabetical, easy-to-read format. (Note that the bold-faced listings are for businesses, schools and organizations that provided support for the guide.)

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 29


After School Activites & The Arts Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise...........375-1932 Aquariumofboise.org

Balance Dance Company Downtown Boise...................407-2943 Balancedance.org

Aqua-Tots Swim School........................ 938-9300

Ballet Idaho Academy......................... 343-0556 Bodies In Motion................................. 381-0587 Boise Art Museum............................... 345-8330 Boise Philharmonic.............................. 344-7849 Born to Succeed.................................. 658-5561 Bronco Elite Athletics........................... 389-9005 Caldwell Fine Arts............................... 459-5783 Capital City Ballet Center..................... 378-9752

Dance Allegro Academy 3015 W. McMillan Rd. Suite 105, Meridian..............................949-0361 danceallegroacademy.com

Lessons for all ages and levels

Piano • Guitar • Voice and

Idaho Tennis Association...................... 322-5150 1-2015

or call

Gem State Gymnastics Academy.......... 853-3220 Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council......... 377-2011 Idaho IceWorld................................... 608-7716

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise.............336-9221 Idahoshakespeare.org

Join us today to experience the joy of music making! Register online at

MusicCenterStudios.com

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle...................................939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

Music Center Studios ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Music Lingua ..........................................571-1713 Musiclingua.com Nampa ATA Martial Arts..................... 546-9282 Nampa Civic Center........................... 468-5500

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa................................468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org Pat Harris School of Dance Broadway Dance & Event Center (Southeast Boise) Pat Harris School of Dance (West Boise) ..........................................375-3255 patharrisdance.com Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development............................. 631-0576

Treasure Valley Children’s Theater 703 N. Main St., Meridian.............................. 287-TVCT TreasureValleyChildrensTheater.com Treasure Valley Family YMCA......Ymcatvidaho.org

1-2015

861-6056

Kindermusik ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

Lee Pesky Learning Center.................... 333-0008

30 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


After SchoolBaby Activites & New & The Parents Arts Babysitting Classes American Red Cross, Idaho Chapter...... 947-HELP St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center ........................................................ 367-2121 St. Luke’s Babysitting Classes................ 381-9000

Breastfeeding Mother’s Milk & More.......................... 484-1899 St. Alphonsus Family Center................. 367-3454 St. Luke’s Breastfeeding Classes............ 381-9000 Women, Infants and Children (WIC)...... 327-7488

Car Seat Safety St. Alphonsus Family Center................. 367-3454 St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital................ 381-9000

Childbirth & Early Education Baby Belly Doula and Placenta Encapsulation ..........................................724-9672 Placentabenefits.info/carinahays BabySteps.............................342-5601 ext. 212 Early Head Start & Head Start, Friends of Children and Families First Inc........................... 344-9187 Idaho Association for the Education of Young Children (IAEYC)................... 345-1090

March of Dimes.................................. 336-5421 St. Alphonsus Family Center................. 367-3454 St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital................ 381-9000

Classes/Education Kindermusik ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Music Center Studios ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Music Lingua ..........................................571-1713 Musiclingua.com

Health & Child Safety American Red Cross, Idaho Chapter...... 947-HELP

Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic 300 Main St. Ste. 103, Boise...................................287-2299 1560 N. Crestmont Ste. E., Meridian..............................288-1776 Chiroforliving.com Central District Health Department......... 327-7450 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare........................................Dial 2-1-1 Idaho Sound Beginnings-Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program (ISB-EHDI)...... 334-0829 March of Dimes.................................. 336-5421

St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center................................... 367-2121 Sleep Well Children............................ 994-9429 Southwest District Health Department..... 455-5345 St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital................ 381-9000 Treasure Valley Family YMCA......Ymcatvidaho.org Women, Infants and Children (WIC)...... 327-7488

Hospitals St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center................................... 367-2121 St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital................ 381-9000

Immunization Central District Health Department......... 327-7450 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, and Idaho Immunization Program......... 334-5931 Southwest District Health Department..... 455-5345

Loss of a Baby Compassionate Friends........................ 855-2137

Midwifery Lovelace OB/GYN and Midwifery/ Kristi Rhodes....................................... 345-3136 Treasure Valley Midwives..................... 343-2079

Placenta Encapsulation Service Avoid the Baby Blues and have a Happy Postpartum

Ease postpartum and menopausal hormonal fluctuations • Contains your own natural hormones • Balances your system • Replenishes depleted iron • Gives you more energy • Increases milk production • Hastens uterus to pre-pregnancy state

Baby Belly Doula and Placenta Encapsulation Carina Hays CD(DONA), CPES(PBi)

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

724-9672

1-2015

1-2015

Certified Labor Doula and Certified Placenta Encapsulation Specialist placentabenefits.info/carinahays

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 31


Baby & New Parents Pediatric Dentists

Postpartum Support

Idaho Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health................. 433-8845

Dan Streeby DDS, Pediatric Dentistry 450 W. State St. Ste. 180, Eagle...................................939-0600 DanStreeby.com

Baby Belly Doula and Placenta Encapsulation ..........................................724-9672 Placentabenefits.info/carinahays

Idaho Parents Unlimited ..........................................342-5884 Ipulidaho.org

Treasure Valley Pediatric Dentistry 1564 South Times Square Lane, Boise...................................376-8873 Tvpdsmiles.com

Playgroup and Moms’ Groups Boise Mothers of Multiples............. boisemom.org Idaho Mom’s Network.......Idahomomsnetwork.org MOMS Club Facebook.com/imnplaygroupMeetup.com/ idahomomsnetwork Mother’s of Preschoolers (MOPS)........... Mops.org

Synergy Birth Services......................... 968-3616

Prevention & Crisis Assistance City Light Home for Women & Children/ Boise Rescue Mission........................... 343-4680 Idaho CareLine....................................Dial 2-1-1 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare........................................Dial 2-1-1 Safe Kids Treasure Valley..................... 381-3033 Women, Infants and Children (WIC)...... 327-7488 Idaho Association for Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health (or AimEarlyIdaho)......... 440-8044 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Infant and Toddler Program................. 334-0900

Idaho Project for Youth with Deaf & Blindness................................. 364-4012 March of Dimes.................................. 336-5421

Rehabilitation Services St. Luke’s Children’s Rehab................... 489-5880

Retail Cassis................................................ 345-5501

Lakeshore Learning Store 417 N. Milwaukee St., Boise...................................377-1855 LakeshoreLearning.com

Birthday Parties All About Games................................ 343-5653

Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise...................................375-1932 Aquariumofboise.org Bodies In Motion................................. 381-0587 Ceramica........................................... 342-3822 Clown Connection.............................. 378-9474 Discovery Center of Idaho.................... 343-9895

Fast Lane Indoor Kart Racing................ 321-1166 Gem State Gymnastics Academy.......... 853-3220 Idaho IceWorld................................... 608-7716 Lilly Jane’s Cupcakes........................... 938-3408 Nampa ATA Martial Arts..................... 546-9282

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa................................468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org

32 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

Pinz Bowling Center............................ 898-0900 Roaring Springs Waterpark.................. 884-8842 Treasure Valley Family YMCA ............................................. Ymcatvidaho.com Wahooz Family Fun Zone.................... 898-0900 Wings Center..................................... 376-3641

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Camps

LET’S PARTY!

Ballet Idaho Academy...............................................................343-0556 Boise Art Museum.....................................................................345-8330 Bronco Elite Athletics.................................................................389-9005

Camp Meadowood Springs Pendleton, Oregon....................................... 541-276-2752 Meadowoodsprings.org Capital City Ballet Center...........................................................378-9752 Ceramica.................................................................................342-3822

Did you know the Aquarium of Boise is the perfect place to host a special birthday party for kids of all ages? Special guests include over 350 different species of animals and marine life - rays, sharks, freshwater turtle, snakes and lizards. - Gift bags for everyone. - Guided tours available. - Hands-on activities.

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle....................................... 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com Gem State Gymnastics Academy................................................853-3220 Idaho Botanical Garden.............................................................343-8649 Idaho IceWorld.........................................................................608-7716

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise........................................... 336-9221 Idahoshakespeare.org Lakewood Montessori................................................................331-3888 Lee Pesky Learning Center..........................................................333-0008

Music Lingua ........................................................................ 571-1713 Musiclingua.com Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise............................................. 385-7674 Rosehillmontessori.com Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development..................................................................631-0576 Treasure Valley Family YMCA........................................... Ymcatvidaho.org

A unique summer camp experience for children with social learning or communication challenges. For ages 6-16 Age appropriate Camp Activities Include:

Check out the birthday party options for children 12 and under or adults at our website AQ U A R I U M O F B O I S E . O R G or call (208) 375-1932 for more information.

(541) 276-2752

meadowoodsprings.org

P.O. Box 1025 • Pendleton, OR 97801

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

64 N. Cole Road, Boise Idaho 83704

1-2015

Bring the ocean to your next birthday party at the Aquarium of Boise.

1-2015

• Zip lines • Adventure Courses • Swimming • Nature Walks • Canoeing • Mini Golf • Campfires • Arts & Crafts • Sports • Many More FLEXIBLE PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 33


Education All About Games................................ 343-5653 Carole’s Learning Center...................... 407-4796

Center for Stepfamily Development 136 S. Academy Way, Eagle...................................322-2908 Stepfamilyhelp.com Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7451 W. Iron Drive, Boise...................................898-1368 320 11th Ave. South, Nampa................................466-1077 1710 N. Whitley Ste. C, Fruitland..............................466-1077 Boisechatterbox.com Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle...................................939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com Idaho Botanical Garden....................... 343-8649

Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. ..........................................342-5884 Ipulidaho.org Kindermusik ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Lee Pesky Learning Center.................... 333-0008

Music Center Studios ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Music Lingua ..........................................571-1713 Musiclingua.com Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise...................................344-4270 Puentes.biz Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development............................. 631-0576

9th St. • 342-1239 12th St. • 424-3387 TTY: Dial711

Hablamos Espanõl USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer

A Bright Child Preschool & Daycare...... 336-7228

A Step Ahead Preschool 3348 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian..............................473-2420 astepaheadpreschoolidaho.com Born to Succeed.................................. 658-5561

Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise.........344-4270 Puentes.biz

Early Learning A Step Ahead Preschool 3348 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian......... 473-2420 astepaheadpreschoolidaho.com Ambrose School 6100 N. Locust Grove Rd., Meridian.... 323-3888 theamboseschool.com Anser Public Charter School................. 426-9840 Aqua-Tots Swim School........................ 938-9300 Bodies In Motion................................. 381-0587 Born to Succeed.................................. 658-5561

Learn French with your child (ages 0-8)

OFFERING PRESCHOOL & CHILDCARE 473-2420

1-2015

New Horizon Academy 1830 N. Meridian Road, Meridian....... 887-3880 12692 W. LaSalle St., Boise..376-2690 11978 W. Ustick Rd., Boise...323-8900 155 E. Boise Ave., Boise.......386-9108 newhorizonacademy.net

CERTIFIED TEACHERS

Drop-off also available

Shuttling to Some Local Elem. Schools

www.giraf felaugh.or g

Responsibility

Child Care

3348 N. Meridian Rd.

1-2015

LOCATIONS

Pride

Education •

TWO BOISE

Stability •

Infant/Toddler & PRESCHOOL

Excellence •

Caring • Teamwork

Boise School District Community Education.......................... 854-4047

Accepting children of all abilities and all incomes.

Kids Choice 2210 W. Everest Lane, Meridian..............................888-7540 MyKidsChoice.com

A Bright Child Preschool & Daycare...... 336-7228

Adult Education

Giraffe Laugh Values:

Giraffe Laugh 9th St., Boise........................342-1239 12th St., Boise......................424-3387 giraffelaugh.org

www.astepaheadpreschoolidaho.com

34 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

208.571.1713

www.musiclingua.com

01-2015

Academic Enrichment

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Education

Boise State University Literacy Center ..........................................462-2702 Education.boisestate.edu/literacy/ literacy-center/summer-literacy-academy/

Eagle Adventist Christian School “…where education meets application” • Elementary School (K - 8th Grade) • Pre-School, Full-Time/Part Time Child Care • Before & After School Care with Busing to Local Schools Eagle’s only NAEYC accredited childcare!

Montessori Preschool Excellent Support For Your Child’s Development And Early Education.

9626 West Victory in Boise

538 W. State St. Eagle, ID 83616

Certified Montessori Master Teacher

(208) 562-1420 MontessoriGardenBoise.com

1-2015

eagleadventistchristian.com eacc12345@gmail.com

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle...................................939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

Anita Wolberd 1-2015

Phone & FAX 939-5544

Carole’s Learning Center...................... 407-4796 Children’s School................................ 343-6840 Cloverdale Montessori School.............. 322-1200 Cole Valley Christian Schools............... 947-1212 Cooperative Preschool......................... 342-7479

ENROLL NOW! CALL TODAY AT 208-466-8451 www.NampaChristianSchools.com

*First-time enrollees or families returning after 90 days only. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Based on availability. Discount must be requested by the first week of enrollment. Locations listed only. Expires 3/31/15.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

1-2015

Boiseko Ikastola 1915 University Drive, Boise..343-4234 Boisekastola.org

CHRIST - CENTERED ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 35


Education

Unlock Your Child’s Full Potential at IDAHO DISTANCE EDUCATION ACADEMY

Early Learning Eagle Montessori 1400 Park Lane, Eagle....................................... 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com Foothill’s School of Arts and Sciences........................................ 331-9260 Friendship Celebration Preschool.............................................. 288-2404 Gem State Gymnastics Academy ............................................. 852-3220

Giraffe Laugh 9th St., Boise..................................................... 342-1239 12th St., Boise................................................... 424-3387 giraffelaugh.org

• Free Accredited Public Charter School • Recognized as a Five Star High Performing School (Highest Possible Rating) • Over 80% of I-DEA graduates earn college credit • Individualized instruction to meet Student’s academic needs and interests • Researched Based Curriculum • Attend school from home • Regional field trips and activities • Flexibility in scheduling

Kids Connect Preschool 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian..................................................... 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Kindermusik ....................................................................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Lakewood Montessori.............................................................. 331-3888 Learning RX............................................................................ 258-2077

Montessori Garden 9626 West Victory, Boise................................... 562-1420 MontessoriGardenBoise.com Nampa Christian Schools ....................................................................... 466-8451 NampaChristianSchools.com

Enrollment opens for the 2015/2016 school year on March 3, 2015

1-2015

BOISE RESOURCE CENTER 208.672.1155 • 8620 W. Emerald, Ste 190 • Boise, ID www.idahoidea.org 36 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Education

WE HELP KIDS

New Horizon Academy 1830 N. Meridian Road, Meridian...................... 887-3880 12692 W. LaSalle St.,Boise................................ 376-2690 11978 W. Ustick Rd.,Boise................................. 323-8900 155 E. Boise Ave., Boise.................................... 386-9108 newhorizonacademy.net Northview Montessori School 7670 Northview St., Boise.................................. 322-0152 northviewmontessorischool.com Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise............................. 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com Polaris Learning Center Locations in Eagle and Nampa (near the CWI campus) ....................................................................... 938-9830 www.polarislearning.net Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise....................................... 344-4270 Puentes.biz Riverstone International School...................................................424-5000

OVERCOME

UNIQUE CHALLENGES Learn how your child can reach their behavioral, social and academic potential through the medication-free, groundbreaking Brain Balance Program. Has your child been diagnosed with one of the following?

� ADD/ADHD � Dyslexia � Tourette’s � OCD

� Asperger’s � Learning Difficulties � ASD (Mild) � Processing Disorder

Give your child a boost of confidence by enrolling NOW!

Call Now & Schedule a FREE Consultation 377-3559

Appointments to fit your schedule. and/or attend our

FREE PARENT EDUCATION NIGHT

First & Third Thursday of each Month at 7pm. at the Brain Balance Center, RSVP 377-3559.

Receive a free copy of “Disconnected Kids” Private preschool positions still available for our 2014-2015 School Year At Our Nampa Campus

• Exceptional learning experiences for children six weeks through school age • Professional & experienced teachers • A curriculum that provides a variety of educational opportunities for all learning styles • Wide variety of scheduling options including half days and varied scheduling Call the location of your choice to schedule a tour or for more information

www.polarislearning.net

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

3210 E. Chinden Blvd. Ste #113 (NE Corner of Chinden & Eagle Rd.)

www.BrainBalanceEagle.com

01-2015

Nampa 466-1322

(near the CWI campus) 1-2015

Eagle 939-9830

208.377.3559

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 37


Education

Ordinary People. Extraordinary Results.

Early Learning Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise............................................ 385-7674 Rosehillmontessori.com SandCastles Children’s Learning Center 3214 Acre Lane, Boise....................................... 376-7846 Sandcastleslc.com St. Joseph’s Catholic School 825 W. Fort St., Boise........................................ 342-4909 Stjoes.com Treasure Valley Family YMCA.......................................... Ymcatvidaho.org Wesleyan Preschool & Kindergarten.......................................... 343-3778

Develop a life changing Christian worldview

1-2015

Online

TheAmbroseSchool.org Chinden & Locust Grove | Meridian | 208.323.3888

Idaho Digital Learning............................................................. 342-0207

Idaho Distance Education Academy (I-DEA) 8620 W. Emerald, Ste. 190, Boise...................... 672-1155 Idahoidea.org

Computers an afterschool necessity (NewsUSA) — Shopping for school supplies isn’t what it used to be. Sure, kids still need notebooks, binders and pens — but they won’t survive without the latest technology either, namely a computer. According to a recent survey commissioned by HP and conducted by Wakefield Research, computers become a significant part of homework assignments for children as young as 10 years old, and students aged 6 to 17 spend at least three hours a day on devices with Internet access. However, that much computer use at such a young age raises some concerns among parents. “If your child is about to hit double digits, computers are going to be a routine part of their afterschool homework,” explains Kevin Frost, Vice President, Volume Business Unit, HP. “HP shares parents’ online safety concerns.” Can kids have fun and be safe online? Most parents want to guarantee safety instead of hoping for it. The survey reported that more than 28 percent of parents have more faith in giving their child a credit card at the mall than leaving them home alone on a computer. In fact, over a third of parents surveyed believe children cruising the Internet unsupervised have more potential for danger than kids staying at a friend’s house without parental supervision. Despite these fears — and the reality that prolonged computer usage is the norm for many students — 66 percent of parents don’t take simple steps to protect their children online, such as using parental control software, and 67 percent don’t block websites they deem inappropriate.

38 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Education Parenting Education Eagle Montessori 1400 Park Lane, Eagle......... 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com

Private Schools Ambrose School 6100 N. Locust Grove Rd., Meridian.... 323-3888 theamboseschool.com Boiseko Ikastola 1915 University Drive, Boise 343-4234 Boisekastola.org Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle........ 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com Eagle Montessori 1400 Park Lane, Eagle.................................. 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com

Foothills School of Arts and Sciences.... 331-9260 Lakewood Montessori......................... 331-3888

Public School Districts

Montessori Garden 9626 West Victory, Boise..... 562-1420 MontessoriGardenBoise.com

Boise School District........................... 854-4112 Caldwell School District...................... 455-3300 Kuna Joint School District #3............... 922-1000 Meridian Joint School District #2.......... 855-4500 Nampa School District #131............... 468-4600 Vallivue School District........................ 454-0445

Nampa Christian Schools ......................................... 466-8451 NampaChristianSchools.com Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise.................................. 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com Riverstone International School............ 424-5000

Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise.............. 385-7674 Rosehillmontessori.com

Tutoring Brain Balance Achievement Centers 3210 E. Chinden Blvd. Ste. 113, Eagle.................................. 377-3559 BrainBalanceEagle.com Tutor Doctor....................................... 922-6416

St. Joseph’s Catholic School 825 W. Fort St., Boise.......... 342-4909 Stjoes.com

BOISE’S BASQUE LANGUAGE IMMERSION PRESCHOOL

Under the education wing of the Basque Museum & Cultural Center Open to all children ages 3-6 • Small class sizes • Language immersion • Kindergarten preparedness • Music • Yoga • Dance • Field Trips

� Year-round program � Before & after school care � Foreign languages � Summer Camp for Grades 1-4

Open M - F 7:30 - 5:30 YEAR ROUND Part Time & Full Time

385-7674

4603 Albion - Boise

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

www.boisekoikastola.org

1-2015

3-2014

rosehillmontessori.com

ikastola@basquemuseum.com

1915 University Drive • 343-4234

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 39


Family Fun & Entertainment All About Games................................ 343-5653

Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise...........375-1932 Aquariumofboise.org Berry Ranch....................................... 466-3860 Bodies In Motion................................. 381-0587 Bogus Basin....................................... 332-5100 Boise Art Museum............................... 345-8330 Boise Philharmonic.............................. 344-7849

Ceramica........................................... 342-3822 Idaho Botanical Garden....................... 343-8649 Idaho IceWorld................................... 608-7716

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise.............336-9221 Idahoshakespeare.org Idaho Tennis Association...................... 322-5150 Jabbers.............................................. 442-5482

Morrison Center Family Theatre Series ..........................................426-1110 Morrisoncenter.com Nampa ATA Martial Arts..................... 546-9282 Pinz Bowling Center............................ 898-0900 Roaring Springs Waterpark.................. 884-8842 Wahooz Family Fun Zone.................... 898-0900 Warhawk Air Museum......................... 465-6446 Wings Center..................................... 376-3641

Field Trips & Day Trips

Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise...........375-1932 Aquariumofboise.org

Warhawk Air Museum......................... 465-6446 Zoo Boise.......................................... 384-4260

1-2015

Boise Environmental Education Center... 608-7300 Discovery Center of Idaho.................... 343-9895 Idaho Botanical Garden....................... 343-8649

Oregon Trail Interpretive Center 22267 Ore. Hwy. 86, Exit 302 from I-84, Baker City...... 542-523-1843 Oregontrail.blm.gov

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 41


Health & Wellness Chiropractors

Wellness Impact Nutrition Healthy Parents + Healthy Children =

A Bright Future!

Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic 300 Main St. Ste. 103, Boise 1560 N. Crestmont Ste. E, Meridian......................288-1776 chiroforliving.com

Counseling, coaching & educating with respect, care & compassion.

Dentistry

Deena LaJoie, MS, RDN, LD

Registered Dietitian-Nutritionist

• Pediatric Nutrition - Challenges / Intake Concerns • Child, Adolescent & Adult Weight Issues • Family Health / Disease Prevention & Management

Emergency Care Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center.....................................367-2121 St. Luke’s Pediatric Emergency Dept.-............................................381-2235

A healthier tomorrow starts today!

Fitness

Many health care plans now cover nutrition services

WellnessImpactNutrition.com 1-2015

208.250.5657

845 East Fairview Ave. #115 Meridian, ID 83642

Delta Dental of Idaho 555 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise...............................344-4546 deltadentalid.com

Bodies in Motion........................................................................381-0587 Boise Strong Mom......................................................................863-8726 Treasure Valley Family YMCA............................................ Ymcatvidaho.org Wings Center............................................................................376-3641

Mental Health Children’s Therapy Place.............................................................323-8888

Midwifery Lovelace OB/GYN and Midwifery/Kristi Rhodes...........................345-3136 Treasure Valley Midwives............................................................343-2079

CENTER FOR STEPFAMILY DEVELOPMENT

Counseling, CBRS

Anxiety, Depression, Grief, Trauma, Parenting

Education and support for divorced and remarried families

“In-home counseling for those that qualify”

Helping to create lasting positive change in marriages, families, and individuals through compassionate, ethical relationships

136 S. Academy Way Eagle

www.FCSmeridian.com

322-2908

1799 N. Lakes Place, Meridian (located directly behind Hastings)

888-5905

01-2014

email: center@stepfamilyhelp.com

42 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

1-2015

www.stepfamilyhelp.com

(208)

Accepting Medicaid and most Insurance plans

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Health & Wellness Pediatric Dentists

Rehabilitation Services

Dan Streeby DDS, Pediatric Dentistry 450 W. State St. Ste. 180, Eagle.................................. 939-0600 DanStreeby.com

Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian............................. 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Delta Dental of Idaho 555 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise................................. 344-4546 deltadentalid.com Dental Care for Kids........................... 888-7711 Meridian Smiles Dentistry & Orthodontics.................................. 893-5440

Treasure Valley Pediatric Dentistry 1564 South Times Square Lane, Boise.................................. 376-8873 tvpdsmiles.com

Pediatric Nutrition Wellness Impact Nutrition 845 E. Fairview Ave. #115, Meridian............................. 250-5657 WellnessImpactNutrition.com

Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888

Family Counseling Services ......................................... 888-5905 FCSmeridian.com

Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7451 W. Iron Drive, Boise.... 898-1368 320 11th Ave. South, Nampa............................... 466-1077 1710 N. Whitley Ste. C, Fruitland............................. 466-1077 Boisechatterbox.com Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888 Christian Clinical Concepts, LLC........... 475-1875

Specialists

Family Counseling Services ......................................... 888-5905 FCSmeridian.com

Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian............................. 898-0988 Advancedtherapycare.com

Speech Spot 2300 S. Orchard St., Suite B, Boise.................................. 908-6469 Boisespeechspot.com

Center for Stepfamily Development 136 S. Academy Way, Eagle.................................. 322-2908 Stepfamilyhelp.com

Strickland Ear Clinic.................375-HEAR (4327)

Specializing in women’s health and pediatric development in the Treasure Valley

1-2015

BOISE Call Anacker Clinic 300 Main St., Suite 103 of Chiropractic 287.2299 TODAY for your MERIDIAN Complimentary 1560 N. Crestmont, Suite E Consultation 288.1776

� Free Preschool and Articulation Screenings! � We have openings! � Individual Evaluations and Therapy � Small and Personal Setting � Accept Most Insurances

1-2015

2300 S. Orchard St, Suite B • Boise

208-908-6469 www.boisespeechspot.com

Special Needs

1-2015

Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian...898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Assisting Families of Children with Disabilities • Education • Health • Art • Advocacy 208.342.5884 or www.ipulidaho.org www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Boise Kids Program ..........................................376-7846 Mycpid.com

Brain Balance Achievement Centers 3210 E. Chinden Blvd. Ste. 113, Eagle...................................377-3559 BrainBalanceEagle.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 43


Special Needs Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7451 W. Iron Drive, Boise.....898-1368 320 11th Ave. South, Nampa................................466-1077 1710 N. Whitley Ste. C, Fruitland..............................466-1077 Boisechatterbox.com Children’s Therapy Place...................... 323-8888 Community Connections Inc................. 377-9814

Speech Therapy Language Therapy Occupational Therapy Free Screenings

Community Partnerships ..........................................376-7846 Mycpid.com Framework Learning............................ 890-0008 Gem State Developmental Center.......... 888-5566

Group Therapy

Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc. ..........................................342-5884 Ipulidaho.org Kindermusik ..........................................861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Lee Pesky Learning Center.................... 333-0008 Learning RX........................................ 258-2077

Speech Spot 2300 S. Orchard St., Suite B, Boise...................................908-6469 Boisespeechspot.com Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association ..........................................954-7448 Idahodownsyndrome.org

www.boisechatterbox.com

Three Locations: Boise Location: 208.898.1368 7451 W. Iron Drive Nampa Location: 208.466.1077 320 11th Ave. South Fruitland Location: 208.466.1077 1710 N. Whitley Ste. C

Specializing in Pediatric Therapy Services • • • •

No Waiting Lists Free Screenings Individual Therapy Therapy Preschool Monday—Thursday 9:00—11:30 12:30—3:00 • Payment Plans Available • Insurance Accepted

Improving quality of life one patient at a time...

Speech & Occupational Therapy Services

44 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

1-2015

We know your child’s communication and development is key to their personal, social and academic success. Chatterbox now of fers Occupational Therapy!

1-2015

Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center is the Treasure Valley’s primary choice for pediatric outpatient therapy because of the training and skills of our therapists, our style of therapy and unique programs.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Sports Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Ski Area...................................332-5100 Bodies In Motion........................................................................381-0587 Bronco Elite Athletics..................................................................389-9005 Idaho IceWorld..........................................................................608-7716

Martial Arts

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa..............................468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org

Swim Lessons

Gymnastics Gem State Gymnastics Academy ................................................852-3220

Mountain West Gymnastics 601 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................................869-1693 Mountainwestgymnastics.com Wings Center............................................................................376-3641

Bodies In Motion........................................................................381-0587 Nampa ATA Martial Arts............................................................546-9282 Meridian ATA Martial Arts..........................................................888-1855

Flow Aquatics............................................................................855-2212 Gem State Gymnastics................................................................853-3220

Tennis Idaho Tennis Association.............................................................322-5150

Youth Sports Treasure Valley Family YMCA............................................ Ymcatvidaho.org

“Where Champions Train”

Winter Session Starts January 5th Bring in this ad and receive a 10% discount off first months tuition Call for class times and schedule 208-869-1693 See why Mountain West is Idaho’s Junior Olympic Club of Year. All our coaching staff are safety certified by USA Gymnastics and have Background checks.

mountainwestgymnastics.com

1-2015

60 N. Cole Rd. • Boise • 869-1693

Parks & Rec Information Boise Parks & Recreation Department 384-4240 cityofboise.org/parks Caldwell Parks & Recreation Department 455-3060 cityofcaldwell.com/parks-and-rec Eagle City Parks Eagle City Hall – 939-6813 cityofeagle.org

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho State Parks & Recreation inquiry@idpr.idaho.gov parksandrecreation.idaho.gov Meridian Parks & Recreation Department 888-3579 meridiancity.org/parks_rec Nampa Parks & Recreation Department 468-5858 nampaparksandrecreation.org

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 45


List of Local Libraries & Branches Ada Community Library 10664 W. Victory Rd., Boise 362-0181, ext. 2 adalib.org/victory

Hidden Springs Branch of Ada Community Library 5849 W. Hidden Springs Dr., Boise 229-2665 adalib.org/hiddensprings

Boise Public Library 715 S. Capitol Blvd. 384-4340 boisepubliclibrary.org

Kuna Library 457 N. Locust Ave. 922-1025 kunalibrary.org

Caldwell Public Library 1010 Dearborn 459-3242 caldwell.lili.org

Lake Hazel Branch of Ada Community Library 10489 Lake Hazel Rd., Boise 297-6700 adalib.org/lakehazel

Eagle Library 100 N. Stierman Way 939-6814 eaglepubliclibrary.org Garden City Public Library 6015 Glenwood St. 472-2942 notaquietlibrary.org

Library! at Cole & Ustick 7557 W. Ustick Rd., Boise 570-6900 boisepubliclibrary.org Library! at Collister 4724 W. State St., Boise 562-4995 boisepubliclibrary.org

Library! at Hillcrest 5246 W. Overland Rd., Boise 462-4996 boisepubliclibrary.org Meridian Library 1326 W. Cherry Ln. 888-4451 mld.org Meridian Library at Silverstone 3531 E. Overland Rd. 884-2616 mld.org Nampa Public Library 101 11th Ave. S. 468-5800 nampalibrary.org Star Branch of Ada Community Library 10706 W. State St. 286-9755 adalib.org/star

*Contact your local library for storytime hours and other events

Support Directory Autism Spectrum Disorders Autism Society Treasure Valley Chapter.................. 336-5676 Idaho Asperger’s Support Group—support@idahoasg.org Blindness/Visual Impairment Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI)............................... 334-3220 Idaho State Talking Book Library........................... 334-2150 Deafness/Hearing Impairment Idaho Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.... 473-2122 Idaho Hands & Voices......................................... 789-9652 Idaho Sound Beginnings...................................... 334-0829 Idaho Speech, Language, Hearing Association....... 467-4829

Mental Health Idaho Association for Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health (or AimEarlyIdaho)...........................info@aimearlyidaho.org Idaho Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health................................. 433-8845 Children’s Mental Health, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare............... 334-0808 National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI), Boise Chapter..................................................... 376-4304 Muscular Dystrophy Muscular Dystrophy Association of Idaho............... 327-0107

Diabetes HODIA – Idaho Diabetes Youth Programs.............. 891-1023 Humphreys Diabetes Center: Boise................................................................. 331-1155 Meridian............................................................ 884-4220 Nampa.............................................................. 463-7364 Down Syndrome Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association.......... 954-7448 Epilepsy Epilepsy Foundation of Idaho............................... 344-4340

46 January 2015 | Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Advertising Index Aquarium at Boise.............................................. 33

Idaho Shakespeare Festival................................. 40

A Step Ahead Preschool..................................... 34

KinderMusik...................................................... 30

Advanced Therapy Care..................................... 44

Montessori Garden............................................ 35

Ambrose School, The.......................................... 38

Morrison Center................................................. 41

Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic............................ 43 Baby Belly Doula................................................ 31 Balance Dance Co.............................................. 31 Boise Ikastola..................................................... 39 Boise Montessori................................................ 48 Brain Balance Achievement Center...................... 37 Camp Meadowood Springs................................ 33 Center for Stepfamily Development...................... 42 Chatterbox Speech............................................. 44 Community Partnerships\Boise Kids Program.........44 Dance Allegro.................................................... 30 Eagle Adventist Christian School......................... 35

Mountain West Gymnastics................................. 45 Music Lingua..................................................... 34 Nampa Christian Schools................................... 35 Nampa Rec Center............................................. 45 New Horizon Academy...................................... 35 Northview Montessori School.............................. 38 Oregon Trail Interpretive Center......................... 41 Pat Harris School of Dance................................. 30 Polaris Learning Center....................................... 37 Rose Hill Montessori........................................... 39 Speech Spot LLC................................................. 43

Family Counseling Services................................. 42

St. Joseph’s Catholic School................................ 36

Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Centers................... 34

Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association........ 44

Idaho Distance Ed--I-DEA................................... 36

Treasure Valley Children’s Theater........................ 30

Idaho Parents Unlimited...................................... 43

Wellness Impact Nutrition................................... 42

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine & Resource Guide | January 2015 47


Idaho family rg 1 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you