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Smith County Fall 2011

www.besafechild.com

BeSafe Child

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What is Project Reach? 6 Apps Every Parent Should Have Are Your Kids Planking? New to NuVal? Help for Autism Foot Care for Kids

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Kids Meal A e e Fr

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BeSafe Child Magazine

Smith County Fall 2011


BeSafe Community number one concern. Just because she climbed out of her crib does not mean she is ready to move to a toddler bed.

Dear BeSafe, my toddler somehow got out of her crib, opened her bedroom door, walked into the laundry Try the following: room where I was, and said, • Lower the mattress as “Hi Mommy.” I am freaking much as possible out! How in the world did • Try removing the she do that? And, more bumper pads. Often kids importantly, now what? will climb on them and Nicole Young get the boost they need (this was how our child kept climbing out of his crib). • Install a crib tent. These seem to be inexpensive (around $50). However, I have never used one and Nicole, thank you so much cannot offer an expert for writing BeSafe. We have opinion. done some research, and Many experts recommend a having faced this problem ourselves, we have a couple new bed when your child is of tips to offer on crib safety closer to three years of age. If your child is potty trained, and appropriate timing on is a great time to transition moving your toddler to a so that he/she can get out “big kid bed”. of bed to use the potty. It is There is no perfect age important to remember not to move your child to a toddler bed; however, if she to make the transition until is climbing out of the crib, your child is ready. Some experts say that firstborn obviously safety is our

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children may tend to resist the transition. Here are few suggestions to help make the transition: • Throw a “big kid bed” party • Take your toddler shopping with you to pick out sheets or bed. • If your toddler gets out of bed at night, make sure you promptly return her to her own bed. • Don’t be afraid to shut your child’s bedroom door and use baby monitors once again. Most importantly, don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work the first time. Third time is the charm, right?

Smith County Fall 2011

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editor’s letter

It wasn’t long before our decision to become

publishers, that Stephanie and I were sitting in our living room watching an episode of “Parenthood” on NBC which, quickly by the way, became our favorite show. For the first time in years, we watched as the tv family acted out dramatic displays of childhood blunders and teenage mischief. The more interesting the show became, the further we sunk into the couch. It didn’t take long before she and I looked at each other during a commerical and decided that we needed to network with people who knew exactly what we were going through . . . other parents. So we set off on our journey to figure out exactly what to do next. We thought about having a game night with other adults our age who had children, but the games were never played. Why? Well because there was homework to do, reading to observe, dinner to cook, messes to clean, lunches to make, baths to take and dogs to walk. It was on one of those walks that our middle son, Landon asked a question that I had absolutely no answer to, that I realized were our future rested. It would become our mission to enhance the parent-child relationship by assuming ownership of BeSafe Child Publications. Since 1994, BeSafe Child Magazine has been a trusted resource for the parents of East Texas’ children. Stephanie and I, two East Texas natives, decided it was time to transition the magazine into a social network where parents could connect with teachers, the community and their children.

With the help of Jerry Woolverton and the great people at Texas Bank and Trust, our dream has begun to be realized. So here is what you can expect from our magazine in the very near future: an interactive website with local events, new layout and content,contests, discounts to local family-friendly businesses, featured writers to include kids themselves, so that we get a glimpse of their world through their own words. We look forward to this new venture and hope that you will come along for the ride.

kid talk exclusive

Parents, have your children write in and tell us what they are most afraid of. Email to: info@besafechild.com Write to: BeSafe Child Publications 1815 Everglades Dr. Tyler, TX 75703

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BeSafe Child Magazine

Smith County Fall 2011

Chris

ChrisTaylor, Editor-in-Chief


What’s INSIDE 6

HOPE FOR AUTISM

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NEW TO NuVAL?

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SIX APPS EVERY PARENT SHOULD HAVE

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9 IS YOUR CHILD PLANKING? 10 A DON’T MISS BeSAFE CONTEST 11 SPOTTING DEHYDRATION 12 PROJECT REACH 13 SMASHBURGER’S KID’S DRAW 14 COULD HOME DAYCARE BE BETTER FOR YOUR Page 8 LITTLE ONE? 15 EAST TEXAS DAYCARE GUIDE On The Cover: 18 NETWORKS/STAR Austin, Hudson, Caitlyn and Landon Taylor 19 BETTER EDUCATION, BRIGHTER FUTURE 20 DADVICE Cover Photo By: 21 KID’S MOST IMPORTANT 903-920-3001 TRANSPORTATION www.morgangauntt.com www.facebook.com/ 22 COW’S MILK ALLERGIES morgangauntt

Smith County Fall 2011

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Applied Behavior Analysis Could Help With Autism by Jim Ayers As a parent, the last thing you want to believe is that there is something wrong with your child. But if you suspect that your child might be delayed in developing the way they should be, waiting is the worst thing you could do. Recent research supports the fact that a child’s early experiences alter the brain dramatically, yet many doctors are still prescribing a “wait-and-see” strategy for toddlers who might later be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or another developmental disorder. That being said, early intervention, if warranted, should never be postponed. Even the youngest children are able to improve their skills in social communication, language and other important skills through structured ABA therapy programs. Dr. Temple Grandin persevered to turn her autistic traits into strengths and become a highly contributing member of society. When reviewing the book Children and Autism, by Ennio Cipani, PhD, she stated, “Both parents and professionals who work with young children with Autism should read this book. Many hours of intensive one-to-one behavioral therapy can bring about great improvements, especially when it is started at an early age. The worst thing that can be done with an autistic 2 or 3-year-old is nothing. When I was two, I had all the full blown symptoms of Autism. By age two and a half I was in a therapy program for many hours a week. If my parents left me in the corner at a young age, I would not be a college professor today.” And at Metro Parent’s 2010 Living with Autism Workshop, Dr. Grandin’s number one strategy she offered was, “Get professional services like Early Intervention and Applied Behavior Analysis in place for your child as soon as you suspect he or she may be autistic.” The younger a child starts therapy, the more benefits they will realize if they have Autism or an6

BeSafe Child Magazine

other developmental disorder. Paying close attention to the warning signs in babies and toddlers is crucial, as it will affect how they live the rest of their lives. If Autism is caught in infancy, treatment can take full advantage of the young brain’s remarkable plasticity. But no matter your child’s age, don’t lose hope. Treatment can reduce Autism’s effects and help your child learn, grow, and thrive. Applied Behavior Analysis, commonly referred to as ABA, is the only therapy endorsed by the Unites States Surgeon General as the most effective treatment for individuals diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. ABA is also endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Psychiatric association, the National Academy of Sciences, ABA International, Parents of Autistic Children, American Academy of Speech-Language Pathologists, and many more professional organizations, including federal and state government agencies. ABA is highly effective as evident by over 40 years of research demonstrating that the techniques of Applied Behavior Analysis result in creating and sustaining meaningful changes in the behavior of individuals. The bottom line is that if you find that your child is not meeting the developmental milestones set out by the American Academy of Pediatrics, you should seek a specialist to assess your child and start therapy as soon as possible if needed. If they don’t find anything to be concerned about, you’ve only spent a small amount of time ruling out something very important that may affect your child for the rest of their lives. But if they confirm a developmental delay, you are able to get your child help at the earliest juncture. The difference you will make in your child’s and family’s life will be invaluable.

Smith County Fall 2011


Using the NuVal System to Encourage Health Family Eating When going to the grocery store, it often feels like we’re in a race against time. We rush through the store getting our weekly groceries before the clock runs out. While we strive to get the most nutritious products for our family, it can be difficult when there’s little time to compare the nutritional value of every product. Let’s face it, even if we did have time to compare each product, the food labels can get confusing. With terms like no sugar added, sugar free, fat free and high in fiber; it can get frustrating trying to pick the best item for our family. At Brookshire’s and Super 1 Foods we have a tool that lets you pick the most nutritious products in a short amount of time. NuVal is a scoring system that places food’s overall nutritional value on a scale between 1 and 100. Simply put, the higher the NuVal score, the higher the product’s overall nutrition. You can find these scores located in the blue double hexagon on the price tag. NuVal produces the scores by entering the information from the nutrition facts panel and the ingredients list into an algo-

rithm, called Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI). The ONQI takes into account 30 different nutrients that affect the health of the general public, including sodium, fat, carbohydrates, proteins, cholesterol, fiber, antioxidants and a number of vitamins and minerals.

When using NuVal, there is not a particular score to shoot for; rather it’s a tool to help you compare items. If you normally buy a cereal that scores a 10, try to find one that scores a little higher, like a 17. Just remember the higher the score, the better the overall nutrition of the product. The NuVal system is not a diet and should not take place of any dietary recommendations provided by your doctor. NuVal is a quick and simple tool to help you pick the most nutritious foods for your family. If you have any questions about NuVal, you can contact Brookshire’s Consumer Nutrition Specialist at askbrooke@brookshires.com or 903-266-2421.

Don’t forget Fit City Day in the Park on Saturday, October 1st from 8am until noon at Bergfeld Park! www.fitcitytyler.com

Helping Young Minds Soar! www.adventuresinlearning-tx.com One Of The Largest Selections Of Educational Material For Parents And Teachers In East Texas

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Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

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Once you become a parent, life is definitely busier. But the good news is, if you know where to look, a few tools can make the day-to-day a bit easier. Liz Zack, suburban mom of two, is editorial director of Pregnancy & Parenting for iVillage.com, the largest community for women online. Here, Liz shares the six mobile apps that help her in her daily routine. Fooducate: A food label may say the ingredients are “all natural” but what does that really mean? This app gives you the lowdown on the foods gracing your grocery list and helps locate alternatives if you need them. Color-coded grades show how your shopping cart stacks up nutritionally. iTriage: When you’re away from home and someone in your family feels sick, it can be difficult to know how seriously to take the symptoms or who to turn to. Fortunately, the iTriage app provides information about potential causes and treatments as well as directions to the nearest ER, doctor or pharmacy. iVillage: Need an answer right away? You can rely on this onestop app for both expert info and real-mom answers to anything from “is this fe-

ver too high?” to “what foods shouldn’t I feed my 10-month-old?” Essential for today’s on-the-go moms and dads. Peapod: From reading nutritional labels to conducting price comparisons, shopping via this app is just like being in the physical store, but without the cranky kids and the cart with the squeaky wheel. Scan the bar code of an empty shampoo bottle or use keywords to find the juice your kids are raving about and instantly add it to your order. Sit or Squat: If you’ve ever been out with a toddler who needs to pee, you will know the value of this app, which helps you locate the nearest restroom. 2Do: Tasks Done In Style: Moms are known for multitasking, but that mental energy can come at a price. Enter this app, which will take a chunk of the stress out of juggling your responsibilities. It syncs the tasks and to-do’s from existing management systems, plus it prioritizes your tasks. Your basic calendar can’t advise you to go to the dry cleaner’s before the grocery store, but this app will. (www.napsnet.com)

Kick Back. Enjoy.

Dial 2-1-1 for Information & Referral Your link to health and community services. ■ Fast, Free, & Confidential ■ 24-hours/day, 7-days/week ■ All Languages ■ Dial 2-1-1 or 903-534-9977 Hablamos Español

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East Texas Area Information Center, a program of the United Way of Smith County, is a part of the Texas Information and Referral Network, a program of the Health and Human Services Commission.

Smith County Fall 2011

www.unitedwaytyler.org


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any parents are already familiar with the term “planking.” It began with two young travelers bored with traditional photo poses in the earlier part of the decade, so they would pose themselves as straight as a “plank”, hence the name, in well, some mighty peculiar places. “Owling,” where the player would have a photo taken while crunched down in an “owl-like” position soon followed. Years later, the photos began to hit the internet and on to social media sites and that was all that was needed for it to become an instant success. As it gained interest, adults and younger children began to plank in places that would make the average person grin. But then, as competitiveness won out, photos of more serious planking activities began to surface, such as on billboards and buildings. While most websites that promote planking such as www. plankinglol.com have statements that remind players to “plank safely,” will East Texas children know how to participate in the new craze, without causing themselves harm? Planking and owling could not only be dangerous as younger children seek to impress their older siblings and friends, but many argue that it may teach younger kids that it is perfectly okay to keep secrets from old mom and dad. Parents we spoke with were mixed on the issue, with some arguing that this is just the next big thing and that as long as we parents do our job, no harm should come. Others were a little more skeptical

Are Your Children Planking? By Chris Taylor, Editor-In-Chief, BeSafe Child Magazine

and felt the issue should be given more attention. So that begs the question, how exactly should we respond? Do we hyperventilate and bark curfew orders? Do we place homing devices inside their tennis shoes? No, I think we address this issue just like we have all others, with a sense of humor and a desire for safety of course. Instead of trying to scare your child into compliance, which rarely seems to work, I have personally found that I can take the fun out of the “if Dad doesn’t know” activities by actually giving my kids permission to participate (this obvisouly doesn’t work in all cases folks). Describing the activity in full detail takes a lot of the mystery out of it and even a little of the so called fun. I’ve heard that the experts call this process “demystification.” As the theory goes, such a practice creates an open door for our kids to communicate with us and actually teaches them to make better choices because we have the opportunity to educate before it gets dangerous. And because we seem more “open” to the idea they are having, they don’t just tune us out. For me, its no different than getting my son his first knife. We all know the anxiety we feel when turning a sharpened stainless steel blade over to a boy with a big

smile on his face. But who knows, a little demystifying might mean the difference between safe and sound and E.R. bound. Bottom line moms and dads is this: talk to your kids about planking, owling and well, anything else you think they might be involved in. We all remember how difficult peer pressure was in school. So maybe we try to avoid being aggressive or passing judgement and shoot for a new approach. If nothing else, it will show them that you know what is going on in their social circle and that you are going to be there right along with them for their journey through childhood. BeSafe Child Magazine was glad to have posted one of the first local articles on planking on its website in July. Since then, area media outlets have provided excellent information on the subject, but we want to know what other East Texas parents think about planking and/or owling. Head on over to www.facebook.com/ besafepub and leave your thoughts for our parents to read.

Smith County Fall 2011

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BeSAFE Contest Alert! It’s simple! Be the family passes. All you over to www.facebook. post the best advice you parents or grandparents. get the most ‘likes’ November 1st, 2011 win!

first to win one of five have to do is head on com/besafepub and ever received from your The five posts which and ‘comments’ by

Kid Quotes

“Did you know my uncle Tony is driving around the country in a winning bagel?” - Sean, 5 “I’m going to have five children and name them cabbage, french toast, table, shower and chair.” -Skye, 6 “Today is election day, where we get to pick who our president is going to be. Oh, I hope they don’t pick me.” - Maddy, 4 (www.justb-byou.com) Add your child’s funny quotes on our Facebook or Twitter page

BeSafe Child With the mission of enhancing the parentchild connection, BeSafe Magazine is the only local resource for parents, teachers and the community that goes home directly with thousands of pre-school and school-aged children. Without our sponsors, we would not be able to fulfill this mission.

This spot could be yours! Tuesday - Friday 11-2 Lunch Thurs, Fri, Sat 5 -10 Dinner Find us on Facebook @ Sadler’s Kitchen Phone: 903.589.0866 10

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Want to be a BeSafe sponsor? Email us at info@besafechild.com or call the office at 903-561-6225 for more information.

Smith County Fall 2011


Keep an Eye On Dehydration

Your child’s softball team has made it to the playoffs.

They’re undefeated and ready to win it all. Usually, the focus isn’t on proper eating and drinking before the big game. But, you wouldn’t consider sending your kid to the game without all her gear -the glove, jersey or shoes, right? Drinks and snacks should be part of the gear, too. If your child doesn’t drink enough before the game, his body won’t be ready to perform at its peak. This is the playoffs – he needs to be at his best. Athletes should fuel their body with a high carbohydrate meal or snack and plenty of fluids (not carbonated, sugary sodas, though) 2 to 3 hours before practices and games. Did you realize your child’s body needs fuel just like a car? If you don’t have enough water, sodium, or carbohydrates, it could affect athletic performance. Athletes should begin all exercise sessions well hydrated. Hydrated means that your child’s body has enough water coming into it to replace the water going out. If they don’t drink enough fluids (water or sports drinks) before and after the big ball game, they could experience heat cramps, heat exhaustion or heat stroke. How do you know if your child is dehydrated (don’t have enough fluids going in)? Typically, they will begin to feel thirsty and irritable and as it gets worse, they could get a headache, or experience weakness, dizziness, cramps and more. To say the least, they won’t feel like finishing the big game. Here are some ideas about how to give your child’s body the fuel it needs when they’re headed to practice

or the big game. Have your child: 1. Eat a good pre-game meal about 2 to 3 hours before the start time. Two good meal ideas are ravioli with meat sauce, Italian bread, steamed vegetables, canned fruit and low-fat milk or baked chicken, rice, steamed broccoli, fruit yogurt and juice. 2. Drink water or sports drinks throughout the day of the game. Try to avoid carbonated, sugary and caffeinated drinks. 3. Eat salty foods like pretzels, crackers or peanuts as snacks.

If your child is on the run after school and doesn’t have time for a meal, pack some snacks in their backpack. Granola and cereal bars, dried fruit, oatmeal cookies and fig bars are good choices. It’s also important to talk to your child about the importance of staying hydrated and by observing their behaviors. Some kids who want to prove how tough they are may tell you they don’t need anything to drink, but you know best. Keep a watchful eye on their dietary habits throughout the day of the game, as it is also important to avoid overeating and overhydrating. If you can get your child to keep a diary of their diet on a piece of paper stuck to the family refrigerator, it will help everyone to see exactly what is consumed without guessing. For more information on this topic, visit www.gssiweb.com. Special thanks to Wendy Frizzell, BeSafe Child Contributing Writer.

Tyler Water Utilities 511 W. Locust

Tyler, Texas 75710

Office: 903-531-1230 Fax: 903-531-1259

email Water Utilities: WaterUtilities@tylertexas.com Smith County Fall 2011

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Smith County Fall 2011


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Smith Counties Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

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Guide to Licensed Child Care Centers by the Better Business Bureau

Choosing a Child Care Provider

Finding the right care for children is one of the most difficult tasks a parent faces today. With the shift towards single parenting and two income households, parents are increasingly being confronted with the need to find a reliable child care provider. A day care program should allow children to learn and play in a healthy, secure, and friendly environment. BBB offers the following tips when choosing a childcare facility: Check References Visit several centers and compare the types and quality of services available. Always go to see a center before registering your child, no matter how highly the center was recommended. Tour the entire facility.

Talk to the director, and visit classes, especially the ones your child will be in. You may want to make a list of questions in advance. Check the Facility Observe the caregiver(s) with children. Do they react enthusiastically to children’s discoveries and accomplishments? Do they respond quickly when a child is hurt or unhappy? Look at the center’s physical attributes. Check for cleanliness. Is the center decorated in a manner that is appealing to children? Is it colorful? Does the equipment/ furniture/playground look secure? Does the facility appear to follow safety guidelines? Making a Decision Compare what you saw during

your visits. The most important aspect of child care is the staff. Think about your feelings when you visited each center. Do the attitudes of the provider match your own attitudes about childcare? Make sure that you have a full understanding of the caregiver’s disciplinary procedures. Be sure that the center you choose has a current license and meets your needs for location, hours, and cost. Ask yourself: Would I feel comfortable leaving my child at the center? Trust your instincts. You are the best judge of what your child needs. And remember before doing business with any company, check their report for any negative experiences on bbb.org.

Could Home-Based Child Care Be For You? by Cindy Lee, former home-based daycare provider

Is your child showing signs of stress while at

Spend as much time researching all options traditional daycare? Maybe mainstream is wrong for and ensure your choice is based on good references. Inquire about your perspective providers ideas, values, their needs. religious views and discipline policy to Too much structure can be very ensure it is a good fit for your family. un-nerving for some children. Home If an individual keeps one-three daycare as an alternative to traditional children in their home, they should be options is very appealing to parents listed with the state. If an individual keeps who want their child to be in a warm more than four children in their home they and friendly home-like environment. should be registered. When registered, the Often, the group size is smaller provider is governed by the State of Texas than in center-based care and the and must meet all minimum standards consistency of having one person for a including background checks, CPR, and child to bond with becomes a key factor First Aid. These individuals must also in their development. acquire educational hours each year. Most home daycare is regulated by the They are also subject to random home state but no one directly supervises your provider’s activities, so it will be important to make occasional inspections. Parents can view inspection reports online at www.childcaresearch.org. unannounced visits. 14

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Smith County Fall 2011


Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Phone Capacity

Acute Children’s Montessori 1709 E. 5th St., Tyler 75701 Andy Woods Elementary Prime Time 809 Clyde Dr.,Tyler 75701 Bell Elementary Prime Time 1409 Hankerson, Tyler 75701 Boys and Girls Club at Andy Wood Elem. 1409 Hankerson, Tyler 75701 Boy and Girls Club at Bell Elem. 1409 Hankerson, Tyler 75701 Birdwell Elementary Prime Time 1919 S. Kennedy, Tyler 75701 Faithful Care Child Dev. & Learning Cntr. 1910 Bellwood Dr., Tyler 75701 First Christian Church Mothers Day Out 4202 S. Broadway, Tyler 75701 Good Sheppard Church Preschool 2525 Old Jacksonville Rd.,Tyler 75701 Grace Community Early Education Center 3215 Old jacksonville Rd., Tyler 75701 Green Acres Early Education Center 1607 Troup Street, Tyler 75701 Kids Kaleidoscope 3030 Copeland Rd., Tyler 75701 Kinder-Care Learning Center #266 2524 McDonald Rd., Tyler 75701 Kisha’s Learning Academy #2 3108 Bellwood Rd., Tyler 75 Kingdom Academy Daycare 1000 Augusta Ave.,Tyler, 75701 Peete Prime Time 1511 Bellwood Drive, Tyler 75701 Stepping Stone School 3105 University Blvd. Tyler 75701 Tiny Town 111 West 5th Street, Tyler 75701 Trinity Lutheran Child Development 2001 Hunter, Tyler 75701 Tyler Christian Preschool 714-A Shelly Dr., Tyler 75701

526-7084

17

593-7729

60

592-5529

40

Hours & Days Open

Drop Ins

After School Care

Ages Accepted

Zip Code 75701

Angela’s Little Angels 2014 W. Erwin St. Tyler 75702 Bridging The Gap Acceleratory 625 N. Glenwood, Tyler 75702 Bright & Early Learning Center 2916 Old Chandler Hwy., Tyler 75702 Brighter Day Christian Academy 3409 Chandler Hwy., Tyler 75702 Building Blocks Child Care 902 N. Border, Tyler 75702 Child Development & Treatment Center 1722 W. Front Street, Tyler 75702 Ebenezer’s Day Care Center 1101 W. Queen St., Tyler 75702 Boys and Girls Club at Caldwell 331 South College, Tyler 75702

593-9211

70

593-9211

70

597-5466

30

596-8220

61

581-7936

167

592-5152

35

593-3859

150

525-1104

256

597-3063

125

597-9805

118

526-5949

31

526-1487

85

593-7327

30

566-1851

420

526-7505

270

593-7465

136

534-9987

155

Mon.-Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon.-Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon.- Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon - Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon.-Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon.-Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon.-Fri. 8:30-2:30 Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 9:30-1:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:15-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 5:45-6:30 Mon. - Fri. 6:00-6:00 Mon - Fri 3:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:15 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00

No

Yes

18 mos. - 6 years

Yes

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

6 wks. - 12 years

Yes

No

Birth - 6 years

No

No

3.5 years - 5 years

No

Yes

2 mos. - Grade 5

No

Yes

6 weeks - Grade 5

No

No

18 mos. - Kindergarten

Yes

Yes

14 mos. - 12 years

Yes

Yes

Toddler - School Age

Yes

Yes

6 wks. -12 yrs.

Yes

Yes

Pre-K - School Age

No

No

Birth - 12 years

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - 12 years

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - 12 years

Yes

Yes

Infant - School Age

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

Yes

Yes

6 mos. - 13 years

Zip Code 75702 Mon.-Sun. 5:30-12:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 8:00-12:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:00

Yes

No

18 mos. - 13 years

Yes

No

Infant - School Age

63

24 Hours

Yes

Yes

18 mos. - 13 years

597-5067

107

No

Yes

18 mos. - 13 years

592-4180

140

No

Yes

Birth - Grade 5

593-9211

106

Mon. -Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00

No

Yes

Students Only

597-7735

51

592-6981

72

595-6646

29

595-4155

37

597-9394

Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

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Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Phone Capacity

Boys and Girls Club at Douglass Elem. 1508 N. Haynie Ave., Tyler 75702 Family Learning Center of Tyler 1508 N. Haynie Ave., Tyler 75702 Greater Purpose Youth Center 3200 Garden Valley Rd, Tyler 75702 Jones Elementary Prime Time 2521 W. Front, Tyler 75702 Kidz Depot Learning Academy 2420 N. Border, Tyler 75702 New Brighter Day Christian Academy 3409 Chandler Hwy.,Tyler, 75702 New Life Learning Center 1202 N. NW Loop 323, Tyler 75702 Ninos de Promesa Preschool 301 Ferguson W., Tyler 75702 North Tyler Child Day Nursery 2624 B. Carter Blvd., Tyler 75702 Paula’s Outreach Center 1700 N. Moore, Tyler 75702 Ramey Elementary Prime Time 2105 Garden Valley Rd., Tyler 75702 Te Te’s Lil’ Angels Infant Care 2323 W. Erwin Str., Tyler 75702 The Faith Learning Center 215 W. Bow, Tyler 75702 Tyler Day Nursery 2901 West Gentry Pkwy., Tyler 75702 Tyler 1st UMC Kidz Place 2107 Woodlawn, Tyler 75702 T.I.S.D. Child Care 1818 North Confederate, Tyler 75702 Visions of Learning Child Care Center 513 South Fleishel, Tyler 75702 YMCA -The Learning Center 225 South Vine, Tyler 75702

593-9311

40

595-0012

44

747-3705

32

531-3848

20

593-5437

33

595-4155

37

526-7676

78

595-1021

55

592-3671

112

592-2471

33

597-5347

20

533-9443

25

592-0502

55

592-4861

136

593-1169

93

590-4020

34

533-0812

31

593-7327

85

Hours & Days Open Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon - Fri 7:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon - Fri 6:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-5:30 Mon. - Fri. 5:30-5:30 Mon. - Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:30-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00

Drop After School Ins Care

Ages Accepted

No

Yes

Students Only

No

No

Birth - School Age Pre-K - School Age

Yes

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - 13 years

Yes

Yes

Infant - Pre-K

No

Yes

6 weeks - 5 years

No

No

Pre-Kindergarten

No

No

Toddler - School Age

No

No

18 mos. - 11 years

Yes

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

Infants - 17 mos.

Yes

Yes

18 mos. - 12 years

No

No

6 weeks - 5 years

Yes

Yes

Birth - 4 years

No

No

6 weeks - 4 years

Yes

Yes

Infant - Pre-K

Yes

Yes

2 year - 12 year

Zip Codes 75703, 75704, 75705, 75707 Creative Kids Learning Center 420 West Reick Rd., Tyler 75703 Boys and Girls Club at Cumberland Acad. 8225 S. Broadway, Tyler 75703 Boys and Girls Club at Jack Elementary 1900 Balsam Gap Ln., Tyler 75703 Boys and Girls Club at Owens Elementary Saline Creek Road, Tyler 75703 Boys and Girls Club at Rice Elementary 409 Carriage Dr., Tyler 75703 Gresham Heights Learning Center 15945 FM 2493, Tyler 75703 Kids R Life Child Care Center 18535 Hwy 69 S., Tyler 75703 Little Peoples School 5210 Holly Tree, Tyler 75703 Live Oak Child Care Center 2022 Colston Drove, Tyler 75703 Oak Hill Montessori School 6720 Oak Hill Blvd., Tyler 75703 Oak Tree Academy LLC 6321 New Copeland Rd., Tyler 75703 Rice Elementary Prime Time 409 Carriage Drive, Tyler 75703 Shiloh Road Learning Center 1201 Shiloh Rd., Tyler 75703 The Young Shall Grow Childcare Center 16625 CR 165, Tyler 75703 Tyler Little Red School House 6611 South Broadway, Tyler 75703 USA Planet Kids (formerly Taylor Garden School) 5330 New Copeland Rd. Tyler 75703 Woods Elementary Prime Time 3301 Fry Str., Tyler 75703 Dixie Prime Time 213 patton Lane, Tyler 75704 Orr Elementary Prime Time 3101 Orr Drive, Tyler 75704

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Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

561-3120

136

593-9211

77

593-9211

136

593-9211

150

593-9211

116

581-5141

75

839-2202

154

509-8904

130

509-3003

38

561-1002

100

581-4075

119

561-6713

65

561-1559

186

561-2355

17

561-0746

175

561-3551

200

593-7327

70

593-6979

50

593-3954

25

Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 9:30-1:30 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 9:00-2:30 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-6:10 Mon. -Fri. 6:45-5:45 Mon - Fri 3:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00

Yes

Yes

12 mos. - 12 years

No

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - 13 years

Yes

No

Infant - School Age

No

No

Preschool - 2-5 years

No

No

Infant - School Age

No

No

Toddler,Pre-k,School Age

No

No

12 mos. - 6 years

Yes

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

12 mos. - 12 years

Yes

Yes

18 mos. - 12 years

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - Grade 5

No

Yes

18 mos. - School Age

Yes

Yes

School Age

Yes

Yes

Students Only

Yes

Yes

Students Only


Name, Address (Listed by Zip Code)

Hours & Phone Capacity Days Open

Kissam Prime Time 12800 St. Hwy 64 East, Tyler 75705 Faith Academy 10645 St. Hwy 64 East, Tyler 75707 The Growing Stick Learning Center 2700 Willard St., Tyler 75707 Fairwood UMC Child Care Center 1712 Old Omen Rd., Tyler 75707

521-9590

65

565-0404

50

534-0601

86

566-8359

102

Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 8:00-3:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00

Drop After School Ins Care

Ages Accepted

Yes

Yes

Call for information

No

No

Pre-K - School Age

No

Yes

18 mos. - 12 years

No

Yes

6 weeks - 13 years

Zip Codes 75708, 75709, 75750, 75757, 75762, 75765 My Little Friends Daycare 11901 FM 3270, Tyler, 75708 ABC Preschool Inc. 13931 St. Hwy 31, Tyler 75709 All About Love 12831 St. Hwy 31, Tyler 75709 Brasswel Academy 300 East Longview, Arp 75750 Boys and Girls Club At Bullard Elem. 2008 Panther Crossing, Bullard, 75757 Bullard Early Education. 111 North Rather St., Bullard 75757 First Baptist Ch. Hand-n-Hand Preschool 1001 FM 2813, Flint 75762 Jackson Prime Time 16406 FM 2767, Tyler 75765

877-3877

36

593-9410

222

593-9788

27

859-2315

17

593-9211

60

894-7222

170

839-4886

96

593-7327

35

Mon. - Fri. 7:00-5:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:30 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon - Fri 3:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 9:00-2:30 Mon - Fri 3:00 - 6:00

Yes

Yes

12 mos. - 5 years

No

Yes

Birth - 12 years

Yes

Yes

18 mos. - 13 years

No

Yes

18 mos. - School Age

No

Yes

School Age

No

Yes

6 weeks - 11 years

No

No

6 weeks - 13 years

Yes

Yes

Pre-K - School Age

No

Yes

Birth - School Age

No

Yes

School Age

No

Yes

Infant - School Age

No

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

18 mos. - 4 years

No

Yes

6 wks. - 10 yrs.

No

Yes

6 mos. - School Age

No

No

18 mos. - School Age

Yes

Yes

Birth - School Age

Yes

Yes

Students Only

No

Yes

6 weeks - 11 years

No

Yes

Birth - 13 years

Yes

Yes

18 mos. - Grade 6

Yes

Yes

6 weeks - 12 years

No

Yes

Headstart - Grade 5

Zip Codes 75771, 75790, 75791 Apple Tree Learning Center 1420 S. Main, Lindale 75771 Boys and Girls Club at Velma Penny 1000 Mt. Sylvan, Lindale, 75771 Grace Community of Tyler Early Ed. Ctr. 15564 Woodsprings Rd., Lindale 75771 Lindale First UMC Prime Time 402 West Hubbard, Lindale 75771 St. Luke’s Episcopal School 16292 FM 849, Lindale 75771 Sweet Pea Retreat 11799 Cherokee Way, Lindale, 75771 Toy Town Preschool 610 South Boyd Street, Lindale 75771 Sonshine Day Care of Chapel Hill 12138 FM 3226, Arp 75790 Crayon Campus 428 Hwy 110 North, Whitehouse 75791 Cain Elementary Prime Time Hwy 110 South, Whitehouse 75791 First Baptist Children’s Learning 801 East Main Street, Whitehouse 75791 Momas House Inc. 802 West Main Street, Whitehouse 75791 New Generations Learning Center 14172 Hwy 110 South, Whitehouse 75791 Tyler Metro Children’s Center 14186 Hwy 110 South, Whitehouse 75791 YMCA Whitehouse Community Branch 301 Terry Street, Whitehouse 75791

881-9921

94

593-9211

75

882-8440

151

593-7327

35

881-8733

65

881-8980

23

881-9494

80

566-2995

22

839-8607

26

839-7666

30

839-4840

144

839-6789

119

561-5833

204

561-0253

165

758-3535

60

Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:00 Mon - Fri 7:00 - 6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 8:30-12:30 Mon. - Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-5:30 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-5:45 Mon. -Fri. 6:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 6:30-5:45 Mon. -Fri. 7:00-6:00 Mon. -Fri. 3:00-6:00

Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

17


NETWORKS/STAR PROGRAM What does NETWORKS STAR have to offer?

What Is Networks STAR?

 In home family counseling, free of charge.  Around the clock crisis intervention.  Conflict resolution.  Links to community education and outreach.  Professional, courteous staff who provide timely access to services through intake, assessment and case follow-up.

The STAR program offers free, preventive, short-term services for youth and their families. In additon to assisting youth and their families in mastering new skills through skills based training, our staff helps to reduce the occurrence of truancy, runaways, family conflict and delinquent behavior. The program helps families resolve problems within the home. Anyone can make a referral to the NETWORKS STAR Program and the process is easy. Phone: (903) 581-2835 Fax: (903) 581-2810 24Hour Line: 1-866-630-3551 Mail: NETWORKS STAR 2624 Kensington Dr. Ste 113 Eligibility: Services:  Youth, ages 0-17  Intake and screening Tyler, TX 75703  Runaway  Crisis intervention Cualquier persona puede referir a otra al programa Es Truancy  Family counseling trella (Start Program), el proceso es muy sencillo.  Family Conflict  Skills training Numero telefonico: (903) 581-2835  School Groups  Linking with resources Numero de FAX: (903) 581-2810  Court Ordered Youth  Youth skills training 24Hour Line: 1-866-630-3551 in school Mail: NETWORKS STAR 2624 Kensington Dr. Ste 113 UNIVERSAL CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION Tyler, TX 75703

We serve Smith, Wood, Henderson, Van Zandt, Kaufman, Navarro, & Ellis Counties The NETWORKS STAR Program Serves Youth Ages: 0 - 17.

What is UCAP? Universal Child Abuse Prevention, or UCAP, is a program funded by the Texas Department of Family Protective Services that is designed to provide information and activities to all members of the community in an effort to prevent child abuse and neglect.

UCAP

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU SUSPECT CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT?  Do listen to the child  Don’t walk away  Don’t try to investigate on your own  Do report reasonable suspicions by calling the 24-hour Abuse Hotline, 1-800-374-6058 or your local law enforcement agency. Que puede usted hacer si sospecha de abuso o neglicencia infantil?  Escuche al menor.  No le de la espalda.  No trate de investigar solo.  Reporte sospechas razonables liamando a la linea telefonica de 24 horas, 1-800-374-6058 o bien a la agencia policial local.

We Are Funded By The Texas Department of Family And Protective Services. 18

BeSafe Child Magazine

Smith County Fall 2011


Better Education, Brighter Future In Smith County alone, approximately 8,000 children spend an average of 36 hours a week in some type of childcare arrangement. Studies have repeatedly shown that high-quality childcare – care that provides a safe, stable and stimulating environment – helps children enter school ready to learn. Yet, many children enter school already behind and once behind, very few catch up. On September 1, 2011, minimum training standards for licensed childcare providers will increase to 24 hours of initial training, 8 hours of which must be completed before assuming any classroom responsibility. The remaining 16 hours of training m ust be completed within 90 days of hire. Annual training requirements are also increasing; new legislation requires 24 hours of annual training for childcare providers and 30 hours for center directors. Since 1996, Champions for Children has been the motivating force behind a coordinated community effort to design and implement progressive programs to help at-risk children, parents and childcare providers. Champions’ employs two Early Childhood Specialists who provide evidence-based training and mentor teaching in best classroom practices, behavior management and efficient operations for childcare providers. Champions’ professional trainings and workshops satisfy Texas Childcare Licensing clock hour / CEU requirements for childcare providers, preschool teachers and center directors. Preservice Training is available almost every Friday

and is free to Smith County childcare centers. Check out our website at www.championsforchildren.org for all scheduled trainings and workshops. Champions’ ensures that childcare / preschool teachers have affordable access to developmentally appropriate tools and materials for use in their classrooms in our Teacher Resource Room. The Resource Room maintains a large inventory of (free) supplies for teachers who wish to make their own classroom materials, including curriculum, die cuts, and project ideas, a substantial library of books and age-appropriate toys, puzzles and games, dramatic play equipment, blocks and manipulatives. The Resource Room is open Monday – Friday, 7:30AM – 3:30PM and the 3rd Saturday of each month, 9:30AM-1:30PM. Well-trained, competent and confident childcare teachers lay the foundation for the academic and social success of the children in their care. From professional teacher trainings and educational materials to individual consultations, Champions’ provides teachers, parents and caregivers with the tools, training and support they need to help children achieve their full potential. Champions for Children is a United Way of Smith County partner agency and is the ONLY non-profit agency in the area whose primary focus is quality, early childhood education. Champions’ provides services to children, families, childcare centers and preschool teachers in Smith County and the 14 surrounding counties in East Texas. For more information regarding TX Senate Bill 260 go to http://e-lobbyist.com/gaits/text/297675

421 S. Bonner Ave., Tyler TX 75702 P (903) 592-1454 F (903) 592-2792 www.championsforchildren.org

Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

19


DADVICE

by Chris Taylor, Editor-In-Chief, BeSafe Publications

“Dadvice” is an editorial series designed to share stories about the necessary silliness of being a dad. Visit www.besafechild.com and share your story under the headline “Dadvice.” When I was a young kid, I spent many of my summers in Delhi, Louisiana. But this was no vacation. My Uncle Leon was what I called the “cookie man.” His job was to stock all the grocery stores with the dozens of delectable goodies that at that age, made my mouth water. Donuts, cakes, cookies, wafers, jelly-filled treats, you name it, he had it. I gladly got up every morning at five o’ clock and helped him stock each stop with a well-calculated number of baked goods and our day didn’t end until the truck was clean. At the time, I thought the motivation was the glazed honey bun my uncle would let me swipe just after lunch. It wasn’t until years later of cours, that I realized the real reason I looked forward to summertime. Uncle Leon was a man of great character. He taught me diligence, integrity, and about doing the job right, not to mention the reminder that work should be fun. I credit Uncle Leon with a lot of my work ethic and as I look back over time, I’ve come to understand that I would not be the person I am today without that time with him. Dads, the time has come that we make a concerted effort to spend time with our kids rather

than our iPhones and Blackberry’s. It seems that society has left many of us dads feeling like we don’t really know where our place is. We are now fixtures in the kitchen. We change diapers. We still change the oil in the car. We learned that glass cleaner has multiple purposes. We (although not always proudly), wear aprons and deliver cupcakes to the classroom. We hold our daughters when they cry, but are told to be “men” and not to cry ourselves. I’ve often wondered if these conflicts are sometimes the excuses behind which we hide, unsure of where to turn, or what to do next. In the midst of this role searching, I have learned that if there is one certainty, it is this: the father who takes time to be a “dad” knows his role. Often, it is as simple as listening. When my daughter needs something logistical from me like money, a ride to a birthday party or a new dress, she calls me “dad.” When she needs my affection, she calls me “daddy.” I’ve learned to pay attention to what name she calls out for, so that I know which of my services are needed. So let’s put down the newspaper. Turn off the game (and yes, this is hard for we college football fans). Put the phone where you can’t hear it. We will never sit on our front porches and regret the missed phone call, or the unsent email. We will however, regret the ball we didn’t catch, the game we were not there to play, the opportunity to connect with our children.

What’cha waitin’ for? OPEN 24 HOURS ACROSS FROM BROADWAY SQUARE MALL GRESHAM Old Jacksonville Hwy 561-2025 137 WSW LOOP 323, TYLER

561-7334

20

BeSafe Child Magazine

Smith County Fall 2011

Home of Hand Cut Steaks & Fall Off The Bone Ribs Tuesdays - Kids Eat Free 2101 E.S.E. Loop 323 509-0053 www.TexasRoadhouse.com


How Important Are Your Kids Feet? by Dr. Robert Lagman, D.P.M

Dr. Robert Lagman is a native East Texan, BeSafe Child contributing writer, and now practices podiatric medicine in Mandeville, Louisiana.

Proper foot care is important for people of all ages. This care should start early in life and the transition of toddler to student is especially important. At this age, children’s feet get exposed to a lot more stress and potentially more trauma. The foundation of good foot care is regular inspection of your child’s feet. As they get older they become more independent and you don’t always get to see their feet in the bath like you used to. It is very important to look regularly for foot problems such as ingrown toenails, infections, blisters, callouses, or other conditions that could signal a problem. Children will often hide these problems because they are afraid of treatment or they may not pay much attention to symptoms such as mild pain. Try to inspect their feet at least once a day. This is easiest at bath time or right after they put on their pajamas. These frequent inspections will help you catch problems early and will usually make treatment easier. Another key component to good foot care for your school age kids is good fitting shoes. Shoes help to take some of the stress off your feet during the daily activities while at school and after school. This starts with a proper fit. Kids’ feet can grow 1-2 sizes in a matter of months, so it is very important to assess this regularly. Always have your child stand in front of you with both shoes on when checking for proper fit. Try to feel the longest toe at the end of the shoe. There should be between 1-2cm of room at the end of the shoe. Not enough room will

put extra pressure on the toes and can cause pain and callouses. If there is too much room this can cause slipping in the shoes and may result in trauma to the toenails or blisters. Also, make sure the shoe is wide enough. This can be done by trying to pinch the material on the top of the shoe over the toes from side to side. If you cannot pinch a little of the material then the shoe is not wide enough. If you can grab the material easily then the shoe may be too wide.

Now if you have checked the shoes and decided that its time for a new pair of shoes, always go in the afternoon. This helps get a more accurate fit because the feet have had a chance to swell a bit during the day from normal activity. Even if you have the correct size, not all shoes are created equal. Everyone, including kids, needs to have proper support when on their feet. This is best achieved with a good running shoe. Flip flops, sandals, etc are convenient but are not meant to support or protect your feet during most activities. It’s okay to wear these types of shoes for short periods like going to the pool or the beach, but not for school or outings that will involve a lot of walking. Following these simple steps can improve the shape of your child’s feet and help them stay active and involved in all the activities that they wish to pursue. If there are any questions about their feet or even they way that they walk, get in to see your pediatrician or a podiatrist immediately to have them checked out.

1313 S.Vine ~ Tyler, TX 75701 903-526-AUTO 912 E. Palestine ~ Palestine, TX 75801 903-723-0500

www.insuremyauto.com Smith County Fall 2011

Local Agents Serving PROFESSIONAL Main Street INSURANCE America AGENTS

BeSafe Child Magazine

21


Spotting Cow’s Milk Allergies

Snack Smart No Bake Peanut Butter Granola Bars

2 Cups granola cereal 1 1/4 cups crispy brown rice cereal 1 cup uncooked quick-cooking oats 2 Tbsp chopped almonds 1/4 cup dried cranberries or dried blueberries 1/2 cup honey 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter 1 Tbsp canolo oil 1 tsp vanilla extract

In large bowl, combine granola, rice cereal, oats, almonds and dried berries; set aside. In small saucepan, stir honey, peanut butter, canola oil and vanilla over low heat for five minutes or until blended. Pour over cereal mixture, stirring until coated. Press into a lightly greased 9X13 inch pan. Press mixture down tightly with wax paper. Cover and cool before slicing.

Cow’s milk allergy (CMA) is a severe food allergy that typically affects infants and toddlers. Symptoms can include constant crying, throwing up, refusal to eat, and severe rashes, and results in a sick, undernourished baby and anxious, discourgaged parents. “Sometimes, when babies are diagnosed with colic or reflux, parents’s instincts often tell them that something else is wrong,” says Steven Yannicelli, Ph.D., vice president of medical and scientific affairs for Nutricia North America. “Parents of children w i t h cow’s milk allergy often complain that it required months of persistence and education to finally get their child correctly diagnosed and treated. This is why it’s so important to know the symptoms of a cow’s milk allergy. Common symptoms include: - Diarrhea two to four times a day for more than five to seven days and/or blood in the stool; - Vomiting beyond typical mealtime spit-up, especially if the baby also have difficulty swallowing; - Skin rash and/or eczema, especially if it occurs along with the other symptoms; Inconsolable crying for long periods of time every day; - Lack of proper weight gain; - Gassiness, when it occurs with the other symptoms; - Respiratory problems such as wheezing, struggling to breathe, and excess mucus in the nose and throat; and - Failure to thrive, due to dehydration, loss of appetite, and lack of energy that comes from a lack of proper nutrition. For more information and to use the Neocate Parent’s Toolbox and symptom checker, visit www.neocate.com.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Boy Scout movement was founded by Lord BadenPowell of England. His army experiences convinced him that British boys needed more physical training and experiences in outdoor life. 22

BeSafe Child Magazine

Smith County Fall 2011


Smith County Fall 2011

BeSafe Child Magazine

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BeSafeChild Magazine  
BeSafeChild Magazine  

Smith County - Fall 2011

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