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I N F I N I T Y

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BA (Hons) Photography 2012 Leeds College of Art


∞ Foreword Your Dad on a Skateboard

Thijs Groot Wassink wassinklundgren.com

Around the age of fourteen I had a short fling with skateboarding. I had just become friends with an eighteen year old skateboarder who seemed to master all the tricks, and I tried to imitate his moves endlessly. I did manage the ollie and kick-flip at some point (for those with no knowledge about skateboarding: they're different ways of jumping up in the air), but I never really mastered the halfpipe. I was just terrified of throwing myself down this U-shaped structure and never really got the balance right. It was always on my way home, or while lying awake at night, that I was convinced that the next time I would be able to do the trick right. However, every time I returned to the halfpipe I just could not do it.  What puzzled me was that it all looked so easy for my eighteen year old friend, so why couldn't I get it to work? I pondered this until one day my father found my skateboard in the back garden, and in an attempt at being funny, decided to show the family how to ride a skateboard. We all know what a dad on a skateboard looks like: not good. It looks uncomfortable and like hard work, really hard work. At that moment I realised why I hadn't been able to do something that looked so easy; why I hadn’t been able do these tricks that my friend pulled off with so much ease. It is because everyone who's really good at something, consciously or subconsciously, makes it look like it's the easiest thing in the world. Whilst someone like my father, who really didn't know what to do with a skateboard, made me see how difficult it actually is. Flipping through this catalogue reminded me of my eighteen year old friend. Because if there is one thing that all photographers in this book have mastered over the last three years, it is this: to make something terribly difficult (i.e. to put the world around you, including all those thoughts about this world, into a cohesive series of images) look like a piece of cake. While looking at all these images I no longer think of the troubles the photographers went through: the permissions they had to obtain, the cameras that failed them or the personal indecisiveness that troubled some for months. What I look at are many exciting stories and even more ideas that this new generation of photographers wants to show me. Some stories are close and personal, others are on big subjects or matters of beauty.  Luckily, even with all these stories told, there are still many more left untold.  And if you— the photographers—ever feel stuck while telling another story, just imagine your dad on a skateboard. It will make you realise you’re pretty well on your way to be the next big thing!


∞ Contents

08 George Beck

12 Claire Sawdon

16 Hannah Reynolds

20 Catherine Laura

24 James Hawley

28 Emily Bailey

32 Alice Hall

36 James Lester

40 Aisha Greenidge-Noorgat

44 Stuart Leckenby

48 Charys Elmer

52 Mindy Goose


56 Scott Salt

60 Sofia Coombs

64 Rory Doyle

68 Jack Turner

72 Tim Mellin

76 Daniele Fitzgerald

80 Chris Jackson

84 Ess Newton

88 Katherine Gregory

92 Aaron Hargreaves

96 Kyla Lynskey

100 Benjamin P. Smith


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George Beck Youth Club georgebeckphoto.co.uk george@georgebeckphoto.co.uk +44 (0) 7572 617 556

The Youth Club project focuses on the users of youth support services who, in the transitory stage between childhood and adulthood, are in a period in their life where they are often overlooked or demonised by wider society. Here by association, Beck also brings to light

the importance of these services (although set up by local authorities, largely run by charities) within our communities; the fact that their work largely goes unnoticed does no justice to their importance in guiding young people towards a successful start in adult life.


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George Beck Youth Club


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Claire Sawdon Project 01482 clairesawdon.com clairesawdon@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7821 213 981

Project 01482 takes its name from the area dialling code for the city of Hull, a city for which the telephone became not just a tool of communication but a symbol of independence. Depicting the steady decline of the public telephone kiosk and presenting it as an echo of a death of a wider cultural heritage. Sawdon

acknowledges the technical developments of the 21st Century but through exploring the remaining kiosks, recalls childhood memories of a time before mobile phones, emphasising the role of the past on shaping all of us and, the importance of one town’s history of independence.


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Claire Sawdon Project 01482


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Hannah Reynolds

hannahreynoldsphotography.co.uk photobyhannah@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7846 231 587

Embarking upon long-term projects, Hannah Reynolds’ practice centres on documenting facets of society and their inherent issues. In her latest body of work, Reynolds investigates the small East Anglian town of Newmarket, internationally renowned as the epicentre of Horse Racing. With one in every three of the fifteen thousand

residents employed on some level of the industry, from stable owners and skilled professionals to semi-itinerant farm hands, Horse Racing is intertwined with every single element of the community. The series seeks to explore the nature and ramifications of this relationship and how it has shaped Newmarket; past, present and future.


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Hannah Reynolds


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Catherine Laura

catherinelaura.com info@catherinelaura.com +44 (0) 7716 544 050

Specialising in underwater fashion photography, Catherine Laura’s series showcases her oftenwhimsical style, as well as her ability to create themes and narratives. These threads which run through each of her ‘fashion stories’, allow her to anchor each set with a cohesive visual approach, while at the same time, from shoot to shoot,

endless scope to produce diverse and creative images. Her firm understanding of working underwater has allowed Laura to push her creative boundaries, undeterred by challenging environments and has led to her coordination of her own team, from creative and stylists to safetydivers, thus facilitating this collection.


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Catherine Laura


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James Hawley

jameshawley.co.uk info@jameshawley.co.uk +44 (0) 7962 157 212

James Hawley’s stripped back approach to fashion photography is designed to allow the model’s personality to become a part of the image. Deemed as of equal importance to the clothes and the photographer, Hawley spends much of his time searching for models with whom he can collaboratively

produce fashion editorials. Naturalistic and minimal in terms of post-production and artificial lighting, this collection of images comes loaded with a subtle yet pervasive sense of beauty; formed from the triptych of clothing, location and model-photographer relationship.


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James Hawley


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Emily Bailey

embphotography.co.uk emilynicollebailey@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7738 307 813

Emily Nicolle Bailey is a fashion and beauty photographer whose inspiration often stems from the themes of self-expression and individuality, Bailey has spent the best part of a year undertaking collaborative projects with various makeup artists and models. Exploring how self-decoration, specifically in the form

of make-up artistry and fashion choices, aid in the construction of an individual’s persona, in that they allow the individual to appear to the world in the way that they choose; the images included here are representative of the photographer’s wider practice, both thematically and visually.


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Emily Bailey


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Alice Hall

alicehall.eu alicehall83@hotmail.com +44 (0) 7920 011 441

Alice Hall’s work takes its form and inspiration from the beauty and fragility of flowers, her subtle and often abstract, images focus on the simplicity and delicacy of the shapes and colours of the petals. Photographing primarily on analogue formats, Hall’s experimentation with a range of methods for image making

and printing, seeks to craft a technique that accentuates both her subject and the imagined tangibility of the medium. Her organic and alluring photographs resonate with a strong emotional involvement and attempt to depict the true and unique beauty of natural forms, while inspiring her own wonder in the viewer.


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Alice Hall


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James Lester

jameslesterphoto@gmail.com +44 (0) 7906 333 905

In James Lester’s autobiographical series, he casts himself in the role of long-lost or distant family members, producing a study of hereditary and genetic traits. Through a subtlety of expression and body language, gleaned from old family photo albums, an

evocation is created of the character of those relatives whom Lester has never met. In doing so, the performance based, photographic study forges a link with these individuals that transcends mere blood ties.


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James Lester


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Aisha Greenidge-Noorgat Playhouse aishagreenidegenoorgat.co.uk aisha_milk@live.com +44 (0) 7572 617 556

Aisha Greenidge-Noorgat’s Playhouse acts as a photographic exploration of a space in which she experienced trauma as a child. The family sitting room becomes a place shrouded in darkness, the images’ aesthetic reflects this turmoil and with their soft focus, references the process of memory. The fabric of the space has

become forever intertwined with a painful past; though, this cathartic work, sets the door ajar, airing the room, absorbing a part of GreenidgeNoorgat’s anguish. Also included are images from the Meat & Flowers series, an attempt to capture the essence of what appears repulsive and beautiful, in immediate juxtaposition.


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Aisha Greenidge-Noorgat Meat & Flowers


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Stuart Leckenby The Invisible Age www.stuartleckenbyphotography.co.uk sleckie68@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7576 218 260

In The Invisible Age, Stuart Leckenby seeks to make a statement on the fate that society has waiting in store for women in their sixth decade. These portraits are intended to represent the notion that these women are often socially undervalued, politically underrepresented and largely ignored by

the opposite sex. The stillness and passivity of these images' subjects, is a testament to preconceived ideas and prejudices. These portraits act as a very real reminder of this existence of this 'invisible' demographic and what it wants to say: We exist.


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Stuart Leckenby The Invisible Age


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Charys Elmer

charysellmer@hotmail.com charysellmer.carbonmade.com +44 (0) 7850 692 959

Charys Ellmer has taken a set of Thematic Apperception Test cards as the starting point for her series of narrative photography. TAT cards are designed for use in psychological examinations, depicting various provocative yet ambiguous images, which the subject is asked to interpret, allowing the attendant psychologist a

window into their patient’s personal history and attitudes. Narrative photography runs corollary to this process, asking viewers to consider and ‘read’ a scene as a story. No interpretation is wrong, merely a version of the truth presented through a medium that can be said to blend veracity and illusion in equal measure.


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Charys Elmer


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Mindy Goose Well-Being mindygoose.co.uk mindy_goose@yahoo.co.uk +44 (0) 7969 647 027

Mindy Goose is a photographer as well as a community workshop leader, whose use of photography extends to self-discovery, social inclusion and education. The Well-being project examines her daily life, capturing the seemingly mundane objects, landscapes, journeys and routines in a manner that seeks

to present them as beautiful, unusual and unique. Her intent here, is to let her images act as a lens through which the viewer has the opportunity to see the everyday world in a more enriching way and in so doing, to inspire her audience to take notice of the beauty in the familiar themselves.


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Scott Salt Behind The Spectacle scottmsaltphotography.com scott@scottmsaltphotography.com +44 (0) 7864 391 080

The Behind The Spectacle series seeks to explore the people and personalities behind performers and the act of performance. Famed for the ‘Big Top’, sideshows, menageries of animals and death-defying feats of athleticism, the circus has always been one of the ultimate spectacles. In this

on-going, long-term project, Salt takes in not only the more familiar extroversion of the ‘show’ but peers behind the curtain, documenting the off stage individuals and their relationships in both transient and domestic environments.


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Scott Salt Behind The Spectacle


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Sofia Coombs Living with Kerstin sofiacoombs.co.uk info@sofiacoombs.co.uk +44 (0) 7864 660 441

Coombs uses image making to gain a greater understanding of the unfamiliar and the observed behaviour of others; in this series, she documents her intimate yet strained relationship to her mother, with whom she is naturally close, despite past issues causing an extended

estrangement. The project is an observation of her mother’s life in an attempt to comprehend why she is the way she is. A serious and complex subject, approached with an innate sensitivity and the well considered, thoughtfulness of a person studying a loved one.


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Sofia Coombs Living with Kerstin


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Rory Doyle

rawreylostinthought.tumblr.com rory_doyle_91@hotmail.com +44 (0) 7889 465 947

The focus of Rory Doyle's body of work lies in gender, specifically in the examining and understanding of gender’s boundaries. In order to do this, Doyle's photographs those who take gender related concepts to what are socially considered to be more extreme conclusions,

capturing images of Transvestism in drag acts and cross dressers. The images, which often take their aesthetic from traditional fashion and beauty photography, seek to question how notions of femininity and masculinity are visually defined within our society.


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Rory Doyle


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Jack Turner

jackturner28@gmail.com +44 (0)7921 463 968

A year after Jack Turner was born his Grandfather moved from his home in London to Northern Scotland, therein causing an estrangement that has lasted all of his conscious life. As an adult, Turner set out to meet and get to know this man, a close family member with whom he had previously almost

no relationship. This series documents his visits to Scotland, from their very first meeting and examines with an acute sensitivity, the unusual dynamic of this new relationship; at once a close familial bond but with a distance, induced by a long absence.


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Jack Turner


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Tim Mellin

timmellin.com tim@timmellin.com +44 (0) 7738 954 062

Tim Mellin has created a body of work designed to appeal to both the creative and commercially minded. Working handin-hand with clients on live briefs in order to develop this series of images that not only meet standard industry requirements

but have challenged both his technical and creative abilities; honing his own distinctive style. Innovation is a highly valued aspect of Mellin’s photographic practice as; each undertaking has its own unique parameters and therefore, demands a unique approach.


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Tim Mellin


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Daniele Fitzgerald

danielefitzgeraldphoto.com danielefitzgeraldphotography@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7746 713 715

Danielle Fitzgerald is primarily a beauty and portrait photographer whose style, drawing on a wide range of cultural influences, is designed to facilitate the capture of the individual nuances and qualities inherent within her subjects. The work presented here

chronicles Fitzgerald’s on-going portfolio development, from more traditional, studio based fashion and beauty work through to her recent move into the field of editorial and music based photography.


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Daniele Fitzgerald


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Chris Jackson

chrisjacksonphoto.co.uk chris@chrisjacksonphoto.co.uk +44 (0) 7766 612 342

In this series of still life images, Chris Jackson explores the genre of creative product photography. The theme of motion runs throughout this set, in which the photographer reveals one of the medium’s most formidable abilities; to capture that which the human eye

could never see. While technically polished, clean and crisp, commercially minded photographs, Jackson looks beyond mere depiction and finds a visual language that gives a life to his subjects, while at the same time reinforcing the power of photography.


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Chris Jackson


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Ess Newton

essnewton.com contact@essnewton.com +44 (0)7946 852 210

Covering lifestyle, fashion and product photography practices, Ess Newton is primarily a commercial photographer. The photographs featured here are a selection from an on going series focusing on men’s

fashion and lifestyle editorials, employing her own personal aesthetic approach, Newton sets out to capture current and commercially viable images of masculine identity, crucially from a female perspective.


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Ess Newton


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Katherine Gregory Northern Soul katherinegregoryphotography.com kategregoryphotography@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7581 277 270

‘Northern Soul’, with its rich, Rhythm and Soul influenced, musical and dance culture has its roots firmly in Northern, industrial Britain and originally centred around legendary nightclubs such as Wigan Casino. As well as its distinctive and unique forms of dance, it is also responsible for the formation and

development its own fashion movement and as such, can be considered an important aspect of cultural heritage in the UK. Katherine Gregory’s hometown of Wigan is also home to this scene and through her series, she documents the present day styles and personalities, focusing on themes of identity and culture.


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Katherine Gregory Northern Soul


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Aaron Hargreaves Meet Me In The Middle aaronhargreaves.com info@aaronhargreaves.com +44 (0) 7590 903 788

This series unveils a side to the Catholic Church that often goes unnoticed and is unmentioned in popular discourse; the positive communities that can be created when the Church opens itself to less dogmatic doctrine. When Hargreaves’ sexuality came into conflict with his family’s preconceived ideas of faith, a schism was created,

ultimately causing him, as it does for many others, to reject his religion altogether. Last year he attended Mass at All Hallows Church in Leeds, an openly inclusive Church that celebrates diversity. The subsequent photographs document and explore his reunion with faith, and the accepting community that facilitated it.


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Aaron Hargreaves Meet Me In The Middle


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Kyla Lynskey Twenty-Two Years www.kylalynskeyphotography.co.uk kyla.lynskey@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7825 913 576

Straddling the genres of fine art and documentary practice, Kyla Lynskey focuses on interior and domestic spaces. In her latest body of work she has spent six months photographing her and her father’s home, a house to be sold after twenty-two years. Like any childhood or family home, the

building itself transcends a mere structure; it comes replete with, in this case, a lifetime of memories. The images produced, likewise transcend mere documentation but come with a clearly tangible, emotional content, a catharsis for Lynskey herself, concluding the process of moving on.


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Kyla Lynskey Twenty-Two Years


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Benjamin P. Smith Signed: The Occupiers benjaminpsmithphotography.com benjaminsmith_photography@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0) 7728 874 753

Benjamin P. Smith is a photographer whose focus lies in documenting movements and groups that overtly or implicitly question socio-political paradigms. Presented here are excerpts from two bodies of work, Signed: The Occupiers and The Camel And The Scorpion. The former, an advocacy based series, deals with communities

of squatters in the UK as the government moves to criminalise trespass; an action that will erode avenues of accommodation for the poorest, protest and culture. The latter takes its title from a Middle Eastern joke and attempts to investigate the situation in Palestine’s West Bank, beyond the standard, politically convenient interpretations.


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Benjamin P. Smith The Camel & The Scorpion


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∞ Acknowledgements With special thanks to: Thijs Groot Wassink wassinklundgren.com Editorial Team: Benjamin P. Smith Scott M. Salt Hannah Reynolds

Publication Design: Jonathan Finch jonathan-finch.co.uk Rosalind Stoughton rosalind-stoughton.com Paweł Adamek paweladamek.co.uk Chris Starkie chrisstarkie.co.uk Sean Perkins


∞ Course Contact Info Adrian Davies, Programme Leader BA (Hons) Photography Leeds College of Art Blenheim Walk Leeds West Yorkshire LS2 9AQ +44 (0) 113 202 8000 info@leeds-art.ac.uk www.leeds-art.ac.uk



Final Photography Yearbook