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Local

DISTINCTIVENESS

Handbook brought to you by

PENNINE PROSPECTS

HOW TO USE

L O C A L DISTINCTIVENESS

TO BENEFIT

YOUR BUSINESS


ABOUT THIS HANDBOOK...

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WHAT IS LOCAL DISTINCTIVENESS? Local distinctiveness is what makes one place different from another. It’s the essential details, large and small, natural and manmade which combine to create a “sense of place”. Local distinctiveness means looking at the small details that are easy to miss but which we love once we notice them. Major landmarks and famous sights can mark one place out against another, but it’s not just big features that are important. Our impressions are formed through other aspects of an area’s character.

THEY INCLUDE: HERITAGE CULTURE TRADITIONS PEOPLE EVENTS FESTIVALS PRODUCE AND INDUSTRY FOOD DRINK FARMING TEXTILES AND CRAFTS WORDS DIALECT LOCAL SAYINGS JOKES AND QUIRKY ANECDOTES NATURAL FEATURES SUCH AS THE LANDSCAPE, FLORA, FAUNA, MAN-MADE FEATURES LIKE BUILDINGS & RESERVOIRS

Local distinctiveness can be experienced and enjoyed with all the senses. Each person will appreciate something different whether it’s drinking beer in a cosy pub, hearing birdsong in a hidden valley, or the nostalgic feeling of cobbles underfoot.


WHY IS LOCAL DISTINCTIVENESS IMPORTANT TO VISITORS? Today’s visitors are changing. There’s growing interest in all things “local”. Visitors want to understand more, to experience places in different ways and to meet “real” people. They are ready to buy locally-made products. They want to do as well as see. Visitors are interested in anything that helps them understand and appreciate the essential character of a place. Some people refer to this as “sense of place”, others as “local distinctiveness”. Like most of us, visitors enjoy being able to tell a story about something they’ve seen or heard when they get back from their trip.

LOCAL DISTINCTIVENESS CAN BENEF IT YOUR BUSINESS Our aim is to get visitors to stay longer and spend more money. If we only tell them about the highlights of a place, visitors will continue to rush around, passing through and not staying for long. If they only visit a market town for an hour or so, they won’t have time to get hungry and spend money in a cafe or pub. They may not bother buying anything in the shops. They probably won’t need to stay in local accommodation.

We need to slow visitors down, to help them see the undiscovered gems: the places that are special but often hidden or not so obvious. Visitors who enjoy a different experience are more likely to stay longer and spend more. They will recommend the area to others. And as we all know, word of mouth is the most powerful – and cheapest – form of promotion. Social media is now a great additional tool, as it’s effectively word of mouth on steroids!


LOCAL DISTINCTIVENESS AS YOUR UNIQUE SELLING POINT Every business needs a strong Unique Selling Point (USP). This should be something that marks you out from others and raises your business above the competition. It must be something distinctive and very specific. It could be the food you serve or an interesting historical connection. It might be your inside knowledge of the area which you can share with visitors to enhance their stay. Focusing on local distinctiveness can help you find and promote a strong USP.

EVERYDAY ACTIVITIES CAN BE SPECIAL e only

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DO IT NOW... THINK ABOUT THE DETAILS OF YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE that you take for granted. What could you tell visitors about? ‘Inside tips’ can relate to the smallest detail. It might be details of a local walk. Or knowing that locals call the local shop by a different name to its official one. Or the best pubs for entertainment and local beers. VISITORS WANT INFORMATION THAT HELPS THEM EXPERIENCE A PLACE FROM THE INSIDE. How much information do you give visitors about the local area? Do you have a good store of leaflets, posters and other information to pass on to visitors? VISITORS OFTEN SAY THEY WANT TO MEET LOCAL PEOPLE and to find out more about the area from them. Where are the best places to meet locals? Are there any guided tours or walks they could join? Story-telling evenings in pubs? Quizzes?

Your commute to work, or someone’s ultimate weekend break?


SO, WHAT DO TODAY’S VISITORS REALLY WANT? Today’s visitors want “something different” from their normal life. They look for places with ambience, atmosphere and soul. They welcome in-depth experiences, opportunities to participate and chances to meet local people. They enjoy going home and telling others what they’ve seen. Visitors look for interesting gifts and souvenirs to take back with them. Ideally these are things that aren’t available on the average high street. Locally-made souvenirs will really remind them of the places they’ve been.

Visitors want direct recommendations, inside knowledge and specific ideas for things to do. Regional visitor surveys have found that the most popular source of information and influence is word of mouth recommendations.

DO IT NOW... MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS! They can really make a difference. Some people are nervous of making direct recommendations because they worry that they’re favouring one place over another. But it’s what visitors want. If you are concerned about showing too much bias, tailor your recommendations. This will also make them more useful eg:

“Fred’s bar is a good place to go with children.” “Doris’s restaurant is perfect for a romantic night out.” “Mike’s pub offers a really good range of local beers”.

Traditionally we’ve offered visitors lists and directories containing the maximum amount of information. The focus has been on being fair to all and leaving visitors to sort through the lists to make their own decisions. But visitor needs have developed. They increasingly use social media and websites like Trip Advisor for second and third opinions. Visitors want more detailed and specific information, with definite recommendations. The time spent researching every trip is now longer than pre-internet because of the tendency to double-check every detail.


I’D LOVE TO KNOW WHAT IT’S LIKE UP THERE....

THAT’S MY FAVOURITE PLACE UP THERE....


BE DISTINCTIVE! One of the most over-used expressions in tourism marketing is “something for everyone”. This coverall phrase is meaningless and makes visitors work too hard. What exactly is “something”? Most people feel they are independentminded individuals and don’t appreciate being lumped together as “everyone”. It is much more productive to promote something very specific to a particular target market. Lots of places promote their diversity because they feel they have so much to offer. It’s better to say exactly what makes the area distinctive and diverse.

And when asked what makes the area particularly special, many locals instantly say “beautiful countryside”. They are right - the landscapes of the South Pennines are stunning. But unfortunately that’s not enough.

If we simply promote the South Pennines as having beautiful countryside, some visitors will come but competition from other regions is strong. Many other British destinations also have “beautiful countryside”.

Some tourism providers are concerned that if they highlight a particular strength or aspect of the area, other people will be put off or you’ll lose visitors’ attention. The reverse is true. A lot of visitor service providers say they have a “great location” or offer “friendly service”. Both of these are great but if several businesses say the same thing, how does the visitor choose? If you talk about something quite specific and distinctive, visitors are more likely to be intrigued and want to find out more. So, be specific and distinctive!


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HELP THEM TO FIND WHAT THEY WANT One simple way to generate more visitor revenue is to double-check the reasons why visitors come to the South Pennines and make sure we offer them the right products. Then we can create appropriate new experiences and adapt our promotional activities. It is essential that we offer excellent customer service to encourage repeat visits and recommendations.

Our heritage and cultural product caters for the many visitors that enjoy strolling around and absorbing the atmosphere of different places. We need to help them to explore the area in more depth, to have stronger, more memorable experiences and to spend more money. Highlighting our Totally Locally distinctiveness is key to achieving this.

Both Yorkshire and Greater Manchester have a high proportion of loyal, repeat visitors, which has huge income potential for the businesses in the towns and villages of the South Pennines.

The two most popular activities undertaken by visitors to our region are “visits to cultural attractions such as museums, art galleries and craft centres” and “shopping”.

This underpins the strengths of our heritage and cultural product and reinforces the fact that many visitors enjoy strolling around and absorbing the atmosphere of different places.

We need to help people to explore the area in more depth, to have stronger, more memorable experiences and to spend more money. Highlighting our local distinctiveness is key to achieving this.


HELP THEM TO FIND WHAT THEY WANT We’ve gathered information which covers all of the area we refer to as the South Pennines and have listed some of this below. What additional information could you add to this list? What do you think are the area’s special strengths?

OUTDOORS

RSDEN MOOR EG. HARDCASTLE CRAGS, MA ES TAT ES T US TR L NA TIO NA NE AND GORPLE. WIDDOP, OGDEN, PIETHOR E, ON ST VE DO : EG S OIR RESERV DIBLE EDIBLE STANDEDGE TUNNEL INCRE CANALS AND TOWPATHS ONE TRAIL ELEY LOOP AND STANZA ST PENNINE WAY, MARY TOWN GING TREE D’S MOOR, THE SINGING RIN AL MB RO ON ES ON ST ED CARV ENDALE ADRENALINE VALLEY, ROSS SEPTEMBER RIDE FESTIVAL HELD EACH SOUTH PENNINE WALK &

TOWNS AND VILLAGES

E HAWORTH HEBDEN BRIDG ROSS) HOLMFIRTH MARSDEN ILL, DIGGLE, DELPH, DOBC RM PE (UP S GE LA VIL H RT SADDLEWO DMORDEN SILSDEN SLAITHWAITE TO COLLER ILKLEY, LITTLEBOROUGH, WY

ARTS & CRAFTS

BRIDGE HEART GALLERY, HEBDEN rmill Millyard gallery, uppe DMORDEN WATER STREET GALLERY, TO YS, HAWORTH OR, HAWKSBY’S & DAISY DA LOFT SPACE, MARSDEN MO

ROBREWERIES FOOD PRODUCERS & MIC AITE HW HANDMADE BAKERY, SLAIT DMORDEN, TO , PEXTENEMENT CHEESE DDLEWORTH GREENFIELDS REAL ALE, SA BDEN BRIDGE LITTLE VALLEY BREWERY, HE VOCATION, CRAGG VALE.


VISITORS COME TO THE SOUTH PENNINES FOR THESE REASONS: TO WALK AND ENJOY THE OUTDOORS AND NATURE THEY ARE INTERESTED IN THE BRONTËS, TED HUGHES OR OTHER LITERARY FIGURES THEY HAVE SEEN AND ENJOYED LAST OF THE SUMMER WINE, LEAGUE OF GENTLEMEN, HAPPY VALLEY, WHERE THE HEART IS OR OTHER TV SHOWS THEY HAVE HEARD ABOUT AND ARE INTRIGUED BY THE INDEPENDENT AND CREATIVE REPUTATION OF HEBDEN BRIDGE THEY HAVE AN ARTISTIC INTEREST – EITHER CULTURAL OR CREATIVE TOURISTS THEY HAVE AN INTEREST IN HISTORIC BUILDINGS BECAUSE OF A SPECIAL INTEREST E.G. TEXTILE HISTORY FOR GENERAL RELAXATION TO SAMPLE REGIONAL FOOD AND DRINK

We can build on key motivations by providing appropriate information and developing the experience we offer visitors.


DO IT NOW... THINK ABOUT THE FOLLOWING TO PROVIDE MORE TRIGGERS FOR VISITS:

WALKING, OUTDOORS & NATURE

Where are the best walks? You could visit www.walkridesouthpennines.co.uk for ideas. What can visitors see? What is unique, less well known or specific to the South Pennines? eg the twite, or pennine finch, which only breeds in the moorlands of the South Pennines.

FILM AND TV LOCATIONS

Last of the Summer Wine, The Railway Children, Last Tango in Halifax, Happy Valley, Ackley Bridge and League of Gentlemen have all been filmed in the South Pennines. How can we use these to create a sustainable visitor product? Some of these programmes are no longer being made – we need to find new angles to market them.

SPECIAL INTEREST EG TEXTILE HISTORY

It’s now easier than ever to promote niche tours and ideas thanks to the “long tail” effect of the internet. We need more suggestions for routes or activities catering for special interest groups. There are numerous growth markets within crafts such as the increasing number of knitting and textile groups.

BRONTËS, TED HUGHES, SALLY WAINWRIGHT & OTHER LITERARY FIGURES Where are the places linked with them? Are there any readings, writers’ days or discussion groups associated with them? eg The Ted Hughes Festival held in Mytholmroyd each October.

GENERAL RELAXATION

Where are the best places to relax? Which picnic spots would you recommend? Can you suggest places off the beaten track that are otherwise undiscovered? Could you provide a simple walking route, using your venue as the starting point?

A REET SMASHING READ...


TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A TREND

The tourism market place continues to change. It’s worth being aware of trends taking place in the outside world and looking at which might offer new market and moneymaking opportunities for you.

HERE ARE SOME CURRENT TRENDS: LOCAL is increasingly important – local food, local people, products etc Visitors want to gain a new experience, do something different and have a story to tell when they go back home. They want to participate and try something for themselves. CRAFTS are enjoying a revival – watching, understanding, trying, buying, such as The Festival of Making, Blackburn. SAMPLING Time is short but everyone wants to do more – there’s a growing trend toward sampling and bite-sized experiences so they can do more in a shorter time.

DO IT NOW...

Consider how you could develop packages, your product or service to take advantage of these trends. WHAT NEW PRODUCTS or packages could you launch?

COULD YOU USE ONE OF THESE TRENDS in your promotional activities?

COULD YOU CREATE YOUR OWN TOUR connecting local places of interest, history, good pubs, cafes, views etc and plot it on a map? MAKE YOUR BUSINESS A CENTRAL OR STARTING POINT for the tour and join forces with others in the area to create a complete experience for visitors.


USING AND PROMOTING LOCAL FOOD Local food has become very popular. A few years ago if you said you served “local food”, that was enough to be newsworthy, but now you need to go further and be more specific. There is growing interest in buying local so offering local food and drink will give you an additional selling point and can make visitors’ experiences more memorable. Local produce celebrates the South Pennines and supports the local economy and environment. Local food and drink can feature on the menus of the smallest B&B to the busiest hotel or restaurant. Todmorden is home to the world-wide food movement - Incredible Edible, which encourages communal growing plus much more including Kindness Tours! You can find out more at www.incredibleedibletodmorden. co.uk

PORCUS HERD BURGERS LOTTIE SHAW’S BLUE SKY BAKER Y R INEYA D HOLMFIRTH V saltaire brewery es lley win a v n e d ludden

ERS VOCATION BE AMA CHEESE YORKSHIRE D K’S MR FITZPARIC THE bakEHOUS E DARKWOODS COFFEE od co. the nowt poncy fo haworth steam brewery the great rock co-op wood ‘n’ chocolate

DO IT NOW... WHEN SERVING LOCALLY SOURCED INGREDIENTS, name the food producer and where they’re from. Try to tell visitors something about them. Have they been farming for decades or are they trying something new? Do they have any rare breeds, different techniques or products? Why not put a photo of the farmer, grower or brewer on your menu or website? You could also include details of where to buy the produce so visitors could take some home. IF YOU SERVE LOCAL FOOD AND DRINK, do you promote that on your website? Rather than just saying “we offer x local beers on tap”, make sure you’re as specific as possible, with beer names, breweries and locations. If there’s a story behind the beer or brewery name, make sure you include it.


GOING LOCAL If you run a restaurant and use a local speciality - eg ale - in your dishes, why not produce a simple version of the recipe so that visitors can buy the beer and try it at home?

If you have self-catering accommodation it’s a good idea to provide guests with details of good local places where they can buy food, to encourage them to shop locally instead of stocking up with supermarket food before they leave. Could you provide a welcome pack of local food, with details of where it all came from in case your guests want to buy more?

If you make good biscuits, cakes or chutney to greet your guests, think how you can make that great memory last even longer. Perhaps you could give your guests the recipe to take home? Don’t forget to include your contact details so they think of you every time they make it.


USING AND PROMOTING LOCAL CREATIVITY

Tourism research shows that visitors are interested in culture and heritage. They are also increasingly interested in creative tourism and opportunities to actively learn and participate in creative activities (such as art, craft, cookery) as a way of having a more memorable experience and perhaps meeting local people. Research by Visit England shows that visitors are demonstrating a growing desire to connect with each other and feel more in touch with local communities. A creative tourism break can provide this and offer a sense of achievement by learning a new skill. The South Pennines has a high number of artists who live and work in the area, inspired by the landscape around them. Promoting creative breaks will help present a more contemporary identity for the area as well as tapping into a new market.

Mapping the South Pennines, Angela Smyth www.angelasmyth.co.uk

DO IT NOW... COULD YOU INVITE SOMEONE CREATIVE TO USE YOUR SPACE? You could promote a special day or evening where visitors learn a new craft or enjoy local entertainment. Think storytelling, music, crafts, art, textiles... IF YOU ARE AN ARTIST OR DESIGNER-MAKER, DOES YOUR WORK HAVE LINKS TO THE AREA? Is it inspired by the South Pennines landscape? Do you use local materials? Do you name your work after local places and landmarks? COULD YOU PUT TOGETHER A CREATIVE BREAK? A creative break will ideally include accommodation, a creative activity or workshop and food and drink. There are several ways of presenting a creative break: work with local creative workshops that are already taking place and use your accommodation as the base; ask an artist to use your cafe, pub, or venue as the base for a workshop; or work with an artist to put together an inclusive package.


USING AND PROMOTING LOCAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE History and heritage are important triggers for visits. Many visitors enjoy knowing about the past and history of places. In the South Pennines we have many historic, unusual and beautiful buildings. They could provide the backdrop and setting for more events, which would have the additional benefit of helping visitors to gain a better insight into local life, events and the arts. It’s surprising how many people take the history of their buildings for granted. You might not have time to research and write a potted history of the place, but displaying a few facts about it will interest visitors. Maybe you could ask a member of your local history society for help? You never know what stories they might come up with...

Towneley Hall, Burnley

the hitching stone

lund’s tower standedge tunnel

the piece hall SALTS MILL skipton ca stle lime kilns vaccary walls the great wall of ges id todmorden r b e s r o packh ck five rise lo ca stle s haw


DO IT NOW... WHAT SORT OF PICTURES ARE ON YOUR WALLS? Do they have any connection with the area? Many businesses use bland, inoffensive pictures to simply fill spaces on their walls but there’s an opportunity to use those walls as display spaces with a real connection to the local area. IS YOUR BUILDING HISTORIC? Did anyone famous or notorious live there? What happened there? Do you have a picture of how the surrounding area used to be? Can you point out any specific features to visitors? WHAT USED TO BE PRODUCED IN THE NEAREST MILL TO YOU? Could you get hold of a piece of fustian, worsted or other appropriate textile and display or use it in some way to make it easier for visitors to make a more direct connection with the local area’s past? FIND WAYS TO MAKE YOUR WALLS CONNECT WITH THE VIEWS FROM THE WINDOWS. These might include buying pictures, wall-hangings, ceramics etc by local artists and craftspeople; creating your own collages or photo montage using different objects, views or textiles of the local area; displaying old maps or photographs perhaps alongside modern views with a brief explanation or history of key buildings; and reproducing excerpts from novels or poetry by local writers. CREATE DISPLAYS IN YOUR WINDOW OF LOCAL PRODUCTS, old pictures, maps, trivia – these provide a talking point as visitors walk by. USE OLD-STYLE LUGGAGE LABELS printed with “did you know?” anecdotes tied on to furniture, beams and doors to surprise and inform visitors. MANY BREWERIES USE LOCAL LANDMARKS or places to name their beers eg Little Valley Brewery’s ‘Stoodley Stout’ or Naylor’s Brewery in Cross Hills who use the local Pinnacle monument as part of their logo. Similarly, accommodation providers could rename rooms after famous local people or favourite places – anything that makes your establishment more memorable. Include a brief explanation in your welcome pack for visitors.

SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING


SUPPORTIN & PROMOTING LOCAL SHOPS Totally Locally is a shop local movement, started in Calderdale, and their work shows that for every £10 spent in a local independent shop, up to £50 is generated for the local economy, compared to £14 spent in multinationals. Local shops create local employment and self-employment, and these people in turn spend money locally so the multiplier effect is strong. The Totally Locally movement is growing and it’s now easier than ever before to encourage our visitors to shop locally during their stay.

REASONS TO SHOP LOCALLY –

WHY NOT USE THEM IN YOUR MARKETING? Shopping locally maintains distinctiveness. As more and more towns start to look like they’ve been cloned, visitors increasingly want to find special places. Independent shops create more distinctive shopping experiences with different products. They can help keep traditional products alive. Independent retailers can respond more quickly to demand and changing needs. They can be more innovative.

SHOPPING LOCALLY SAVES MONEY

Out of town shops and supermarkets are often more expensive. They advertise the low prices on specific items in order to grab attention but not all their prices are low. Add in travel, parking costs and travelling time, and out of town shopping isn’t such good value for money.

SHOPPING LOCALLY IS MORE REWARDING

You’re likely to receive better customer service in independent shops. They survive by their reputation and repeat business so are likely to offer a higher standard of service. Many local shops are specialists, with particular expertise and knowledge that shop owners are ready to share with you.


SHOPPING LOCALLY HELPS COMMUNITIES

We need to shop locally to preserve communities. Most people can get to their local shops quite easily. This is especially important for older people, those who are vulnerable or who have young children and those without transport. If you support local shops, you’ll support the whole community. Because they know more local people and often live in the area, sole traders and independent shop owners are often more generous in their support for local schools, charities and community events.

SHOPPING LOCALLY HELPS THE ENVIRONMENT Local shops often stock locally sourced goods. You don’t need to make a long car journey to get to them.

SHOPPING LOCALLY SUPPORTS OTHER SERVICES

Services such as hairdressers, vets, doctors and so on are often clustered around shops. If shops on the High Street disappear, other essential services may be relocated as well, in less accessible locations.

WHAT LOCAL PRODUCTS CAN YOU RECOMMEND?

Could you sell them directly to visitors? Would it be possible for you to work with others in the area to create some new souvenirs and products?

VISIT WWW.SOUTHPENNINES.CO.UK OR WWW.PENNINEPROSPECTS.CO.UK FOR MORE INFO.


DESCRIBING THE SOUTH PENNINES As we’ve said, it’s not enough to simply say things like “beautiful”. We need to stress the most attractive aspects and say why they are good. Some words are particularly associated with the South Pennines - such as “brooding moors” - but we need to expand those descriptions.

These are just some of the words people used during the course of our pilot project. You’ll be able to add many more to really bring the area alive in your descriptions:

SPECTACULAR, UNSPOILT, INSPIRING, BREATHTAKING, WINDSWEPT, DRAMATIC, BROODING, MOORLAND, PEAKS, SLACKS, CRAGS, CLOUGHS, LAITHES SNICKETS, HIDDEN ALLEYWAYS, NOOKS & CRANNIES, COBBLES, STEEP SLOPES, WOODED VALLEYS, WANDERING FOOTPATHS SECRET HAUNTS IN SHELTERED VALLEYS STRAIGHT OUT OF A FAIRY STORY, PACKHORSE TRAILS, STONY TRACKS, STEAM TRAINS, STRAIGHT CANALS, LONG TUNNELS, INDEPENDENT, CREATIVE, NON-CONFORMIST, QUIRKY, HIGGLEDY PIGGLEDY, COMMUNITY...


WHAT’S SO SPECIAL ABOUT YOU AND YOUR AREA? When we go somewhere for the first time, our impressions are often formed through subtle details which we may remember for years afterwards. We perceive our surroundings through all our senses. They each help us to build up an overall picture and a sense of place. If you only do one thing after reading this handbook, imagine describing your local area to some one for the first time and try to answer these questions:

Is there a sound you associate with this place? When you come home after a while away, what sight instantly makes you feel at home? Is there a particular smell or taste you associate with this place? What’s the most unusual thing about your business, your building or your area? What’s the most beautiful aspect of your business, building or area? Why? Do you know anything about the history of your building? Does it have any particularly notable features? Is there an interesting meaning behind your business name, building, street or place name?


DESCRIBING THE SOUTH PENNINES CONT. MOST VISITORS DON’T BOTHER ASKING WHAT’S SPECIAL ABOUT YOUR AREA OR BUSINESS. BUT THEY’D LIKE YOU TO TELL THEM. Our website might say “in a great location” but we rarely stress all the wonderful aspects of that location – or if we do, we simply list a few place names. If you take the trouble to offer a more detailed and evocative description, your business will really stand out from the rest. WHAT THREE “MUST DO” EXPERIENCES WOULD YOU SUGGEST TO VISITORS? REMEMBER TO TRY AND MAKE THEM REAL EXPERIENCES instead of a simple list of places eg: “Go to xxx pub and taste Mrs. Hurd’s meat and potato pie”.

USE THIS SPACE TO JOT DOWN YOUR TOP 3...


PSSST...PASS IT ON! We need to pass on information and stories about the South Pennines to all our visitors. Some of the simple anecdotes you tell will be the memories they take home with them to pass on to others. Don’t assume everyone who works with you will automatically get involved and speak to visitors. You may need to specifically tell your staff and colleagues to offer information to visitors and suggest what might be most useful. Events are useful starting points for conversation. Make sure you know what’s happening in your area. Gather local leaflets and information, compile lists of events and try to pass on ideas and information to visitors. Your local Visitor Centre should be able to help. Not all visitors ask for ideas – but even when they don’t actually ask, they are usually happy to receive inside tips to make the most of their stay – so remember to spread the word!


DO IT NOW

THINK ABOUT THE BEST TIMES AND WAYS in which to tell visitors a little more. CONSIDER WHO YOU COULD WORK WITH, signpost or promote for mutual benefit. COMPILE REALLY GOOD LISTS of what’s on. Don’t just focus on well-known events that already attract visitors. Guests may be interested in smaller scale and less obvious events that will nonetheless give them an insight into the area. START A DIFFERENT KIND OF VISITORS’ BOOK, both in print and on the web inviting them to submit photos, poems, stories and favourite places after their stay with you. Get their permission to use the ideas as part of your future promotion and to give new visitors ideas for things to do.


TO SEE A CLOSE UP AND EXPLORABLE OF THE SOUTH PENNINES MAP, VISIT: WWW.SOUTHPENNINES.CO.UK


AND THERE’S ALWAYS A FESTIVAL GOING ON.... MAKE SURE YOU TELL PEOPLE! beer festiv als

Literature Festivals

als film festiv

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ghte i l p m La

e Festival s 1940s weekend comedy festivals

s Walk & Rid e in n n e P h t Sou

MUSIC FESTIVAL S

rushbearing arts FESTIVALS open studio t

rails

moonraking

agricultural s

duck races

hows

stivals outdoor Fe

k food & drin

festivals

the tour de york

shire

tivals waterway fes

christmas light switch on


FOR MORE INFORMATION: If you’d like to find out more about The South Pennines & Pennine Prospects, visit: www.southpennines.co.uk or www.pennineprospects.co.uk

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Acknowledgements: This handbook was written by Susan Briggs (www.tourismnetwork.co.uk) in 2010 and updated by Pennine Prospects in 2012, 2013 and 2018 It has been designed by Chris Sands (www.thegoodco.co.uk) with illustrations & map by Angela Smyth (www.angelasmyth.co.uk) Photographs by: Steve Morgan www.stevemorganphoto.co.uk Sarah Mason www.sarahmasonphotography.co.uk Mark Davis www.mark-davis-photography.com

© 2018 Pennine Prospects


www.southpennines.co.uk Local distinctiveness is what makes one place different from another. It’s the essential details, large and small, natural and manmade which combine to create a “sense of place”. Local distinctiveness means looking at the small details that are easy to miss but which we love once we notice them.

Major landmarks and famous sights can mark one place out against another but it’s not just big features that are important. Our impressions are formed through other aspects of an area’s character. Here’s our guide to help your business get the most out of your local distinctiveness.

The South Pennines Local Distinctiveness Handbook  

A handbook on how to use local distinctiveness to help your business.

The South Pennines Local Distinctiveness Handbook  

A handbook on how to use local distinctiveness to help your business.

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