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Christopher Le

Georgia Institute of Technology|BS in Architecture


Schindler House addition studio.fall 2006 student housing studio.fall 2006 library studio.spring 2007 farmer’s market studio.fall 2007 resort studio.fall 2007 Smyrna aquatic center studio.spring 2008 - studio-wide competition sponsored by Velux variations of Saltzman House intro to design computing.fall 2007 photos from Europe study abroad program.summer 2008


The addition project was the first time I designed an addition for an existing work—the Schindler House by R.M. Schindler in Hollywood, CA from 1922. The program was a house for two couples and not the traditional singlefamily occupants. While working in pairs to analyze, draw, and build the existing house, I took notice of its design language. There was careful attention paid to the selection and placement of materials: light and transparent glass and wood were often positioned opposite that of heavy structural concrete walls. There was also the use of sliding doors that opened the interior up to the exterior. My addition utilized numerous elements from the existing language. To reiterate the U-forms, the addition is L-shaped in plan. As a variation of the L-shape, a second storey double-height space is introduced where the L-shape is also present in the elevation.

1

BACKGROUND.plan with addition.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.autoCAD TOP.study model.styrofoam BOTTOM.existing & addition u-forms.autoCAD & Illustrator


TOP.elevations with addition.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.autoCAD BOTTOM.presentation model.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.basswood

schindler house addition

2


3

student housing

TOP.west elevation.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.autoCAD BOTTOM.floor 2-5 plan.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.autoCAD


The student housing project introduced me to numerous challenges. The first was that this was the first time where I actually had a real site location—in a lot in Georgia Tech’s Technology Square on 5th Street. There were also a multitude of requirements such as square footages, circulation percentages, standardized dorm rooms, and other program elements—like mechanical rooms, offices, and a gallery. My main concept was to design standardized dorm rooms that could receive maximum amounts of sunlight. I wanted to stay away from the typical room scheme where only one wall contains windows. After experimenting with different layouts for the 400 square foot rooms with beds, desks, and bathrooms, I came up with a staggered form. With the staggered rooms, two walls could have windows while the pairs of rooms could still have a shared wet wall. TOP.room alignment massing models.styrofoam MIDDLE.study model.chipboard BOTTOM.typical room plan.original @ 1/4” = 1’-0”.autoCAD

4


5

student housing

ABOVE.presentation model.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.basswood FACING PAGE.final model w/ class-constructed site.original @ 1/16”=1’-0”.basswood, chipboard & wood


The library project was an in-depth project that had two completely different precedents and was designed for two different sites in Atlanta’s Castleberry Hill neighborhood. Along with the usual square footage requirements, there was also a need for space for light-sensitive rare books, a lecture hall, offices, and reading space. The initial precedent was an existing library— my choice was Louis Kahn’s Exeter Library. I really liked his concept of the carrels: while the shutters could be closed to provide privacy, they could also be opened up to offer views to the outside and provide some often needed distraction. I also liked Kahn’s quote in which he describes the user being

able to easily decipher the buildings plan, “A reader as he enters be able to sense at once the building’s plan.”

separated program elements, the user can easily grasp the organization of the library as he enters.

The other precedent was a conceptual one that was based on a child’s game. My game was the Rubik’s Cube. I noticed how all of the pieces were connected to the core and identified the rules of each center-, corner-, and side-piece.

The second site was an open lot at the intersection of Castleberry Street and Peters Street. With further investigation of applying the game into the library, I applied the different pieces of the Rubik’s Cube to different elements. The center pieces that have the most connections would become the circulation; corner pieces would become the separated program elements for the user; and the most frequent side pieces would be applied to light that surrounds everything.

The first site location was at the intersection of Walker Street and Nelson Street. Existing buildings flanked the irregularly shaped site on both sides. My concept for the library was to enclose the more private spaces while leaving the open areas on top and around them for public activities. With the

function|activities|user|kahn|exeter library machine room

receiving room

basement

ground

storage

arcade

archive

machine room

periodical back numbers

periodicals librarian’s office

storage

arcade

periodicals stacks

periodicals room

arcade

periodicals stacks

machine room

2nd/3rd mezzanine listening room

general book stack

general general stack book area stack

general book stack

general stack area

carrels restroom

general book stack general stack area

staff office

carrels

general book stack

carrels

carrels upper general reading area

roof garden staff office

rare book room

carrels

upper general reading area

general general stack book area stack

general book stack general stack area

general book stack

4th

general book stack

general book stack

restroom

restroom

general stack area

carrels

carrels

music listening area

3rd

carrels

upper general reading area

staff office

reference desk

central space

carrels

upper general reading area

general stack area general book stack

video viewing room

current periodicals

arcade

carrels

secretary’s office

copying room

entrance

2nd

staff offices

staff lounge

work area

restroom

av storage

circulation desk

librarian’s office

carrels

carrels

machine room

card catalog

periodicals reading area

janitor’s room

microfilm room

1st mezzanine

1st

carrels

exhibition preparation

public|private individual|group

roof garden

rare book office

rare book room

seminar room

roof garden

carrels restroom

restroom fiction area

roof garden

exeter library analysis.orginial @ 11” x 17”.Illustrator

7


spatial qualities|kahn|exeter library

organization|kahn|exeter library

“the quality of concrete work will largely determine the quality of architecture” “a reader as he enters be able to sense at once the building’s plan”

“I made the outer depth like a birck doughnut; I made the inner depth like a concrete doughnut; the central area is a result of these two contiguous doughnuts”

clerestories with structural diffusers provide indirect natural sunlight for the entire central hall

“the emphasis should not be on housing books but on housing readers using books” “the carrel belongs to the outside world; occasional distraction is important to reading as concentration”

the carrels on the 2nd and 3rd floors have views directly outside, along with personal shutters that can cover the windows entirely

inner doughnut is made of concrete

2nd/3rd

the placement of the circulation and reference desks along with direct views to the middle put an emphasis the central hall

mechanical chases lie in the corners of the building

the inner doughnut protects the books from direct sunlight

outer doughnut is made of brick

the carrels provide isolated space for reading and studying; in both cases the carrels lie on the perimeter of the floor

all four levels with the general stacks are shown through the circular openings in the concrete

stairs and elevators are on diagonal axis opposite from mezzanine carrels

elevators lie in the corner right by the mechanical chases

the carrels on the mezzanine levels overlook the open space below and also have views through the windows to the outside

carrels on main floors are oriented on axis with the general stacks

2nd/3rd mezzanine

carrels on mezzanine floors are on axis with the corner elements

general stacks are on main axis concrete walls form the dominating central hall

corner vertical elements are structural and are 45 degrees off axis in relation to the general stacks and carrels

stairs also lie next to mechanical chases

organization|rubik’s cube

no matter the which way the sections are rotated, each color retains its position in relation to the square that it is in blue always stays in the center orange always stays in the corner green always stays on the side

each cube is connected to the center through the corner or side closest to the center cube

rotation to side

center

rotation to top

knowledge

information

{

principles facts ideas truths

communication experience

media

proximity

each square can connect to its adjacent square vertically, horizontally, or diagonally; the center always has the most connections, followed by the sides, then the corners

vertical or horizontal

diagonal

{

vertical, horizontal, and diagonal 8

4

4

3

2

5

2

1

3

axis

corner

the 90˚ and 45˚ axes combine to form a radial axis

all of the cubes rotate around the center cube

corner elements

side in their own squares, the orange and green elements are separate; when the cube is put together, the two elements combine to become a larger unit

TOP.library 1 analysis.orginial @ 11” x 17”.Illustrator BOTTOM.study models.chipboard

90˚ axis through the center

45˚ axis through the center

combined radial axis through the center

books periodicals computers labs classrooms/teachers/tutors

rubik’s cube organization applied to knowledge

start position

organization|rubik’s cube + knowledge access to and components of information can be strategically placed to be in close proximity to related elements- this always occurs with the central element; classrooms/labs should have convenient access to all types of sources; information is obtained through numerous types of communication and experience

relationship of access to information classrooms/labs

components of obtaining information information

paper sources

communication

electronic sources

experience

axes that relate to user space can create a pattern to how space is utilized; frequently used public space can be placed in a certain axis to classrooms/labs and private space can be placed opposite to those spaces

public open space classrooms/labs

public open space private space

paper sources: books, reference, periodicals

combined paper source rooms

isolated study rooms

large reading rooms

library

8


organization|application of rubik’s cube to library

dw

office

circulation

office

workroom

staff lounge office

light

+1 floor

dw dw

program/user

lecture hall/gallery space dw

up

systems|aperatures

carrels on mezzanine levels provide views to exterior and interior

dw

circulation desk ground floor

up

dw

exeter library’s use of carrels with views to exterior

individual desks

up

built-in tables around perimeter of second storey provide views to city, park, and interior up

up

stacks

-1 floor

computers periodicals

up

up

9

library

LEFT.library 1 plans.orginal @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.autoCAD & Illustrator RIGHT.library 2 analysis.original @ 11” x 17”.Illustrator


axonometric|systems Staff Offices

Computer Lab

DW

DW

DW

public

+1 Floor

private structure circulation structure + circulation skin

perspectives

DW DW

Reading Space

DW

UP

UP

UP

Reading Space DW

Carrels

UP

Carrels

Ground Floor Mezzanine Castleberry Street

Reading Space

Stacks

Cafe/Lounge

DW DW

DW

Circulation Desk

UP

Entrance UP

DW

Ground Floor

Lecture Hall/Gallery

Rare Book Room

Periodicals

UP UP

Reading Space UP

Stacks Restrooms

UP

Janitor’s Closet

-1 Floor

LEFT.library 2 plans.orginal @ 1/16” = 1’0”.autoCAD & Illustrator RIGHT.library 2 analysis.original @ 11” x 17”.Maya

library 10


The farmer’s market project marked the first time in studio where we were introduced to the idea of sustainability. Studio was taken in conjunction with the Environmental Systems course, which further enforced sustainability issues. Throughout the project, we paid careful attention to numerous issues like solar attributes and the impact of the project on the site. The market was to be self-powered with the use of solar panels and have the ability to recycle water. Situated off Howell Mill Road, the site is triangular shaped and bordered by a mix of paved parking from adjacent restaurants, light vegetation, and railroad tracks to the south. While observing the slope, I noticed there were three main elevations. The program elements could fit into each of the main elevations, with the more frequently used programs being at the highest near the entrances. The main program elements involve the vendors and the customers. In addition to the vendor stalls in the market, there was also a requirement for vendors to have pullup car access on weekends. The pavilion that houses the café was placed up on the highest part of the site for views to Atlanta. The addition of the lake acts as a reservoir for water recycling.

11

TOP.conceptual model.chipboard & prismacolor BOTTOM.analysis.ink & prismacolor on trace, solar study.original section @ 1/4” = 1’0”, plan @ 1/32” = 1’-0”.autoCAD & Illustrator


Huff Road

Howell Mill

N

Road

pavilion

Fo ste

rS

tre

et

dw

storage facility oad

ailr

rn R

the

Sou

market

facing Huff

buildings

steep elevation

paved parking

bushes/trees

facing Howell Mill

entrances

facing Foster

facing Southern Railroad

restrooms

parking/weekend vendor space

6AM

2PM

January July

N

BACKGROUND.roof plan.original @ 1/32” = 1’-0”.autoCAD & Illustrator TOP:site analysis.Illustrator FOLLOWING PAGE.final model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.basswood, cardboard & chipboard

farmer’s market 12


This project differed from all of the previous projects because the site was located in a heavily wooded natural area. The site, surrounded by neighborhoods near Clairmont Road and North Druid Hills Road, also contained a creek and a hilly slope. Once again, there was a focus on solar attributes and the impact on the natural site. As a resort there were numerous requirements for indoor and outdoor activities. There had to be 13 suites, a restaurant, and

a gallery space. The outdoor requirements included walking trails, pools, and a kayak training course. To preserve the existing trees and emphasize the feeling of being in the woods, I chose to build the project around the trees. By identifying the thresholds through the trees, I designed the building around them and worked with the existing nature. The raised elements lessened the amount of excavation and also framed views to the surrounding nature. The suites were care-

BACKGROUND.tree treshold analysis.autoCAD & Illustrator ABOVE.final model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.basswood, cardboard & chipboard

fully designed to offer solar shading in the summer as well as adequate cross ventilation. Their alignment offers views to the surrounding nature while retaining a sense of privacy from other suites. The design of the roof of the gallery echoes the linear thresholds between the trees.

14


parking

pedestrian trail

pool

pool

15 resort

BACKGROUND.ground plan.original @ 1/32” = 1’-0”.autoCAD & Illustrator TOP.typical suite section model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.basswood & chipboard BOTTOM.study model.chipboard


Jan 8AM

Jan 12PM

July

Jan 4PM

roof

lounge

dining BACKGROUND.solar study.original @ 1/64” = 1’-0”.autoCAD & Illustrator ABOVE.final model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.basswood, cardboard & chipboard

resort 16


There are many requirements for the numerous components that make up the aquatic center. Such aspects include controlled access for members, separate wet and dry areas, and a variety of programs for the user. In order to make the building successful, it is crucial to link the programs that are related to each other and to make it easy for the user to figure out how the building is organized. The two main groups of program are that of the competitor, and that of the non-competitor. This introduces the concept of the machine versus nature, where the competitor can be applied to the machine and the non-competitor to nature. The building is organized into a linear spine that ends in the competition pools. The spine is intersected by the nature component. This component consists of the leisurely exterior pool, gardens, and the gym and dance studio on the upper floor. The building as a whole can be thought of as the transition between the organic forms to the east of the railroads and the orderly Smyrna master plan to the west. The main vertical circulation is surrounded by glass and gardens on all levels that reflect and cast shadows to blur the line between the artificial and the natural—interior and exterior.

MACHINE order straight spine artifical business performance

NATURE trees sun organic fluid natural leisure

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BACKGROUND.detailed section model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.chipboard, cardboard, & acetate ABOVE.conceptual diagram.Illustrator


circular en

powder springs

The buildin roundabo towards th standard entrances

st se

circular co

The comm all utilize c All of the b forms in th entrances cal corne

site

v il

lag

e green cir cle

axis powder springs st

ta rd

atlan

All of the m axis. The b are orient West axis, axis. The c as well an Atlanta Ro

skylights

The three skylights. located in hall it lies a library, it is desk; in th the main c

BACKGROUND.recurring site elements diagram.original @ 11� x 17�.Illustrator ABOVE.process diagrams.ink & prisma on trace, Illustrator

The library skylights in Similar to t multi-heig diffusers w direct smyrna aquatic center 18sun


19 smyrna aquatic center

ABOVE.parti models.SketchUp FACING PAGE.site plan & sections.original @ 1/50” = 1’-0”.AutoCAD & Illustrator


a

N

b

b

c

c

site plan a site section a site section b

smyrna aquatic center 20


up

dw

10 dw

18

9

8

up

dw up

dw dw

up

6

5

dw

7

1

4a 3 17

2 4b

16 5

6

7

dw up up

21

1 service entry 2 mechanical/electrical/storage/ janitorial/filtration/chemical 3 sunken garden 4a female locker room 4b male locker room 5 storage 6 sauna 7 steam room 8 beginner’s pool 9 diving pool 10 competition pool

level -2 plan [-18’6”]

11 lobby/attendant’s station 12 cafe 13 meeting room 14 public restrooms 15 administration offices 16 patio 17 exterior pool 18 spectator’s stand 19 viewing platform 20 gym 21 dance/aerobics/yoga/tai chi studio 22 garden

level -1 plan [-11’6”]

12

11

15

14

13

entry level plan [0]


]

dw

up

19 up

dw

dw

21

22

20

dw

22 level +1 plan [+11’6”]

level +2 plan [+19’6”]


section a

23 smyrna aquatic center

PREVIOUS PAGES.plans.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.AutoCAD & Illustrator TOP.sections.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.AutoCAD & Illustrator BOTTOM.detailed section model/light study.original @ 1/4” = 1’-0”.acetate, cardboard & chipboard


+2 [+19’6”] +1 [+11’6”] entry level [0] -1 [-11’6”] -2 [-18’6”] section c

smyrna aquatic center 24


25 smyrna aquatic center

ABOVE.massing model w class-constructed site.original @ 1/50” = 1’-0”.acetate, chipboard & wood LEFT.final model.original @ 1/16” = 1’-0”.acetate, basswood & cardboard BOTH PAGES.perspectives.Architectural Desktop & VIZ


D

PRIVATE PUBLIC

OUTDOOR SPACE

STAIRS

EXTERIOR DOORS

D

TRIPLE HEIGHT DOUBLE HEIGHT

27 variations of saltzman house

GEOMETRY

STRUCTURE

BATHROOMS

BACKGROUND.original language diagram.AutoCAD & Illustrator ABOVE.original Saltzman House rendering.Architectural Desktop & VIZ

WINDOWS


This on-going semester project for the Introduction to Design Computing course dealt with mostly three-dimensional renderings. At the beginning, we analyzed a house, then as the semester progressed, we designed variations of the house. Working in pairs throughout the project, we started by figuring out the language of the original house—Richard Meier’s Saltzman House in East Hampton, New York from 1969. After creating a set of rules for the design language, we created variations of them. There were three main sets of variations of the house: Neo-, Post-, and Meta-Languages. They all were designed off variations of the previous grammars. In the final Meta-Languages, we created a walkthrough .avi video as well.

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T R ANSFORMATION A L GR A MM A R S : S A L T Z M A N H O U S E DREW KINNEY AND CHRIS LE

G E O R G I A I N S T I T U T E O F T E C H N O L O G Y l C O L L E G E O F A R C H I T E C T U R E l FA L L 2 0 0 7 l P R . AT H A N A S S I O S E C O N O M O U , P H D l G R A C A S S I E B R A N U M , M . A R C H

LANGUAGE

NEO-GRAMMAR

NEO-LANGUAGE FIRST LEVEL

SPATIAL

SECOND LEVEL

POST-GRAMMAR

THIRD LEVEL

FIRST LEVEL

R

SPATIAL

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

R

PRIVATE

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R

R’

PUBLIC

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

R’ PRIVATE

BATHROOMS

R

PRIVATE

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

BATHROOMS

R’ PRIVATE

PRIVATE

STRUCTURE

R

PUBLIC

STRUCTURE

R’ PRIVATE

SHORT DESCRIPTION

SHORT DESCRIPTION

STRUCTURAL WALLS

R

PRIVATE

STRUCTURAL WALLS

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

DIVIDING STAIRS

R

DIVIDING STAIRS

PUBLIC

R’ PRIVATE

R’ PRIVATE

CURVED WALL

FIREPLACE

R

CURVED WALL

PRIVATE

R

FIREPLACE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R’ PRIVATE

PUBLIC

SPIRAL STAIR SPIRAL STAIR

R’

PUBLIC

R’

R

SHORT DESCRIPTION

SHORT DESCRIPTION

2ND FLOOR STAIR R

2ND FLOOR STAIR

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

R’

EXT

INTERIOR

INTERIOR

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

R

R

INTERIOR

R

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR EXTERIOR

EXT

DOUBLE HEIGHT

DOUBLE HEIGHT/ TRIPLE HEIGHT

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R’

DOUBLE HEIGHT

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

TRPL HT.

PUBLIC WINDOWS

R’ PRIVATE

PUBLIC WINDOWS

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE WINDOWS

R’ PRIVATE

SHORT DESCRIPTION PRIVATE WINDOWS

FIRST LEVEL

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

SHORT DESCRIPTION

R

R

R

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

FIRST LEVEL

PUBLIC

R

SECOND LEVEL

R

SECOND LEVEL

PUBLIC

R

R

THIRD LEVEL

R

FIRST LEVEL

R

R

R

PUBLIC

R PRIVATE

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

THIRD LEVEL

R

R PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SECOND LEVEL

R

R

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R

R

R

PUBLIC

PUBLIC PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SECOND LEVEL

R

R

R

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

R

PUBLIC

TRPL HT PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R

EXT.

FIRST LEVEL

R

PUBLIC

R PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

R

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R

EXT.

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

R

DBL PUBLIC HT TRPL HT

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

R

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

R

THIRD LEVEL

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

PUBLIC

THIRD LEVEL

EXT.

PRIVATE

R

PUBLIC PRIVATE

R

final project board.original @ 72” x 30”.Architectural Desktop, Illustrator & VIZ

29 variations of saltzman house


POST-LANGUAGE SECOND LEVEL

META-GRAMMAR

THIRD LEVEL

SPATIAL

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

R’

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

THIRD LEVEL

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

R’’

R’’

R’’ PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SECOND LEVEL

R’’’

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

R’

PUBLIC

META-LANGUAGE FIRST LEVEL

PUBLIC

R’

BATHROOMS

PRIVATE

R’’

R’’

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

STRUCTURE

R’’ PUBLIC

SHORT DESCRIPTION

SHORT DESCRIPTION PRIVATE

PUBLIC

STRUCTURAL WALLS

R’’ PUBLIC

PRIVATE PUBLIC

DIVIDING STAIRS

R’’ PUBLIC

PRIVATE PUBLIC

MORPHED WALL

R’’ PUBLIC

PRIVATE PUBLIC

FIREPLACE

R’’

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

SPIRAL STAIR

R’’ PUBLIC

SHORT DESCRIPTION

SHORT DESCRIPTION

R’

R’’

2ND FLOOR STAIR

INTERIOR

INTERIOR

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR

R’

R’ INTERIOR

R’’

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

R’’

R’’ INTERIOR

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

H=10

DOUBLE HEIGHT

DOUBLE HEIGHT

R’

R’’

H=10

H+4 H+2

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

H=10

R’’ H+6

DOUBLE HEIGHT

R’’

R’

PUBLIC WINDOWS

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PRIVATE WINDOWS

R’ PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

R’’ R’

R’’ PUBLIC

PRIVATE

SHORT DESCRIPTION

SHORT DESCRIPTION FIRST LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

R’

FIRST LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

FIRST LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

FIRST LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

R’’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

H=10

R’

R’’ H=10

R’

R’’

R’’ R’

SECOND LEVEL

R’

R’

R’’

R’’

R’’

H=10

H+6 H+4 H+2

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’’

R’

variations of saltzman house 30


In the summer of 2008, I participated in a study abroad program in Barcelona, Spain for ten weeks. The structure of the program allowed for two separate one-week breaks in which we were encouraged to travel and then come back to Barcelona with a fresh set of eyes. During the first break I traveled to Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and Hilversum in the Netherlands. Throughout my travels I was exposed to a great mix of historical, iconic and eclectic architecture.

Institute for Sound & Vision.Neutelings Riedijk Architects.Hilversum, Netherlands.Nikon D40.1/60� ƒ/4 ISO 400

31


photos from Europe 32


MACBA (Museum of Contemporary Art).Richard Meier.Barcelona, Spain.Nikon D40.1/320” ƒ/10 ISO 200

33 photos from Europe


Kunsthal.Rem Koolhaas.Rotterdam, Netherlands.Nikon D40.1/30� ƒ/7.1 ISO 450

photos from Europe 34


Barcelona Pavilion.Mies van der Rohe.Barcelona, Spain.Nikon D40.1/160� ƒ/9 ISO 400

35 photos from Europe


“The Whale” residential complex.CIE Architects.Amsterdam, Netherlands.Nikon D40.1/320” ƒ/10 ISO 200

photos from Europe 36

Chris Le portfolio  

Chris Le portfolio from architecture undergraduate program @ Georgia Tech.