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Even Production Book


Mood Board


Further Reference

Snorricam

I liked how this turned out last year, maybe a variation would look nice


Limitations • No funds for equipment – all gear, props etc. must be sourced from UBC • Public locations must be shot late at night when not in use • All crew and actors volunteering – must not keep them up all night or make them come out repeatedly – short time to shoot in • My schedule prevents me shooting before March 7 and actors are not available after March 13, giving me a narrow window • Flimsy snorricam rig prevents me from using a heavier camera such as the HVX


Assets • Oliver’s homemade snorricam • Free gear from Stuart – HVX200, lights, grip equipment • Free props from Theatre department • Free locations on campus • Oliver and Kevin’s basement – can easy be made pitch black, has overhead beams to possibly hang lights • 12x12 black to block out large light sources • Lydia’s car – for transportation of gear and people


Location Notes I originally wanted a very white, plain room that had walls that could easily be blown out. Several classrooms in Buchanan has large white walls but there were none with 3 plain walls with nothing on them that I would need to create a good effect. Some had one grey brick wall and one white wall which looked interesting but they all had something on them. Then I noticed how white the bathroom was and liked how one end had a frosted window. The bathroom was also a more 'sketchy' place for this transaction to take place. The absence of a light next to the window allowed me to place the assassin in a darker space than the main character.


Creative Approach • Basement stairs - The shot coming down the stairs should perfectly silhouette the character. Light should spill down the stairs, just catching the edge of each one.


Creative Approach • Basement Table - The shots at the table should be super spotted. There should not be any detail of the basement visible. Dolly ins can be used to establish the shot then move in to the character's head. Framing the face in the angle the open briefcase makes can be used to hide what is inside. An over the shoulder shot can be used to reveal its contents.


Creative Approach • Snorricam - The snorricam sequence should be shot in locations with interesting lighted backdrops, geometrical architecture and alternating light on the face. An led bank will be used to make the face stand out more to give a more ethereal feel.


Creative Approach • Bathroom - The bathroom contains two components: the walk in and the conversation. The walk in should be largely dolly shots. The cubicles across from the door can frame the entrance nicely, especially with dollying in or out. The mirrors can be used for a variety of reflection shots and interact in interesting ways when dollying.


Creative Approach • Bathroom - The conversation can be used to highlight the nature of each character. The assassin is a dark and violent character and so stands under a flickering light, with the black window behind him. The flickering light does not fall on the main character with a pristine blown out white backdrop (here brightness implies hope that he will finally get what he wants).


Map of locations to take snorricam


Floorplans

m

c J

j

a

d

b a j

Bathroom

Basement


Shotlist and Schedule Day 1 (11 Mar) No.

Type

Subject

Action

Time

3d

LS -LA

Malcom and Jonathan, dolly

Whole scene

8:00pm-

3f

MCU

Jonathan

Whole scene

9:30-

3j

CU

Jonathan+guts case

Showing guts to end

10:00-

3g

MCU

Malcom

Whole scene

10:15-

3i

CU

Guts case

Opening guts case to end

10:45

3h

CU

Briefcases

Whole scene

10:55

3e

MS mirror

Jonathan to Malcom, dolly whip around?

Whole scene

11:05

3c

MS – mirror

Jonathan, dolly

Walking up to Malcom

11:25

3b

MS – mirror

Jonathan, dolly

Walking in

11:45

3a

LS

Jonathan

Walking in

12:0512:30

Inside


Shotlist and Schedule Day 1 (11 Mar) No.

Type

Subject

Action

Time

2a

XCU

Briefcase

Clicking shut

12:40-

2b

MCU

Malcom

Through windshield sitting in car w briefcase and getting out

12:50-

2c

LS

Malcom

Getting out of car

1:05-

2d

S/C

Malcom

Getting out of car

1:15-

2e

MS

Malcom

Entering BuchD

1:25-

2h

MS

Jonathan

Entering BuchD

1:35-

2f

LS

Malcom

In front of BuchD (light in bathroom)

1:45-

2g

S/C

Malcom

Locations

1:50-

2i

S/C

Jonathan

Locations

2:303:00

Outside


Shotlist and Schedule Day 2 (12 Mar) No.

Type

Subject

Action

Time

1b

MS

Jonathan – dolly in

Whole scene

11:00am-

4b

MS

Jonathan – dolly in

Whole scene

12:00-

1d

MCU

Jonathan, briefcase

Whole scene

12:30-

4d

MCU

Jonathan, briefcase

Whole scene

12:50-

1c

OTS

Briefcase, Jonathan

Whole scene

1:30-

4c

OTS

Briefcase, Jonathan

Whole scene

2:20-

1a

LS

Jonathan

Coming down stairs

3:00-3:30

Basement


Equipment List •

DV track

2x 200 Midget fresnel

8x sandbag

2x kindo flo 400 diva

5x AC

LED bank

2x auto poles

4x c-stand

grip package of clamps etc

single net

HVX200

solid flag

rain cover

2x silk

baby legs

12x12 solid

Manfrotto tripod

boom

1K mickey mole

shotgun mic

1K solarspot

recorder


Crew List • • • • •

Chris Gilling – Director/DP Lydia Strojan – AD Nate Wendel – Sound Operator Kevin Doherty – Gaffer Tim Fernandez – Grip


Conclusions • Scene 1 - During the first scene I felt I made a few directing mistakes. The pacing of the scene is too fast and difficult to slow down in editing. Some dolly shots do not cut too well with the more still shots; some stationary camera angles would have helped. Coverage is sparse but I don't feel as though it needed more.


Conclusions • Scene 1 - During the first scene I felt I made a few directing mistakes. The pacing of the scene is too fast and difficult to slow down in editing. Some dolly shots do not cut too well with the more still shots; some stationary camera angles would have helped. Coverage is sparse but I don't feel as though it needed more.


Conclusions • Scene 2 - Much of the snorricam footage is in very dark places and the HV30 does not seem to handle very well in poor light. On the other hand it looks really great in good light so I should have looked for areas with more contrast as opposed to being just dark. The interresting backdrops did not look as good as I hoped but transitions from bright to dark places did. The HV30 was quite confusing to set up with features such as iris buried in strangely laid out menus.


Conclusions • Scene 3 - The bathroom shot might have been perfected given more time. The flickering light did not totally match the house lights (salad 4 bank kino) and so was not as convincing as I hoped. Trying different gels might have helped since there is too much warm or unmatched light. Also the conversation shots were somewhat uninteresting. There is a large visual jump when the black behind the assassin cuts into the white behind the main character, which I like but I wish had been bolder. I think color correction will work wonders on the bathroom shot, as with many others. There were no outlets in the bathroom and so much AC was needed to bring it in from adjacent rooms - as you can tell in one of the shots.


Conclusions • Scene 4 – Very similar to scene one as they were shot at the same time. The guts were not as distinctive as I had hoped - please refer to Pat's project for some serious guts. Please note that guts are not "my thing“, that was just a coincidence. The puke was also way to green which the camera seemed to highlight. A dolly was really useful in feeling out the scene and making moves based on the acting. The spotlight and 12x12 behind worked well in creating an ultra low key effect.


Conclusions • Transportation - Transport arrangements were much more complicated that I anticipated. My original plans fell through since Lydia's car could only hold 2 passengers when the equipment was in so more trips were needed.


Conclusions • Summary - I think overall, more experience or more time is the key to figuring out how to do more 'normal' scenes such as the bathroom one. My simplest setups were the best (eg. one fresnel in the basement) but cannot be used all the time. I also did not heed what I learned from the first class and did not bring a larger monitor (which may have been why I overlooked cables in shot). Kevin also had some good ideas for setting up of equipment and consolidation of shots when I was running behind and suggested some interesting mirror angles. Everyone working on it was really helpful in coming up with practical and creative ideas.


Chris Gilling, Even