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First Anniversary Edition

SEPTEMBER 2017

Trades&Unions

Labor Day: A time to celebrate unions 1


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Table of Contents • April 2017

Trades&Unions From the publisher - P. 6 Labor Day: A time to celebrate - P. 8 Bricklayers rehab 225-year-old bridge - P. 13

P.10

Local 592 hosts MAGIC Camp - P. 17

P.27

Unions fight for A Lift for a Vet - P. 21 SMART army mobilizes unions - P. 24 Loomis and Williams promoted - P. 27 BCIT creating opportunities - P. 31

P.13

Union member joins town council - P. 34

P.42

Painters & Allieds support community - P. 35 Ensign Elliot monument dedicated - P. 36 Occupational injury claims - P. 40 Crunch time for school projects - P. 42

P.17

Atlantic City construction revival - P. 46

P.46

Bits & Pieces - P. 57

Volume 2 Issue 1 September 2017 Copyright 2017 Trade Media LLC

President & Publisher Chris Ferrari Chief Strategic Advisor Bart Mueller Executive Editor Jane C. Yepez Cover Photo Mike Plunkett

Sales Bret Mueller David Spector Robynn Dumont Photography Curt Hudson Mike Plunkett Mike Tribulas Joe Warner

Writers Don Benevento Kevin Callahan Matt Chando Samantha Costa Shannon Eblen Linda Hinkle, Esq Gus Ostrum Breanna Ruiz Deanna Santo Ken Shuttleworth Joe Tansey

Graphic Design Amanda Ferry Marketing Consultant Jane C. Yepez Cutler Parrish LLC Contact Chris@trademediallc.com

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Trades&Unions From the publisher

Keeping labor issues top of mind It has been one year since we launched Trades & Union magazine, and what a year it has been. In just a year, the publication has doubled in size and it has been my honor to work directly with union leadership and to tell the stories of union members that would not otherwise be told. We are committed to telling the union story and look forward to another great year. By the time you read this, summer will be all but over. It has been a very busy summer on job sites and behind the scenes. Getting school projects done to put kids back in the classroom on time has been a major undertaking by all of our trades. And projects are going full steam ahead in the tri-state area. However, the union way is under attack from legislators in Washington who want to broaden Right To Work, diminish Davis-Bacon, and reduce health coverage by repealing the Affordable

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Care Act. It is important that unions band together to fight this both regionally and nationally. Throughout the summer, we have witnessed numerous occasions where contractors have employed non-union labor snubbing local skilled labor. The result is reduced safety and quality of work, and diminished wages and benefits for trained workers. This trend is dangerous and we are seeing it not only on privately funded jobs, but also those that are publicly funded. The best way to ward off this trend is to continue to get Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) in place and enacted. PLAs protect the public in general and ensure safe and quality work. A continuous supply chain, uniform wages, on-time construction and the use of skilled local labor all serve the public’s interest. Locally, we are very fortunate to have elected officials that come from the building

Representation is crucial to furthering labor’s causes. trades. They understand the importance of these issues and the need to fight for or against them. Congressman Donald Norcross, (D) NJ-1st, is always fighting in Washington to protect workers and workers’ rights. As the only member of Congress who is a union electrician (IBEW Local 351, South Jersey), he understands the challenges that union members face on a daily basis. Continued p. 6


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Keeping labor issues top of mind Continued from p. 4

Congressman Donald Norcross

Senator Steve Sweeney

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In Trenton, Senator Steve Sweeney, (D) NJ-3rd, has been a staunch supporter of labor. Sweeney is an Iron Worker (Local 399 – South Jersey) and also knows the realities faced by the building trades.

the 40-hour work week, medical coverage and fair wages. The country was built on the backs of the men and women in the labor movement, and on Labor Day, we should all remember them.

It is important that the building trades do what they do best and stand with these leaders because they are being challenged and, in Senator Sweeney’s case, being maliciously attacked.

In closing, I hope you enjoy this edition of the Trades and Unions. We ask that our readers and union members support our advertisers whose generosity makes this publication possible.

Last year, labor took a big loss in the general election. This year we cannot afford to be complacent and lose these two seats. Their representation is crucial to furthering labor’s causes. It is imperative that we all work for these legislators and all the labor candidates.

Have a safe, happy and healthy Labor Day.

Labor Day is here. Never forget those that fought hard to get workers better working conditions,

Chris Ferrari President & Publisher Trades & Union LLC

Trades&Unions From the publisher


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Labor Day: A time to celebrate the people who brought you the weekend.

Bob Schiavinato, union organization social services, left, and Congressman Donald Norcross at 2016 Labor Day ceremonies at the Peter J. McGuire memorial.

By Shannon Eblen Photos: Mike Plunkett In September of 1882, an estimated 10,000 workers gathered in New York City to march in a parade, watch fireworks, dance, drink and eat in what is recognized as the first celebration of Labor Day. While the holiday is still enjoyed as a respite from work, recognition of organized labor’s role in establishing it and fighting for modern workplace rights like the 40-hour workweek has fallen by the wayside.

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“It would be nice if it were more recognized nationally,” says Kurt Krueger, business manager of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 322. “Now [people] look at it as the end of summer and a day for sales. Sad to say, Memorial Day is the same thing -- the beginning of summer and more sales.” A third-generation union leader, Krueger grew up understanding what Labor Day meant. His father would tease the kids on the last holiday before school started by saying:

“You’re welcome for this three-day weekend.” When Krueger still worked in the field, he recalls, he had a sticker on his hard hat that read: “Union Labor, from the people who brought you the weekend.” “The weekend, workplace safety, social security, unemployment – the entire social safety net, things that people now basically take for granted … all of those things are attributed entirely to organized labor,” says Christopher Hayes, an instructor at Rutgers University who specializes in urban

and labor history. “The backdrop for the establishment of Labor Day was the Gilded Age,” says Hayes, “a period of unprecedented wealth for those with names like Carnegie or Rockefeller, but for the vast majority of workers, it was the ‘wild west.’” Back then, even the elderly and children worked, he says. “No one celebrated the worker. These were people with precarious lives.” There was no job security, no regulations


protecting workers, no retirement. Protections enjoyed today took decades to enact. After that first parade in 1882, Labor Day was introduced state-by-state. New Jersey was one of the first states to sign it into law. Congress didn’t declare it a national holiday until 1894, and only then, Hayes says, to save face following the Pullman railroad strike that effectively shut down the railroads and led to violence in 26 states. There is great debate as to who first proposed a celebration of labor, whether it was Peter J. McGuire of Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners or Matthew Maguire, a machinist. But McGuire is the local favorite. He is buried at Arlington Park Cemetery in Pennsauken, and every Labor Day, local unions gather to lay a wreath at his grave and award scholarships to children of union members. According to Rich Sweeney, president of Iron Workers Union 399 and a second-generation union leader, “It would be nice if [New Jersey] did big parades like the Philadelphia unions do. Philadelphia does a great job. Their building trades go all out,” he said. Sweeney said he does make an effort to educate apprentices about the history, but would like it if the public had that same awareness. “Even for the people who work non-union, it’s the 40-hour

workweek and all the safety; it’s good for them also.” That union membership has declined over the years doesn’t help the cause. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016 only 10.7 percent of workers across the country were union members, 16.1 percent in New Jersey. According to Krueger, it would help if leaders, like politicians or the president, even celebrities, would speak out about the significance of Labor Day. But while he would like people to recognize who made the holiday possible, he says, he also wants them to just take the day off and enjoy the time with their families. The only time the history and significance really comes up, Hayes points out, is in articles like this one. “It’s sad that it winds up that people have to write articles about how we remember Labor Day,” Hayes says, “which is really pointing out we don’t remember Labor Day.”

Union members march in 2016 to show their support for organized labor.

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Cumberland County Democratic Committee Re elect Carol Musso Freeholder Jack Surrency for Freeholder George Castellini for Freeholder Re elect Sheriff Robert Austino Doug Long, Chairman Mike Burden, Executive Director

Paid for by the Cumberland County Democratic Committee

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The Burlington County Freeholder The Burlington County Freeholder Board is proud to stand with working Board is proud to stand with working families, policiesthat thathelp help families,and and promote promote policies totocreate propertytaxes, taxes, create jobs, jobs, reduce reduce property and and invest invest in in infrastructure. infrastructure.

TheBurlington Burlington County County Republican The RepublicanParty Party congratulates the Trades & Union Digest congratulates the Trades & Union Digest on all of their success. on all of their success. Paid for by the Burlington County Republican Committee, Treas. C. Lambiase, 223 High St, Mt. Holly NJ 08060

Paid for by the Burlington County Republican Committee, Treas. C. Lambiase, 223 High St, Mt. Holly NJ 08060

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Bricklayers Local 5 rehabilitating 225-year-old Stony Brook bridge

The goal of historians is to bring the bridge back to its original state. By Joe Tansey Photos: Mike Plunkett

The men and women of Bricklayers Local 5 have taken on the job of a lifetime – rehabilitating the oldest bridge in the state of New Jersey. The 82-foot-long Stony Brook Bridge was completed in 1792 when George Washington was president. It played a key role in the Battle of Princeton when Washington and his troops almost destroyed it in an effort to keep the British from crossing. Happily, that did not happen. The historic

landmark had been in continuous use until 2016 when part of the bridge collapsed. Some temporary repairs were made but today, the bridge is finally undergoing a major rehabilitation. “It’s not a restoration,” said Leon Jones, field representative of Local 5. “It’s a complete rehabilitation and historical archaeologists are overseeing the entire process.” Jones explained that all the old stone taken off the bridge has been numbered and categorized so it can be put

back in the same place. The goal of the project is to achieve historical integrity along with structural integrity. “We’re replacing all of the power pits and guardrail sides,” explains Jones. “We’re rehabbing the arches and there’s an old cannon ball going back to the 1700s that’s being stabilized. “There are at least 16 inspectors on the project on any given day to make sure everything is historically accurate. There were five or six mock-ups done even

before the project was started. It’s been very intense,” he said. “Although the process is more complicated than most jobs,” said Jones, “figuring out the minute details and making sure everything is in place for the reopening of the bridge is something the bricklayers take immense pride in. When it’s reopened, they’ll have an even bigger sense of pride knowing they were the ones who rehabilitated one of the state’s most historic places.”

Continued on p. 14

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1. Platinum Scaffolding’s Project Foreman Tommy Cehula and Superintendent Tom Blake, both of Local 1, and Rick Tillman, Local 5, in front of the original grist mill wall which was part of the original bridge. 2. Leon Jones, Jr., Field Representative of Bricklayers Local 5, explains how the rehab must meet historians’ requirements. 3. Project Foreman Tommy Cehula shows mock samples of stone work approved by historians. 4. Rehab is in progress on New Jersey’s oldest bridge located off Route 206. 5. L-R, Mike Kubar, Local 5; Steve Pfiel, Local 1; Matt Snyder, Local 5, and Frank Kifer, Local 8, Ohio, continue work on the project. 6. Bridge marker dating back to 1792.

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7. Senior RGA historian Teresa Bulger in orange vest meets with Tom Blake of Local 1.

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Local 592 hosts Magic Camp Encouraging women to enter the trades By Breanna M. Ruiz Photos: Mike Plunkett

Pounding work boots echo through the building as a group of fresh faces enters the Cement Masons and Plasterers Local 592 training center in Gloucester City, New Jersey. Sporting fluorescent vests and hard hats, the participants at MAGIC Camp arrive fully prepared to take on the day. MAGIC, Mentoring A Girl In Construction, perfectly describes what it feels like to be in the presence of these young women. The summer camp, sponsored by the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) Philadelphia Chapter 145, is a free week-long program that introduces seventh to twelfth grade girls to the rewarding world of trades. In July, camp members had the chance to learn about the benefits of pursuing a trade and enrolling in the union’s cement masonry and plastering apprenticeship program. Rob Petracci, the cement masons’ safety instructor and coordinator, stands at the head of the room. Looking into the crowd, he says, “We need women in our industry. A woman can finish concrete just as good as a man can. You can.” According to a 2014 report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, women comprise only 1.2 percent of the entire U.S. construction workforce. According to Petracci, it’s a truth more need to hear. Anthony Ditri, the safety instructor for Local 592, has been a union member for the last 31 years. Ditri, who could probably plaster a wall in his sleep, emphasizes that no

Robert Petracci, apprentice safety instructor/coordinator, teaches the class how to level concrete.

matter who you are or where you come from, hard work is the key to success. “If you master your craft, there is so much you can do, from plastering in the field to instructing classes in the training center. You’re always going to be needed in the trades. If you’re a hands-on person and you’re handy, you can always make a living,” says Ditri. After learning about the trade, it was time for what the girls of MAGIC Camp refer to as ‘the fun part.’ The campers, eager to get their hands dirty, broke off into two groups. The instructors showed their teams a few essential tools of the trade before the girls dived in and put them to use. Angelique Hunter, NAWIC member and MAGIC Camp volunteer, was excited to be a part of the program as she donned a hard hat and supported the girls from the sidelines. Passionate

about community outreach and empowering women of all ages and backgrounds, Hunter comments: “You’ll see that most of the girls here are from the inner city and it’s important to introduce them to this opportunity.” Hunter is the Marketing and Promotions Director of Smith Flooring Inc. Witnessing her mother and father build their company from the ground up has given Hunter a great appreciation for the construction field. “In construction, you work, you branch off, and eventually you can own your own shop. In my opinion, that’s the American Dream,” she says. Mary Gaffney, owner of GEM Mechanical Services and NAWIC Chapter 145 director, moves skillfully in the background while snapping photos of the campers plastering a wall and stamping Continued on p. 19

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India Barnes, left, and Safiyyah Franklin learn how to plaster a wall at Local 592 MAGIC Camp. 18


Continued from p. 17

concrete. Her smile is contagious. Gaffney, one of the leaders of this year’s MAGIC Camp, has spent the last eight months preparing for this week. “This is another avenue for young women who may not be interested or have the opportunity to go to college. They have a chance to learn a trade that gives them the ability to provide for their family,” says Gaffney. She watches the group in awe. This year, Gaffney wanted to work directly with the students.

“has made me feel like a strong, smart, and bold young woman.” She promises she’ll be back next summer. Each year MAGIC Camp and unions like Local 592 teach young women that the world of construction is

full of opportunities. The girls arrived at the training center to learn about cement masonry and plastering, but most importantly, they leave with confidence, knowing they are valued, equal, and capable of having a successful career in the trades.

Through team building exercises, visits to various unions, and exciting handson experience, she hopes to show these girls that a career in the trades can be both fulfilling and fun. “There are so many benefits for girls in the trades. Besides being able to provide for your family, there’s the gratification they’ll have each day knowing that they achieved something, that they built something that they can point to and say, ‘I did that’ and be proud,” says Gaffney.

MAGIC Camp participants learn how plaster is prepared.

Fifteen-year-old Jaydah has attended MAGIC camp for the past three years. Although she has not yet decided on a career, her visit to Local 592 taught her an invaluable lesson. “Girls and women can do what men can do. Girls are still strong in the world,” she says. [This program]

Kara Harris learns how to use a trowel under the supervision of camp volunteer Thalia Witherill.

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*** 98 Deptford Phillip Schocklin Joseph Lukac 102 Manville Borough Council 269 District 14Council State Assembly WayneMisciagna DeAngelo UBC 255 Absecon Council Michael RingIBEW * IBEW 164 Park Ridge Council Keith Misciagna *** 98 Deptford Council Phillip Schocklin 269 District 14 State Assembly Wayne DeAngelo Joseph Lukac IBEW 102 Manville Borough Council IBEW 164 Park Ridge Council Keith Misciagna * UBC 255 Camden County Freeholder Jonathan Young, Sr. *351 IBEW Pittsgrove Board of Education Steven DiMatteo ** 269 District 14 State Assembly Wayne DeAngelo Joseph Lukac 102 Manville Borough Council IBEW 164 Park Ridge Council Keith *** IBEW 269 District 14 Board State Assembly Wayne DeAngelo 351 Pittsgrove of Education StevenMisciagna DiMatteo Troy Singleton UBC 715 District 7 State Senate IBEW 351 Buena Borough Council Gregory McAvaddy * 164 Park Ridge Council Keith Misciagna * IBEW Pittsgrove of Education Steven DiMatteo ** * 269 District 14 Board State Council Assembly Wayne DeAngelo IBEW 351 351 Buena Borough Gregory McAvaddy USW 943 Council John 400 District 11 StateWoodstown Assembly 351 Pittsgrove of Education Eric Houghtaling Steven DiMatteo *** *Hall* IBEW 269 14 Board Wayne DeAngelo IBEW 351 Buena Borough Council Gregory McAvaddy IBEW 351 Pittsgrove of Education Steven DiMatteo ** * 400 DistrictBorough 11Board StateCouncil Assembly Eric Houghtaling IBEW 456 District 17 State Assembly 351 Buena Joseph Egan * Gregory McAvaddy IBEW 400 District 11 State Assembly 351 Pittsgrove Board of Education Eric Houghtaling Steven DiMatteo IBEW 351 Buena Gregory McAvaddy 456 DistrictBorough 17 StateCouncil Assembly Joseph Egan * **** * * IBEW 827 Palmyra Council 400 District 11 State Assembly Gina Ragomo-Tait Eric Houghtaling 351 Pittsgrove Board of Education Steven DiMatteo IBEW 400 456 District 17 State Council Assembly 351 Buena Borough Joseph Egan * Gregory McAvaddy IBEW District 11 State Assembly Eric * ** 827 Palmyra Council GinaHoughtaling Ragomo-Tait IBEW 456 District 17 State Assembly Joseph Egan * 351 Buena Borough Council Gregory McAvaddy * IBEW 827 Palmyra Council 400 District 11 State Assembly Gina Ragomo-Tait Eric Houghtaling IBEW 456 District 17 State Assembly Joseph Egan** * ** Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati 827 Palmyra Council Gina Ragomo-Tait 400 District 11 State Assembly Eric Houghtaling * IBEW 456 District 17 State Assembly Joseph Egan * IBEW 827 Palmyra Council Gina Ragomo-Tait * Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education 1158 Lori Brigati * Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education IBEW 456 District 17 State Assembly Joseph Egan * Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati * 827 Palmyra Council Gina Ragomo-Tait * Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education ILA 1291 Deptford Council Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education William Lamb IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati * * * 827 Palmyra Council Gina Ragomo-Tait Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati * ** ILA 1291 Deptford Council William Lamb Ironworkers 399 District 3 State Senate Steve Sweeney Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education ILA 1291 Deptford Council Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education William Lamb IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati * ** Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education Ironworkers 399 District 3 State Senate Steve Sweeney IUOE 68 Morristown Mayor ILA 1291 Deptford Council Timothy Dougherty * William Lamb Passaic Valley Regional H.S. District Board of Education IBEW 1158 Lori Brigati * ** Ironworkers 399 District 3 State Senate Steve Sweeney Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education ILA 1291 Deptford Council William Lamb ** IUOE 68 Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty * Ironworkers 399 District 3 State Senate Steve Sweeney Ray Cibo IFPTE 195 Glassboro Board of Education IUOE 68 Morristown Mayor ILA 1291 Deptford Timothy Dougherty * William Lamb ** Ironworkers 399 District 3 Council State Senate Steve Sweeney IUOE 68 District State Assembly Thomas Giblin Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty * ILA 1291 Deptford334Council William Lamb *** Ironworkers 399 District State Senate Steve Sweeney IUOE 68 Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty * District 34 State Assembly Thomas Giblin * James Gorman IUOE 68 Galloway Council Ironworkers 399 District 334State Senate Steve Sweeney * IUOE 68 District State Assembly Thomas Giblin * Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty * James Gorman IUOE 68 68 Galloway Council East Hanover Council Michael Martorelli IUOE District 34Council State Assembly Thomas Giblin * ** Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty James Gorman IUOE 68 Galloway IUOE 68 District 34 State Assembly Thomas Giblin * Name Union Office Sought East Hanover Council Michael Martorelli * Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council James Gorman 68 Galloway Council IUOE 68 East Hanover Council Michael Martorelli * District 34 State Assembly Thomas Giblin * Name Union Office Sought James Gorman IUOE Galloway Council LIUNA68 55 Essex County Freeholder ChrisCivitan Carney 825 Frankford Council Wayne Richardson * Nick IUOE 825 Frankford Council 68 East Hanover Council Michael Martorelli District 34Council State Assembly Thomas Giblin * ** Name Union Office Sought Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council James Gorman 68 Galloway LIUNA 55 Essex County Freeholder Wayne Richardson IUOE East Hanover Michael Martorelli * Nick Civitan 825 Frankford Council LIUNA68 77 Camden City Council Curtis Jenkins * Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council James Gorman 68 Galloway Council LIUNA 55 Essex County Freeholder Wayne Richardson * Nick IUOE Frankford Council 68 East Hanover Michael Martorelli ** LIUNA 77 Camden City Council Curtis Jenkins * Jr. Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council LIUNA825 172 Florence Council FrankCivitan Baldorossi, Nick Civitan IUOE 825 Frankford Council 68 East Hanover Michael Martorelli ** * denotes Incumbent LIUNA 77 Camden City Council Curtis Jenkins * Jr. Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council LIUNA 172 Florence Council Frank Baldorossi, Nick IUOE Frankford LIUNA825 172 Lawrence Council JamesCivitan Kownacki* * denotes Chris Carney IUOE 825 Frankford Council + denotes Labor Incumbent Candidate LIUNA825 172 Florence Council FrankCivitan Baldorossi, Nick IUOE Frankford LIUNA 172 Lawrence Council James Kownacki* Jr.* * denotes Incumbent Fred Scheetz LIUNA825 172 Florence Council + denotes Labor Candidate Nick Civitan IUOE Frankford Council * denotes LIUNA Lawrence James Kownacki* Fred Scheetz LIUNA 172 172 Florence Council + denotes LaborIncumbent Candidate * denotes Incumbent + denotes Labor Candidate Fred Scheetz LIUNA 172 Florence Council * denotes Roofers 30 Delsea Regional Board of Education Mario Christina* + denotes LaborIncumbent Candidate * denotes Roofers 30 30 Delsea Regional Board of Education Mario Christina + denotes LaborIncumbent Candidate Roofers Atlantic City Council George Tibbitt** Roofers 30 Delsea Regional Board of Education Mario Christina * + denotes Labor Candidate Roofers 30 Atlantic City Council George Tibbitt * SAG/AFTRA District 4 State Assembly Paul Moriarty* Roofers 30 Atlantic Council George Tibbitt** SAG/AFTRA District 4City State Assembly Paul Moriarty UA 24 Warren Hills Regional Board of Education Christopher Hamler* SAG/AFTRA District 4 State Assembly Paul Moriarty * UA 24 Warren Hills Regional Board of Education Christopher Hamler * UBC 255 Atlantic County Freeholder John Carman* UA Warren Regional Board of Education Christopher * UBC24255 AtlanticHills County Freeholder John CarmanHamler * UBC 255 Atlantic County Freeholder John Carman* UBC 255 Absecon Council Michael Ring* UBC Absecon CouncilFreeholder Michael * Sr.* UBC 255 255 Camden County JonathanRing Young, UBC 255 255 Absecon County CouncilFreeholder Michael Ring * Sr.* UBC Camden Jonathan Young, Troy Singleton UBC 715 District 7 State Senate UBC 255 Camden County Freeholder Jonathan Young, Sr. * Troy Hall Singleton UBC 715 District 7 State Senate USW 943 Woodstown Council * denotes Incumbent John * Troy Singleton UBC 715 District 7 State Senate USW 943 Woodstown Council John Hall* + denotes Labor Candidate USW 943 Woodstown Council John Hall*


Union fighters to put on a good show for A Lift for a Vet Story & photos by Kevin Callahan

Rich Bilo, a former Air Force jet engine mechanic, will join other union members in a fundraising boxing event on September 30 to support A Lift for a Vet, a charity of the International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 5. “I’m a vet and I’m fighting to raise money for those who’ve served,” said Bilo, a Local 19 union member and an Erial resident who played football and wrestled at Timber Creek High School. “It’s an opportunity to give back.” To date, 75 lifts have been installed in the homes of veterans, and this year’s event -- at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 30 at Katie O’Donnell’s Irish Pub, 4501 Woodhaven Road in Philadelphia – will raise funds to install even more. Proceeds from the event will enable A Lift for a Vet to buy and install elevators, chair lifts or wheelchair lifts in the homes of disabled U.S. military service veterans. Accessibility modifications are vital for a disabled veteran and can make it possible for them to stay in their own homes. “We appreciate Katie O’Donnell’s for hosting us,” said Tom Dooley, the business collections manager of Local 542. “One hundred percent of the proceeds goes to A Lift for a Vet.”

Bottom Row kneeling (L to R):Johnny D”Ambrosia, Jerome Kinard, Santino Wade, Roman Wade and Tommy Taylor. Middle Row Standing (L to R): Angelo Torres, Dana Gaeta, Patrick McGuinness, Jake Curran, Jason Whalen, Kevin Manacchio, Dennis Lord, Mike D’Amico and Dave Infante Third Row Standing (L to R): Tom Dooley, Rich Bilo and Ed Shaw.

Johnny D’Ambrosia of Local 252 served with the Marines 0311 infantry. “I just want to give back. There were men and women who lost their lives,” said D’Ambrosia, who has had a couple of amateur fights. “And there are those who lost limbs, so I want to help contribute to their quality of life.” Tommy Taylor of Local 5 was among 10 union members who gathered in August at the Jack Costello Boxing Gym in the Tacony section of Philadelphia to help promote the event. “It is for a good cause, to help those who fought for our country and to represent my local as well,” Taylor

“Life isn’t about losing. It’s about what you do after you lose.” – Rich Bilo said. “But it is the cause that has brought me out to do it.” Kevin Manacchio, Local 30, has a Pennsylvania

boxing license after years of sparring. “The trick is not to get nervous. When you get nervous, you exert energy,” said the 52-year-old Manacchio of Philadelphia. “You don’t know who you will be matched up against, but I won’t let it get to me because you will be out of energy before you start.” The matches will feature both men and women union members. “I think it will be fun,” said Dana Gaeta of Local 252. “It will be a good workout and for a good cause.” Like many of the participants, Dave Continued on p. 22

21


Continued from p. 21

Infante of Local 5, has no previous boxing experience. “I’m excited,” Infante said. “I’m looking forward to putting on a good show for a good cause and to support those who served our country. They

Name: Dave Infante Union: Local 5 Hometown: Bensalem Age: 41 Weight: 185 Boxing Experience: none

Name: Tommy Taylor Union: Local 5 Hometown: Philadelphia Age: 32 Weight: 165 Boxing Experience: None

Name: Kevin Manacchio Union: Local 30 Hometown: Philadelphia Age: 52 Weight: 176 Boxing Experience: sparring

22

need our help to gain their independence in their own homes.” Jerome Kinard of Local 252 played football at Upper Darby High School, so the 23-year-old hopes his athletic experience

Name: Jerome Kinard Union: Local 252 Hometown: Philadelphia Age: 23 Weight: 170 Boxing Experience: None

and youth will serve him well in the ring. “I always like to help the vets and give back to the community,” he said. Local 164 members Patrick McGuinness, a Marine Corp veteran

Name: Patrick McGuinness Union: Local 164 Hometown: Philadelphia Age: 45 Weight: 215 Boxing Experience: none

Name: Jason Whalen Union: Philadelphia Hometown: Local 158 Age: 40 Weight: 230 Boxing Experience: None

Name: Dana Gaeta Union: Local 252 Hometown: Philadelphia Age: 33 Weight: 140 Boxing Experience: None

Name: Johnny D’Ambrosia Union: Local 252 Hometown: Feasterville Age: 38 Weight: 140 Boxing Experience: a couple of amateur fights

Name: Rich Bilo Union: Local 19 Hometown: Erial, NJ Age: 19 Weight: 200 Boxing Experience: fought in the event last year

who played football at Father Judge High School, and Jake Curran, who played football and wrestled at Haddonfield High School, also hope their past athletic experience will help them. Jason Whalen, who played football at West Catholic High School, is looking to help the veterans and himself. “I’m in recovery. I lost everything a year ago, but I’m coming back and I’m clean, so this is something I’m looking forward to,” said Whalen of Local 158. The night will open with the Wade brothers stepping into the ring. Santino, 8, will box his younger brother Roman, 7. “They will be boxing for the FOP Local 5,” said their father, Tim Wade, a retired narcotics officer. “It’s nice they are able to do it for a good cause.” Rich Bilo, 29, fought in the event last year and lost. But he understands the event is about more than the outcome. “It’s about helping those who might have lost a limb in combat. Life isn’t about losing,” he said. “It’s about what you do after you lose.”

Name: Rich Bilo Union: Local 19 Hometown: Erial, NJ Age: 19 Weight: 200 Boxing Experience: fought in the event last year


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SMART Army program mobilizes union members to take action By Gus Ostrum

Innovative, progressive, and yes, smart! These are the appropriate words to describe the new SMART Army program, implemented by The International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers. This unique communications program mobilizes union members to take action when notified of pressing issues affecting their local or state communities. SMART (Sheet Metal Air Rail & Transportation) is one of North America’s most dynamic and diverse unions with 216,000 members, and this new communications program demonstrates the progressiveness often displayed by their leadership. SMART’s members produce and provide the vital services that move products to market, passengers to their destinations, and ensure the quality of the air we breathe. The SMART Army program was rolled out in December 2016 in several states including Pennsylvania and Nevada, according to SMART General President Joseph Sellers, Jr. The trial lasted several months and helped officials refine the program for a national rollout to all 216,000 SMART members in the U.S. in March 2017, a rollout that has been highly

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successful according to Sellers. “Success is measured by the action our brothers and sisters take following the alerts they receive,” says Sellers who has been SMART’s General President since May 2015. “We are using today’s technology to educate and mobilize our members to become involved in community and state issues and, more importantly, to take action.” SMART members can achieve this in several ways. First, members have been prompted to sign up on the Smartaction.org website. After providing basic contact and background information, members are regularly contacted through text and email messages on issues of local and national importance when action is needed. SMART frequently sends informational videos on current issues being addressed, which has been an effective tool in communicating with members. “The videos provide faces of our leaders, including our local reps, who talk directly to our members,” said Sellers. “This tool has been quite effective.” Issues that have been addressed involve health care, workplace, and

International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers General President Joseph Sellers, Jr., launched the SMART Army to give union members a voice on issues of concern to the union, the community and veterans.

community issues, as well as problems affecting U.S. veterans. Across the United States and Canada, SMART members are making their voices heard in halls of power and in the sheet metal and transportation industries they work in. Supporters, mainly in union locals, receive key updates and take action on issues of importance to working families.

mobilized more than 400 local sheet metal workers to take action within 24 hours which helped defeat the measure.

For example, when one state was recently faced with a well-publicized vote on right-to-work legislation, the SMART Action Network

To sign up for the SMART Action Network, union members are encouraged to visit: http://smartaction.org

“This is a perfect example of a win at the local level – and an important one at that,” said Sellers. “Again, our network will need to win these battles on state and local levels. That is where we will be effective.”


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Loomis and Williams promoted at IUEC Local 5 Story & photo by Shannon Eblen

It was a bittersweet moment for Ed Loomis. It was his second-tolast day as business manager of the International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 5. Sitting in his Northeast Philadelphia office, surrounded by portraits and photographs of union members going back nearly a century, Loomis was looking forward to a new chapter and back on three decades of fond memories with colleagues he had known for years. “It’s a family,” Loomis said of Local 5. In his 34 years with IUEC, he has held various positions, including vice president. As business manager, Loomis dealt with day-today operations, grievances, safety matters, benefit problems and even the personal problems of members.

Loomis is too humble to say it, said Joe Williams, the IUEC Local 5 business representative who will take over as business manager, but “all the locals made a big request to put him in that position. His reputation precedes him.” Williams said the five and a half years he has spent working with Loomis have been his best at Local 5. “We became like brothers,” Loomis said. “We’re a tight-knit group,” Williams agreed. That the IUEC Local 5 feels like family might partially be due to the many there who were actual family. Williams followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Loomis’s son, Sean, a mechanic, is

a fourth-generation IUEC Local 5 member, as Loomis started working there with his in-laws in the 1980s. “It was a big building boom at the time,” he said. “That was when Liberty 1 started getting built, and Mellon bank.” Loomis grew up in a union family in Pennsauken. His father was a Teamster, and Loomis said he saw first-hand how well the union provided for his family. “Unions are often treated as a scapegoat these days,” he said, but “all the unions try to do is benefit their members. [People] forget the unions brought them the five-day workweek and health benefits. Everything workers have comes from unions.” Continued on p. 28

In his new position as an international organizer, Loomis will be traveling the region from Pennsylvania to Maine, a job that will keep him on the road three to four days a week. A real challenge, he said, but one he is excited to take on. The choice of Loomis was an obvious one, said IUEC General President Frank Christensen, who has worked with Loomis for 20 years. When he announced the appointment, “The reaction I got from everybody was, ‘Great pick, he’s the right guy for the job.’”

Joe Williams, left, and Ed Loomis take on new challenges at IUEC Local 5.

27


Continued from p. 27

But it wasn’t just the work he loved, and the security the union offered, that made Loomis proud to be part of Local 5. The philanthropic aspect also made the job meaningful. Local 5 union members have built playgrounds in the community. They started a charity that went national called A Lift for a Vet, which installs and covers the cost of vertical transportation systems in homes of disabled military veterans. “[These veterans] raised their families there, been there for 40 or 50 years,” Loomis said. “We make it possible for them

to stay there. There’s no greater satisfaction than seeing the smiles on their faces.” After headstones were vandalized at the Mount Carmel Jewish cemetery in February, said Loomis, “Every building trade union in Philadelphia was there to help.” In his years at Local 5, Loomis has seen technology transform the industry, relay logic controllers giving way to computers. He’s also collected little-known elevator trivia. For example, elevators don’t free-fall like they do on television

or in movies. That’s only happened once, he said, when a plane hit the Empire State Building in 1945, sending an elevator plummeting 75 stories. And with the advent of cell phones, it is unlikely someone would be trapped in an elevator, at least not for very long. All in all, it’s been a fun ride, he said. The day he announced he would be leaving the IUEC Local 5 was one of the hardest days of his life, Loomis said. “I’m going to definitely miss the day-to-day relations I’ve had here for 34 years.”

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BCIT creating opportunities for future employment in the trades By Dr. Christopher Nagy Burlington County Superintendent of Schools Photos: Mike Plunkett Over the past year, Burlington County Institute of Technology has aggressively assessed and upgraded its technical education programs to meet the growing demand of employers in Burlington and surrounding counties. Whether in the adult division or in either of our two high schools, BCIT is committed to preparing students to earn college credits whether a high school student or apprentice. In our adult division, individuals with high school diplomas or more can engage in apprenticeships, preapprenticeship and intern programs to prepare for what the US Department of Labor has identified as “In-Demand Career Fields.� Students in our high schools may select a career major among a wide range of industrial and academic pursuits. This past school year, in partnership with Rowan College at Burlington County, BCIT launched a program in advanced manufacturing and fabrication which is now full after only one year. In addition, BCIT identified three key areas where virtual reality could support the curriculum, offering nontraditional students exposure

BCIT is launching the School of Construction Technology this fall.

to welding, auto-body and collision, and law and public safety. Virtual reality engages students in a near reality that mirrors every aspect of welding, car painting or gun safety. Students in pre-engineering will have

the opportunity to earn their Federal Aviation Association Drone Pilot License to meet employer needs. For the first time in September, BCIT will launch a new School of Construction Technology. This School will directly

respond to the demand for skilled workers in construction trades in the state. This construction technology pathway allows students to earn industrial credentials in carpentry, electrical, HVAC/R, plumbing and welding. Continued on p. 32

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Continued from p. 31

The School of Construction Technology will incorporate field experiences through monthly field trips to various union and non-union operations. Students will have opportunities to interact with invited journeypersons, artisans and apprentices on campus who will provide an overview of a trade through live demonstrations. They will also discuss the applications of key program learning at BCIT to real world demands in the building trades. BCIT will also hold a Career Trades Fair where union and non-union representatives from around the State will meet with students and provide live demonstrations for bricklaying, masonry, carpentry, welding, painting, plumbing, ironwork,

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electrical, heating and air conditioning among a host of other options. The fair will be held on November 15, 2017 as part of National Apprenticeship Week on the BCTI Medford Campus. These demonstrations will be designed to provide a glimpse of the career opportunities that await students upon graduation. BCIT will hold a Career Trades Fair on November 5 at their Medford Campus.

BCIT is committed to customized learning to meet employer needs. BCIT encourages employers to become educational partners and invest in our students and provide on-the-job training opportunities. BCIT is dedicated to being an incubator for learning and leading and to be a “go-to� solution for employer needs.


THERE IS A LOT GOING ON

OVER YOUR HEAD It’s critical that your HVAC system be installed “by the book.” We know, because we wrote the book that sets the standards for the industry. SMACNA standards and manuals address all facets of the sheet metal industry, from duct construction and installation to air pollution control, energy recovery and roofing/architectural sheet metal. They are regarded worldwide as the “gold standard” in the industry. With all these systems over your head do you really want anyone less than an expert installing them? Learn more about SMCA / Local 19 Visit smca.org or call 610-828-4055

SMCA GOLD STANDARD MEMBERS INCLUDE: Accu-Flow Balancing Co., LLC Aer Dux, Inc Air Concepts, Inc. Air Systems, Inc. Baltronix, Incorporated Bonland Industries Campano Mechanical, LLC Cromedy Construction Corp. Dynamic Balancing Co. Eastern Air Balance Corporation Edward J. DeSeta Co., Inc. Environmental Construction Services Ernest D. Menold, Inc. Fisher Balancing Company Hays Sheet Metal, Inc. Hunter Mechanical, Inc. Independent Balancing Co., Inc.

Keystone TAB Consulting, LLC Lor Mar Mechanical Services, Inc. Luthe Sheet Metal, Inc. Modern Controls National Balancing Co., Inc. Optimum Performance Balancing, LLC Precision Air Design, LLC Prime Sheet Metal, Inc. Restaurant Ventilation Design SSM Industries Tab Systems, Inc. Thermodesign Corp. Thomas Company, Inc. Total Comfort Solutions W.F. Smith, Inc. Wm. J. Donovan Co.

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For a complete list of contractors employing the skilled workers of Local 19, visit www.smca.org.

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Frank Rollo is sworn in as a Clayton Councilman. L – R, sons Frank and Ryan Rollo, Frank Rollo, and Dawn Rollo.

Local 14 union member joins Clayton Town Council By: Deanna C. Santo Photos by: Mike Plunkett

On Thursday evening, July 13, the residents of the Borough of Clayton gathered for a town hall meeting to address local events, receive news updates, and express concerns. On the agenda was an opportunity for town residents to meet its newest council member during a swearingin ceremony. Frank Rollo, a 23-year town resident and proud member of Local 14 International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers, was enthusiastically welcomed to his position as Councilman by Mayor Tom Bianco who is currently serving in his second four-year term. Town Council members welcomed 34

Rollo to his first town hall meeting as a council member. Rollo, expressing his excitement about the opportunity to join them, said: “This opportunity came up and I jumped at it,” going on to say that it was yet another chance to “give back to the community.” With leaders like Senator Steve Sweeney and Congressman Don Norcross having trail-blazed the territory of union representation in government, there has been growing enthusiasm among members from an array of trades to follow suit and civically engage. Councilman Rollo is no stranger to serving his town, having volunteered as a coach in local sports and serving on the planning board. He attributes the timing to his two sons saying, “Now that my children…my boys are getting older,

this was the time to do this.” When asked about his goals and priorities while serving on Clayton’s Town Council, Rollo responded: “Dedicating my time, listening, and having open ears to anything that needs to be done. I think that’s a good start and that’ll draw up a plan of what my next move should be. I always enjoy helping people.” Rollo, a proud 30-year union member, paid homage to his home local for the massive support he received along the way to his appointment, acknowledging with gratitude the life it has afforded him and his family. Rollo’s mother, father, wife and two sons were in attendance at the meeting to lend support and celebrate his new appointment.


Painters and Allied Trades support Community Day of Action Every year in April, members of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades throughout the United States and Canada come together to work on projects in the communities where they live and work. This year, District Council 711 in New Jersey dedicated their efforts to the Hamilton Township Library’s Children’s Room which was in much need of a facelift. Partnering with Assemblyman Wayne D’Angelo (D), Scott Chianese, acting director of the Hamilton Township Library, and Pat Tumulty, executive director of the New Jersey Library Association, DC711 painters,

drywall finishers, glaziers and decorators joined together to complete the project while also showing support for the New Jersey Library Construction Bond Act. This legislation, sponsored by Assemblyman D’Angelo and 18 other House Democrats and Republicans, authorizes the issuance of $125 million in state bonds to provide construction grants enabling New Jersey to construct, expand and equip its libraries. The money would be used to finance 50 percent of projects with the other half coming from local governments. “As an international organization

that has been built upon serving our communities for over 120 years,” said Vincent Lane, DC711 business manager/secretary-treasurer, “we are proud to be in Mercer County and to support the Hamilton Township Library to help make it better for the families that come here to enjoy everything it has to offer. “New Jersey public libraries have long been social and economic drivers that enable every citizen regardless of age, race and gender to have the opportunity to grow, learn and imagine. They provide the necessary resources such as internet access and literacy programs for our most vulnerable populations.”

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William Elliot, father of Ensign Elliot, speaks at the dedication with his wife Muriel, daughter Jennifer and other family members at his side.

Ensign Elliot Monument Dedicated Story & photos by Gus Ostrum The family of Navy Ensign John R. Elliott, along with state and local dignitaries including New Jersey State Senate President Stephen Sweeney (Vice President of International Ironworkers) and Assemblyman Adam Taliaferro, formally dedicated a roadside memorial honoring Ensign Elliott on the 17th anniversary of his death at the hands of a drunk driver along a busy stretch of Route 40 in Upper Pittsgrove Township, Salem County. The memorial was refurbished by volunteers from Bricklayers Local 5 and Ironworkers Local 399 whose officials were part of the moving cere-

36

mony held before dozens of attendees on a sun-drenched afternoon. Joining the Elliotts were Richard Tolson, President of The International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers/Administrative District Council of New Jersey, and Richard Sweeney, President of Iron Workers Local 399 and himself a victim of a DUI crash. “Rich Tolson, William Elliott and I got together here one day during a driving rain storm,” said Sweeney, “to discuss what needed to be done to refurbish the memorial, and from there our members did a wonderful job. It’s a great day today to also rename this section of Route 40 for John Elliott, and an honor to be here.”

On July 22, 2000, Elliott was a recent graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy traveling home from Annapolis, MD, to New Jersey for his mother’s birthday when he was killed in a head-on collision with a drunk driver near Woodstown, Salem County. The man who killed Elliott had been arrested earlier in the evening for a DUI and was released to a friend, only to get behind the wheel of a car again. William and Muriel Elliott and their daughter Jennifer and her family were present to participate in the dedication. “We are humbled that John is being honored,” William Elliott told the audience, “and we want to make sure everyone remembers this Continued on p. 38


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Ensign Elliot Monument Dedicated Continued from p. 36 day – not only for the price that John paid, but the price that everyone pays through the perils of drunk driving.” Sadly, it took this senseless tragedy to spur the establishment of the HERO Campaign for Designated Drivers, created by the Elliott family in their son’s memory. The campaign encourages people to become designated drivers and to toughen penalties for people who drive while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. HERO stands for Human Education Resource Officer, a title John Elliott obtained while in the Naval Academy. The HERO Campaign has grown into a regional movement to prevent drunk driving in seven states. Tolson praised the courage of the Elliott family along with the generosity demonstrated by his union members to make this monument a reality. “The members of the Elliott family are remarkable and courageous,” said

Celebrating the life of Ensign Elliot were (L to R): Senator Steve Sweeney, Assemblyman John J. Burizichelli (D) NJ 3rd, Assemblyman Adam Taliaferro (D) NJ 3rd, and William Elliot. Tolson. “And although we came together under these tragic circumstances, we are honored that our own union members were so generous with their time and commitment to this project.” After burying their son, the Elliotts vowed to do everything they could so that no one else would have to face such tragedy. They turned their efforts toward the legislative process

to accomplish their goals. The family convinced local lawmakers to make New Jersey’s DWI laws tougher. The couple lobbied legislators to pass John’s Law in 2001, requiring police to impound the cars of suspected drunk drivers for up to 12 hours. There are about 30,000 arrests for drunk driving every year. A version of John’s Law has been passed on the federal level, and implemented by individual states.

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Occupational injury claims Workers can file claims for long-term injuries By Adam S. Malamut, Esquire

Most people believe you must have had an accident to receive benefits under New Jersey’s Workers’ Compensation Statute. These benefits can include medical treatment, temporary total disability benefits while you cannot work, and even monetary awards for permanent disability from your injury. While it is true that many employers are quick to address injuries following a traumatic accident, this may not be the case for injuries that occur after many years of hard work. Do you wake up in the morning with pain in your back or knees? Have you ever noticed occasional tingling or numbness in your hands? Is getting up out of a chair, or playing with your child a challenge? If you have not had an accident or injury to explain these pains, your job may be to blame and you may have a claim for workers’ compensation benefits under the occupational disease statute. Many jobs that require repetitive motion, prolonged movements, or intense lifting can cause injuries over time. These injuries are sometimes called “cumulative trauma injuries” or “occupational injuries” for purposes of New Jersey Workers’ Compensa-

40

tion claims. Under the law, these injuries are described as “arising out of and in the course of employment, which are due in a material degree to causes and conditions which are or were characteristic of or peculiar to a particular trade, occupation, process or place of employment.”

If you think your job may have caused injury or disability over time, don’t let your entitlement to compensation benefits slip away. What does this mean? An occupational claim is when the type of work you do or where the place in which you perform your work has caused pain or injury over time. Common examples of occupational claims include back and shoulder injuries in jobs that require frequent or heavy lifting; carpal tunnel syndrome in jobs that require frequent typing or other fine motor movements; claims for pulmonary (breathing) injuries from jobs with exposure to chemicals or paints, and knee injuries in jobs that

Adam S. Malamut, Esq.

require frequent kneeling, bending, or squatting. There are many other ways your job could be contributing to your aches and pains. In New Jersey, injured workers’ can file an occupational claim for up to “two years after the date on which the claimant first knew the nature of the disability and its relation to the employment.” If you think your job may have caused injury or disability over time, don’t let your entitlement to valuable medical treatment and other workers’ compensation benefits slip away. For more information and a free consultation, contact Malamut & Associates, LLC, a law firm with offices in Cherry Hill and Woodbridge, at 877-567-5293 or visit www.MalamutLaw.com.


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Summertime is crunch time for school construction projects By Matt Chando Photos: Mike Plunkett

When most people think of summer, an absence from school comes to mind. The normally bustling hallways and classrooms melt away for several months while vacations are taken, barbeques hosted, and batteries recharged. Yet for South Jersey’s trade union members, the dynamic is different. Summertime means a full-on sprint to complete

any one of the many school construction jobs crammed into the months of June, July and August. “When it comes to school jobs, things are moving,” Plumbers & Pipefitters UA Local 322 business representative Fred Green said. “When you take a school job, you’re ready to work because it’s definitely not easy. Believe me, nobody is worried about a hard day’s work, though. They’re eager to get the

job done. Our members are always up to the challenge.” Local 322 has more than 20 active school projects currently. While some deadlines, like those for colleges such as Rowan University and Richard Stockton College, stretch beyond the traditional summer months, the vast majority of work for Local 322 and other local unions have a hard late-August target to ensure area schools can reopen on time. “The biggest challenge for summer construction is

The new student center at Rowan College at Burlington County nears completion.

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the timeframe for actual work,” said Drew Sole, Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds for Glassboro Public School District, which has several active jobs this summer. “The timeframe is very limited for the amount of work that is anticipated. Most teachers would like to be able to get into their classrooms by the third week of August and school runs through the second week of June. Continued on p. 44


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Continued from p. 42 “Deadlines are extremely important in that it would be a major inconvenience to a district if summer projects did not finish on time and the opening of school is delayed. That has an impact on the teaching staff, the students and their families, as a delay in opening means the time lost has to be made up at the end of the year.” Green emphasized planning and communication in April and May as essential groundwork for ensuring successful summer work. This means tracking available jobs, staying in touch with school district officials, and maintaining open lines of communication with general contractors. Putting members in the right position to complete the job safely and on time is the only way such deadlines can be met. “It does pose some sort of challenges in the summer because a lot of our members have vacations planned, and we are working with that very hard pre-Labor Day deadline,” Green said. “Knowing when jobs are coming up, we can work with contractors to know exactly what they need to get the job done and make sure we provide it. We have a great crew of men and women that work their butts off.”

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1. Campus walkways are prepared by Austin Moore, left, and Javier Berroa, LIUNA Local 172. Edward Mount, Local 825, operates the hoe. 2. Chris Lang, Sheet Metal Local 27, works on a duct in the mechanical room. 3. Brian Kamp, business representative for Sheet Metal Workers Local 27 and an RCBC trustee, visits the project to check on progress.

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Union members and contractors play key roles in Atlantic City Revival By Gus Ostrum Photos: Mike Plunkett

A revival in Atlantic City is in full swing and at the center of it are union workers from all around the Philadelphia-South Jersey region. A renaissance cannot come fast enough for the beleaguered shore town which has seen steady drops in revenue from the closing of casinos over the past several years. The revival is welcomed by members of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry Local 322. “It’s about time,” said Fred Green, Jr., Business Agent for Local 322. “Atlantic City has been in a free fall for a few years, and it’s great to see the city make a comeback. Everyone benefits. Consumers, local citizens and especially our union work force.” Local 322 provides skilled plumbers, pipefitters and HVAC service technicians to Southern New Jersey counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean and Salem. The start of new projects in Atlantic City has been especially brisk, and plenty of projects are underway through 2019.

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“The projects are available and we expect our skilled contractors to enjoy steady employment over the next two years,” said Green. “We knew it was just a matter of time before this happened. A successful Atlantic City means a lot to the entire state of New Jersey, and businesses are beginning to invest once again.” Heading the list of construction projects scheduled is the $500-million renovation of the former Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort by Hard Rock International. The new Hard Rock Hotel and Casino is expected to bring thousands of jobs and a vibrant presence to the Boardwalk, with hopefully a shot in the arm to the city’s casino gaming industry. Also scheduled is the Stockton University project that will include a three-story, 56,000-square-foot academic building along with a 200,000-squarefoot residential complex that will house more than 500 students. The Stockton project is part of the $220-million Gateway Project that includes an adjacent six-story office tower that will serve as headquarters for South Jersey Gas. Completion of the Stockton project is scheduled for the fall of 2018.

Union workers will also work on the Inlet Boardwalk Project at the Absecon Inlet, a project that includes the rebuilding of the Boardwalk that connects the existing boardwalk to Gardner’s Basin. Sections of the boardwalk have been closed for decades and some sections were washed away by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. When finished, the project will complete a nearly six-mile motor-free route for walkers and bicyclists stretching from the Margate-Ventnor city line through Atlantic City.

In addition, a $138-million entertainment complex featuring a bar and restaurant, a food court, retail shops, video games and a Polercoaster is scheduled for completion by summer 2019 in the area once occupied by the Sands Casino. The Polercoaster, designed by U.S. Thrill Rides, transforms a traditional roller coaster design into a vertical amusement ride with loops, dips and twists. Continued on p. 48

Members of Plumbers Local 322, Iron Workers 399 and IBEW Local 351 take a break for a quick photo at the Stockton College project.


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Continued from p. 46 The availability of local jobs not only benefits UA Local 322, but also members of District Council 21 of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades. District Council 21 provides skilled painters, drywall finishers, wall coverers, glaziers and glass workers, sign and display workers among others. Mike Laughlin, DC 21 business representative, is enthusiastic about the opening of the Hard Rock Casino. Laughlin previously worked on site at Hard Rock’s predecessor, the Taj Mahal, and sees the project as an excellent opportunity.

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“We will easily have 70 to 80 glaziers working in Atlantic City regularly, and we could push 150 to 200 through the winter if the Hard Rock meets their construction goals,” Laughlin said. “And, of course, the new facility will need maintenance, and we will have our workers available for that later on.” Much of the contracted work on the Hard Rock will come through Strauss Glass of Atlantic City. Laughlin also feels there will be potential work on the AC Gateway Project as well as with the pop-up businesses that open near the site of the Stockton campus and South Jersey Gas Headquarters. “We haven’t seen these types of opportunities since the Revel Casino opened a few years back, so we are pleased that our members will be getting regular work,” Laughlin said. Other local South Jersey and Philadelphia area unions and their members are expected to play major roles in construction of the Atlantic City facilities currently on Continued on p. 49

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the drawing board while State and local politicians have also fought for and contributed to the Atlantic City renaissance. Democratic State Senate President Stephen Sweeney of Gloucester County noted at the Stockton groundbreaking: “When we disagree, we disagree,” Sweeney commented referring to the planning of the Atlantic City renaissance and plan for revival. “But when we agree, we work like hell to make things happen. Atlantic City is too important to the entire state for it to fail.”

PHOTO CAPTIONS 4

1. The Taj Mahal will become the Hard Rock Café when construction is complete. 2. (L-R) John Lamanter, Bob Middleton and Joe Lamanter, Electricians Local 351, work on the Inlet boardwalk project. 3. Butch Widmaier, left, and Daniel Connor, Plumbers Local 322, work at the Inlet boardwalk project.

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4. Construction of the Stockton College parking garage is underway. 5. A Stockton College classroom building is under construction as part of the Atlantic City Gateway Project. 6. A view of the Stockton project on Albany Avenue.

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Trades&Unions

Join The Union Connection Network The Building Trades, Legislators and Civic Leaders have worked in tandem for years to create an economically thriving Philadelphia/South Jersey region. Supported by local businesses, the region has prospered. Be a part of that prosperity and take your business to the next level by building a lasting relationship with the Building Trades Industry. Join the Union Connection Network to connect with people who can help your organization thrive.

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As a member, your organization will be listed in the print edition of Trades and Unions distributed to union halls and members, and in over 40 area WAWAs, ShopRites and Heritage Dairy Stores.

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Cement Masons and Plasterers Local 592 - www.opcmia592.com

3281 Route 206, Suite 1 Bordentown, NJ 08505 (609) 324-9681

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2014 Hornig Road Philadelphia, PA 19116 Stephen F. Pettit, Business Manager

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Ironworkers Local 399 www.ironworkers399.org 409 Crown Point Road Westville, NJ 08093 (856) 456-9323 Richard Sweeney, President & Business Manager

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Sheet Metal Workers Local 27- www.smwlu27.org P. O. Box 847 Farmingdale, NJ 07727 (732) 919-1999 Andrew C. Caccholi, President & Business Manager

Plumbers & Pipefitters Local 9 - www.ualocal9.org 2 Iron Ore Road @ Route 33 Englishtown, NJ 07726 (732) 792-0999 Michael K. Maloney, Business Manager & Secretary/Treasurer

Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 - www.smartlu19.org 1301 South Columbus Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19147 (215) 952-1999 Gary Masino, President & Business manager

United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry Local 322 - www.ua322.org 534 South Route 73 Winslow, NJ 08095 (609) 567-3322 Kurt R. Krueger, Jr., Business Manager

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Bits & Pieces Ocean City, NJ: A strong union town

saying he refused to accept any tolerance of ‘‘bigotry and domestic terrorism.’’

In an article on 24/7 Wall Street, an online business publication, Ocean City, NJ, was named one of the 14 strongest union towns in the U.S. based on the percentage of the labor force that is unionized. With 29 percent of the 6,624 workers as union members, Ocean City ranked 9th on the list.

‘‘President Trump’s remarks today repudiate his forced remarks about the KKK and neo-Nazis,’’ Trumka said in a statement. ‘‘We must resign on behalf of America’s working people, who reject all notions of legitimacy of these bigoted groups.’’

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%

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13. Vallejo-Fairfield, CA

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12. Johnston, PA

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11. Monroe, MI

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10. El Centro, CA

28.6

9. Ocean City, NJ

29.0

Trumka announced earlier in the week that he was ‘‘assessing’’ his role on Trump’s bench of factory-job advisers after the president took two days to explicitly condemn a white supremacist rally that turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia. He chose to leave the council after Trump again said that blame fell on ‘‘both sides’’ for the violence that erupted.

Philly’s tallest building nears completion Comcast II, formally called the Comcast technology center, is just months away from completion in the first quarter of 2018. The building, begun in late 2014, will contain 60 stories and 9,000-plus windows. The last beam will be put in place sometime this fall and will be celebrated by a Topping-Off ceremony. About 1,500 people have been employed on the project. About 3,000-plus employees are expected to move in sometime in early 2018.

8. San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles-Arroyo Grande, CA

29.1

7. Topeka, KS

29.2

6. Duluth, MN-WI

29.9

5. Carbondale-Marion, IL

30.5

4. Saginaw, MI

32.1

3. Colorado Springs, CO

34.0

2. Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY

34.5

1. Springfield, IL

37.1

AFL-CIO head abandons Trump’s council Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, the largest group of labor unions in the country, quit President Donald Trump’s manufacturing council on August 15, with the labor leader

Continued on p. 58

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Bits & Pieces Ten movies about unions not to be missed

Made in Dagenham, 2010, dramatizes the Ford sewing machinists strike of 1968.

Bread and Roses, 2000, depicts the struggle of poorly paid janitorial workers in Los Angeles.

Hoffa, 1992, a biographical film of the Teamsters Union leader.

Matewan, 1987, details the events of a coal miners’ strike in 1920.

Norma Rae, 1979, about Crystal Lee Jordan’s successful attempt to unionize her textile factory. I’m All Right Jack, 1959, a comedy with Peter Sellers playing a shop steward. On the Waterfront, 1954, a drama about longshoremen with Marlon Brando.

The Grapes of Wrath, 1940, about an Oklahoma family that becomes migrant workers during the Great Depression.

Black Fury, 1935, depicts the hardships among striking coal miners in 1929.

Final Offer, 1985, about the 1984 contract negotiations with General Motors.

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Trades & Unions Digest  

September 2017 Edition: The meaning of Labor Day, restoring a historic bridge, fighting for veterans, AC being built, schools getting ready...