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LIBERTY JEANS.APOTHECARY Great Marlborough Street London W1B 5AH

Prepared By: Christine Bulbrook Submission: December

3rd

2009

Course Tutor: Sue Dean IMA Year 1/ Report Word count: 3286

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Table of Contents

2

Table of Figures........................................................................................................................... 3

3

Table of Tables............................................................................................................................ 4

4

Executive Summary .................................................................................................................... 5

5

Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 6

6

Liberty to Date ............................................................................................................................ 7

7

The JEANS.APOTHECARY Mission Statement .......................................................................... 8

8

Industry Profile ........................................................................................................................... 9

9

Market Segment ......................................................................................................................... 9 9.1

10

Strategic Market Segment drivers........................................................................... 9 Product Proposition ............................................................................................................... 10

10.1

Product Competition .........................................................................................12

10.2

Product Environment ........................................................................................12

10.3

Sale Environment ..............................................................................................13

11

Pricing................................................................................................................................... 15

12

Marketing Plan ....................................................................................................................... 17

12.1

Above The Line Advertising................................................................................17

12.1.1 12.1.2 12.1.3

Magazines ............................................................................................................................... 18 London Taxis ........................................................................................................................... 19 Online Banners ........................................................................................................................ 19

12.2

Below The Line Advertising ............................................................................... 20

12.3

Public Relations Promotion ................................................................................21

12.4

Justification of Costs..........................................................................................21

12.5

Campaign Timing ..............................................................................................22

13

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 23

14

Appendix A – Primary Market Research .................................................................................. 25

15

Appendix A – Secondary Research ..........................................................................................27

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Table of Figures

Figure 1 JEANS.APOTHECARY Brand Structure............................................................................... 5 Figure 2 JEANS.APOTHECARY’s Branding ...................................................................................... 8 Figure 3 The Brand Logo ..................................................................................................................... 8 Figure 4 Lycra technology silhouette Figure 5 High Quality Denim .................................................. 10 Figure 6 JE.AP Superior Fit ................................................................................................................11 Figure 7 JE.AP Confidence .................................................................................................................11 Figure 8 7 For All Mankind Jeans Figure 9 Not Your Daughters Jeans................................................ 12 Figure 10 Product Environment .........................................................................................................13 Figure 11 eStyle software portal ....................................................................................................... 14 Figure 12 Apothecary Envelopes for Sales Receipts Figure 13 Inspiration for Shopping Bags ............... 20 Figure 14 Money-off Voucher ............................................................................................................ 20 Figure 15 1/4ly Liberty Magazine ...................................................................................................... 20

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Table of Tables

Table 1 JEANS.APOTHECARY Competitors Bulbrook, 2009 .................................................................... 15 Table 2 Retail considerations when determining price Cox & Brittan. (2004) .............................................. 16 Table 3 JE.AP and Competitors Price Comparison (Bulbrook, 2009) ............................................................ 17

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Executive Summary

This report serves to detail a proposal for a new sub-brand of jeans for Liberty Department Store. The sub-brand will be JEAN.APOTHECARY, with JE.AP for short. The Unique Selling Point is ‘Jeans, but Better’. The Mission Statement focuses on expert and eclectic design using modern fabrics and techniques in-keeping with Liberty traditions. This product aims to fill the gap in the current jeans market by providing jeans manufactured with considerations for the over thirties woman. This target market segment comprises women 28 – 48 year old in the AB social group who enjoy shopping and fashion. She wears jeans for style and practicality but wants a product sympathetic to post-twenties body. The JEAN.APOTHECARY 5 pocket western jeans with Liberty print accents will feature optional strategically placed control support. The sub-store will be based within the Liberty Flagship Department Store, Marlborough Street and feature modern/vintage and eclectic furnishings and visuals. The proposed price-point of £220.00 will fall into the luxury jeans category. This is in line with competitor and reflects details of design and promotional activities. A planned strategic marketing campaign aims to begin in September 2010 with a proposed budget of £376, 000. This budget will serve a six month campaign and utilizes prominent magazines and online news sources with optimum AB readership. Alongside these will be a fleet of London Taxis covered in vinyl boasting the JEAN.APOTHECARY brand. To compliment these there will be in store promotions including shopping bags and Apothecary-‘esque’ visual merchandising for maximum exposure of this new Liberty sub-brand.

Respond to tailored research and Consumer ideals

Product Design based on providing Consumer Value

Consumer Led Offering and Positive Buying Experience

Figure 1 JEANS.APOTHECARY Brand Structure

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Introduction

In 2008 Liberty underwent a makeover with its Chief Executive, Mr. Geoffroy de La Bourdonnaye, at the helm. This make-over was titled ‘Renaissance’. The new focus and theme is fully in-keeping with the traditional neoclassical style of Liberty to date. Renaissance according to Oxford Dictionary is ‘a revival of or renewed interest’ in something. Alongside this renewal, Liberty have successfully launched sub-brand ‘Liberty of London’. To continue this diversification, Liberty proposes introducing a five pocket Western Jeans range. This report will outline the present day jeans market. Considerable focus will be on the suitable market segment and brand identity to complement the proposed five pocket Western Jeans range. The latter sections of this report detail a marketing campaign using both media and PR for effective communication of the brand. This new sub-brand will excite the existing and new Liberty consumer alike, by mixing some modern concepts with classic Liberty traditions.

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Liberty to Date

LIBERTY of Old Since its start in 1875 Liberty Department Store has stayed true to its’ ethos of offering not only the luxurious but also the eclectic. Oscar Wilde himself described it as "The chosen resort of the artistic shopper“. (Retail Renaissance at Liberty, 2009)

LIBERTY and A New Direction In the spring of 2009 Liberty initiated a modernizing venture with the introduction of a few drastic changes. This has been referred to in-store as the Liberty Renaissance. “It’s got to be a bit mad, doesn’t it? It is Liberty, after all.” Yasmin Sewell, Creative Consultant, Liberty (Retail Renaissance at Liberty, 2009)

LIBERTY and The Future This report proposes a new product for a new Liberty. This product will be in-keeping with Liberty’s renaissance that will bridge the generation gap between the old and new Liberty customer. Presenting:

“JEANS.APOTHECARY”

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The JEANS.APOTHECARY Mission Statement

Through its sub-brand JEANS.APOTHECARY, Liberty will provide expertly designed Jeans, incorporating optional strategically placed support injected with some Liberty eclecticism. We’ll make your jeans experience better because we are:

JEANS.APOTHACARY “Jeans, but better” (Unique Selling Point) Figure 2 JEANS.APOTHECARY’s Branding

JE.AP

JE.AP

Figure 3 The Brand Logo

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Industry Profile

The present global denim market is worth $19.7bn and Western Europe is responsible for 20% of the global jeans market (Rumsey, 2008). That works out to a turn-over of over $3bn in Europe alone. Britain has been enjoying its share of this success. According to Mintel, (2007) Jeans have become a staple in the consumer’s wardrobe and sales of jeans continue to grow as consumers purchase more frequently. This may explain why there are currently over one hundred JEANS brands available to denim consumers with new concepts and designs emerging continuously. However the vast majority of these focus on the under thirties age group. Those which do focus on the over-thirties are not giving customers true value. There is a definite gap in the jeans market for the over thirty luxury Liberty female consumer.

9

Market Segment

The JEANS.APOTHECARY woman is aged between twenty-eight and forty-eight years old. She is passionate about fashion and can afford to splurge occasionally. She loves shopping and is comfortable amongst luxury. However she abhors bad customer service so is willing to spend more to guarantee an enjoyable shopping experience. She is educated to university level and has reached a professional level in her career. She may or may not have children. If she does have children she will most likely be at home for the first two years before returning to work, most likely part-time. She visualises jeans as smart/casual essential daywear. They allow her to look and feel modern, are sexy but also practical. She buys premium jeans such as 7 for all Mankind and J Brand. She is a woman having the time of her life in the ‘noughties’, she’s ‘Sex in the City’ meets ‘Desperate Housewives’ with some urban ‘Cool Britannia’ thrown in.

9.1

Strategic Market Segment drivers

The JEANS.APOTHECARY woman expects good value; although she is accustomed to luxury she values her money and demands the whole package. This package comprises of good service, quality products and enjoyable shopping experiences. The JEANS.APOTHECARY Woman She wants to feel appreciated. Her shopping experience is not only about the product, it is about her. She wants to be recognised as a consumer, she wants direct, friendly and professional service. She wants a product designed for her. She is not eighteen, nor is she sixty-five. She wants those behind the product being marketed to her to be considerate of her concerns, her changing body shape and her need to maintain style whilst carrying out practical day-to-day tasks.

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Research has shown that there is a connection between women who aim to maintain a youthful lifestyle (Rumsey, 2008) and jeans purchases. Jeans are viewed as stylish, youthful and sexy. They are the perfect transitional garment for women in their 20s, 30s, and 40s and beyond.

10 Product Proposition Proposal for a ‘5 Pocket Western Style’ JEANS with vintage Liberty print accents. These accents will appear as finishing for the garment, on inside stitching and pocket linings. A few styles will showcase diminutive accents on the rear pockets. The jeans will feature flattering variations of modern cuts for the 25 plus woman who is not willing to sacrifice looking good for high fashion. These jeans will feature optional strategically placed medium control support to allow the mature woman to feel good and look good using innovative denim ingrained with a high count Lycra (at least 5%) for a smoother silhouette. The popularity of support underwear, e.g. Spanx, proves there is a market for this technology. Louise France, of the Guardian newspaper, in an interview with Sarah Blakely, the founder of Spanx, got to the bottom of this Lycra technology. “It's not so much about looking skinny, it's about looking smooth.” (France, 2008)

Lycra technology + Quality Denim = Superior Fit

Figure 4 Lycra technology silhouette

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Figure 5 High Quality Denim


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I’m Looking Good! I’m Feeling Great!

Figure 6 JE.AP Superior Fit

Figure 7 JE.AP Confidence

The use of quality denim ensures longevity and fit producing maximum value for the discerning consumer. This woman has heavy financial commitments. She needs ‘hard-working’ pieces. She does not want ‘faddish’ high fashion. (Halliday et al, 2009)

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10.1 Product Competition The current jeans offerings tend to fall into two groups; jeans designed for the under twenty three year old who has not experienced any signs of ageing or the over fifty age group who are often no longer so bothered with keeping in fashion. 7 For All Mankind are a typical brand of luxury jeans which are noted for quality and style. However they are styled for fashion and do not make allowances for post thirty changes in body shape which mainly affects the hips and lower abdomen. As a result women over the age of thirty wear and purchase jeans like ‘7’ for the quality they offer, but eventually suffer discomfort. At the other end of the scale are Not Your Daughters Jeans marketed at women who are, say fortyeight and above. These jeans have a higher waistband and a Lycra content to tackle the aforementioned issues. However they lack quality and style. The concept is good except that these jeans look like jeans suitable for the much older consumer. In a focus group (14 Appendix A: Primary Research) carried out on November 4th 2009 five women who match the JEAN.APOTHECARY target consumer were shown the following photographs of 7 For All Mankind jeans and Not Your Daughters Jeans. All the participants favoured the ‘7’ jeans but expressed concern at the low waistband. It was also unanimous that the NYDJs were ‘old fashioned’.

Figure 8 7 For All Mankind Jeans

Figure 9 Not Your Daughters Jeans

10.2 Product Environment The luxury consumer wants and expects a shopping experience. Visual Merchandising is of upmost importance to create an environment in keeping with the Brands identity. JEANS.APOTHECARY will need to convey, on first impression, it is a sub-store steeped in Liberty tradition, focused on quality with modern technology.

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Figure 10 Product Environment

The theme of Modern / Vintage Eclectic comprises of: 

Eclectic Lighting

Unusual Recycled Flooring

Luxurious Seating throughout concession including changing rooms

Apothecary Chests for Storage and Point -of -Sale Transactions

Spacious and Well- Lit Changing Booths with 360° mirrors

Birdcages and Foliage for ambiance

10.3 Sale Environment The sales environment not only serves to encourage the consumer to purchase; it has to inspire confidence. Staff responsible for customer-care have to believe in the product and be confidently knowledgeable of its characteristics. Steve Simon of National Jean Company, based in the USA, explained the importance of knowledgeable staff in a recent WGSN Lifestyle Monitor Report.

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Simon who retails jeans to the luxury end of the consumer market says: “Women who think they don’t have a body leave looking and feeling great...People who buy denim should go to a place where the staff is educated about fit and sizing, and really assists them.” Steve Simon of National Jean Company (Denimwear: mass-market appeal, 2009)

At the JEANS.APOTHECARY professionally trained staff will each wear different styles of JE.AP jeans. The staff will also be trained on how to demonstrate the use of and assist with helping consumers who wish to take advantage of the eStyle software.

Figure 11 eStyle software portal

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eStyle Fit Finder Software for ultimate fit by choosing body type and desired fit, to include: - Measure for jeans by Body Type - Shop by Style - Goes well with - Customer favorite Staff will have a variety of Liberty shirts on hand to offer to consumers trying on jeans in the changing rooms. These shirts will be available to buy in the JEANS.APOTHECARY sub-store.

11 Pricing The luxury Jeans market is competitively priced. The following chart demonstrates a pricing matrix from central London’s leading department stores. With six pairs of randomly chosen jeans the median price demonstrates what current jeans market consumers are willing to pay for a pair of luxury jeans. Make of Jeans Nina Ricci

Established 1932

Price £460

Source Harvey Nichols

J Brand

2005

£250

Liberty

Sass and Bide

1999

£185

Net.a.porter.com

7 For All Mankind

2000

£185

Selfridges

Diesel

1978

From £150

Diesel

Not Your Daughters Jeans NYDJ

2008

£129

John Lewis

Table 1 JEANS.APOTHECARY Competitors

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Bulbrook, 2009


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Based on this research the average price of a pair of luxury jeans in central London is around £200. Using the competition as a starting point, other factors influencing affecting JEANS.APOTHACARY’s price, as stated by Cox and Brittan (2004) are: Pricing Considerations

JEANS.APOTHECARY Price

Target Market

JE.AP’s customer is a luxury market consumer who values superior quality and service. This consumer expects to pay premium prices and expects a premium garment and shopping experience.

Company Objectives

The JEANS.APOTHECARY brand aims to emulate its’ parent company Liberty. Liberty is a luxury retailer and JE.AP will follow the tradition.

Competition

Using the competition as comparison JE.AP can determine how to price competitively.

Table 2 Retail considerations when determining price

Cox and Brittan, 2004

A proposed price of £220 shows that JE.AP is in-line with the competitor’s price whilst taking its values into consideration. This includes advertising considerations. More can be spent on advertising by using a graduate student designer collaboration. Possible candidates can be recruited from London College of Fashion or Graduate Fashion Week. This gives JEANS.APOTHECARY the opportunity to save on hiring expensive designers and provides an opportunity to market itself as socially conscious. (See 12.3 Public Relations Promotion).

“Retailer tie-ups are mutually beneficial to both designer and chain... (They) generate revenues for the label outside of ‘normal’ levels.” (Halliday et al, 2009)

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Price £500 £450 £400 £350 £300 £250 £200 £150 £100 £50 £0

Nina Ricci J Brand JE.AP Sass and Bide 7 For All Mankind

Table 3 JE.AP and Competitors Price Comparison

Bulbrook, 2009

Interestingly in a recent survey (WGSN, 08, Denimwear: Premium rates) where women were asked to name and rate their top five considerations when purchasing premium jeans. In first place 34% of the vote went to the fit, style of cut and length of jeans. In fifth place 17% of women said they considered price. This only goes to prove that women appreciate luxury jeans, and will overlook price in favour of the emotional confidence they get from looking and feeling good.

12 Marketing Plan The best way to communicate the availability of JE.AP jeans is to tap into a variety of knowledge bases this consumer uses on a daily basis The consumer needs to be enticed to try the product, to see and feel the difference for themselves. The reasoning behind this is that JEANS.APOTHECARY need to be known for great style, fit and service for the 28 – 48 year old woman. The Unique Selling Point is “Jeans, but better” – better fit, better design but with a secret Apothecary ingredient! Although the brand will offer a pair of jeans with characteristics which include support Lycra it is important not to advertise this fact. The target consumer knows she will benefit from wearing jeans with ‘support’ but she doesn’t want anyone else to know it. Therefore JEANS.APOTHECARY will market itself on its associations with Liberty and the advertising will use the USP “Jeans, but Better” but will avoid falling into the narrow niche of being only known for not making the consumer look ‘fat’. 12.1 Above The Line Advertising A proposed budget of £376,000 for advertising in a six month timeframe will cover a number advertising avenues placed with magazines, online broadsheet newspapers and external mediums for optimal exposure to the AB market segment.

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12.1.1 Magazines Harpers Bazaar – Issued Monthly 

Intelligent, sophisticated, and luxury with a balanced mix of fashion, beauty and editorial features. Target Audience are AB thirty + year old women who represent 53% of total readership.

Advertisement; Inside Cover Double Page Spread

Frequency: Three months; appearing intermittently over six months

Cost: Colour Double Page Spread £23,359.00

3 months x £23,359.00 = £70,077

Red – Issued Monthly 

Lifestyle, Practical, Up market, mid end-Luxury incorporating fashion, beauty, travel and shopping via Red Direct. Target audiences are AB and ABC1 women between the ages of 25 – 55 years old who represent 51% of the readership.

Advertisement: Colour Double Page Spread

Frequency: Three months; appearing intermittently over six months

Cost: First Colour Double Page Spread £40,688.00

3 months x £40,688.00 = £122,064.00

Grazia – Issued Weekly 

Glamorous, unique luxury, news and lifestyle well packaged for Fashion, news, guilty but entertaining celeb gossip. Sophisticated Weekly. Target audience are fashionable ‘fashionistas’ 25 – 45 year old who regularly read high end monthly magazines and represent 39% of the AB readership.

Advertisement placed Inside Cover of a Double Page Spread

Frequency: Once a month for a six month period

Cost: Double page spread appearing once a month over six months £20,520.00

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6 months x £20,520.00 = £123,120.00

12.1.2 London Taxis 

Taxi Media

Ten central London JEANS.APOTHECARY vinyl covered taxis per month for a six month campaign.

30 Taxis (10 per month over 3 months) at £1000 per Taxi = £30,000.00

30 Taxis (10 per month over 3 months) at £825 (Additional month tariff) per Taxi = £24,750.00

Total £54,750.00

12.1.3 Online Banners 

Independent.co.uk

Reputation for unbiased international news. Appeals to mainly young to middle aged up market forward thinking AB professionals.

Between September 2008 – September 2009 total of 8,787,141 Online users

Online Leader-board Super Banner advertisement (728 x 90)

180 Banners interspaced over a six month period at a cost of £35.00 per banner = £6,300.00

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12.2 Below The Line Advertising Point of sale and in-store Visual Merchandising serve as Brand indicators which in turn unobtrusively advertise prospective consumers and remind existing consumers of JEANS.APOTHECARY. Possible subliminal indicators, when applied to JEANS.APOTHECARY, can take the form of:

Figure 12 Apothecary Envelopes for Sales Receipts

Figure 13 Inspiration for Shopping Bags

Liberty publishes its own 1/4ly magazine which is placed in the form of an insert in many nationally distributed magazines. Occasionally this publication will include a promotional money-off voucher which gives the consumer the incentive to spend the nominated amount to be eligible to redeem the voucher. This magazine is the perfect promotional vehicle to launch the JEANS.APOTHECARY subbrand. As Liberty and JEANS.APOTHECARY share the same market segment the magazine is very relevant and suitable for the launch of this new sub-brand.

Figure 14 Money-off Voucher

Figure 15 1/4ly Liberty Magazine

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12.3 Public Relations Promotion Celebrity ‘Sightings’ – When celebrities who match the market segment are seen wearing a new product this can result in column inches which inadvertently do not have to be paid for. The risks of these celebrities eventually tarnishing the brand and the cost of celebrity endorsements are also avoided. Gifts to Celebrities, who fit the JEANS.APOTHECARY Target Consumer, E.g. Jools Oliver, can be beneficial to publicise the brand with minimum cost and risk. Through British graduate designer tie-ins Liberty can be seen to be socially aware and responsive to modern society. One advantage to this would be to help Liberty shake off any image of being too traditional by collaborating with a young designer. Another advantage is Liberty could be seen as being responsive to the latest well publicised plight of the graduate. No jobs. JEANS.APOTHECARY provide business acumen and funding to young un-established designers via designer tie-ins. Central St Martin’s have an excellent reputation of producing graduate fashion designers.

12.4 Justification of Costs Advertising Proposal includes Harpers Bazaar, Red and Grazia Magazines. In addition to the magazines there will be exterior advertising via London Taxis and online advertising via The Independent newspapers website. 

Total Advertising Cost/Budget £376,313.00.

The retail price of JEANS.APOTHECARY jeans are £220.00. The percentage of jeans price dedicated to advertising is 20%. So 20% of £220.00 = £44.00 

Therefore £44.00 from every pair of jeans for advertising.

To justify spending a total of £376,313.00 on advertising over six months, JEAN.APOTHECARY will have to sell a total of 8500 pairs of jeans in said period.

Total Budget of £376,313.00 divided by advertising percentage £44.00 (20%) =8500 pairs of jeans.

A total of 8500 pairs of jeans

To sell a total of 8500 pairs of jeans over 6 months JEANS.APOTHECARY will need to sell, in store and online:

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8500 pairs of jeans divided by 6 months = 1,416 pairs of jeans per month

8500 pairs of jeans divided by 26 weeks = 326 pairs of jeans per week

8500 pairs of jeans divided by 182 days = 46 pairs of jeans per day


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12.5 Campaign Timing Proposal for a launch date of first weekend in September. This is when everyone is back from summer holidays and life returns to normal after the summer. This also ensures consumers are familiar with the brand at the busiest shopping time of year – the run-up to Christmas.

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Bibliography

Cox, R and Brittan, P. (2004) Retailing: An Introduction. Harlow: Pearson Education. Denimwear: mass-market appeal (2009) WGSN Lifestyle Monitor Reports. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/members/cotton-inc/reports/ci2009jul01_000361 [Online] (Accessed: 02 November 2009).

Denimwear: Premium rates. (2008) WGSN Lifestyle Monitor Reports. [Online] Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/members/cotton-inc/reports/ci2008jun11_000326 (Accessed: 02 November 2009). France, L. (2008) ‘The Woman in control of America’s bottom.’ The Observer, 13 April 2008. [Online] Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/apr/13/women.fashion2 (Accessed: 17 November 2009). Grazia. (2005) [Online] Available at: http://www.bradinsight.com/brad/ (Accessed: 21 November 2009). Halliday et al. (2009) ‘Designer labels: Retail tie-ups.’ WGSN UK Fashion Report: 19. [Online] Available: at: http://blackboard.arts.ac.uk/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab=courses&url=/bin/common/course.pl?co urse_id=_167559_1 (Accessed: 2 November 2009). Halliday et al. (2009) ‘Designer labels: Retail tie-ups.’ WGSN UK Fashion Report: 48. [Online] Available at: http://blackboard.arts.ac.uk/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab=courses&url=/bin/common/course.pl?co urse_id=_167559_1 (Accessed: 2 November 2009). Halliday et al. (2009) ‘Fashion Retail’ WGSN UK Fashion Report: 48. [Online] Available at: Harpers Bazaar. (1970) [Online] Available at: http://www.bradinsight.com/brad/ (Accessed: 21 November 2009) Hines, T. (2007) Fashion Marketing: contemporary issues, 2nd Ed, Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. http://www.7forallmankind.com/ (2000). (Accessed: 08 October 2009). http://www.nydj.com/#/home/ (2009). (Accessed: 08 October 2009). Independent.co.uk. (1997) [Online] Available at: http://www.bradinsight.com/brad/ (Accessed: 21 November 2009) Jeans: from rags to riches’ (2007) Mintel: Jeans - UK - April 2007. [Online] Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen_academic/search_results/show&/display/id=220121/displa y/id=273106#hit1 (Accessed: 08 November 2009) Jefkins, F. (2000) Advertising 4th ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall. Jobber, D. (2004) Principles and practice of marketing 4th ed. London: MccGraw Hill. Kotler, P. (2006) Principles of marketing 11th Ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Red. (1998) [Online] Available at: http://www.bradinsight.com/brad/ (Accessed: 21 November 2009) 23 | P a g e


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Retail Renaissance at Liberty (2009). Available at: http://www.regentstreetonline.com/RegentStreet/ShoppingChannel/Retail+Renaissance+at+Liberty.h tm [Online] (Accessed: 17 November 2009). Rumsey, A. (2008) ‘Denim: a global Market overview’. WGSN Business Resource. [Online] Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/members/business-resource/research/br2008jan09_082952 (Accessed: 2 November 2009).

Taxi Media. (2009) [Online] Available at: http://www.bradinsight.com/brad/ (Accessed: 21 November 2009) The Liberty Renaissance. [Online] Available at: http://blog.liberty.co.uk/305/the-liberty-renaissance/ (Accessed: 2 October 2009). White, R. (2000) Advertising 4th Ed. London: McGraw-Hill.

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14 Appendix A – Primary Market Research Liberty Focus Group Brief th

Date: November 4 2009 Time: 20:30

 Participants: Kristina Thiele, Fashion Advertising Photographer, 40 Years Old, Patricia Burrows, Kings College London University Lecturer, 36 Years Old Emma Saunders, Magistrates Court Immigration Judge, 42 Years Old Naomi Siederfeld, Art Gallery Curator and Managing Director, 45 Years Old Tanya Mclenborg, Post War Conflict Policy and Defence Consultant, 39 Years Old Focus Group and its Objectives -A Focus Group is a planned group discussion carried out for Market Research purposes. - The objective of a Focus Group discussion is to elicit specific thoughts and opinions.

The Four P’s: -

Liberty, the department store, would like to develop a jeans sub-brand. My job is to develop a Marketing Strategy based on the Four P’s Product  Person Place Promotion

5 Pocket Western Style Jeans.  Target customer these jeans will appeal to.  Where to sell them.  How to advertise them.

Power Point presentation titled: LIBERTY JEANS.APOTHECARY Promotion Campaign 2009

Question led discussion with your thoughts and feelings about what you have seen and heard.

Thank You 

Focus Group summary of findings

After viewing the accompanying presentation the panel was asked: 

what they thought of the concept behind JEANS.APOTHECARY , Liked the name, liked the principles

What they liked about the brand and also what they disliked. Liked Liberty print accents on the jeans, Liked the store and eStyle software Liked the support concept if it was invisible Would have liked more Liberty print on outside of jeans, maybe on back pockets

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Would have liked liberty print fabric lining for pockets

When you think about jeans what brands come to mind? Lee, Diesel, 7 For All Mankind, Levis

Think about a pair of jeans you own, what do you like and dislike about them? Liked the cut (straight and skinny styles) Liked that they buttoned up instead of zipped up Did not like that they are too tight after washing Did not like struggle getting into jeans Did not like bulge at sides of tummy when they are buttoned

The woman in the presentation, is she realistic? Do you feel you can relate to her? Unanimous ‘yes’

Do you read the newspaper? Which ones? How often – week or weekends? Are you aware of supplementary flyers or inserts? Aware of Liberty magazine? Group did read newspapers, mostly online and on weekends Read The Times, The Independent and The Guardian Aware of supplementary info, o Advertising goes straight in the bin o Enjoy weekly newspaper magazines o 1 person aware of Liberty magazine

Think of a celebrity you admire for their personal style, if you knew she wore JEAN.APOTHECARY jeans would you try/buy them? No! I person might if saw them whilst out shopping but wouldn’t go out to buy them specially. 1 person said the shop window would influence them more.

When you think of Liberty what comes to mind? Do you shop there? For yourself? For gifts? Aware of Liberty subbrands? They thought Liberty was quirky, eccentric, high quality, pricey, artistic, boho, British, no riff faff, All but one person had not shopped there lately because they had forgotten about it One person was aware of sub-brands

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15 Appendix A – Secondary Research 

Harpers Bazaar – Issued Monthly

Intelligent, sophisticated, and luxury with a balanced mix of fashion, beauty and editorial features. Target Audience are AB thirty + year old women who represent 53% of total readership. Advertisement; Inside Cover Double Page Spread Frequency: Three months; appearing intermittently over six months (Brad, 2009) Women Total Readership  AB Female Monthly Readership: 53% 88,000 readers out of a possible 163,738.00 readers 25 – 44 year old Female Readership: 32% 53,000 readers out of a possible 163,738.00 readers Cost: Colour Double Page Spread £23,359.00 3 months x £23,359.00 = £70,077 

Red – Issued Monthly

Lifestyle, Practical, Up market, Mid end-Luxury incorporating fashion, beauty, travel and shopping via Red Direct. Target audience are AB and ABC1 women between the ages of 25 – 55 years old.

Advertisement: Placed at First Colour Double Page Spread Frequency: Three months; appearing intermittently over six months

Women Total Readership AB Female Monthly Readership: 51% 339,000 readers out of a possible 670,741 readers 25 – 44 year old Female Readership: 47% 312,000 readers out of a possible 670,741 readers

Cost: First Colour Double Page Spread £40,688.00 3 months x £40,688.00 = £122,064.00

Grazia – Issued Weekly

Glamorous, unique luxury, news and lifestyle well packaged for Fashion, news, guilty but entertaining celeb gossip. Sophisticated Weekly. Target audience are fashionable ‘fashionistas’ 25 – 45 year old who regularly read high end monthly magazines. Advertisement placed Inside Cover of a Double Page Spread Frequency: Once a month for a six month period Women Total Readership

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AB Female Monthly Readership: 39% 191,000 readers out of a possible 481,665.00 readers 25 – 44 year old Female Readership: 47% 228,000 readers out of a possible 481,665 readers

Cost: Double page spread appearing once a month over six months £20,520.00 6 months x £20,520.00 = £123,120.00

London Taxis

Taxi Media Ten Central London JEANS.APOTHECARY Vinyl covered per month for a six month campaign. 30 Taxis (10 per month over 3 months) at £1000 per Taxi = £30,000.00 30 Taxis (10 per month over 3 months) at £825 (Additional month tariff) per Taxi = £24,750.00 Total £54,750.00 

Online Banners

Independent.co.uk Reputation for unbiased international news. Appeals to mainly young to middle aged upmarket forward thinking AB professionals.

Between September 2008 – September 2009 total of 8,787,141 online users Online Leaderboard Super Banner advertisement (728 x 90) 180 Banners interspaced over a six month period at a cost of £35.00 per banner = £6,300.00

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Liberty sub-brand