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(Continued) 1

Issue #: [Date]

Presenting! •
“Remembering
…
”
 
 by
Rick
Roll
 
 •
“Pilots,
WOCs
Train
Together”
 
 by
Emily
Brainard
 
 •
“Dear
Lou
…
”
 
 by
CWO
John
D.
Sarviss
 
 •
“Blaise
‘N’
a
Trail”
 
 by
CW3
Michael
Clarke
 
 •
“Taipan
Joe
—
Flying
in
Vietnam”
 
 by
Joe
Ralph
 
 •
“ArmyAircrews.com”
 
 by
Kevin
Allen


Sponsor CHPA! Have
you
considered
 sponsoring
CHPA’s
 programs?


 You
may
make
tax‐free
 donations
to
support
the
 Blaise
‘N’
a
Trail
For
 Education
Scholarship
 Program,
Holiday
Boxes
 For
The
Troops,
or
the
 association.

 For
further
information
 please
visit
Sponsorship
 at
www.chpa‐us.org.


Thank You!

June
2010


CHPA
President
 Howdy Y’all! Well, we’ve got another month down and plenty going on. We should have the final touches completed any day now for our New Orleans convention! It is shaping up to be a great time! If you haven’t experienced our after-hour lie-telling sessions, (um, I mean hospitality suites), then consider this my personal invitation for you to come drink all my alcohol! Haha! In all seriousness, I really hope to see each of you in New Orleans!! Meanwhile! It is important that you make your reservations now for the CHPA annual meeting at St. Christopher’s, because the deadline for the CHPA special rate is August 23rd. Remember, this is a Saint’s home-game weekend, so the Big Easy will definitely be buzzing. Call 800.645.9312 or email info@stchristophershotel.com to square away your reservation. Oh and, invite a friend! By now, many of you have heard of the passing of CHPA member and Army Aviation legend, Louis J. “Rocket” Rochat, Jr. Lou will be missed greatly! Later in this issue, we have included a tribute to Lou, as well as information on how friends can donate through CHPA to a fund established to defray funeral expenses for the Rochat Family. Rest in peace, Lou. Before I get any farther, special thanks for renewing your membership! We really appreciate your support, and it saves us a ton of work when our members lean forward in the saddle and get their renewals in. Also, many of you have recommended CHPA to your friends and buddies, and that means so much to all of us! Please continue to reach out to others and spread the word about CHPA. You can do this by forwarding your issue of The Swash Plate or you can go to www.chpa-us.org and use the handy “Tell Your Friends” tool. We keep track of how many people are referred and by whom. I think super-member, Larry Shatto, is the man to beat right now! Haha! The VHPA Reunion in San Diego is right around the corner: June 30th to July 5th. Please make a point to come by and say hello to the CHPA crew and be sure to bring a friend! I’ll go ahead and throw out a personal challenge while I’m at it: The person who refers the Continued on page 2


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

most friends will walk away with one of our coveted CHPA hats! Woo-hoo! Recruit away! In fact … why stop there? Think you have what it takes to beat Larry? The next member to recruit five additional members can have their choice of something from our CHPA store! I’m still down here in the Gulf Coast region, flying in support of the oil spill response. Despite the serious nature of this disaster, I have to admit I’m really enjoying the missions and seeing the beautiful Louisiana wetlands and coastal region. It is great to see the Gulf Coast community come together once again in the face of adversity. If for some reason you are trying to get in touch with me, be patient. The days are sometimes long and the cell-phone service sporadic!  Thanks again for all the fantastic suggestions and emails! We are always looking for ways to make a difference! We love hearing from our members, and if you have questions, concerns, or ideas on how to make CHPA better, we’re definitely interested! CHPA President, Lori Gaff, flying in support of Operation Deepwater Horizon oil spill respons, on the Louisiana Gulf Coast.

Duty • Honor • Courage -Lori.


Reunions and Gatherings … The
1‐24th
AHB
Vipers
are
having
a
reunion
October
15th
‐
17th,
2010
in
 Savannah,
GA.

Those
interested
can
contact
viperreunion@gmail.com.
 If
 you
 will
 be
 attending
 the
 VHPA
 reunion,
stop
by
our
booth
for
a
visit.

 We’d
 love
 to
 have
 you
 drop
 by
 to
 shake
hands
and
let
us
know
if
there’s
 anything
we
can
do
to
make
your
organization
better.


 
 Remember!

There
will
be
a
CHPA
cap
awarded
to
the
person
who
recruits
 the
 most
 members,
 and
 let’s
 face
 it
 —
 VHPA
 is
 a
 very
 target‐rich
 environment!


 
 Thanks
 to
 Chairman
 of
 the
 Board,
 Jay
 Brown,
 and
 CHPA
 Director,
 Rusty
 Bourgoyne
and
his
lovely
wife,
Lynn,
for
supporting
the
CHPA
presence!


Does your group have a reunion coming up soon? Let us know and we’ll mention it here! 2


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Remembering
the
Helicopter
Pilots
Who
Didn’t
 Make
it
Home
from
Vietnam
 Rick
Roll


One of the great things about retirement is the opportunity to do exactly what I want and when I want to do it. Golf is great exercise and a mental and physical challenge, but my volunteer work at the Air Mobility Command Museum, www.amcmuseum.org, at nearby Dover Air Force Base is what I enjoy the most. It is a way for me to personally remember my comrades who didn’t make it home from Vietnam. At the museum, I recently had the opportunity to appear on camera and narrate a brief segment that later aired on our local television station over Memorial Day weekend. You can see the segment by accessing the website: http://www.whyy.org/news/first.html and then clicking on “Restoring History.” This was my first opportunity to publicly express my love and appreciation for the more than 2,700 brave fellow helicopter pilots who lost their lives in that terrible war so many years ago. Although the museum is funded by and dedicated to the USAF, it has one Army helo on display though it’s painted in Air Force colors. It’s a UH-1H, SN 69-15475, and my research disclosed that it was flown by the 201st AHC out of Nha Trang from 1970-1973. I’m hoping to assemble a restoration team and restore it to its U.S. Army paint configuration as soon as possible. The only other helo we have on display is a HH-43B which is, in my honest opinion, the

Give Back!

“Platypus” of helos. It’s as ugly as sin, has a T-53 turbine, no tail rotor, and, believe it or not, sports wooden rotor Retired Army Aviator and CHPA Director, Rick Roll blades. No swash plate or pitch change links at the hub for this baby either. A control rod runs down the center of each blade and actuates a small aileron attached to the trailing edge of each blade to control blade pitch, cyclically and collectively. I’m sure glad the Army didn’t buy any. We have over 30 restored warbirds on display at the museum plus a lot of other really interesting exhibits. If you ever travel in this vicinity, please contact me and it will be my pleasure to provide you with a personalized tour of our fine facility that serves, especially during the Memorial Day weekend, as an opportunity to remember those from all wars and branches of the service that served our beloved Country so gallantly and selflessly. Keep your rotors in the green and best regards, Rick Roll CHPA Director

[
Get
Involved!
]


Do
 you
 have
 a
 special
 skill
 or
 ability
 that
 you
 could
 share
 with
 CHPA?
 
 We
 are
 always
 on
 the
 lookout
 for
 members
 who
 are
 interested
 in
 pitching
 in
 here
 and
 there
 or
 lending
 a
 hand
 on
 special
 committees.

 Photographers,
editors,
organizers,
networkers,
computer
or
web‐savvy
individuals
are
just
a
few
of
the
people
 we
are
looking
to
tap
for
“special
missions!”
 Drop
 us
 a
 line
 at
 admin@chpa‐us.org
 if
 you
 are
 interested
 in
 getting
 involved
 with
 CHPA
 projects!
 
 We
 are
 looking
forward
to
hearing
from
you!
 3


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

St. Bernard, LA – A Louisiana National Guard, UH-60 Black Hawk provided Governor Bobby Jindal and local officials flyover support near the Chandeleur Islands to view the oil spill and the containment operations around the islands on May 7th, 2010. (U.S. Air Force Photo by MSgt. Toby M. Valadie, Louisiana National Guard State Public Affairs Office/Released)

As
 the
 crisis
 on
 the
 Gulf
 intensifies,
 the
 Louisiana
 National
 Guard
 has
 been
 joined
 by
 aviation
 assets
 from
 several
 other
 states.

 Louisiana’s
State
Aviation
command
 extended
 the
 call
 for
 help
 through
 the
 Emergency
 Management
 Assistance
 Compact
 (EMAC).
 
 Four
 additional
 Black
 Hawks
 and
 two
 Chinooks
were
added
to
the
fight
to
 protect
Louisiana’s
fragile
wetlands.


A Louisiana Army National Guard Soldier watches a Black Hawk helicopter drop a cluster of three sand bags, each weighing between 1,500 to 4,000 pounds, on one of the several gaps on Pelican Island, south of Venice, LA. Guard Soldiers from around the U.S. are joining Soldiers on the Gulf Coast to combat the oil spill. Special thanks to the Louisiana National Guard for permission to reprint these photos!

Morgan City, LA – Louisiana National Guard's UH-60 Black Hawk provided flyover support to Governor Bobby Jindal and local officials to view the oil spill and the containment operations on May 13th, 2010. (U.S. Air Force Photo by MSgt. Toby M. Valadie, Louisiana National Guard State Public Affairs Office/Released)


 These
 National
 Guard
 units


 have
 seen
 multiple
 combat
 tours
 overseas
 in
 support
 of
 the
 Global
 War
on
Terrorism.


Share the Swash! 
 Please
feel
free
to
forward
this
issue
 of
“The
Swash
Plate”
to
your
 colleagues,
potential
members,
and
 other
interested
parties!


4


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Pilots,
WOCs
Train
Together
 Emily
Brainard
—
Fort
Rucker
Army
Flier
Staff
Writer


CH-47 Chinook pilots dropped off dozens of Warrant Officer Candidates at Tactical Training Base Freedom Tuesday as part of the new “WOC Freedom” joint training effort. The budding exercise is conducted by Flight School XXI instructors, Chinook student-pilots and Warrant Officer Candidates. “They’re getting realworld experience. This is how the mission is (in Iraq and Afghanistan). This is as real as we can make it,” said CW4 Sam Baker, B Company, 1st Battalion, 223rd Aviation Regiment executive officer. WOC classes act as infantry-like units, allowing student-pilots to plan picking up, transporting and dropping off troops, Baker said. This simulates what pilots will be performing in combat as well as allowing WOCs to maneuver around post to get to their necessary training locations. Instructors flew the mission earlier this week that students helped plan and will soon take over flying the missions themselves, Baker noted. A week’s worth of planning, coordination and meetings takes place leading up to the actual mission execution, he said. WOCs explain to flight school students what support their classes require, and student-pilots determine how to best conduct it. Because of the

detailed planning required, all parties involved gain leadership and tactical experience, Baker said. “We try to give them the best support possible,” he said. Every Chinook studentpilot will participate in these future missions. Training is scheduled to be conducted within the first month of each CH-47 FSXII course, Baker said. Students must still maintain regular academics and

“In a combat environment your main mode of transportation is air, especially in Afghanistan.” flight time during the weeklong segment. This adds extra responsibilities on students because another unit is counting on them to make training a success. Some Warrant Officer Career College instructors said they find this up-and-coming training useful to their candidates and are grateful for its implementation. “In a combat environment, your main mode of transportation is air, especially in Afghanistan. (WOC Freedom) incorporates

the real-world environment into training. You should train as you fight,” said CW3 Michael Noerr, a WOCS training, advising and counseling officer. He noted every candidate will be going through the joint training exercise during their third or fifth weeks here, depending on which warrant officer course they’re attending. After WOC class 10-13 members were dropped off at TTB Freedom Tuesday, they began their weeklong field training exercise, including warrior tasks, battle drills, urban operations and more, according to class historian WOC Karl Kelly, from Ewing, NJ. He said he believes the combined effort benefits everyone involved. “It’s an excellent operation for flight school students and warrant officer candidates,” Kelly said. “It gives pilots a chance to participate in live training exercises using candidates. For candidates, it provides a jump into leadership and breaks up regular training.” As a former sergeant and UH-60 Black Hawk crew chief, WOC Dallas Garza, from Fort Leonard Wood, MO, said he was especially excited to work with the student-pilots. He plans to attend flight school after graduation and said the joint training helps him Continued on Page 6 5


Volume 5, Issue 6

integrate into life here. He assisted with the coordination and organization of the exercise for his class. “It’s a good feeling to know I’m giving them this learning experience,” he said. “This is how we fight today. It’s a great way to learn and train how we fight.” Transforming from a noncommissioned officer to warrant officer gives Garza new responsibilities, which he said he eagerly awaits. He added this training helps him prepare for his upcoming leadership roles. “As a crew chief, I followed orders,” he said. “Now, as a (future) warrant officer, I implement (plans) as a leader.” WOC Katrina Jones, from Pennington, AL, said she appreciated the training because she works in human resources and doesn’t often get to interact with pilots or perform on-the-ground training. Field training helps her brush up on skills she doesn’t use frequently. “It’s preparing us if we go out to war,” she said. “Now we know the techniques. If (certain situations) come across us again, I can help someone else who’s never done it before.”

The Swash!

CHPA • The Swash Plate

A CH-47 Chinook flies over Tactical Training Base Freedom Tuesday as warrant officer candidates conduct field training. CH-47 pilots dropped off students during “WOC Freedom.” Photo by Emily Brainard.

[
Call
For
Articles
]


We hope you enjoy your newsletter! We work to find articles of interest for our very diverse membership ranging from human interest to humor, and wonderful war stories of helicopter pilots and crewmembers’ and their “daring do.” Our most entertaining and informative stories come from you, our membership. If you have an idea for an article, or if you have an article you’d like to submit, it’s as easy as emailing us. The story can be about anything from flight school to real life, TINS, or there-I-was stories. We’ve published several stories over the years ranging from tales of flight school a long, long time ago to real life “war stories” that we’re sure most of you can identify with. We look forward to hearing from you so, take a moment to lay fingers on keyboard or just put pen to paper and send in those stories. You can email them to hq@chpa-us.org or through the U.S. Post Office to: CHPA • PO Box 15852 • Washington, DC 20003

6


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Dear
Lou
…

 CWO
John
Sarviss


Dear Lou, I received a phone call from Ann yesterday saying you had passed away. Well Lou, I just can’t find it in my soul to believe that. Yet, I knew it before it happened. You know how we would always say to one another when you or I called, “I was just about to call you … ” Premonitions, I guess. Perhaps clairvoyant... I have only been back home three weeks from seeing you. You were in and out of consciousness, but you knew the minute I walked in. You even mustered enough strength to talk for a few brief moments and asked how I was doing with my injuries. The nerve of you! Ann had called four weeks ago to say you wanted to see me before you left. I dropped what I was doing, took a week’s leave, and drove from LA to San Antonio almost nonstop. That was the pact that we had from day one. No one gets left behind. Not ever. You had two favorite quotes that you used. “Bury the dead; they only smell up the place” and “Opera non Verba” (Deeds, not words). I think I’ll address your life’s quotes individually. You see, number one, you’re not dead. You’ve only beat some of us to the punch once again. Bodies are only vehicles on earth to give tangibility to mere mortals to

convey and cement their true intentions in life into eternity. It’s a test. You live a good life, do good by others … you get a good eternity. It’s that simple. When you pass the tests, you get chosen. It, this thing we know as life, had to be put into a tangible context that we could comprehend. You were tested more than anyone I know. Loss of a father at an early age, nearly mortally wounded in combat; putting your own life at risk to help save Steve Ellis and his crew from certain death and flying his crippled Loach back to Lai Khe. That’s one of only a few that I can think of. I need not mention the 44 surgeries, years with prosthetic difficulties, wheelchairs and the like. For you, you handled that in stride. Humor during times of imminent danger seemed to be a forte of yours. Like the time we had the hydraulics failure in the Huey and you looked at me and said, “You got it, Bud.” Thanks, Pal. I needed that. You said after I landed, “That’s the most perfect landing I have ever seen.” I have to be honest Lou. It was either Luck or Divine Providence. All I did was raise the nose a few degrees and lower the collective a bit and add a touch of right pedal. The controls locked up right after I did that. You and I were just ballast at that point. We touched down, ran

about two skid lengths, slightly rocked up on the toes of the skids and as I was rolling off the throttle and it rocked back gently on the heels. I said “Cool it off; let me see what the hell just happened.” I jumped out, ran back and shimmied up the hell hole. Then the farmer (whose backyard we landed in) came out of his house, saw my legs sticking out of the bottom of the helicopter and he ran over and asked you if you landed on someone and you said “Yuuup.” We laughed for years about that. Laughed ‘til we cried. I’m still laughing, Lou. So on to number two. “Deeds, not words.” Opera non Verba. Hmmm … Doing what you say you’re going to do instead of endless dialogue. Oh, if only the world and its “Leaders” could pay attention to that mantra and live the life, walk the walk, and talk the talk. Good deeds without Continued on Page 8 7


Volume 5, Issue 6

ulterior motives. They say mismanagement and corruption starts at the top. ‘Nuff said about that. Pay it forward works. They just don’t get it. The world would be a different place then, huh? Well it is a different place without you. There’s a void that can’t be filled. CAV, Buddy, plain and simple. We can’t change it, so FIDO. That’s how we roll … When you came home from the hospital, you said to your wife, “Ann, I’ve done all they’ve asked me to, and Honey, I don’t know what else to do.” Well, Lou, there wasn’t anything else. You met the challenges with grace and dignity and I am one of the world’s fortunate few to share with you our challenges of surviving and coming back from LOH-crumpled messes and metallic tastes in the back our mouths from being scared to death but never admitting it. Those who’ve been there know what I mean. Those that haven’t, never will. Now if you don’t mind, I must run along, for I must work on my own challenges and tests in life. I only ask just one last favor, Lou. May I share this with the world? Thanks, Bud. I knew you’d understand. Standing on the Edge of Forever with you, CWO John D. Sarviss

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Louis James Rochat III 
 UNIVERSAL
 CITY,
 TX
 —
 Louis
 James
 Rochat
 III,
 60,
 retired
 CW3
 United
 States
 Army,
 died
 May
 29th,
 2010.
 
 His
 interment
 is
 9
 am
 Tuesday,
 August
 31st,
 at
 Arlington
 National
 Cemetery
 in
 Virginia.

 He
will
be
laid
to
rest
with
full
military
honors.
 

 He
was
born
July
20th,
1949,
at
Fort
Knox,
KY,
in
a
military
 hospital
to
post‐World
War
II
military,
Depression
Era‐experienced
 parents.

He
was
the
first
son
and
oldest
sibling
of
LTC
Louis
James
 (Rocky)
Rochat,
Jr.
and
Hermia

(Johnnie)
Tyler
Johnson.
 His
parents
could
not
make
it
back
to
Texas
in
time
for
his
 birth
 but
 he
 considered
 San
 Saba,
 Texas,
 home,
 where
 his
 grandparents,
 Louis
 James
 (Gaga)
 Rochat,
 Sr.
 and
 Linnie
 (Mimi)
 Floyce
 Taylor
 owned
 and
 worked
 a
 ranch
 and
 farm
 unit
 that
 he
 dearly
loved.

His
little
brother
is
retired
Army
LTC
Larry
Lee
Rochat
 (an
 Airborne
 Ranger
 and
 aviator)
 and
 his
 sister,
 Mary
 Madelyn
 Rochat.
 Louis
 is
 survived
 by
 the
 love
 of
 his
 life
 for
 33
 years,
 Ann;
 two
daughters,
Amy
Huff
and
Celena
Hendrix,
and
two
sons‐in‐law,
 James
 Huff
 and
 Michael
 Hendrix;
 and
 grandchildren,
 McKenna
 (Little
Miss)
Huff.

Cade
Huff,
Tristan
and
Gabriella
Hendrix.

CHPA
has
once
again
established
a
fund
for
the
Rochat
family
to
 help
cover
the
costs
associated
with
interment
expenses.


 If
 you'd
 like
 to
 donate
 you
 may
 do
 so
 by
 contacting
 CHPA
 at
 800.832.5144
or
you
can
send
a
check
made
out
to
CHPA
with
 “Rochat
Funeral”
in
the
memo
field
to:


 CHPA
•
PO
Box
15852
•
Washington,
DC
20003


 All
 donations
 will
 be
 used
 to
 help
 the
 Rochat
 family
 defray
 funeral
expenses
and
are
tax
deductible.
 8


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Blaise
‘N’
a
Trail
 CW3
William
Michael
Clarke


August 5th, 2005: The graveyard was cool and quiet in the early morning sun, just the way they are supposed to be, I guess. It was the small town of Shelbyville, MO, where five faithful riders, and a few others, came together at the burial site of a fallen warrior, friend, husband, and son. Just before us lay the remains of CW2 Michael T. Blaise of the 101st AB, 2/17 CAV, who lost his life when his OH-58D Kiowa Warrior crashed near Mosul, Iraq in what seemed like such a short time before, on January 23rd, 2004. We were there to pick Mike up, and take him to Sturgis. As we stood around his place of rest, each of us was fighting our own demons, and our own battles, but many of them were the same. We had come together as friends and strangers, with a common bond: To honor and remember our fallen and to come to terms with the loss that each of us felt. Although this is where the trip began, it was not the beginning. Just a short time after his death, Mike’s good friend CW2 C.D. Foster decided we were going to ride to Sturgis, and we were going to pick up Mike on the way to take him with us. He and Mike had talked about one day going together in between deployments and hardship tours, and C.D. was not going to let him down. Among those five riders were Mike’s father Terry Blaise, who rode Mike’s Springer Softail,

and his widow, CPT Kate Blaise, who had just completed a book about their lives together entitled, “The Heart of a Soldier,” and who also rode her own Softail Standard. On this first trip, we packed a lot into a few days. We traveled through the pioneer countryside of Nebraska and up through Bad Lands National Forest with our final destination and meeting place in Sturgis, SD. We spent four nights there camping under the stars and spending the days riding through Black Hills National Forest where we viewed the Crazy Horse monument, Mount Rushmore and also took time to visit Devil’s Tower, WY. The scenery was spectacular and being on the highway with thousands of other bikers was an amazing experience. There was a lot of healing that took place on this trip. I believe that for most of the people involved, it can only be described as a “Spiritual Experience.” We had participants from a few different states, and from all walks of life. We were all-weather road warriors, rain or shine, from temperatures of 55 to 109. Through it all, I believe that each of us would agree on this: It was not where we came from, what we did for a living, or even the sights that we saw. What made this a “Spiritual Journey” was the Purpose, the People, and God! Since the publication of

the above article in the 2006 edition of Rolling Thunder magazine, we have continued the tradition of honoring our fallen. In 2006, as you might have guessed, we rode to Washington DC for Rolling Thunder in honor of CW4 Matt Salter. Matt lost his life while flying an Apache in Iraq on December 26th, 2005. We rode with Matt’s brother-in-law, some of his close friends, and believe it or not — they brought Matt (that’s another story). In 2007, we rode to Daytona Beach, FL for Bike Week in honor of CPT Matt Mattingly who was shot by small arms fire while flying his OH-58D Kiowa Warrior outside of Mosul, Iraq on September 13th, 2006. Matt’s fiancé, Alicia, and her father Mike rode with us that year. In 2008, we rode to Milwaukee, WI for the 105th anniversary of HarleyDavidson and the opening of their museum. We rode in Continued on Page 10 9


Volume 5, Issue 6

member who has sacrificed his or her life in the name of freedom. If you are a patriot, you are welcome to join us. Meet us in Shelbyville, MO each year at Mike Blaise’s resting The first trip to Sturgis in 2005. For more pictures like this visit www.blaisenatrail.com place or meet us at the resting place of any of the honor of CW3 Dave Stanley, service members that we are who lost his life while flying his honoring, or have honored in UH-60 Black Hawk over north previous years. Or simply ride Alabama. Dave’s wife, Kristy, straight to our destination and braved a whole new world, with meet us there. Trailer your bike a group of people she did not (we’ll probably give you a hard know at all. We picked her up time, but it’s really okay). Find in Clarksville, TN, and she rode a group near you and ride with most of the way to Milwaukee. them all the way, or give them Several of our riders had the some extra company for part of honor of carrying their two sons, their trip. We welcome Tyler and McGwire for a short anyone’s participation in ride in the morning as we left whatever capacity they are able. Clarksville. In closing, I am proud to In May 2009, we rode to introduce to you the soldier we Branson, MO, for their 8th have chosen to honor in 2010 as Annual Motorcycle Rally. This we BLAISE A TRAIL to the was the first year that we rode in Niangua River, MO. CW2 Earl honor of a National Guardsman, R. “Scotty” Scott III was born CW3 Brady Rudolf. Brady was on December 24th, 1984 to Earl on his third deployment when he Scott, Jr. and Sandra Lee Scott. lost his life in Iraq, while flying From a young age Scotty his CH-47 Chinook. His widow loved to fly and always joined us on the ride along with dreamed of being a pilot. He many other family members and loved the freedom of the air and friends of the crew of Brady’s translated that into a love of aircraft. motorcycles when he found EVERY year we will himself on the ground. Earl continue, by riding to a different was on his second tour of duty location to honor those who in Iraq in support of Operation have given of themselves in the Iraqi Freedom when his OHservice of their country, and 58D Kiowa Warrior Helicopter more specifically, an aircrew

CHPA • The Swash Plate

crashed on November 8th, 2009 in Tikrit, Iraq. He is survived by his parents and one brother, William Scott, all of Jacksonville, FL. We hope that you will join us in honoring our fallen this year, or in the years to come. For more information visit the Combat Helicopter Pilots Association (CHPA) website at www.chpa-us.org, or feel free to contact us at blaisenatrail@yahoo.com. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. 2 Timothy 4:7 BLAISE ON SCOTTY!!!

10


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

ArmyAircrews.com
 Kevin
Allen


When the news of a crash or shoot down is heard, it has become a sad tradition amongst Army aviators to patiently wait for the identities of our fallen. In the past, the wait for details or even just the names of the victims could be lengthy. But in recent years, word of a new website devoted to memorializing our Army aviation fallen has made the rounds. Nowadays, the website ArmyAircrews.com is the first place most people check when tragedy strikes. Here is the story of Kevin Allen and how his website, ArmyAircrews.com, came about. My stint in Army aviation was short, serving only four and a half years, all stationed at Fort Hood, TX. I departed the Army shortly after the stop/loss was lifted in 1991. I maintained contact with several comrades from my unit. In 1995, I received a call from one of my friends that my former roommate was killed in an Army aviation accident. I wanted to find out more information about the accident and was not very productive in my search. Eventually I found some information, but it was too vague to satisfy my curiosity. I began searching the internet for any Army aviation accidents and began making notes and copies of the news clippings on the ones that I

could find. Sometime in 1997, I began compiling the information by the accident date, airframe type and names of Photo taken June 1989 at Hood AAF in front of UH-1H #704 the victim(s). While I continue to dedicate searching I also found that there ArmyAicrews.com to my two was not a good central website friends, Joel Meints and Kevin for the information I was Jenkins, whose deaths inspired looking for, excepting the me to develop the website. period of the Vietnam War. This gave me the idea to start a website strictly for Army aviation accidents, since I was certain that I would not be the only person who may be looking for similar type Corporate Sponsors information. I thought that not only would the website serve as a research and reference tool, it would also serve the purpose as •
Marpat
Aviation
 a memorial to those individuals •
Robertson
Aviation
 who gave their lives while serving their country. •
Greater
Las
Vegas
Property
 While maintaining the Management
 website and exhaustive research is sometimes cumbersome, I feel •
M1
Support
Services
 compelled to continue with the project. I have received •
AM
Air
Services
 information not only from friends and families of the •
DS2
Defense
Support
 victims, but from some Services
 survivors as well. It is 
 sometimes difficult to respond to the families and close friends of some of those individuals listed, but it is important that people remember them for the sacrifice they paid.

CHPA’s

Thank You Sponsors!

11


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

Taipan
Joe
—
Flying
in
Vietnam
 Joe
Ralph


George
 Edward
 (Joe)
 build
 a
 parachute
 Ralph,
 hails
 from
 Australia
 tent
 and
 how
 to
 (near
 the
 Sydney
 suburb,
 of
 live
 off
 the
 land,
 Redfern)
 and
 he
 joined
 the
 plus
 ideas
 on
 how
 Australian
Navy
in
June
of
1964.

 to
 escape
 and
 Later
 he
 spent
 a
 year
 flying
 in
 evade
if
necessary.

 Vietnam
 with
 the
 135th
 Assault
 The
 next
 days
 Helicopter
 Company
 as
 a
 door
 were
 spent
 in
 the
 gunner
 and
 a
 crew
 chief
 on
 swimming
 pool,
 The author, Joe Ralph, pictured here with a Taipan gunship. slicks,
 and
 later
 he
 crewed
 on
 where,
 come
 to
 the
 Huey
 gunships,
 known
 as
 find
 out
 not
 many
 of
 the
 Royal
 also
 did
 many
 drills
 created
 Taipans.
 Australian
Air
Force
pilots
could
 especially
 for
 the
 aircrews.

 The
 Experimental
 swim,
 so
 the
 course
 stalled
 long
 After
 a
 while,
 we
 had
 enough
 Military
 Unit
 (EMU)
 was
 a
 enough
to
get
the
RAAF
pilots
to
 practice
 under
 out
 belts
 to
 company­sized,
 helicopter
 float
around
the
pool
a
bit.


 work
with
the
Australian
Army
 assault
force,
created
when
Joe’s
 
 Next,
 we
 found
 ourselves
 on
field
exercises
to
the
west
of
 unit,
 (formed
 as
 the
 Royal
 in
 the
 field,
 being
 chased
 by
 HMAS
 Albatross.
 
 It
 was
 there
 Australian
 Navy
 Helicopter
 RAAF
 airfield
 guards
 and
 using
 that
 we
 conducted
 troop
 Flight
Vietnam
or
RANHFV)
was
 maps
 to
 find
 hidden
 spots
 for
 insertions
 and
 extractions
 in
 incorporated
 into
 the
 U.S.
 food
 and
 water.
 
 That
 was
 readiness
 for
 our
 deployment
 Army’s
135th
Assault
Helicopter
 followed
 by
 a
 week
 of
 living
 off
 to
Vietnam.
 Company.
 
 In
 1969,
 Joe’s
 the
land
and
making
a
camp.

All
 
 At
 that
 time
 we
 didn’t
 RANHFV
unit

consisted
of
pilots
 this
 was
 done
 only
 using
 what
 receive
Navy
aircrew
wings,
as
 and
aircraft
technical
personnel,
 we
had
been
given
as
if
we
were
 no
such
qualification
existed
in
 and
was
lead
by
 in
 an
 actual
 the
 Navy
 training
 manual.
 
 So
 LtCdr
 Farthing.

 aircraft
 crash.

 although
 there
 were
 to
 be
 no
 Two
 units
 of
 Our
 supplies
 wings
 for
 us,
 it
 could
 be
 said
 RANHFV
 had
 told me of the joys consisted
 of
 a
 that
 we
 wrote
 the
 book
 on
 already
gone
to
 24‐hour
 ration
 Navy
 aircraft
 crews
 firing
 of being in Vietnam.
 pack,
 flight
 suit,
 weapons
 on
 troop
 insertion
 
 The
 Vietnam … suntan parachute
 and
 a
 and
 armed
 helicopter
 gunship
 following
 is
 plus
 tactics.
 oil, hammocks and map
 excerpted
 from
 compass.
 
 The
 
 We
flew
out
on
a
707
to
 surfboards.” some
 of
 Joe’s
 instructors
were
 greet
 the
 war
 in
 Vietnam
 on
 writings
 about
 sure
 to
 search
 October
 8th,
 1969.
 
 On
 our
 his
 experiences
 while
 training
 us
 to
 make
 sure
 we
 had
 no
 way,
we
were
met
by
members
 and
flying
in
Vietnam.


 hidden
supplies.


 of
 the
 outgoing
 RANHFV.
 
 I
 
 
 On
 return
 to
 the
 HMAS
 particularly
 remember
 SubLt.
 
 Before
 shipping
 out
 we
 Albatross,
 we
 carried
 out
 flying
 Bob
 Kyle
 who
 told
 me
 of
 the
 were
 sent
 to
 Amberly
 in
 drills
and
live
fires
with
the
M60
 joys
 of
 being
 in
 Vietnam,
 all
 Queensland,
 where
 we
 learned
 machine
guns
fixed
to
the
UH1B
 suntan
oil,
hammocks
between
 escape
 and
 survival
 practices.

 Hueys
 of
 723rd
 Squadron.
 
 We
 coconut
 trees
 and
 surfboard
 We
 were
 given
 a
 few
 days
 of
 Continued on Page 13 classroom
 lessons
 on
 how
 to


“Bob Kyle

12


Volume 5, Issue 6

riding.
 
 It
 was
 a
 great
 little
 20‐ minute
 story,
 none
 of
 which
 came
 true
 of
 course!
 
 I
 bet
 he
 had
 a
 good
 laugh
 getting
 on
 that
 flight
 home
 to
 Australia!
 
 Next
 it
 was
 off
 to
 the
 base
 BEARCAT
 to
 join
 the
 135th
 Assault
 helicopter
 Company,
 which
 fell
 under
 the
 command
 of
 the
 145th
 Aviation
 Battalion.
 
 (Those
 Army
 units
 seemed
 to
 have
 a
 very
 long
 chain
 of
 command!)
 
 Upon
 arrival
we
collected
our
clothing
 and
 bedding
 —
 a
 very
 skinny
 mattress
 and
 a
 thinly
 covered
 pillow.
 
 Then
 began
 the
 sorting
 out
of
sleeping
quarters.

Most
of
 the
beds
were
made
out
of
used
 boxes
 (previously
 home
 to
 2.75
 inch
folding
rockets).


 
 The
 building
 we
 called
 home
 was
 two
 stories
 tall
 and
 consisted
 of
 a
 big
 open
 space
 with
 wire
 beds
 and
 footlockers.

 No
 mirrors
 or
 windows,
 just
 thin,
 old
 pinewood.
 
 The
 toilet
 was
 a
 very
 friendly
 affair,
 consisting
of
just
a
long,
wooden
 plank
 with
 about
 eight
 holes.

 Under
 each
 hole
 there
 was
 half
 of
a
44‐gallon
drum.

The
drums
 were
 later
 emptied
 by
 filling
 them
 with
 diesel
 and
 burning
 the
contents.

As
those
of
us
who
 were
there
can
attest,
the
smoke
 and
smell
could
be
discerned
for
 many
miles!

The
reason
for
the
 absence
 of
 mirrors
 and
 windows
 was
 to
 reduce
 the
 effect
 of
 flying
 glass
 during


CHPA • The Swash Plate

attacks,
 which
 to
 me
 seemed
 more
like
a
good
excuse
for
not
 supplying
 them!
 
 The
 showers,


into
 BEARCAT
 on
 a
 regular
 basis,
 and
 we
 all
 soon
 got
 accustomed
 to
 being
 under
 fire
 in
the
camp.

There
 were
no
safe
zones
 except
 in
 the
 bunkers.


 
 Not
too
long
 after
 we
 received
 our
 main
 mission
 tasks,
 we
 were
 integrated
 into
 the
 135th
 Assault
 Helicopter
 Company.

Many
of
 us
 were
 assigned
 jobs
 in
 the
 maintenance
 areas
 of
 electronics,
 radio,
 ordinance,
 engines
 and
 located
 under
 a
 water
 tower,
 airframes,
 as
 we
 learned
 to
 do
 consisted
 of
 five
 shower
 heads
 things
 the
 U.S.
 Army
 way.
 
 We
 —
 again,
 very
 friendly
 —
 and
 were
allowed
to
wear
U.S.
Army
 water
 straight
 from
 the
 water
 flight
 uniforms
 and
 rank
 so
 as
 tower
to
add
pressure.


 to
 be
 recognized
 by
 U.S.
 Army
 
 BEARCAT
 was
 a
 large
 personnel
on
the
base.

 base
 located
 a
 few
 miles
 down
 
 I
 started
 flying
 with
 2nd
 the
 road
 to
 the
 platoon
 on
 northeast
 of
 their
 slicks,
 in
 Long
 Binh,
 just
 November.

 be off
 Highway
 1
 Melchor
 happy if I could and
 to
 the
 Batista
 was
 my
 southeast
 of
 remember a few more crew
 chief
 and
 Saigon.
 
 We
 what
 a
 very
 names of those brave were
co‐located
 fine
 and
 pilots and crews.” there
 with
 a
 professional
 few
 other
 one
 he
 was,
 assault
 helicopter
 companies
 too.
 
 Slicks
 were
 the
 troop
 including
 the
 240th
 AHC
 and
 carrying
UH1H
Hueys,
so
called
 the
350th
AHC.

The
240th
guys
 because
 the
 seats
 were
 beside
 lived
 next
 to
 us
 and
 had
 their
 the
transmission
well
instead
of
 helicopter
 gun
 ships
 next
 to
 the
box
cabin
like
a
gunship.


I
 ours.
 
 Artillery
 guns
 were
 felt
 like
 it
 was
 a
 good
 start
 to
 placed
 all
 around
 for
 fire
 flying
helicopter
flight
missions.


 support.
 
 The
 VC
 (bad
 guys)
 Our
 missions
 consisted
 used
to
fire
mortars
and
rockets
 mainly
 of
 troop
 transport,


“I Would

Continued on Page 14 13


Volume 5, Issue 6

CHPA • The Swash Plate

single‐ship
 resupply
 missions
 rounds.
 
 The
 sliding
 (out
to
very
remote
and
difficult
 cabin
 doors
 were
 to
 reach
 outposts)
 and
 also
 often
 removed
 as
 dustoff
 missions.
 
 The
 dustoffs
 they
 got
 in
 the
 way
 were
 the
 hardest,
 because
 we
 and
were
very
rarely
 were
working
with
the
dead
and
 used.


 wounded.


 Slicks
 were
 a
 
 A
crew
in
the
135th
AHC
 good
training
step
to
 was
 made
 up
 of
 four
 progress
 to
 the
 3rd
 crewmembers.

The
pilot’s
main
 platoon,
 (known
 as
 roles
 were
 as
 both
 pilot
 and
 the
 Taipans)
 for
 helicopter
 captain.
 
 The
 copilot
 both
pilots
and
crew.

 was
second
in
command
and
the
 These
gunship
crews
 main
 navigator,
 which
 was
 a
 had
 to
 be
 real
challenge
with
just
the
basic
 trustworthy
 and
 Army
 ground
 maps.
 
 Next
 was
 reliable
as
there
was
 the
 helicopter
 crew
 chief,
 who,
 no
 time
 for
 was
in
charge
of
the
helicopter’s
 instructions
 under
 Joe painted his wife’s name on the rocket pods. “They wore out basic
electronics
and
mechanical
 fire.
 
 They
 kept
 a
 quickly but it meant something to me.” pieces.
 
 Lastly,
 the
 gunner
 constant
 lookout
 for
 manned
 the
 starboard
 M60
 replacements
in
case
 machine
 gun
 on
 slicks
 and
 the
 their
 existing
 crewmembers
 what
 had
 just
 happened
 and
 port
 M60
 machine
 gun
 on
 a
 were
 wounded,
 which
 they
 what
 we
 could
 expect
 on
 the
 helicopter
 gunship.
 
 He
 also
 inevitably
were.

My
goal
was
to
 next
trip
to
that
same
LZ.

Only
 later
 in
 life
 do
 we
 think
 about
 helped
 the
 crew
 chief
 perform
 join
a
Taipan
crew.

 field
 maintenance.
 
 Cleaning,
 
 My
 first
 helicopter
 the
brave
troops
we
left
in
that
 refueling,
 and
 rearming
 was
 all
 missions
 were
 mainly
 a
 lot
 of
 field
 of
 fire.
 
 The
 winking
 little
 done
 by
 the
 firing
 and
 being
 lights
 hidden
 in
 the
 tree
 line
 enlisted
 fired
 on,
 both
 on
 and
 the
 green
 glowing
 flashes
 later in crewmembers.


 the
way
in
and
on
 were
 the
 only
 reminders
 that
 
 In
 terms
 life do we think the
 way
 out.
 
 In
 we
 had
 even
 been
 there.
 
 We
 of
 armor,
 the
 about the brave slicks
 we
 had
 repeated
 this
 scenario
 daily,
 at
 helicopter
 other
 helicopters
 different
 LZ’s
 and
 extraction
 carried
 just
 two
 troops we left in flying
 in
 points.


 pilot
 seats
 with
 that field of fire. formation
near
us
 
 My
 helicopter
 about
 this
 sliding
 side
 The winking lights as
 well
 as
 troops
 time
 was
 tail
 number
 244,
 and
 plates
 and
 full‐ on
 the
 ground,
 these
missions
set
the
stage
for
 and green glowing harness
 seat
 not
 to
 mention
 the
 next
 several
 months.
 
 We
 flashes were the belts.
 
 The
 crew
 our
 own
 rotor
 were
 flying
 mostly
 all
 day,
 and
 chief
and
gunner
 only reminders that blades.
 
 There
 some
 after
 dark.
 
 The
 unit
 had
 had
canvas
seats
 was
 a
 lot
 to
 keep
 helicopters
 in
 the
 operation
 we had been there.” with
 just
 a
 lap
 an
 eye
 on!

 area
 every
 day
 of
 the
 week
 …
 belt
 and
 they
 Mostly
 it
 was
 so
 regardless
of
what
day
it
was.


 were
 each
 given
 a
 heavy
 hectic,
 with
 so
 many
 things
 
 In
 my
 free
 time
 I
 would
 fiberglass
plate
to
wear
on
their
 happening
at
once
that
it
wasn’t
 sit
 on
 the
 hooch
 landing
 steps
 chests.
 
 Most
 just
 sat
 on
 them.

 until
 we
 were
 finally
 out
 of
 the
 and
 watch
 the
 machine
 gun
 The
 M60
 machine
 guns
 had
 a
 LZ
that
we
had
time
to
reflect
on
 tracer
bullets
rip
into
the
jungle
 makeshift
 ammo
 box
 that
 Continued on Page 15 usually
 held
 around
 1500


“Only

14


Volume 5, Issue 6

around
the
base
and
write
to
my
 wife
 Bonnie.
 
 The
 gunships
 flew
 overhead
 with
 the
 occasional
 short
bursts
of
bright
red
tracer
 streams
 from
 minigun
 fire.
 
 I
 wrote
 home
 as
 often
 as
 I
 could
 because
 we
 never
 knew
 when
 we
 would
 get
 back
 to
 base.
 
 My
 lovely
 wife
 kept
 each
 one.
 
 I
 found
 the
 letters
 to
 be
 a
 very
 important
 part
 of
 my
 ability
 to
 cope
 with
 being
 in
 a
 high
 stress
 area.
 
 Having
 letters
 from
 home
 in
 my
 pocket
 made
 me
 happy
 and
 helped
 me
 face
 the
 rest
 of
 my
tour.
 
 My
 first
 real
 aircraft
 crash
 came
 in
 early
 December
 1969,
while
flying
in
a
UH1H,
tail
 number
 67‐17109,
 with
 crew
 chief
 Harris
 MacGough.
 
 We
 were
 on
 a
 single‐ship
 resupply
 of
personnel
and
ammunition
to
 a
 fire
 support
 base
 deep
 in
 the


CHPA • The Swash Plate

delta.

We
were
at
2000
feet
with
 eight
 soldiers
 and
 a
 full
 load
 of
 105mm
artillery
ammo,
when
we
 either
 took
 a
 sniper
 hit
 or
 had
 a
 mechanical
 failure
 of
 the
 short
 shaft.


“Not a single one of the crew was an American citizen, although we were flying an American helicopter in an undeclared war in Vietnam.” 
 It
materialized
in
the
form
 of
 a
 loud
 bang
 on
 my
 side
 of
 the
 helicopter
 behind
 the
 exhaust
 pipe.
 
 I
 saw
 a
 dark
 object
 fall
 from
just
inside
the
rotor
arc
and
 the
 helicopter
 lost
 tail
 rotor


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searching?


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control.
 
 We
 started
 a
 very
 steep,
 spiraling
 decent,
 but
 not
 much
 was
 in
 my
 mind
 at
 that
 time
 about
 crashing,
 as
 I
 was
 too
 busy
 checking
 all
 the
 stuff
 we
 had
 in
 the
 helicopter.
 
 The
 soldiers
 on
 board
 couldn’t
 understand
 me,
 and
 my
 helmet
 was
 full
 of
 the
 sound
 of
 voices
 shouting
 MAYDAY.
 
 My
 mind
 was
 racing
 …
 
 wondering
 what
 to
 do
 with
 the
 105mm
 ammo.

 It
didn’t
take
long
to
glide
to
the
 ground
 as
 the
 tail
 rotor
 had
 no
 drive.

We
had
the
luck
to
flare
 out
into
a
full
rice
paddy,
which
 broke
 the
 helicopter
 into
 many
 pieces.


 
 I
 never
 thought
 too
 much
 about
 being
 hurt
 —
 my
 job
 was
 to
 disable
 the
 helicopter
 radios
 and
 to
 keep
 checking
 for
 VC
 sniper
 fire.

 Fortunately,
 another
 helicopter
 in
 the
 area
 heard
 our
 MAYDAY
 call
 and
 swooped
 in
 to
 pick
 us
 up.
 
 Huey
 gunships
 destroyed
 the
helicopter
as
it
was
in
such
 a
 bad
 place
 and
 there
 were
 all
 those
 105
 rounds,
 so
 we
 watched
 our
 beloved
 Huey
 get
 destroyed
 as
 we
 were
 flown
 away.
 In
 another
 letter
 to
 my
 wife,
Bonnie,
I
did
mention
that
 being
shot
at
makes
a
person
sit
 up
 and
 take
 notice,
 because
 flying
 is
 so
 peaceful
 and
 the
 scattered
 white
 clouds
 hide
 reality.
 
 Despite
 the
 surreal
 surroundings
 I
 was
 able
 to
 meet
 some
 fantastic
 people
 during
 my
 tour.
 
 Larry
 Linebargar,
was
one
of
my
best
 buddies
 and
 a
 crew
 chief
 mate
 of
mine.

I
flew
with
slick
pilots
 like
 LT
 Dick
 Marum,
 LT
 Peter
 Clark,
 SubLt
 Eric
 Wile,
 SubLt
 Andy
 Perry
 and
 SubLT
 Clive
 15


Volume 5, Issue 6

Mayo
 just
 to
 mention
 a
 few.

 The
 U.S.
 Army
 pilots
 and
 crew
 chiefs
 were
 great
 to
 fly
 with
 too.

I
had
the
pleasure
of
flying
 with
 CPT
 Miller,
 CPT
 Ditton,
 Tim
 Noyes
 and
 LT
 Moses.
 
 I
 only
 wish
 I
 could
 remember
 a
 few
more.


 
 The
 135th
 AHC
 was
 a
 real
 mix
 of
 personnel
 because
 besides
 the
 Australian
 Navy,
 the
 U.S.
 personnel
 were
 made
 up
of
different
nationalities
too.

 One
 day
 I
 was
 flying
 with
 my
 buddy
 Melchor
 Batista
 and
 he
 related
 to
 me
 this
 interesting
 tidbit
about
the
diversity
of
our
 crews:

“There
was
this
one
day
 flying
slicks,
when
the
pilot
was
 Australian,
 the
 copilot
 was
 German,
the
gunner
was
a
chap
 from
 Columbia
 and
 I
 was
 the
 crew
chief
from
Cuba!”


 This
 meant
 that
 not
 a


CHPA • The Swash Plate

single
 one
 of
 the
 crewmembers
 was
 an
 American
 citizen,
 although
 we
 were
 flying
 an
 American
 helicopter
 in
 an
 undeclared
war
in
Vietnam.

“The
 German,
 the
 Columbian
 and
 I
 were
 studying
 or
 residing
 in
 the
 U.S.
 and
 were
 drafted
 into
 the
 military
 service.
 
 Rather
 than
 returning
 to
 our
 countries
 we
 chose
 to
 serve
 in
 the
 U.S.
 Army
 and
so
gain
permanent
residence
 in
 the
 U.S.
 and
 be
 able
 to
 study,
 work
 and
 make
 a
 living
 there.

 Later,
while
in
Vietnam,
I
took
an
 R
and
R
trip
to
Hawaii
to
visit
my
 sister
 and
 took
 the
 oath
 of
 citizenship
 there,
 becoming
 a
 proper
U.S.
citizen,”
said
Melchor.


 I
would
be
happy
if
maybe
 one
 day
 I
 could
 come
 to
 remember
 a
 few
 more
 names
 of
 those
 brave
 pilots
 and
 crews
 I
 served
with
back
then.


Submit Your Photos! CHPA
has
a
growing
 collection
of
photos
 reflecting
the
 spectrum
of
our
 combat
legacy
…

 


If
you
would
like
to
 contribute
to
the
 collection
please
 click
here
to
 upload!


Call on Us! Contact
Quick
Reference
 
 President
—
Lori
Gaff
 
 lgaff@chpa‐us.org
 Headquarters
—
Jay
Brown
 
 hq@chpa‐us.org
 Vice
President
of
Administration
 Rhea
Rippey
 
 admin@chpa‐us.org
 Vice‐President
of
Membership
 Randy
Welch
 
 membership@chpa‐us.org
 Secretary
—
Robert
Frost
 
 secretary@chpa‐us.org
 Treasurer
—
Loren
McAnally
 
 treasurer@chpa‐us.org


Rusty
Bourgoyne
 
 rbourgoyne@chpa‐us.org
 
 Michael
Clarke
 
 mclarke@chpa‐us.org
 
 Russell
Leslie
 
 rleslie@chpa‐us.org
 
 Rick
Roll
 
 rroll@chpa‐us.org 
 Randy
Zahn

 
 rzahn@chpa‐us.org
 



 Call
us!
 



800.832.5144
 



 Write
us!






CHPA
 



PO
Box
15852
 



Washington,
DC

20003
 


Remember!


 We’re
here
for
you!

Please
 feel
free
to
contact
us
any
 time!
 16


The June 2010 Issue of "The Swash Plate"--Volume 5, Issue 6