Page 1

MERRY
CHRISTMAS
AND
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR


Presenting!


December
2011


President’s
Message



 •
“T
Shirts
for
Heroes
Program”





 Robert
Frost
 
 
 •
“Book
Review”
 I
am
pleased
to
report
that
after
a
later
 




by
John
Penny
 than
 expected
 start
 to
 our
 Christmas
 Box
 
 program
 for
 deployed
 helicopter
 aviation
 •
“Life
Memberships”
 units,
we
have
had
our
most
successful
year
in
 
 terms
of
the
number
 of
boxes
sent.

The
final
 •
“Important
Proposals”
 count
was
178,
and
this
year,
as
in
years
past,
 





 •
“US
Troops
Leave
Iraq”
 we
 owe
 a
 debt
 of
 gratitude
 to
 all
 our
 




Tehran
Times
 benefactors.
 
 Specifically,
 I
 want
 to
 publicly
 
 thank
Patrick
Glass,
a
CHPA
member
who
has
 and
much,
much
more!


spearheaded
 the
 assembly,
 packing,
 and
 distribution
 for
 several
 years.
 
 Pat
 has
 had
 the
 support
of
LTC
Paul
Jackson,
Professor
of
Military
Science
at
McDaniel
College
and
a
group
of
his
cadets
 who
volunteered
their
time
to
make
this
possible.

CHPA
thanks
you
for
your
support
of
this
program.


 It
is
worth
noting
that
this
year
will
mark
the
first
time
we
have
not
sent
boxes
to
Iraq.

With
the
 withdrawal
presently
underway,
we
chose
to
send
all
the
boxes
to
Afghanistan.

To
those
units
returning
 from
Iraq,
we
say
“Welcome
home!”
 As
 our
 families
 across
 this
 Nation
 gather
 in
 fellowship
 to
 celebrate
 Christmas
 and
 the
 holiday
 season,
we
are
reminded
of
our
blessings
during
this
special
time
of
the
year.

It
also
reminds
us
of
our
 duty
to
others.

Our
men
and
women
who
wear
this
Nation’s
uniform
fulfill
that
duty
every
day
–
here
at
 home,
on
the
seas
and
in
distant
lands.

We
who
have
served
and
been
deployed
at
this
time
of
the
year
 know
it
has
always
been
a
difficult
time
to
be
away
from
family
and
friends.

Our
military
is
the
best
in
the
 world
 because
 it
 has
 always
 been
 able
 to
 adapt,
 improvise,
 and
 overcome.
 
 Those
 tens
 of
 thousands
 protecting
us
maintain
lonely
and
harsh
vigils.

It
has
always
been
that
way
in
our
Nation’s
history
–
from
 the
brutal
winter
at
Valley
Forge
for
the
Continental
Army,
the
indescribable
freezing
cold
of
the
Battle
of
 the
Bulge
and
Bastogne
during
WWII,
the
cold
winter
battle
of
Chosin
Reservoir
in
Korea,
the
steamy
hot
 jungles
of
Vietnam,
and
the
desert
heat
and
cold
of
Iraq
and
Afghanistan.



 During
this
season
we
also
recognize
the
sacrifice
of
our
Nation’s
military
families.

They
carry
a
 heavy
burden
while
their
loved
ones
are
serving
in
harm’s
way.

This
Nation
is
blessed
to
have
so
many
 who
 are
 willing
 to
 protect
 our
 nation
 at
 great
 personal
 sacrifice,
 including
 their
 families.
 
 We
 at
 CHPA
 understand
this
as
well
as
anyone.

Our
warriors
have
lived
it
and
in
some
cases
are
still
living
it.

I
would
 urge
all
of
you
who
receive
this
newsletter
to
find
some
way
to
thank
our
military
this
Christmas
season.

 If
you
see
uniformed
service
members,
take
a
minute
and
thank
them
for
their
service.

If
you
want
to
do
 more
 then
 check
 out
 the
 website:
 
 Americasupportsyou.mil.
 Continued
on
Page
2
 There
are
more
than
150
organizations
that
can
use
your
help.



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 


One
final
thought
I
would
like
to
leave
with
you
is
the
passing
of
so
many
of
our
WWII
veterans.

 This
year
marked
the
70th
anniversary
of
the
attack
on
Pearl
Harbor.

It
was
to
be
the
last
of
the
Pearl
 Harbor
Survivors
Association
gatherings
at
the
Arizona
Memorial.

The
association
was
founded
in
1958
 with
over
28,000
members.

Now
less
than
ten
percent
survive
and
most
of
them
are
so
advanced
in
age
 they
are
unable
to
sustain
the
organization.

It
is
my
hope
we
will
always
keep
December
7th
as
a
national
 day
of
remembrance.

Those
of
us
who
served
in
Korea
and/or
Vietnam
recognize
our
eventual
passing
as
 part
of
the
natural
process
of
life.

As
our
numbers
continue
to
decline
we
will
someday
be
relegated
to
a
 chapter
in
a
history
book.

There
will
be
no
one
to
talk
to
school
children
about
our
Nation’s
past
wars.

It
 is
our
duty
to
do
what
we
can
to
promote
our
legacy
and
the
legacies
of
those
who
preceded
us.


 On
 behalf
 of
 Board
 of
 Directors
 for
 CHPA,
 thank
 you
 for
 making
 this
 our
 best
 year.
 
 We
 look
 forward
to
serving
you
in
2012.
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 CHPA is building quite a collection of patches 
 
 from our members. These patches are displayed 
 at our booth at HAI, Quad A, and VHPA. 
 Several of you have donated patches, like the one 
 shown here, but we’re always looking for more. 
 They are very eye catching and help us garner 
 attention. So please dig through your old patches 
 and if you have some you’d like to share, send 
 them to us at: 80814‐0042

 CHPA
 • PO Box 42 • Divide, CO
80814‐0042
 


GOT PATCHES?

The
Swash!


[Call
For
Articles]


Now, I know there are stories out there yet to be told in this forum. Helicopter crewmembers lead a most interesting life and stories abound from qualification courses, nonflying assignments, combat missions or just goofing off. Our most entertaining and informative stories come from you, our membership. So, if you have an idea for an article, or if you have an article you’d like to submit it’s as easy as submitting it to the guy who puts the newsletter together. The story can be about anything from flight school to real life, TINS, or there-I-was stories. We’ve published several stories over the years ranging from tales of flight school a long, long time ago to real life “war stories” that we’re sure most of you can identify with. Take a moment to lay fingers on keyboard or just put pen to paper and send in those stories. You can email them to hq@chpa-us.org or through the US Post Office to: CHPA • PO Box 42 • Divide, CO 80814-0042


 


2



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 


CHPA’s
T‐Shirts
for
Heroes
 Jay
Brown
 CHPA’s
T‐shirts
for
Heroes
program
is
off
to
a
great
start.

To
date
we’ve
been
able
to
ship
over
40
 T‐shirts
 to
 our
 aviation
 brothers
 and
 sisters
 deployed
 to
 Afghanistan.
 
 The
 “desert
 camo”
 T‐shirts
 are
 desert
tan
in
color
and
the
logo
and
text
has
been
adjusted
to
coordinate
with
that
base
color.

The
color
 was
chosen
to
allow
the
T‐shirts
to
be
worn
with
the
desert
tan
uniform.
 Unfortunately,
the
initial
funding
for
this
program
has
been
depleted
so
we’re
on
a
hold
for
more
 T‐shirts
until
we
get
more
funding.

If
you’d
like
to
help
sponsor
this
new
effort
just
log
onto
the
website
 and
follow
the
sponsorship
links.

Sponsorship
can
be
via
credit
card
or
check.

Take
this
opportunity
to
 let
our
deployed
soldiers
know
we
remember
them
and
appreciate
their
service. 


Share
the
“Swash”
 Please feel free to forward this issue of “The Swash Plate” to your colleagues, potential members and other interested parties! 
 
 
 
 
 



 Reunions
and
Gatherings
 



 This
is
the
area
where
we
place
your
announcements
for
upcoming
reunions
and
gatherings
that
 may
be
of
interest
to
our
members.

It’s
a
way
to
help
you
get
the
word
out
and
support
veterans
groups
 of
 all
 sizes
 and
 locations.
 
 Getting
 your
 gathering
 listed
 here
 is
 simple.
 
 Just
 send
 a
 message
 with
 the
 information
to
HQ@chpa‐us.org.

If
you’ve
got
a
logo
send
that
along
as
well.

Be
sure
to
include
accurate
 contact
and
registration
information
and
we’ll
take
care
of
the
rest. 
 


3



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 


Book
Review
 John
Penny
 This
review
by
CHPA
member
John
L.
Penny
has
previously
appeared
in
 the
VHPA
Aviator.
 
 Journey
to
the
Golden
Hour,
by
Randolph
Mains,
is
the
story
of
his
post‐ Vietnam
helicopter
career
and
sequel
to
Dear
Mom,
I’m
Alive.

This
story
has
 many
 facets
 and
 includes
 his
 time
 as
 a
 helicopter
 EMS
 pilot
 which
 he
 fictionalized
 in
 his
 book
 The
 Golden
 Hour.
 
 Mains’
 writing
 skills
 and
 his
 interesting,
and
often
quite
unique
experiences
flying
helicopters
make
this
a
 particularly
good
read.
 Like
many
of
us,
he
was
at
loose
ends
after
serving
his
Army
military
 obligation.
 
 While
 attending
 college
 in
 California
 and
 working
 to
 make
 ends
 meet
for
his
new
family,
a
pilot
friend
asked
if
he
would
like
to
try
his
hand
 flying
“down
under”
in
Australia.

What
follows
is
a
series
of
adventures
and
mishaps
including

a
“Flight
 of
 the
 Phoenix”
 job
 recovering
 a
 crashed
 airplane
 in
 the
 northern
 outback,
 cattle
 mustering
 (read
 ‘herding’)
with
a
Hughes
300C
and
flying
on
a
heli‐rig
contract
with
an
S‐58T
in
Papua
New
Guinea
where
 the
night
time
entertainment
involved
crocodile
hunting.

Such
fun
was
not
to
last,
as
the
company
lost
 the
contract.

 Mains
 moved
 on
 hoping
 to
 find
 more
 sedate
 work
 that
 involved
 being
 at
 home
 more
 often.
 
 He
 learned
 that
 a
 job
 as
 a
 Flight
 Instructor
 for
 Bell
 Helicopter
 in
 Iran
 was
 available.
 
 It
 seemed
 a
 solid
 prospect
and
he
felt
such
a
huge
company
would
be
unlikely
to
go
bust.

However,
he
did
not
anticipate
 the
Ayatollah
Khomeini
for
one.

After
just
two
and
a
half
short
years,
Mains
and
his
family
were
on
the
 proverbial
“Last
Flight
Out”
of
Iran
for
Bell
Helicopter
employees.
 Shortly
 after
 that,
 Mains
 received
 a
 call
 and
 began
 his
 most
 dangerous
 job:
 helicopter
 EMS
 (HEMS).
 
 It
 was
 the
 beginning
 of
 a
 new
 era
 of
 medical
 evacuation
 which
 took
 him
 to
 jobs
 in
 Houston,
 Phoenix,
and
San
Diego
and
earned
him
the
HAI’s
Golden
Hour
Award.

There
were
hazards,
not
the
least
 of
 which
 was
 flying
 VFR
 into
 deteriorating
 weather,
 which
 continues
 to
 claim
 an
 increasing
 number
 of
 HEMS
pilots
and
medical
staff.

Throw
in
long
duty
hours,
lax
FAA
oversight,
employer
profit
motive,
and
 intense
pressure
for
a
pilot
to
take
a
flight
and
you
have
the
makings
for
a
disaster.

Mains’
book
includes
 a
sobering
list
of
the
343
names
of
HEMS
pilots
and
medical
staff
that
have
died
in
the
line
of
HEMS
work
 since
1980.
 Mains
 left
 HEMS
 work
 and
 moved
 on
 to
 fly
 13
 years
 for
 the
 Sultan
 of
 Oman
 and
 3
 years
 for
 the
 King
of
Saudi
Arabia,
after
which
he
retired.

But
surprise,
he
came
out
of
retirement
to
work
as
a
type
 rating
instructor
and
flight
examiner
on
a
412EP
flight
simulator
in
Abu
Dhabi.

Dear
Mom,
I’m
Alive
has
 been
 optioned
 for
 a
 movie.
 
 He
 also
 continues
 to
 speak
 on
 and
 work
 for
 change
 regarding
 the
 unique
 safety
issues
of
HEMS.

He
was
a
keynote
speaker
at
the
Association
of
Air
Medical
Services
conference
in
 St.
 Louis
 in
 mid‐October
 2011.
 
 Many
 former
 military
 helicopter
 pilots
 have
 had
 extraordinary
 careers.

 Mains
is
certainly
one
of
those,
and
his
writing
skills
make
sharing
that
career
well
worth
your
time.




 Journey
 to
 the
 Golden
 Hour:
 My
 Path
 to
 the
 Most
 Dangerous
 Job
 in
 America:
 Flying
 a
 Medical
 Helicopter
($20.00,
367
pages)
by
Randolph
P.
Mains,
ISBN:
978‐0986675904
is
available
 in
paperback
 from
randymains.com/contact.html.
 


4



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 


Submit
Your
 
 Photos!
 

 


CHPA
has
a
growing
collection
 of
photos,
from
flight
school
 
 class
pictures
to
action
photos
 
 to
helicopter
shots
from
 around
the
world
to
these
 
 from
our
2011
Annual
 Meeting…
 
 If
you
would
like
to
contribute
 to
the
collection
please
upload
 your
photos
by
following
the
 links
on
the
CHPA
website
or
 click
here!

 




 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


5



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 



 
 
 Please 
 consider sponsoring 
 CHPA’s programs. You may 
 make
 tax deductible donations to

Sponsorship


support the Goldie Fund, CHPA’s Scholarship program, the Holiday Boxes for the Troops, T-shirts for Heroes or the Association. For further information please look at Sponsorship at the website, http://www.chpa-us.org. 


Lifetime
Memberships
 Have
 you
 thought
 about
 a
 Lifetime
 Membership
 in
 CHPA
 but
 thought
 it
 was
 too
 expensive,
 or
 maybe
not
worth
the
cost?

To
break
it
down,
dues
for
a
Lifetime
Membership
for
pilots
is
$650;
for
Crew
 Members
dues
are
$425.

While
that
may
seem
like
a
lot,
when
you
do
the
math
it
covers
you
for
just
a
 shade
over
twenty
one
years
at
regular
member
dues.

Has
anyone
ever
mentioned
you
don’t
necessarily
 have
 to
 pay
 the
 entire
 amount
 “up
 front?”
 
 Well,
 you
 have
 the
 option
 of
 enjoying
 the
 benefit
 of
 not
 worrying
about
any
renewal
notices
or
writing
a
yearly
check
by
paying
the
dues
in
installments.

CHPA
 offers
plans
to
allow
you
to
pay
your
Lifetime
Membership
dues
over
several
months.

You
can
also
set
up
 automatic
debits
to
your
credit
card.

Give
us
a
call
at
800•832•5144
for
details.

Proposals
Before
The
Board
 As
 previously
 reported,
 two
 proposals
 have
 been
 presented
 to
 the
 Board
 that,
 if
 implemented
 would
 require
 amending
 the
 By‐Laws.
 
 It
 is
 imperative
 that
 the
 membership
 fully
 understand
 and
 seriously
consider
these
changes
prior
to
voting
on
each
of
them.

The
By‐Laws
may
only
be
amended
by
 an
 approval
 vote
 of
 the
 membership.
 
 CHPA
 is
 your
 organization
 and
 you
 have
 a
 voice
 in
 how
 it
 is
 to
 proceed
into
the
future.

We
urge
you
to
let
your
voice
be
heard.
 The
 first
 proposal
 involves
 instituting
 a
 procedure
 to
 allow
 membership‐wide
 voting
 instead
 of
 voting
 in
 person
 or
 via
 delegates
 at
 the
 Annual
 Business
 Meeting.
 
 The
 second
 proposal
 concerns
 removing
 the
 current
 barrier
 to
 voting
 and
 board
 service,
 and
 increasing
 Crewmember
 dues
 to
 parity
 with
Pilot
dues.

Prior to bringing these issues before the membership for a vote it is imperative that we gather input and opinions from our members. Please consider these proposals carefully then share your opinions with your Board of Directors by sending an email to HQ@chpa-us.org or visit the Bulletin Board where questions, commentary, and discussions may be posted on these topics. Now is the time to provide your input on these very important proposed changes to our Bylaws. 


6



Volume 7, Issue 12


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org 


US
Troops
Leave
Iraq
 Tehran
Times


The
 last
 convoy
 of
 US
 soldiers
 pulled
 out
 of
 Iraq
 on
 Sunday,
 ending
 nearly
 nine
 years
 of
 war
 that
 cost
 over
 one
 million
Iraqi
and
4,500
American
lives
and
left
the
Middle
Eastern
 country
grappling
with
extremism,
sectarianism
and
terrorism.

 According
 to
 the
 California‐based
 investigative
 organization
Project
Censored,
more
than
one
million
Iraqis
have
 been
 killed
 in
 the
 US‐led
 invasion
 and
 subsequent
 occupation
 of
 the
country
since
March
2003.

 Washington
 said
 the
 military
 action
 was
 carried
 out
 to
 discover
 the
 weapons
 of
 mass
 destruction
 (WMD)
 when
 former
 dictator
 Saddam
 Hussein's
 Baathist
 regime
 was
 in
 power.

 Troops
watch
colleagues
as
the
last
US
military
convoy
 departs
Iraq
from
the
3rd
Brigade
after
crossing
over
the
 However,
no
WMDs
have
ever
been
found
in
Iraq.

 border
into
Kuwait
on
December
18,
2011
in
Camp
 Under
a
2008
bilateral
security
accord,
known
as
the
Status
of
 Virginia,
Kuwait.
(Getty
Images)
 Forces
 Agreement
 (SOFA),
 all
 the
 troops
 are
 required
 to
 leave
 the
 country
by
December
31.

 The
 final
 column
 of
 around
 100
 mostly
 US
 military
 MRAP
 armored
 vehicles
 carrying
 500
 US
 troops
 trundled
 across
 the
 southern
 Iraq
 desert
 from
 their
 last
 base
 through
 the
 night
 and
 daybreak
 along
an
empty
highway
to
the
Kuwaiti
border,
Reuters
reported.
 Honking
 their
 horns,
 the
 last
 batch
 of
 around
 25
 American
 military
 trucks
 and
 tractor
 trailers
 carrying
Bradley
fighting
vehicles
crossed
the
border
early
Sunday
morning,
their
crews
waving
at
fellow
 troops
along
the
route.
 “I
just
can't
wait
to
call
my
wife
and
kids
and
let
them
know
I
am
safe,”
SFC
Rodolfo
Ruiz
said
as
 the
border
came
into
sight.

Soon
afterwards,
he
told
his
men
the
mission
was
over,
“Hey
guys,
you
made
 it.”
 For
 US
 President
 Barack
 Obama,
 the
 military
 pullout
 is
 the
 fulfillment
 of
 an
 election
 promise
 to
 bring
troops
home
from
a
conflict
inherited
from
his
predecessor,
the
most
unpopular
war
since
Vietnam
 and
one
that
tainted
America's
standing
worldwide.
 For
Iraqis,
though,
the
US
departure
brings
a
sense
of
sovereignty
tempered
by
nagging
fears
their
 country
may
slide
once
again
into
the
kind
of
sectarian
violence
that
killed
many
thousands
of
people
at
 its
peak
in
2006‐2007.
 The
 intensity
 of
 violence
 and
 suicide
 bombings
 has
 subsided.
 
 But
 a
 stubborn
 Sunni
 insurgency
 and
 rival
 militias
 remain
 a
 threat,
 carrying
 out
 almost
 daily
 attacks,
 often
 on
 Iraqi
 government
 and
 security
officials.
 Iraq
says
its
forces
can
contain
the
violence
but
they
lack
capabilities
in
areas
such
as
air
defense
 and
intelligence
gathering.

A
deal
for
several
thousand
US
troops
to
stay
on
as
trainers
fell
apart
over
the
 sensitive
issue
of
legal
immunity.
 For
many
Iraqis,
security
remains
a
worry
‐
but
no
more
than
jobs
and
getting
access
to
power
in
a
 country
 whose
 national
 grid
 provides
 only
 a
 few
 hours
 of
 electricity
 a
 day
 despite
 the
 OPEC
 country's
 vast
oil
potential.
 US
and
foreign
companies
are
already
helping
Iraq
develop
the
world's
fourth‐largest
oil
reserves,
 but
 its
 economy
 needs
 investment
 in
 all
 sectors,
 from
 Concluded
on
Page
8
 hospitals
to
infrastructure.
 


7



Volume 7, Issue 12


www.chpa-us.org 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

“We
don't
think
about
America
...
We
think
about
electricity,
jobs,
our
oil,
our
daily
problems,”
said
 Abbas
Jaber,
a
government
employee
in
Baghdad.

“They
(Americans)
left
chaos.”
 After
 Obama
 announced
 in
 October
 that
 troops
 would
 come
 home
 by
 the
 end
 of
 the
 year
 as
 scheduled,
the
number
of
US
military
bases
was
whittled
down
quickly
as
hundreds
of
troops
and
trucks
 carrying
equipment
headed
south
to
Kuwait.
 US
forces,
which
had
ended
combat
missions
in
2010,
paid
$100,000
a
month
to
tribal
sheikhs
to
 secure
stretches
of
the
highways
leading
south
to
reduce
the
risk
of
roadside
bombings
and
attacks
on
 the
last
convoys.
 Only
 around
 150
 US
 troops
 will
 remain
 in
 the
 country
 attached
 to
 a
 training
 and
 cooperation
 mission
at
the
huge
US
embassy
on
the
banks
of
the
Tigris
River.
 At
the
height
of
the
war,
more
than
170,000
US
troops
were
in
Iraq
at
more
than
500
bases.

By
 Saturday,
there
were
fewer
than
3,000
troops,
and
one
base
‐
Contingency
Operating
Base
Adder,
300
km
 (185
miles)
south
of
Baghdad.
 
 


Call on Us! Contact Quick Reference 


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of
the
Board
–
Rhea
Rippey

 Chairman@chpa‐us.org

 
 President
–
Robert
Frost

 president@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Administration
–
Vacant

 admin@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Membership
–
Rusty
Bourgoyne

 membership@chpa‐us.org



Buzz
Covington
 BCovington@chpa‐us.org


Secretary/Treasurer
–
Loren
McAnally

 Treasurer@chpa‐us.org

 
 Executive
Director
–
Jay
Brown
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
 
 
 


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Ferguson
 JFerguson@chpa‐us.org
 
 
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Fore
 
 JFore@chpa‐us.org
 
 
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Jones
 RJones@chpa‐us.org


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Major


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8


Swash Plate December 2011  

CHPA Newsletter for December 2011

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