Page 1


 Volume 9, Issue 2


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


HAPPY
THANKSGIVING


Presenting!
 • “President’s
Message”
 
 Milan
Tesanovich


November
2013


President’s
Message

 Milan
Tesanovich



First,
 I
 want
 to
 thank
 all
 of
 you
 who
voted
to
elect
me
as
your
president
 for
 the
 next
 two
 years.
 I
 am
 both
 • ”Reunions
and
Gatherings”

 honored
 and
 humbled
 by
 your
 faith
 in
 • “Welcome
New
Members”
 my
 ability
 to
 lead
 this
 extraordinary
 • “Living
a
Bonus
Life”
 group
 of
 veterans
 and
 friends
 as
 we
 
 Vincent
T.
Davis
 
 move
 on
 to
 the
 next
 phase
 of
 growth
 • “A
Veteran
Died
Today”
 and
service
to
the
military
community.
 A.
Lawrence
Vaincourt
 Those
who
read
this
column
each
 and
much,
much
more!
 month
have
either
served
in
the
military
 
 at
some
point
in
time
as
combat
aviators
 or
 crew
 members,
 or
 are
 friends
 or
 honorary
 members
 of
 the
 CHPA.
 
 It
 matters
 not
 whether
 we
 volunteered
 to
 serve,
 were
 drafted,
 or
 served
 as
 the
waiting
spouses,
children,
parents,
or
friends
of
those
served.

In
our
own
way,
we
each
provided
service
 to
our
nation
and
those
who
wore
the
uniform.

In
the
course
of
our
service,
we
all
learned
the
importance
of
 working
together,
as
a
team,
to
achieve
a
common
goal
or
objective.
 Our
website
enumerates
four
goals:

(1)
To
organize
and
unify
US
Armed
Forces
Rotary
Wing
Aviators
 and
crew
members
from
all
service
branches
who
have
flown
helicopter
combat
missions
in
support
of
US
and
 specified
Allied
Coalition
Partner
National
Interests;
(2)
To
remember
and
honor
our
fallen
aviation
comrades
 lost
 during
 helicopter
 combat
 operations;
 (3)
 To
 conduct
 national
 and
 regional
 social
 activities;
 and
 (4)
 To
 conduct
charitable
activities
related
to
the
US
specified
Allied
Coalition
military
helicopter
community.
 The
success
of
any
organization
in
attaining
its
goals
is
dependent
upon
the
willingness
of
its
members
 to
get
involved
and
stay
involved
in
that
pursuit
and
furtherance
of
those
goals.

I
pledged
at
my
installation
as
 president
of
this
relatively
young
but
nevertheless
venerable
organization
that
I
would
do
my
best
to
further
 the
first
three
goals
that
have
already
been
established
by
my
predecessors.

As
for
the
fourth
goal,
I
pledged
 to
 come
 up
 with
 a
 plan
 to
 increase
 the
 amount
 of
 charitable
 activities
 that
 this
 organization
 provides
 to
 its
 members,
their
families,
and
the
military
community
–
active
duty,
reserve,
National
Guard,
retired,
and
non‐ career
veterans.
 To
accomplish
this,
your
Board
of
Directors
and
I
are
establishing
five
additional
committees,
making
a
 total
of
eleven,
to
focus
on
the
programs
we
need
to
accomplish
our
goals.

In
the
past,
a
handful
of
members
 (and
their
spouses)
have
stepped
up
to
shoulder
the
burden
of
performing
our
projects.

That
is
due
partly
to
 our
not
asking
for
more
volunteers
from
the
general
membership.

Your
Board
and
I
are
determined
to
spread
 the
 work
 that
 is
 required
 for
 our
 success.
 
 Consequently,
 Concluded
on
Page
2
 each
of
you
will
be
asked
to
serve
on
one
or
more
of
those
 • “AH‐64E”
 
 Tom
Roeder



Volume 9, Issue 11
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


committees.

We
want
you
to
participate
in
developing
and
refining
our
programs.

This
is
especially
critical
if
 we
 are
 going
 to
 expand
 the
 service
 and
 assistance
 to
 our
 fellow
 veterans
 in
 need.
 
 In
 my
 opinion,
 we
 are
 exceptionally
fortunate
to
have
a
core
group
of
members
who
possess
your
diverse
skills,
bring
your
unique
 ideas,
and
provide
your
willingness
to
serve
the
needs
of
your
fellow
veterans
and
their
families.
 During
our
annual
meeting
in
October
of
this
year,
many
of
our
spouses
suggested
that
we
consider
 forming
 an
 Auxiliary
 arm
 that
 would
 allow
 them
 to
 directly
 support
 our
 organization’s
 programs.
 
 What
 an
 insightful
idea.

They
recognize
that
many
of
us
have
jobs
and
other
commitments
that
limit
how
much
time
 we
can
devote
to
the
CHPA.

Just
as
they
did
when
we
were
serving
on
active
duty,
they
want
to
do
their
part
 to
 help
 us
 to
 achieve
 our
 goals.
 
 So,
 we
 are
 going
 to
 establish
 the
 CHPA
 Auxiliary
 so
 that
 our
 families
 and
 friends
can
help
us
make
our
programs
successful.
 I
will
expand
on
these
programs
and
committees
in
the
coming
months.

It
is
enormously
important
for
 those
of
our
members
who
have
been
blessed
with
abilities
and
talents
and
have
not
yet
taken
an
active
role
 in
our
organization
to
come
forward
and
volunteer
to
serve.

Over
the
next
few
months,
we
will
define
the
 variety
of
roles
in
which
you
can
serve,
and
I
look
forward
to
your
service.
 
 In
fellowship
and
service,
 
 Milan
“Mick”
Tesanovich
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 One
 of
 the
 things
 we
 all
 know,
 nobody
 tells
 a
 better
 story
 than
 a
 combat
 helicopter
 crewmember,
 whether
 it’s
 the
 truth
 or
 “enhanced
 truth.”
 
 Our
 most
 entertaining
 and
 informative
 
 stories
come
from
you,
our
membership.

We
often
received
responses
from
our
members
when
an
 
 article
is
published
that
opens
a
memory
or
touches
a
nerve,
in
a
good
way.
 
 
 The
stories
we
hear
are
about
anything
from
flight
school
to
real
life
there‐I‐was
stories.

We’ve
 published
 several
 stories
 over
 the
 years
 ranging
 from
 tales
 of
 flight
 school
 a
 long,
 long
 time
 ago
 to
 
 “war
stories”
that
we’re
sure
most
of
you
can
identify
with.

But
we
need
more
stories.

Stories
from
 
 Vietnam
 and
 more
 importantly
 Iraq
 and
 Afghanistan.
 Those
 conflicts
 and
 those
 stories
 are
 far
 too
 untold.
 So,
all
you
veterans
of
the
skies
of
OEF
and
OIF
with
an
idea
for
an
article,
or
a
story
to
tell
it’s
as
 easy
as
sending
it
in.

Take
a
moment
to
lay
fingers
on
keyboard
or
just
put
pen
to
paper
and
send
 them
in.

You
can
email
them
to
hq@chpa‐us.org
or
through
the
US
Post
Office
to:

CHPA
•
PO
Box
42
 •
Divide,
CO

80814‐0042

 Help
us
help
you
tell
the
tales
of
your
experiences
and
continue
to
preserve
our
shared
legacy
 of
combat
under
a
rotor
disc.



The
Swash!


2
 


[Call
For
Articles]



Volume 9, Issue 11


AH-64E

Tom
Roeder,
Colorado
Springs
Gazette


CHPA • The Swash Plate 


www.chpa-us.org 



 The
 Army's
 newest
 helicopter
 is
 quiet,
 fast
 and
 has
 no
 trouble
flying
and
fighting
in
the
mountains.
 And
the
AH‐64E
is
getting
rave
reviews
from
Fort
Carson
 soldiers
who
are
among
the
first
troops
to
fly
the
latest
version
 of
the
Apache
attack
helicopter.
 "It
 even
 has
 that
 new
 aircraft
 smell,"
 said
 Capt.
 Chris
 Curran
 with
 the
 post's
 1st
 Battalion
 of
 the
 25th
 Aviation
 Regiment
‐
the
second
unit
in
the
Army
to
get
the
aircraft.
 Curran's
battalion
is
flying
the
first
of
24
of
the
helicopters
it
expects
to
receive
in
the
coming
months.
 The
helicopter
is
a
new
version
of
the
venerable
Apache
that
first
saw
combat
in
the
1991
Persian
Gulf
War
 and
has
proven
to
be
a
flexible
fighting
tool
for
tracking
and
killing
insurgents
in
Iraq
and
Afghanistan.
 But
 the
 older
 Apaches
 are
 loud,
 don't
 fly
 in
 foul
 weather
 and
 have
 trouble,
 as
 most
 helicopters
 do,
 flying
in
the
thin
air
of
high
altitudes.
 The
new
"E"
model,
built
at
a
Boeing
plant
in
Arizona,
has
a
whisper‐quiet
rotor,
upgraded
electronics
 and
 flight
 instruments
 and
 a
 power‐train
 that
 "lets
 you
 use
 all
 of
 the
 engine's
 power,"
 said
 Chief
 Warrant
 Officer
Micah
Howell,
who's
flown
the
new
helicopters.
 That
extra
power
comes
in
handy
in
Colorado,
where
older
Apaches
had
trouble
dealing
with
the
thin
 air,
seldom
taking
off
with
full
payloads
of
fuel
and
munitions.
In
testing,
the
newest
Apache
became
the
first
 military
helicopter
to
hover
at
6,000
feet
with
a
full
load
of
gear.
 New
aircraft
are
rare
in
the
military
these
days,
as
the
Pentagon
works
to
cut
spending
by
nearly
$1
 trillion
over
10
years.
But
getting
top‐notch
helicopters
was
identified
as
a
top
priority,
and
the
$2
billion
AH‐ 64E
program
is
proceeding
as
planned.
 The
Apache
has
a
well‐earned
reputation
on
the
battlefield.
A
single
helicopter
can
pack
16
tank‐killing
 Hellfire
 missiles.
 The
 helicopter
 also
 is
 equipped
 with
 a
 full
 suite
 of
 cameras
 and
 sensors
 to
 spot
 enemy
 movement.
 The
 newest
 Apache
 is
 designed
 to
 control
 drones;
 vastly
 increasing
 the
 amount
 of
 territory
 one
 helicopter
can
cover,
earning
it
the
nickname
"Apache
Guardian."
 The
 new
 helicopters
 went
 into
 full
 production
 in
 October
 2012,
 and
 hit
 the
 training
 ranges
 at
 Fort
 Carson
in
earnest
Oct.
22.
 The
helicopters
blasted
targets
with
30
mm
cannons
and
fired
rockets.
 Curran
said
the
simulated
attacks
help
pilots
learn
how
their
new
craft
behaves
in
combat
conditions.
 Clearly
evident
on
the
training
range
was
the
quieter
nature
of
the
helicopter,
which
couldn't
be
heard
 from
more
than
a
couple
of
hundred
yards
away.
 Helicopters
are
traditionally
loud,
because
rotor
blades
break
the
speed
of
sound
as
they
whip
through
 the
sky.
 Howell
 said
 the
 new
 helicopter's
 relative
 quiet
 comes
 with
 a
 composite
 rotor
 that
 more
 efficiently
 slices
through
the
air
when
compared
with
its
metal
predecessor.
 It's
also
quick,
with
a
top
speed
approaching
200
mph.
 Curran
said
pilots
in
the
brigade
are
still
learning
its
systems.

The
cockpit
is
virtually
unchanged,
but
it
 now
 has
 the
 capability
 for
 instrument‐only
 flight,
 allowing
 Concluded
on
Page
4
 the
 new
 helicopters
 to
 navigate
 through
 clouds
 and
 guide
 


3



Volume 9, Issue 11
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


pilots
to
a
safe
landing
using
electronic
tools.
 The
helicopter,
though,
keeps
the
classic
lines
of
the
old
Apache,
with
its
angry
bug
look.
The
cockpit
is
 also
familiar
to
pilots
and
about
70
percent
of
the
new
bird's
parts
are
the
same
as
the
older
model,
making
it
 cheaper
to
maintain.
 "It's
basically
an
improvement
on
an
old
platform,"
Curran
said.

 
 
 
 
 By

 Byron
Edgington
CW‐4
(ret.)
 


The
Sky
Behind
Me,
a
Memoir
of
Flying
and
Life


.



 




 “Chock‐full
 of
 heart‐stopping
 drama,
 gut‐ 
 wrenching
 lows,
 euphoric
 highs,
 tragic
 
 personal
 loss,
 laced
 liberally
 with
 humor
 and
 
 garnished
 with
 deep
 introspection,
 
 Edgington’s
 story
 gripped
 me
 from
 the
 very
 
 first
 page
 keeping
 me
 spellbound
 until
 I
 
 finished
 
 the
 very
 last
 sentence.
 
 You
 don’t
 have
to
be
a
pilot
to
enjoy
this
story
for
this
is
 a
 tale
 anyone
 can
 relate
 to
 if
 you
 have
 ever
 
 
 yearned
to
pursue
a
dream
of
your
own.”
—
 Randolph
P.
Mains,
author
of
Dear
Mom,
I’m
 
 Alive,
and
Journey
to
the
Golden
Hour.

 
 Amazon.com/Randolph‐P.‐Mains
 
 
 
 “What
a
pleasure
to
read
this
book
and
get
to
 
 know
 this
 man
 who
 so
 dearly
 loved
 every
 
 minute
 of
 his
exciting
 career.

 If
 he
 handled
 
 choppers
 as
 well
 as
 he
 handles
 the
 English
 
 language,
it
must
have
been
pretty
exciting
to
 
 be
 in
 the
 sky
 with
 him.”—
 Thomas
 E.
 Barden,
 
 Professor
 of
 English
 and
 Dean
 of
 the
 Honors
 
 College
 U.
 of
 Toledo
 &
 Author
 of
Steinbeck
 in
 
 Vietnam,
 Dispatches
 from
 the
 War.
 University
 
 of
Virginia
Press.
www.upress.virginia.edu
 


 
 
 
 
 “The
Sky
Behind
Me
is
one
man’s
forty‐year
love
affair
with
helicopters
and
his
almost
poetic
rendering
of
a
 
 life
lived
in
the
sky.”


Free
download
is
available
at
http://goo.gl/LYKul.

Buy
it
at
Amazon
http://goo.gl/klFGF
 
 
 4
 



Volume 9, Issue 11


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


 
 
 CHPA continues to receive quite an assortment 
 
of patches from our members. These patches are 
 displayed at our booth at HAI, Quad A, and 
 VHPA. Several of you have donated patches, but 
 we’re always looking for more. They are very eye 
 catching and help us garner attention. So please dig through your old patches and if you have 
 some 
you’d like to share, send them to us at: 
 CHPA
 • PO Box 42 • Divide, CO
80814‐0042
 
 
 
 
 


GOT PATCHES?


 
 
 Are
you
planning
a
reunion
or
event
that
may
be
of
interest
to
our
members?

Let
us
help
you
get
the
 word
out
and
support
veterans
groups
of
all
sizes
and
locations.

Just
send
a
message
with
the
information
to
 HQ@chpa‐us.org.

If
you
have
a
logo,
send
that
along
as
well.


 Be
sure
to
include
accurate
contact
and
registration
information
and
we’ll
take
care
of
the
rest.
 


Reunions
and
Gatherings


VHCMA
 
 The
Vietnam
Helicopter
Crewmembers
Association
will
host
its
28th
ANNUAL
REUNION
in
 San
Antonio,
TX,
June
24
–
28,
2014.

The
Reunion
Hotel
is
the
Hilton
San
Antonio
Airport,
 611
NW
Loop
410.

Book
your
room
now
by
calling
the
hotel
at
1‐210‐340‐6060
and
ask
for
 in‐house
 reservation.
 
 Tell
 them
 the
 group
 code
 is
 VHC
 to
 receive
 the
 room
 rate
 of
 $103.75,
all
inclusive.

The
preferred
room
rate
is
good
for
three
days
before
through
three
 days
after
the
reunion.

If
you
have
any
questions
contact
the
VHCMA
office
at
1‐901‐850‐ 0500
or
1‐800‐842‐6201.
 
 
 
 
 
 To
those
listed
below
CHPA
extends
a
hearty
“Welcome
Aboard.”


 
 Jack
Bailey
 


Mark
Cullison
 


Charles

Price
 


Christopher
White
 
 


Welcome
New
Members


5



Volume 9, Issue 11
 
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


John
 Bercaw’s
 journey
 to
 Vietnam
 started
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 the
 Korean
 War
when,
as
a
young
boy,
he
thrilled
to
see
his
first
helicopter
as
it
defied
 gravity
 and
 common
 sense
 by
 flying.
 A
 circuitous
 route
 through
 troubled
 teenage
years
and
four
years
in
the
Marines
led
him
to
Fort
Wolters,
Texas,
 and
the
US
Army’s
Warrant
Officer
Rotary
Wing
Aviation
Course.
His
year
of
 war
was
not
as
expected.
Awed
by
the
lush
landscapes
of
Vietnam
and
the
 unexpected
 moments
 of
 war’s
 savage
 beauty,
 Bercaw
 changed
 his
 mind
 about
war
and
its
effect
on
the
men
who
fought
in
it.
Based
on
the
books
he
 had
read
and
the
movies
he
had
seen,
he
had
not
anticipated
the
addiction
 to
the
highs
and
lows
brought
on
by
the
intensity
of
war.
The
difficult
part
 came
at
the
end.
Leaving
Vietnam
before
the
war
was
over,
the
sudden
end
 to
 the
 daily
 adrenalin
 rushes
 and
 the
 sense
 of
 being
 part
 of
 something
 important—aggravated
 by
 the
 shameful
 reception
 experienced
 by
 all
 returning
 veterans—initiated
 a
 period
 of
 depression
 that
 haunted
 him
 for
 years.
 Available
on
Amazon.com:
http://tinyurl.com/APinkMist



 
 
 
 
 
 Please
consider
sponsoring
CHPA’s
programs.

You
may
make
tax
deductible
donations
to
support
the
 
 Goldie
Fund,
CHPA’s
Scholarship
program,
the
Holiday
Boxes
for
the
Troops,
T‐shirts
for
Heroes
or
the
 
 Association.

For
further
information
please
look
at
Sponsorship
at
the
website,
http://www.chpa‐ 
 
 us.org.
 
 


Sponsorship



 
 
 


Share
the
“Swash”
 Please feel free to forward this issue of “The Swash Plate” to your colleagues, potential members and other interested parties!

Sponsorship
 Please
consider
sponsoring
CHPA’s
 programs.

You
may
make
tax
 deductible
donations
to
support
the
 Goldie
Fund,
CHPA’s
Scholarship
 program,
the
Holiday
Boxes
for
the
 Troops,
T‐shirts
for
Heroes
or
the
 Association.

For
further
information
 please
look
at
Sponsorship
at
the
 website,
http://www.chpa‐us.org.
 


6
 



Volume 9, Issue 11
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

Submit
Your
 Photos!
 


CHPA
has
a
growing
 collection
of
photos,
from
 Annual
Convention
pictures
 like
these,
to
action
photos
 to
helicopter
shots
from
 around
the
world
…
 
 If
you
would
like
to
 contribute
to
the
collection
 please
upload
your
photos
 by
following
the
links
on
the
 CHPA
website
or
click
here!




 


7



Volume 9, Issue 11
 


Living a Bonus Life Vincent
T.
Davis,
San
Antonio
Express‐News
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org



 


MAJ
 Glenn
 L.
 Nordin
 and
 2LT
 Bob
 Riddick
 were
 14
 miles
 from
 landing
 their
 F4‐C
 Phantom
 at
 Da
 Nang
 Air
 Base
 in
 South
 Vietnam
when
their
aircraft
was
struck
by
enemy
ground
fire.

 As
the
jet
became
engulfed
in
flames,
the
pilots
ejected.
 From
 a
 distance,
 CWO
 Jim
 White,
 flying
 a
 US
 Army
 helicopter
 gunship,
 saw
 an
 orange
 fireball
 and
 two
 parachutes
 floating
down.
 As
White
raced
toward
a
river
and
sandbar
where
the
fliers
 landed,
a
squad
of
North
Vietnamese
soldiers
began
firing
at
them.
 “I
 was
 making
 like
 a
 submerged
 alligator,
 watching
 the
 soldiers
 get
 closer,”
 Nordin
 said,
 recounting
 the
 events
 of
 Dec
 10,
 Retired
USAF
COL
Glenn
Nordin,
right,
a
fighter
pilot
who
 1967.
 
 “There
 were
 about
 a
 dozen
 of
 them,
 and
 each
 time
 they
 was
shot
down
in
a
Phantom
jet
over
Vietnam,
reunites
 fired,
the
river
all
around
my
head
would
just
come
alive
with
the
 at
the
Combat
Helicopter
Pilot
Association
gathering
in
 San
Antonio
with
Jim
White,
middle,
and
Chuck
Canfield,
 Army
Huey
helicopter
pilots
that
rescued
him
years
ago.

 shooting,
the
water
was
boiling
all
around
me.”
 Speaking
 at
 a
 recent
 convention
 of
 the
 Combat
 Helicopter
 Nordin
described
landing
in
a
parachute
and
 immediately
seeing
a
rescue
helicopter
descending
to
his
 Pilots
 Association
 in
 San
 Antonio,
 Nordin
 continued:
 
 “Then
 a
 aid.
 Photo
By
Billy
Calzada/San
Antonio
Express‐New
 strange
thing
occurred
...
I
knew
I
was
going
to
get
killed,
but
I
felt
no
 s
 qualms
or
concerns
about
that.
It
was
a
given.

 “But
I
had
this
overwhelming
curiosity
as
to
just
how
it
would
happen.

Would
it
just
be
'lights
out,'
or
 would
I
know
it
when
the
bullet
slammed
into
my
forehead
—
which
was
all
that
was
showing
—
and
then
 lights
out?

I
couldn't
wait
to
find
out.”
 His
 questions
 were
 never
 answered,
 because
 White
 suddenly
 dropped
 his
 helicopter
 straight
 down
 beside
the
pilots
—
a
maneuver
he
hadn't
been
taught
in
flight
school.

Two
gunners
dashed
out
to
retrieve
 Nordin
and
Riddick.
 Nordin
said
that's
the
moment
his
“bonus
life”
began.
 “There's
 no
 rational
 reason
 that
 we're
 still
 alive;
 there's
 no
 reason
 we
 should
 have
 survived
 any
 of
 that,”
said
Nordin,
a
San
Antonio
resident.

“I
owe
them
my
life.”
 Veterans,
family
and
friends
watched
as
he
thanked
his
rescuers,
White
and
his
co‐pilot,
CWO
Chuck
 Canfield,
who
were
at
his
side
at
the
conference
last
month.
 Riddick
had
been
at
the
event
earlier,
where
the
four
men
were
together
for
the
first
time
since
the
 war.

It
was
an
intensely
moving
reunion.
 Nordin
said
it
was
equally
emotional
for
his
wife,
Mary.

 “She's
had
a
husband
and
father
for
her
kids
for
46
years
she
wouldn't
have
had,”
he
said.

 Nordin
and
White
have
visited
and
corresponded
with
each
other
since
2005.

Nordin's
son,
Carl,
who
 was
in
the
Air
Force
Reserve
himself,
found
White
in
Huntsville,
AL,
through
a
squadron
mate.

 Rhea
 Rippey,
 the
 association's
 secretary,
 said
 Nordin's
 story
 was
 very
 familiar
 to
 the
 veterans
 at
 the
 conference,
who'd
flown
similar
missions
under
dangerous
conditions
daily,
refueling
and
heading
back
into
 combat.

“Vietnam
was
the
first
helicopter
war,”
Rippey
said.

“You
did
whatever
was
necessary;
we
existed
to
 support
the
ground
troops,
they
were
No.
1.”
 Rippey
 said
 White’s
 maneuver
 to
 save
 Nordin
 and
 Concluded
on
Page
9
 Riddick
dropped
the
Huey
like
a
rock.
 8
 



Volume 9, Issue 11


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

“It's
 a
 ballet.
 
 If
 you're
 going
 too
 fast
 and
 misjudge
 your
 angles,
 you
 hit
 the
 ground,”
 Rippey
 said.
 
 “What
 these
 guys
did
was
nose
it
over,
come
in
as
hot
as
possible,
pulling
as
 much
power
as
you
have
at
the
bottom
and
come
to
a
hover.”

 To
 evade
 gunfire,
 White
 used
 a
 maneuver
 called
 jinking,
 hovering
 and
 changing
 direction,
 not
 staying
 in
 the
 same
airspace
more
than
a
few
seconds.
 Rounds
 ricocheted
 around
 the
 chopper,
 kicking
 up
 geysers
 of
 sand.
 
 After
 a
 series
 of
 slips
 and
 falls,
 the
 gunners
 and
pilots
climbed
inside
of
the
copter.

White
sent
the
copter
 Retired
USAF
COL
Glenn
Nordin,
left,
reunites
at
the
Combat
 straight
 up
 1,000
 feet,
 with
 the
 gunners
 firing
 rifles
 and
 the
 Helicopter
Pilot
Association
gathering
in
San
Antonio
with
Jim
 rescued
pilots
shooting
with
revolvers
at
the
enemy.

 White,
middle,
and
Chuck
Canfield
 Photo
By
Billy
Calzada/San
Antonio
Express‐News
 An
hour
later,
White
landed
the
helicopter
safely
at
his
 base,
Chu
Lai.

The
crew
checked
the
chopper
for
damage
—
 there
 wasn't
 a
 single
 bullet
 hole.
 
 The
 pilots
 were
 uninjured
 except
 for
 the
 one
 lens
 missing
 from
 the
 sunglasses
Nordin
still
was
wearing.
 “It's
unexplainable
unless
you
believe
in
a
higher
authority,”
Nordin
said.

 A
member
of
his
squadron,
in
a
similar
situation,
never
had
a
chance
to
grow
old.
 A
month
before
his
own
rescue,
Nordin
had
taken
part
in
the
search
and
rescue
mission
for
25‐year‐old
 CPT
Lance
Sijan,
who
was
severely
injured
after
ejecting
into
North
Vietnam.
 After
several
hours,
Nordin's
team
came
within
inches
of
saving
Sijan,
but
enemy
gunfire
stopped
the
 rescue
attempt.

The
team
lost
contact
with
Sijan,
and
the
North
Vietnamese
eventually
captured
him.
 “It's
one
of
the
oddities
of
war.

I
got
to
come
home
and
see
my
four
wonderful
kids
and
my
fantastic
 wife,
live
with
them
and
watch
them
grow,”
he
said.

“Lance
never
had
a
life.
Those
things
prey
on
your
mind.”
 
 
 



 


9



Volume 9, Issue 11
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate

A Veteran Died Today Adapted
from
the
poem
“A
Soldier
Died
Today”
by
A.
Lawrence
Vaincourt



 
 



 He
was
getting
old
and
paunchy
and
his
hair
was
falling
fast,

 and
he
sat
around
the
Legion,
telling
stories
of
the
past.

 Of
a
war
that
he
once
fought
in
and
the
deeds
that
he
had
done,

 in
his
exploits
with
his
buddies;
they
were
heroes,
every
one.

 And
'tho
sometimes
to
his
neighbors
his
tales
became
a
joke,

 all
his
buddies
listened
quietly
for
they
knew
where
of
he
spoke.

 But
we'll
hear
his
tales
no
longer,
for
ol'
Joe
has
passed
away,

 and
the
world's
a
little
poorer
for
a
Veteran
died
today.

 He
won't
be
mourned
by
many,
just
his
children
and
his
wife,

 for
he
lived
an
ordinary,
very
quiet
sort
of
life.

 He
held
a
job
and
raised
a
family,
going
quietly
on
his
way;

 and
the
world
won't
note
his
passing,
'Tho
a
Veteran
died
today.

 When
politicians
leave
this
earth,
their
bodies
lie
in
state,

 while
thousands
note
their
passing,
and
proclaim
that
they
were
great.

 Papers
tell
of
their
life
stories
from
the
time
that
they
were
young,

 but
the
passing
of
a
Veteran
goes
unnoticed,
and
unsung.

 Is
the
greatest
contribution
to
the
welfare
of
our
land,

 someone
who
breaks
his
promise
and
deceives
his
fellow
man?

 Or
the
ordinary
fellow,
who
in
times
of
war
and
strife,

 goes
off
to
serve
his
country
and
offers
up
his
life?

 The
politician's
stipend
and
the
style
in
which
he
lives

 are
often
disproportionate
to
the
service
that
he
gives,

 while
the
ordinary
Veteran,
who
offered
up
his
all,

 is
paid
off
with
a
medal
and
perhaps
a
pension,
small.

 It
is
not
the
politicians
with
their
compromise
and
ploys,

 who
won
for
us
the
freedom
that
our
country
now
enjoys.

 Should
you
find
yourself
in
danger
with
your
enemies
at
hand,

 would
you
really
want
some
cop‐out,
with
his
ever‐waffling
stand?

 Or
would
you
want
a
Veteran
his
home,
his
country,
his
kin,

 just
a
common
Veteran,
who
would
fight
until
the
end.

 He
was
just
a
common
Veteran,
and
his
ranks
are
growing
thin,

 but
his
presence
should
remind
us
we
may
need
his
likes
again.

 For
when
countries
are
in
conflict,
we
find
the
Veteran's
part,

 is
to
clean
up
all
the
troubles
that
the
politicians
start.

 If
we
cannot
do
him
honor
while
he's
here
to
hear
the
praise,

 then
at
least
let's
give
him
homage
at
the
ending
of
his
days.

 Perhaps
just
a
simple
headline
in
the
paper
that
might
say:

 "OUR
COUNTRY
IS
IN
MOURNING,
A
VETERAN
DIED
TODAY."
 
 
 10
 


www.chpa-us.org



Volume 9, Issue 11


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


 
 
 
 The
Silent
Auction
held
for
the
first
time
at
the
San
Antonio
convention
was
a
success
but
we
do
have
a
 few
 items
 left
 over;
 some
 that
 didn’t
 sell
 and
 others
 where
 we
 have
 several
 issues
 of
 a
 single
 item.
 
 These
 items
 will
 be
 put
 up
 for
 sale
 on
 the
 website
 in
 a
 few
 days
 but
 before
 that
 happens
 I
 wanted
 to
 let
 the
 membership
know
what
is
available
and
what
the
minimum
bid
was.

These
items
will
be
sold
on
a
first
come
–
 first
served
basis
until
they’re
sold
out
so
give
us
a
call
and
make
an
offer
no
lower
than
the
minimum
bid.

The
 items
available
are:
 
 1. A
certificate
for
two
people
to
ride
in
a
UH‐1B
from
Wings
and
Rotors
Air
Museum
‐
$500.00
 2. A
voucher
to
attend
one
Dave
Ramsey
“EntreLeadership”
event
during
2014
‐
$125.00
 3. Two
vouchers
to
attend
one
Dave
Ramsey
“Legacy
Journey
Live”
event
during
2014
‐
$40.00
 4. Dave
Ramsey’s
book
“Total
Money
Makeover”
‐
$25.00
 5. Russell
Jones’
book,
“Honorable
Intentions”
‐
$16.95
 6. Framed
poster
of
a
Bell
Helicopter
Attack
Helicopter
‐
$25
 7. Signed
and
embossed
copy
of
Jimmy
Moore’s
print
“Goin’
Home”
‐
$125.00
 
 If
you’re
interested
in
any
of
these
items
or
have
questions
give
HQ
a
call
at
800‐832‐5144.


Silent Auction Items for Sale

Call on Us! Contact Quick Reference 


Chairman
of
the
Board
–
Robert
Frost

 Chairman@chpa‐us.org

 
 President
–
Mick
Tesanovich

 president@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Administration
–
Rich
Miller

 admin@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Membership
–
Al
Major

 membership@chpa‐us.org



Buzz
Covington
 BCovington@chpa‐us.org


Secretary
–
Rhea
Rippey

 secretary@chpa‐us.org
 
 Treasurer
–
Loren
McAnally

 Treasurer@chpa‐us.org

 
 Executive
Director
–
Jay
Brown
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
 
 
 


Dan
McClinton
 DMcClinton@chpa‐us.org


Mark
Hilton


 MHilton@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Call
us!
 800•832•5144


Alex
Horony
 AHorony@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Fax
us!
 719•687•4167


Randy
Jones
 RJones@chpa‐us.org



 
 
 



 
 
 


Write
us!
 CHPA
 PO
Box
42
 Divide,
CO
80814‐0042



 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 


Remember!
 Feel
free
to
contact

 us
any
time.
 
 


Randy
Zahn

 RZahn@chpa‐us.org

 
 
 
 
 
 


11


Swash plate November 2013  
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