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 Volume 9, Issue 2


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


HAPPY
BIRTHDAY,
AMERICA


Presenting!
 • “President’s
Message”
 
 Robert
Frost


June
2013


President’s
Message

 Robert
Frost


Earlier
 this
 month
 I
 made
 a
 business
 trip
 to
 Washington,
 DC.
 
 Accompanying
 me
 was
 my
 younger
 brother
 and
 a
 business
 • ”Boeing
Inks
$4B
Contract”

 
 Joseph
P.
Blank
 client
 who
 had
 never
 visited
 our
 nation’s
 capital.
 
 I
 decided
 to
 become
 their
 tour
 • “Reunions
and
Gatherings”
 guide.

Since
our
schedule
was
such
that
we
 • “Solo
Flight
Reinstated”
 had
several
hours
of
free
time,
I
decided
we
 
 Nathan
Pfau
 should
visit
the
Lincoln
Memorial,
World
War
 • “Convention
Notes”
 II
Memorial,
Korean
War
Memorial,
Vietnam
 • “My
Brothers”
 Veterans
 Memorial,
 and
 Arlington
 National
 
 Terry
Garlock
 Cemetery
 to
 witness
 the
 changing
 of
 the
 guard
 at
 the
 Tomb
 of
 the
 
 Unknowns.

 and
much,
much
more!
 The
 trip
 to
 Arlington
 is
 always
 somber,
 yet
 beautiful,
 regardless
 of
 
 the
time
of
the
year.

For
me,
it
brings
comfort
and
provides
an
emotional
 therapy
I
have
found
nowhere
else.

The
changing
of
the
guard
and
the
wreath
laying
ceremonies
at
the
Tomb
 of
 the
 Unknowns
 brought
 back
 memories
 of
 last
 November
 when
 the
 Combat
 Helicopter
 Pilots
 Association
 placed
a
wreath
at
the
Tomb.

What
an
honor
and
privilege
it
was
for
those
of
us
in
attendance.

I
shall
never
 forget
it.

As
all
of
you
know,
one
can
spend
a
week
in
our
nation’s
capital
and
still
not
see
most
of
what
has
 been
 created
 to
 honor
 and
 commemorate
 our
 past
 history.
 
 As
 a
 Vietnam
 veteran,
 I
 still
 gravitate
 to
 the
 Vietnam
Veterans
Memorial
first.

To
stand
before
it
and
see
the
tens
of
thousands
of
names
on
the
wall
is
a
 great
reminder
of
the
price
this
nation
and
its
citizens
have
paid
 for
the
freedoms
we
enjoy.

One
also
senses
the
enormity
of
the
 wars
we
have
fought
when
visiting
the
World
War
II
Memorial.

I
 do
 regret
 that
 we
 as
 a
 nation
 took
 too
 long
 to
 build
 that
 memorial
 to
 honor
 the
 sacrifices
 of
 our
 greatest
 generation.

 Many
of
the
millions
of
veterans
who
wore
our
nation’s
uniform
 during
 that
 war
 did
 not
 live
 to
 see
 it.
 
 Finally,
 we
 made
 a
 short
 jaunt
 over
 to
 the
 Smithsonian
 National
 Museum
 of
 American
 History
 to
 see
 the
 “The
 Price
 of
 Freedom
 –
 Americans
 at
 War”
 exhibit.

This
is
the
largest
exhibit
in
the
museum
and
chronicles
 the
 military
 history
 of
 this
 nation
 from
 the
 French‐Indian
 Wars
 (pre‐revolutionary)
to
current
times
to
include
Iraqi
Freedom
and
 Enduring
 Freedom.
 This
 exhibit
 is
 really
 special
 –
 especially
 to
 America’s
Huey
091
Arrives
At
Washington
Mall.

Photo
 Jay
Brown
 those
of
us
within
The
Combat
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
and
 • “Afghanis
Take
Over
Security”
 
 Akbar
Shinwari
&
Sohel
Uddim



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


the
Vietnam
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
who
participated
in
the
mission
to
bring
America’s
Huey
091
to
her
 final
resting
place
in
the
Vietnam
section
of
the
exhibit.

As
we
Vietnam
veterans
know,
the
Huey
was
the
icon
 of
the
Vietnam
War
and
this
special
war
bird,
which
served
the
173rd
Assault
Helicopter
Company
(The
Robin
 Hoods),
has
found
an
appropriate
resting
place
where
she
is
on
display
for
everyone
to
see.

Seeing
her
there
 as
the
largest
artifact
in
the
exhibit
caused
me
to
reflect
back
on
what
else
came
out
of
that
mission
to
bring
 her
 to
 the
 Smithsonian.
 
 This
 mission
 in
 2004
 was
 the
 genesis
 to
 create
 a
 veterans
 organization
 that
 would
 include
 pilots
 and
 crew
 members
 from
 all
 branches
 of
 the
 US
 military,
 and
 all
 wars
 in
 which
 rotary
 winged
 aircraft
were
used.

I
will
never
forget
the
day
I
was
approached
by
Steve
Reilly,
our
first
president,
about
his
 idea
for
this
new
legacy
organization
to
be
called
the
Combat
Helicopter
Pilots
Association.

All
of
us,
probably
 about
 18
 or
 so
 members
 of
 VHPA,
 agreed
 to
 work
 with
 Steve
 to
 start
 the
 organization
 and
 be
 Founding
 Members.

Steve
is
a
visionary
and
he
realized
the
need
to
create
a
new
organization
that
would
live
beyond
 VHPA,
which
is
a
“Last
Man
Standing”
organization.


 We
received
our
IRS
approval
as
a
501
(c)
19
veterans
organization
in
January,
2005.

Since
that
time,
 we
have
recruited
more
than
1100
members
from
the
Korean
era
through
the
recent
times
of
Iraqi
Freedom
 and
Enduring
Freedom.

Some
of
our
young
warrior
members
are
still
on
active
duty
and
some
are
currently
 deployed
in
Afghanistan.


 We
have
been
blessed
by
the
support
we
have
received
from
the
Vietnam
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
 (VHPA),
The
Army
Aviation
Association
of
America
(Quad
A),
Helicopter
Association
International
(HAI),
Pop‐A‐ Smoke,
 and
 numerous
 other
 corporate
 benefactors
 and
 individuals
 who
 have
 donated
 time,
 talent,
 money
 and
 hard
 work.
 
 We
 have
 come
 a
 long
 way
 in
 just
 eight
 years.
 
 Thanks
 to
 a
 dedicated
 board
 and
 loyal
 members,
CHPA
will
continue
to
grow
and
serve
the
military
rotary
wing
community
for
many
years
into
the
 future.
 
 
 


The
Swash!


[Call
For
Articles]


One
 of
 the
 things
 we
 all
 know,
 nobody
 tells
 a
 better
 story
 than
 a
 combat
 helicopter
 crewmember,
 whether
 it’s
 the
 truth
 or
 “enhanced
 truth.”
 
 Our
 most
 entertaining
 and
 informative
 stories
come
from
you,
our
membership.

We
often
received
responses
from
our
members
when
an
 article
is
published
that
opens
a
memory
or
touches
a
nerve,
in
a
good
way.
 
 The
stories
we
hear
are
about
anything
from
flight
school
to
real
life
there‐I‐was
stories.

We’ve
 published
 several
 stories
 over
 the
 years
 ranging
 from
 tales
 of
 flight
 school
 a
 long,
 long
 time
 ago
 to
 “war
stories”
that
we’re
sure
most
of
you
can
identify
with.

But
we
need
more
stories.

Stories
from
 Vietnam
 and
 more
 importantly
 Iraq
 and
 Afghanistan.
 Those
 conflicts
 and
 those
 stories
 are
 far
 too
 untold.
 
 So,
all
you
veterans
of
the
skies
of
OEF
and
OIF
with
an
idea
for
an
article,
or
a
story
to
tell
it’s
as
 easy
as
sending
it
in.

Take
a
moment
to
lay
fingers
on
keyboard
or
just
put
pen
to
paper
and
send
 them
in.

You
can
email
them
to
hq@chpa‐us.org
or
through
the
US
Post
Office
to:

CHPA
•
PO
Box
42
 •
Divide,
CO

80814‐0042

 Help
us
help
you
tell
the
tales
of
your
experiences
and
continue
to
preserve
our
shared
legacy
 of
combat
under
a
rotor
disc.

 2
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

Afghan
Authorities
Take
Over
Security
 Akbar
Shinwari
and
Sohel
Uddin,
NBC
News


US
 led
 troops
 handed
 complete
 control
 of
 security
to
Afghanistan
authorities
Tuesday
–
an
act
 of
faith
in
that
country’s
fledgling
police
and
army
in
 the
face
of
near‐constant
insurgent
attacks.
 The
 formal
 transfer
 of
 responsibility
 is
 a
 major
 milestone
 in
 the
 process
 of
 withdrawal
 from
 the
country,
12
years
after
NATO‐led
ISAF
began
its
 mission
to
end
Taliban
rule.
 However,
 a
 botched
 car
 bomb
 that
 killed
 at
 least
three
civilians
just
before
the
official
handover
 ceremony
raised
renewed
questions
about
how
the
 Afghan
President
Hamid
Karzai,
left,
shakes
hands
with
NATO
Secretary‐ country’s
 352,000‐strong
 security
 forces
 will
 tackle
 General
Anders
Fogh
Rasmussen
prior
to
Tuesday's
ceremony
in
Kabul.

Photo
 the
militant
threat.
 Jawad
Jalali/EPA
 Most
 foreign
 combat
 troops
 will
 leave
 the
 country
 by
 the
 end
 of
 2014,
 but
 international
 funding
 and
 humanitarian
 aid
 will
 continue
 ‐
 prolonging
 the
 political
headache
for
President
Barack
Obama
over
America's
involvement
in
the
conflict.
 “Today
is
a
day
for
all
Americans
to
take
pride
in
the
hard
work
our
service
members
and
their
civilian
 counterparts
 are
 performing
 every
 day
 in
 Afghanistan,”
 Defense
 Secretary
 Chuck
 Hagel
 said
 in
 a
 statement
 that
called
Tuesday’s
handover
a
“critical
milestone.”
 Ordinary
Afghans
may
be
harder
to
convince.
 “It
is
a
good
decision
that
the
Afghan
forces
are
taking
the
responsibility
because
it
is
their
own
country
 and
they
are
the
ones
who
should
be
responsible
for
the
security,”
said
Kabul
restaurant
owner
Mohammad
 Faried,
adding:
“I
still
have
doubts.

If
they
do
not
have
good
weapons
it
will
be
hard
for
them
to
keep
peace
 and
stability
in
the
country
especially
in
the
villages.”
 The
 US
 and
 its
 allies
 have
 yet
 to
 decide
 exactly
 how
 long
 troops
 will
 remain
 in
 Afghanistan
 beyond
 2014,
and
what
their
role
should
be.
 Earlier
this
month,
retired
GEN
John
Allen
called
on
the
US
to
keep
a
larger
force
in
Afghanistan
than
 the
8,000‐12,000
reportedly
being
considered
by
US
officials.
 Among
the
problems
is
a
high
desertion
rate
in
local
police
forces,
meaning
thousands
of
new
recruits
 are
needed
each
month.
 A
Congressional
research
report
published
in
April
said
the
Obama
administration
was
also
concerned
 that
“weak
and
corrupt
governance”
in
Afghanistan
would
hamper
the
fight
against
the
Taliban.
 In
 addition,
 the
 Afghan
 army
 has
 suffered
 a
 sharp
 rise
 in
 casualties
 since
 it
 began
 slowly
 assuming
 greater
 control
 of
 security,
 the
 BBC
 reported.
 
 By
 comparison,
 international
 coalition
 casualties
 have
 been
 steadily
falling
since
2010,
it
said.
 Afghans
 are
 now
 responsible
 for
 security
 in
 all
 districts
 of
 Afghanistan's
 34
 provinces,
 completing
 a
 transfer
of
power
from
NATO
that
began
in
2011.
 “Is
a
great
day
for
us,
not
only
for
the
Afghan
government
but
also
for
the
Afghan
nation,”
said
Janan
 Mosazai,
spokesperson
for
the
country's
ministry
of
foreign
 Concluded
on
Page
4
 affairs.

“It
is
a
big
day
of
honor.”
 


3



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


The
US
military
is
by
far
the
single
biggest
group
within
ISAF’s
steadily‐shrinking
force
of
about
100,000
 foreign
troops.
 The
 security
 handover
 means
 the
 remaining
 US‐led
 forces
 will
 play
 only
 a
 supporting
 role,
 providing
 help
if
needed
but
no
longer
taking
the
lead
in
tackling
insurgent
attacks.
 "We
 will
 continue
 to
 help
 Afghan
 troops
 in
 operations
 if
 needed,”
 NATO
 Secretary‐General
 Anders
 Fogh
Rasmussen
said
at
Tuesday’s
ceremony.

“But
we
will
no
longer
plan,
execute
or
lead
those
operations.

 And
by
the
end
of
2014,
our
combat
mission
will
be
completed.

At
that
time,
Afghanistan
will
be
fully
secured
 by
Afghans.”
 As
combat
troops
are
scaled
down,
the
US
focus
will
shift
to
Special
Operations
forces
who
will
advise
 the
Afghan
military
on
hunting
down
top
insurgent
or
terrorist
leaders.
 On
 any
 day
 in
 Afghanistan,
 about
 60
 Special
 Operations
 teams
 are
 working
 with
 Afghan
 local
 police
 forces
to
provide
security
in
villages,
according
to
a
New
York
Times
report.
 The
 target
 of
 Tuesday's
 suicide
 car
 bomb
 attack
 was
 prominent
 lawmaker
 and
 Shia
 Muslim
 cleric
 Mohammed
Mohaqiq,
police
at
the
scene
told
The
Associated
Press.
 GEN
 Mohammad
 Zahir,
 chief
 of
 the
 Kabul
 Criminal
 Investigation
 Division,
 told
 the
 AP
 three
 people
 were
killed
by
the
bombing
and
another
30
were
wounded
—
including
six
bodyguards.

Mohaqiq
survived
the
 attack,
Reuters
reported.
 In
March,
Karzai
publicly
criticized
the
American
presence
in
his
country,
causing
embarrassment
to
US
 defense
secretary,
Chuck
Hagel,
during
his
first
visit
to
Kabul
in
his
new
role.
 




 

 

 


 
 
 
 
 Please
consider
sponsoring
CHPA’s
 Please feel free to forward 
 programs.

You
may
make
tax
 
 deductible
donations
to
support
the
 this issue of “The Swash 
 Goldie
Fund,
CHPA’s
Scholarship
 Plate” to your colleagues, 
 program,
the
Holiday
Boxes
for
the
 
 potential members and Troops,
T‐shirts
for
Heroes
or
the
 
 Association.

For
further
information
 other interested parties! 
 please
look
at
Sponsorship
at
the
 
 website,
http://www.chpa‐us.org.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Sponsorship


4
 


Share
the
“Swash”



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

GOT PATCHES? CHPA continues to receive quite an assortment 
 of patches from our members. These patches are displayed at our booth at HAI, Quad A, and VHPA. Several of you have donated patches, but we’re always looking for more. They are very eye catching and help us garner attention. So please dig through your old patches and if you have some you’d like to share, send them to us at:

CHPA • PO Box 42 • Divide, CO
80814‐0042



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 of
 heart‐stopping
 drama,
 “Chock‐full
 gut‐wrenching
 lows,
 euphoric
 highs,
 tragic
 personal
 loss,
 laced
 liberally
 with
humor
and
garnished
with
deep
 introspection,
 Edgington’s
 story
 gripped
 me
 from
 the
 very
 first
 page
 keeping
me
spellbound
until
I
finished
 the
 very
 last
 sentence.
 
 You
 don’t
 have
 to
 be
 a
 pilot
 to
 enjoy
 this
 story
 for
this
is
a
tale
anyone
can
relate
to
if
 you
 have
 ever
 yearned
 to
 pursue
 a
 dream
 of
 your
 own.”
 —
 Randolph
 P.
 Mains,
author
of
Dear
Mom,
I’m
Alive,
 and
Journey
to
the
Golden
Hour.

 Amazon.com/Randolph‐P.‐Mains


The
Sky
Behind
Me,
a
Memoir
of
Flying
and
Life
 By

 Byron
Edgington
CW‐4
(ret.)
 
“What
 a
 pleasure
 to
 read
 this
 book


and
 get
 to
 know
 this
 man
 who
 so
 dearly
 loved
 every
 minute
 of
 his
exciting
 career.

 If
 he
 handled
 choppers
 as
 well
 as
 he
 handles
 the
 English
 language,
 it
 must
 have
 been
 pretty
 exciting
 to
 be
 in
 the
 sky
 with
 him.”—
 Thomas
 E.
 Barden,
 Professor
 of
 English
 and
 Dean
 of
 the
 Honors
 College
 U.
 of
 Toledo
 &
 Author
 of
 Steinbeck
in
Vietnam,
Dispatches
from
 the
 War.
 University
 of
 Virginia
 Press.
 www.upress.virginia.edu
 



“The
Sky
Behind
Me
is
one
man’s
forty‐year
love
affair
with
helicopters
and
his
almost
poetic
rendering
of
a
 life
lived
in
the
sky.”


Free
download
is
available
at
http://goo.gl/LYKul.

Buy
it
at
Amazon
http://goo.gl/klFGF
 
 5
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

Boeing Inks $4B CH-47F Contract Defense
Daily
 


www.chpa-us.org



 Boeing
 will
 supply
 177
 CH‐47F
 Chinook
 helicopters
 to
 the
 US
 Army
 under
 a
 new
 $4
 billion
 multi‐year
 contract
 announced
 on
 11
 June.
 
 The
 contract
 includes
 options
 for
 the
 army
 to
 increase
 its
 total
buy
to
215
aircraft.
 The
 contract
 is
 a
 cost‐effective
 alternative
 to
 annually
 contracting
 for
 the
 aircraft
 ‐
 something
 Boeing
 said
 will
 save
 the
 US
 government
 more
 than
 $800
million.
 COL
 Robert
 Barrie,
 US
 Army
 project
 manager
 for
 Cargo
 Helicopters,
 said:
 
 “This
 multi‐year
 contract
 provides
 unprecedented
 savings
 for
 the
 US
 Army
 and
 American
 taxpayers.
 
 But
 the
 most
 important
 benefit
 is
 the
 continued
 support
 these
 aircraft
 will
 provide
 to
 soldiers
in
the
field
and
civilians
in
distress.”
 This
 contract
 will
 see
 deliveries
 begin
 in
 2015,
 and
 will
 eventually
 bring
 the
 Army's
 CH‐
 47F
 total
 procurement
close
to
its
target
of
464
aircraft,
including
24
to
replace
peacetime
attrition
aircraft.

The
force's
 current
inventory
stands
at
241
F‐model
aircraft.
 The
tandem‐rotor
Chinook
is
the
primary
 rotary‐wing
 heavy‐lift
 asset
 of
 combat,
 logistics
 and
 humanitarian
 operations
 for
 the
 US
 Army.

 There
 are
 15
 Army
 active
 duty
 and
 National
 Guard
units
operating
the
CH‐47F,
and
a
16th
is
 currently
 being
 equipped.
 
 CH‐47F
 units
 have
 logged
 more
 than
 86,000
 combat
 hours
 in
 Afghanistan,
 maintaining
 an
 operational
 readiness
 rate
 of
 over
 80
 percent
 while
 conducting
 air
 assault,
 transport,
 and
 medical
 evacuation
and
support
missions.
 Chuck
 Dabundo,
 Vice
 President,
 Boeing
 Cargo
 Helicopter
 Programs,
 said:
 
 “The
 Army
 is
 benefiting
 not
 only
 from
 the
 efficiencies
 of
 a
 multi‐year
contract
but
also
from
the
production
efficiency
gains
Boeing
and
our
suppliers
have
made.

That
 includes
 the
 $130
 million
 investment
 we
 made
 to
 modernize
 the
 Chinook
 factory.
 This
 contract
 will
 enable
 Boeing
 and
 our
 partners
 and
 suppliers
 in
 45
 states
 to
 bring
 stability
 to
 the
 workforce
 and
 to
 invest
 in
 production
tooling,
processes
and
other
capital
improvements.”
 
 
 
 
 
 6
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

Submit
Your
 Photos!
 


CHPA
has
a
growing
 collection
of
photos,
from
 flight
school
class
pictures
 like
these,
to
action
photos
to
 helicopter
shots
from
around
 the
world
…
 
 If
you
would
like
to
 contribute
to
the
collection
 please
upload
your
photos
by
 following
the
links
on
the
 CHPA
website
or
click
here!

 
 



 
 



 7



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

Reunions
and
Gatherings


www.chpa-us.org
 
 
 



 Are
you
planning
a
reunion
or
event
that
may
be
of
interest
to
our
members?

Let
us
help
you
get
the
 word
out
and
support
veterans
groups
of
all
sizes
and
locations.

Just
send
a
message
with
the
information
to
 HQ@chpa‐us.org.

If
you
have
a
logo,
send
that
along
as
well.


 Be
sure
to
include
accurate
contact
and
registration
information
and
we’ll
take
care
of
the
rest.
 
 


A
Troop,
1/9
Cavalry,
1
Air
Cav
Division
 
 Apache
 Troop,
 1st
 Squadron,
 9th
 Cavalry,
 1st
 Air
 Cavalry
 Division
 will
 host
 its
 annual
reunion
at
the
South
Lake
Tahoe
Embassy
Suites.

Check
in
will
be
Sunday,
 August
25,
2013
with
a
final
Memorial
Service
and
departure
on
Thursday,
August
 29,
 2013.
 
 This
 reunion
 is
 for
 all
 former
 members,
 families
 and
 honored
 guests.

 Special
 emphasis
 is
 for
 enlisted
 personnel
 regardless
 of
 flight
 status
 or
 position.

 Contact
Jeff
Cromar
at

 apachetroopreunion2013@gmail.com
or
817‐647‐5213
for
more
information.
 
 
 


The
Warriors
of
An
Loc
 
 The
Warriors
of
An
Loc
will
host
their
annual
reunion
in
Sumter,
SC
from
25
‐
27
 Oct
2013.

The
host
hotel
will
be
the
Hampton
Inn
–
Sumter,
803‐469‐2222.

The
 special
rate
for
the
reunion
is
$77
per
night
but
you
must
reserve
your
room
by
 September
 27th
 to
 receive
 this
 rate.
 
 When
 making
 your
 hotel
 reservations
 tell
 them
 you’re
 with
 “The
 Warriors
 of
 An
 Loc.”
 
 The
 reunion
 will
 take
 place
 at
 Pep
 McPhillips
 house,
 2515
 Maidenfair
 Lane,
 Sumter,
 telephone
 803‐720‐4902.

 Contact
Pep
(Sundog
07)
with
any
questions
or
for
more
information.
 
 


CHPA
Annual
Convention
and
Business
Meeting
 
 The
Combat
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
will
gather
for
its
9th
Annual
Convention
in
 San
Antonio,
TX.

The
dates
are
set
for
Oct
15
–
17
so
come
join
the
party.

Contact
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
or
call
800‐832‐5144
for
current
details.
 
 
 
 
 
 8
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

USAACE
Reinstates
Solo
Flight
Incentives
After
15
Years


www.chpa-us.org 
 


Nathan
Pfau,
Army
Flier
Staff
Writer



 A
 few
 Aviators
 at
 Fort
 Rucker
 had
 the
 opportunity
 to
 experience
 for
 the
 first
 time
 something
 that
hasn't
taken
place
in
almost
15
years.
 Solo
 flying
 in
 flight
 school
 was
 re‐instituted
 by
 COL
 Kevin
 J.
 Christensen,
 110th
 Aviation
 Brigade
 Commander
 as
 an
 incentive
 that
 limits
 the
 potential
 to
 solo
to
only
students
who
score
85
percent
or
above
on
 all
 written
 and
 flight
 evaluations,
 including
 their
 final
 basic
warfighter
skills
check
ride.
 Two
flight
students
out
at
Shell
Field
were
among
 Flight
students
2LT
Jennifer
MacGibbon,
recent
West
Point
graduate,
 the
 first
 to
 pass
 all
 the
 requirements
 and
 take
 part
 in
 the
 and
1LT
Glenn
Dorth,
2‐238th
General
Support
Aviation
Battalion,
 new
solo‐flight
incentives.
 Indiana
National
Guard,
go
over
their
pre‐flight
checklist
in
an
OH‐58
 "It
was
foreign
to
us,
but
we
were
told
that
we
were
 Kiowa
at
Shell
Field
March
29.
MacGibbon
and
Dorth
were
among
 the
first
flight
students
to
fly
solo
after
the
solo‐flight
incentives
were
 going
 to
 get
 the
 chance
 to
 go
 out
 and
 do
 what
 we've
 been
 re‐instituted
after
15
years.
 training
 to
 do
 without
 the
 instructor
 pilot,"
 said
 1LT
 Glenn
 Dorth,
 2‐228th
 General
 Support
 Aviation
 Battalion,
 Indiana
 National
Guard.

"All
the
responsibility
was
on
us
and
we
didn't
have
a
safety
net.

At
first
it
was
kind
of
scary
 and
I
wasn't
sure
if
I
wanted
to
do
it,
but
I
figured
I
was
in
a
good
position
for
it
and
I've
been
working
so
hard,
 so
I
told
myself
that
I
might
as
well
take
the
shot."
 "It
was
only
by
chance
that
we
got
to
be
among
the
first,"
said
2LT
Jennifer
MacGibbon,
recent
West
 Point
graduate.

"It's
definitely
a
cool
opportunity
to
be
able
to
conduct
a
solo
flight."
 The
flight
students
trained
with
the
OH‐58
Kiowa
for
about
four
weeks,
and
although
the
incentive
is
in
 place
to
help
drive
aviators
to
excel,
Dorth
said
that
wasn't
what
motivated
him,
it
was
a
desire
to
do
well
for
 himself.
 "I
just
wanted
to
do
well
regardless
of
whether
there
was
a
solo
flight,
incentive
or
not
‐‐
that's
just
the
 type
of
person
I
am,"
he
said.

"I'm
sure
that
everyone
that
is
[going
through
flight
school]
is
going
to
try
their
 hardest
anyway
because
everyone
had
to
try
their
hardest
to
get
here
to
begin
with."
 Even
with
sufficient
training,
MacGibbon
said
that
it
was
tough
to
not
rely
on
the
instructor
pilot
when
 going
out
for
the
solo
flight
with
just
her
stick
buddy,
Dorth.
 "Even
when
an
instructor
pilot
tells
you
that
he
or
she
is
going
to
be
acting
as
copilot
‐‐
they're
going
to
 rely
on
you
to
tell
them
everything
‐‐
you
still
rely
on
them
to
make
sure
everything
is
safe,"
she
said.

"When
 it's
 just
 you
 and
 your
 stick
 buddy
 in
 there,
 all
 of
 those
 things
 that
 [the
 instructor
 pilot]
 queued
 you
 to
 do
 throughout
the
course
is
now
on
you
and
you
have
to
remember
to
do
it
yourself."
 The
 students
 weren't
 left
 completely
 alone,
 however.
 
 The
 instructor
 pilot
 follows
 the
 students
 in
 a
 chase
aircraft
to
make
sure
that
everything
is
going
smoothly.
 "It's
still
definitely
a
little
scarier,"
said
MacGibbon.

"As
I
saw
our
IP
walk
off,
I
just
looked
at
Glenn
and
 said,
'We're
by
ourselves,'
and
that
was
scary
‐‐
it
was
that
epiphany
moment."
 "When
 you're
 sitting
 there,
 you're
 just
 thinking
 Concluded
on
Page
10
 about
 what
 you
 need
 to
 do,"
 added
 Dorth.
 
 "We
 were


9



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


sitting
there
for
a
while
[during
our
solo
flight]
to
try
and
figure
out
what
it
was
we
had
to
do,
and
then
it
just
 clicked
and
we
said,
'OK,
we've
got
to
go
and
this
is
what
we
need
to
do
to
go.'"
 MacGibbon
 said
 that
 the
 incentive
 is
 not
 only
 a
 great
 motivator,
 but
 great
 training,
 too,
 and
 a
 good
 way
to
make
sure
that
aviators
are
ready
to
take
the
next
step
in
their
training.
 "It's
a
great
confidence
builder
and
it's
a
great
time
to
be
able
to
put
everything
together
and
show
 that
you
do
know
how
to
operate
the
aircraft
‐‐
the
procedures
while
you're
flying
and
what
you
need
to
do,"
 she
said.

"This
is
something
we
do
right
before
we
select
our
main
airframes,
so
we
go
in
feeling
prepared
 that
we
have
the
basic
piloting
skills
‐‐
it's
a
good
situation
to
be
in."
 MacGibbon
said
she
doesn't
know
what
airframe
she
will
be
going
to,
but
Dorth
said
he
will
be
training
 to
fly
UH‐60
Black
Hawks.
 "They're
the
workhorse,"
he
said.

"I
come
from
a
transportation
unit
and
we've
had
lots
of
experience
 with
flooding
pulling
people
off
of
rooftops,
and
that's
[the
kind
of
thing]
I
want
to
do
with
the
Black
Hawk."
 
 
 2013
Convention
Notes
 
 Jay
Brown
 
 The
 2013
 Annual
 Convention
 and
 Business
 meeting
 continues
 to
 come
 together
 nicely.
 
 The
 Annual
 Convention
will
run
from
October
15
–
17
and
the
host
hotel
is
the
Saint
Anthony,
300
East
Travis
Street.

Their
 website
 is
 http://www.thestanthonyhotel.com/
 and
 we
 invite
 you
 to
 visit
 their
 site
 for
 a
 preview
 of
 the
 accommodations.
 Rich
 Miller
 has
 had
 great
 success
 setting
 up
 tours
 and
 events
 which
 include
 a
 welcome
 “meet
 and
 greet”
where
you
can
gather
with
friends,
old
and
new,
a
boat
tour
of
the
River
Walk,
a
visit
to
the
historic
 Market
 Square
 and
 the
 banquet.
 
 Stand
 by
 for
 more
 information
 in
 the
 next
 Swash
 Plate.
 
 The
 online
 registration
 will
 be
 announced
 to
 the
 membership
 in
 plenty
 of
 time
 to
 allow
 you
 all
 to
 make
 your
 plans
 to
 attend.
 
A
couple
of
important
things
to
keep
in
mind
for
this
year
are
the
election
of
the
Board
of
Directors
 and
submission
of
nominees
for
the
Robert
N.
Tredway
Award.
 The
Board
of
Directors
election,
which
takes
place
in
odd
numbered
years
is
but
one
reason
to
attend
 this
meeting.

There
are
currently
two
vacancies
on
the
Board
of
Directors
and
now
is
a
perfect
opportunity
for
 you
to
play
a
role
in
your
organization,
either
by
nominating
yourself
or
another
qualified
member
for
one
of
 those
 positions.
 
 Service
 on
 the
 Board
 of
 Directors
 is
 neither
 arduous
 nor
 excessively
 time
 consuming.
 
 The
 Board
meets
once
per
month
via
teleconference,
which
takes
place
over
a
toll
free
line
so
there’s
no
out
of
 pocket
expense.

The
duties
of
a
director,
to
include
active
participation
in
the
teleconference
take
no
more
 than
 a
 couple
 of
 hours
 a
 month.
 
 So
 take
 a
 moment
 to
 submit
 those
 nominations
 to
 our
 headquarters
 at
 hq@chpa‐us.org
or
give
us
a
call
at
800‐832‐5144.
 The
 time
 for
 submission
 of
 nominees
 for
 the
 Robert
 N.
 Tredway
 Award
 has
 just
 about
 expired.
 
 We
 received
 several
 nominations
 for
 this
 prestigious
 award
 and
 the
 results
 of
 the
 selection
 committee
 will
 be
 published
in
the
July
issue
of
the
Swash
Plate.

The
details
of
the
award
can
be
found
on
the
CHPA
website
at
 www.chpa‐us.org.

The
Robert
N.
Tredway
award
is
named
in
honor
of
a
gentleman
who
personified
the
word
 “leader”
during
his
distinguished
military
career
and
well
afterward.

The
presentation
of
the
award
will
take
 place
at
the
Annual
Convention,
another
reason
to
plan
to
be
there.
 So
now
is
the
time
to
plan
to
attend
the
convention,
meet
new
friends
and
renew
old
friendships.

San
 Antonio
in
October
is
an
excellent
place
and
time
for
that
well
deserved
vacation
and
who
better
to
spend
it
 with
than
fellow
combat
aviators
and
crewmembers?
 10
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

My
Brothers




 
 Terry
Garlock
 
 
 Ed
note:

The
following
is
a
speech
given
by
Terry
Garlock
on
Memorial
Day
2013
at
Fayetteville
GA.

Terry
is
a
 Certified
Financial
Planner
living
with
his
wife,
Julie,
and
two
daughters
aged
11
and
16
in
Peachtree
City,
GA.

 He
flew
Cobras
with
the
Dragon
platoon
of
the
334th
Attack
Hel
Co,
145th
Av
Bn
based
in
Bien
Hoa
in
1969.

 Terry
was
shot
down
halfway
through
his
tour,
suffered
a
broken
back
and
was
medivaced
home.


 


I
am
honored
to
be
here
today
among
people
who
know
we
must
 remember
 the
 ones
 who
 paid
 the
 ultimate
 price
 to
 serve
 our
 country.
I
 never
knew
anyone
who
gave
his
life.
I
do
know
some
who
lost
their
life
 doing
 their
 duty,
 doing
 America’s
 dirty
 work
 in
 unpleasant
 places.
 Not
 a
 single
 one
 of
 them
 died
 willingly,
 they
 just
 wanted
 to
 get
 their
 job
 done
 honorably
and
go
home
to
live
out
their
lives
like
you
and
me.

 For
 the
 families
 who
 lost
 a
 loved
 one
 in
 war,
 it
 may
 be
 small
 comfort
but
I
want
you
to
know
something.
Those
of
us
who
lived
through
 it
 will
 remember
 them
 vividly
 for
 the
 rest
 of
 our
 lives.
 We
 think
 of
 them
 nearly
every
day,
as
if
we’re
keeping
an
unspoken
pledge
to
each
other
–
I
will
remember
you.

 Bear
with
me
and
I
will
try
to
tell
you
how
veterans
think
of
each
other
and
how
we
think
of
our
dead
 brothers,
why
we
are
proud
of
them.
I
am
no
expert,
but
over
a
5
year
period
while
I
was
working
on
a
book
 about
veterans
I
spoke
to
a
great
many
of
them,
and
listening
carefully
helped
me
see
more
clearly
how
we
 were
changed
by
war.
It
helped
clarify
some
things
that
are
very
hard
to
put
into
words.
 Whether
 soldiers,
 sailors,
 airmen
 or
 marines,
 how
 do
 you
 prepare
 18
 year
 olds
 for
 combat?
 Intense
 training
and
drilling
helps
a
lot
because
every
one
of
them
is
worried
about
measuring
up,
wondering
if
they
 are
made
of
the
right
stuff.

 When
the
time
comes
and
the
shooting
starts,
new
guys
are
too
busy
doing
their
job
to
notice
they
are
 learning
lessons
that
are
not
taught
any
other
place.
 •
They
thought
they
would
be
fighting
for
the
flag,
but
it
turned
out
they
were
fighting
for
each
other
 •
They
thought
courage
was
not
being
afraid,
but
they
found
out
courage
is
doing
your
job
well
while
 you
are
scared
to
death.
 Combat
is
a
cruel
teacher,
but
somehow
it
turns
a
group
of
men
into
a
sort
of
family
where
you
may
 not
like
or
even
know
a
guy
but
you’ll
take
breathtaking
risks
in
the
struggle
to
keep
each
other
alive.
 Amidst
the
chaos
and
danger
of
combat,
beyond
the
mission
there
is
powerful
motivation
that
can
be
 summed
up
in
two
words
–
honor
and
trust.
 What
does
a
19
year
old
soldier
in
combat
know
about
honor?
Quite
a
bit,
I
think.
He
may
not
ever
put
 it
into
words
but
he
knows
honor
is
doing
his
job
well
and
defending
his
brothers
even
at
the
risk
of
his
life.
He
 knows
 while
 looking
 in
 the
 mirror
 to
 shave
 in
 the
 morning
 whether
 he
 met
 the
 challenge.
 Passing
 that
 test
 becomes
what
he
likes
most
about
himself.
 As
he
gets
good
at
his
job,
at
some
point
he
suddenly
realizes
his
brothers
trust
him
to
deliver,
even
 under
fire.
He
may
never
say
it,
but
he
is
enormously
proud
of
earning
that
trust,
and
he
would
do
anything
 not
to
lose
it.
 It’s
 almost
 like
 we
 proudly
 wore
 an
 invisible
 jacket
 of
 honor
 and
 trust
 that
 we
 had
 to
 earn,
 a
 high
 achievement
that
our
family
at
home
would
never
understand.
The
complete
trust
we
had
in
each
other
made
 a
 closeness
 that
 only
 Shakespeare
 has
 successfully
 Continued
on
Page
12
 described.
 
 


11



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org



 And
so,
even
though
everyone
in
combat
fears
dying,
we
feared
even
more
that
under
fire
our
courage
 might
falter
and
we
might
screw
up,
we
might
fail
to
do
our
job,
and
we
might
lose
our
brothers
trust
or
even
 lose
their
lives,
and
we
feared
that
more
than
anything.
 If
you
asked
us
back
then
if
we
loved
each
other,
we
would
have
thought
you
were
out
of
your
mind.
 But
when
one
of
us
was
killed
the
cut
ran
very
deep,
and
we
crammed
our
anguish
way
down
inside
us
into
 our
own
secret
box
and
we
closed
the
lid
tight
so
we
could
carry
on
to
do
our
job
.
.
.
and
the
ghosts
of
our
 dead
brothers
were
never
far
away.
 Whether
the
war
was
WWII,
Korea,
Vietnam,
Iraq
or
Afghanistan,
the
calendar
days
passed,
some
days
 boring,
some
days
exciting
and
some
dark
with
anguish,
and
we
all
fantasized
about
going
home,
getting
away
 from
the
nastiness
of
war
and
back
to
those
we
loved.
 We
 may
 have
 left
 home
 as
 boys
 but
 we
 would
 return
 home
 serious
 men
 who
 learned
 to
 quickly
 separate
the
fluff
from
important
things
that
might
get
our
brothers
killed
or
keep
them
alive.
 When
we
finally
arrived
home
the
reunion
might
not
have
been
as
smooth
as
we
expected
since
we
 had
changed
more
than
we
realized.
We
may
have
seemed
remote
to
some
people
since
our
dead
brothers,
 tucked
 safely
 away
 in
 our
 secret
 box,
 meant
 far
 more
 to
 us
 than
 the
 dumbasses
 we
 met
 who
 would
 never
 sacrifice
a
thing
for
their
country.
 It
didn’t
seem
right
that
life
went
on
as
if
there
was
no
war,
as
if
Americans
were
not
still
fighting
and
 dying,
and
we
found
ourselves
missing
our
brothers,
both
dead
and
alive,
the
people
we
respected
now,
the
 people
who
understood
us
now,
the
people
we
trusted
completely
now
to
watch
our
back.
 How
crazy
is
it
that
many
of
us
secretly
wished
to
be
back
with
those
guys
where
honor
and
trust
are
 the
coin
of
the
realm?
Maybe
we
hated
the
war
but
felt
the
urge
to
be
there
again
with
the
ones
who
were
 part
of
us
now.
 We
were
cautious
about
opening
our
secret
box
to
visit
with
our
dead
brothers
because
the
memories
 are
wrapped
in
the
same
feelings
we
had
when
they
died,
just
as
fresh
as
yesterday,
and
we
didn’t
like
that
we
 couldn’t
control
the
tears
and
overwhelming
sadness.
 That
 is
 part
 of
 the
 power
 of
 the
 Vietnam
 Memorial
 in
 Washington,
 DC.
 The
 names
 on
 the
 polished
 black
marble
wall
make
it
personal,
and
as
family
members
and
brothers
in
arms
approach
The
Wall
the
air
 becomes
electric
as
secret
boxes
are
opened
and
memories
with
their
wrappings
of
anguish
are
set
loose
to
 run
free.
 We
can
almost
see
our
dead
brothers
in
the
reflection
of
that
polished
wall,
proudly
wearing
the
jacket
 of
honor
and
trust
they
earned.
 The
Wall
in
Washington
is
our
place
to
ease
the
pressure,
to
let
loose
those
feelings
we
suppressed
for
 so
long,
where
we
can
talk
to
our
dead
brothers
to
tell
them
they
are
not
forgotten,
that
we
are
teaching
our
 children
and
grandchildren
about
them.
It’s
a
place
where
we
can
confess
a
tinge
of
guilt
that
we
lived
through
 it
and
they
did
not,
that
we
got
to
live
out
our
life
and
grow
old
and
we’re
sorry
their
faces
are
frozen
forever
 young.
 The
 Wall
 is
 our
 place,
 where
 we
 can
 go
 together
 with
 our
 brothers
 and
 sisters
 who
 lived,
 a
 bit
 like
 church,
a
place
of
healing.
 I
hope
you
see
why
we
should
build
memorials
for
Iraq
and
Afghanistan.
Not
to
glorify
the
war,
but
to
 provide
the
men
and
women
of
those
wars
a
place
of
their
own
to
gather
and
grieve
and
cleanse
their
soul.
 We
should
build
those
memorials.
 I
 think
 all
 these
 things
 I
 am
 telling
 you
 are
 part
 of
 why
 veterans
 are
 drawn
 to
 each
 other.
 It’s
 more
 than
 Concluded
on
Page
13
 12
 



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

remembering
 the
 past
 and
 swapping
 old
 tales.
 It’s
 the
 comfort
 of
 being
 with
 men
 and
 women
 who
 proved
 themselves
worthy
of
honor
and
trust,
people
who
did
hard
things
well
when
they
were
young,
people
who
 understand
when
we
say
we
can
almost
see
the
ghosts
of
our
dead
brothers
among
us,
laughing
and
joking,
 sipping
with
us
when
we
drink
a
toast
to
them
and
say
our
prayers
in
silence
for
them,
the
ones
we
miss,
the
 ones
we
respect
and
admire.
 I
am
grateful
that
America
pauses
to
remember
them
every
year,
but
we
think
of
our
dead
brothers
all
 the
time
with
the
affection
of
this
old
Irish
blessing:
 

 May
the
road
rise
up
to
meet
you
 May
the
wind
always
be
at
your
back
 May
the
sun
shine
warm
on
your
face
 May
the
rains
fall
soft
on
your
fields
 And
until
we
meet
again
 May
God
hold
you
in
the
palm
of
His
hand
 


Job
Openings
 



 
 


Chief
Test
Pilot
and
Production
Control
Manager.
 
 My
client,
a
growing
aerospace
and
defense
company
is
in
need
of
a
Chief
Test
Pilot
and
Production
 Control
Manager
to
add
to
their
new
team
for
their
Army
Aviation
Division
in
Alabama.

This
Fortune
200
 Company
is
looking
for
strong
candidates
with
skills
that
exceed
expectations.

Does
this
sound
like
you?
 Please
contact
me
for
more
details
regarding
this
dynamic
opportunity
and
send
your
resume
to
me
at:
 Kari@jobsforsuccess.com

 
 
 UH‐60
Black
Hawk
Pilots,
S‐70
Family.
 
 US
any
branch
aviation,
UK
Pilots
type
rated
to
S‐70
Family,
or
twin
engine
rated.
Middle
East,
not
 located
in
combat
zone,
expat
package,
1
year
renewable
contract.

Must
be
current
or
able
to
be
certified,
 pass
flight
physical.

Instructor
rated
pilots
also
needed.

Contact
me
with
CV/Resume;
License/Med
Cert.
 Inquiries
are
confidential.

Jon
Harrell,
email:
jharrell.rcfr@gmail.com
 
 
 CHPA
has
a
Career
Connector
tap
on
its
website
at
www.chpa‐us.org.

Using
this
tool
CHPA
provides
 information
 on
 job
 openings
 in
 the
 rotorcraft
 aviation
industry
to
 our
 pilot
and
 flight
 crewmembers.
 
 We
 will
also
list
those
openings
in
this
section
of
the
newsletter
to
reach
our
membership.

If
you
have,
or
know
 of,
a
job
opening
let
us
know
and
we’ll
get
the
word
out
to
members
who
may
be
searching
for
an
opening.

 This
will
assist
our
membership
and
your
organization
by
providing
well
trained
personnel
with
experience
 in
a
wide
range
of
rotorcraft
operations
in
worldwide
environments.

 
 


13



Volume 9, Issue 6


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


The
Juno
Letters
 
 Antoine
Bouchard
held
a
terrible
secret
in
his
hands
‐
a
secret
that
could
save
thousands
of
lives
as
the
 Allied
forces
stormed
the
shores
of
Juno
Beach
on
June
6,
1944.

The
Gestapo
hunted
him
as
a
traitor
‐
the
 French
resistance
as
a
collaborator.

As
chaos
erupted
all
around
him,
Bouchard
resolved
to
face
Hell
even
if
it
 meant
he
could
lose
his
family,
his
friend,
and
his
life.
 L.
 W.
 Hewitt,
 Author
 of
 “The
 Juno
 Letters”
 wants
 to
 honor
 those
 who
 serve
 by
 offering
 “The
 Juno
 Letters”
FREE
to
service
members,
veterans,
their
families,
and
friends
until
September
1
in
the
iBook
and
PDF
 formats
at
http://hewittmbm.com/juno_letters.
The
book
is
also
available
on
Amazon.com
and
Google
Books.
 For
information
visit
hewittmbm.com/juno_letters/
or
contact
Mr.
Hewitt
at
larryh@hewittmbm.com,
 hewittmbm.com
or
360.880.4855.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Contact Quick Reference 
 
 
 Chairman
of
the
Board
–
Rhea
Rippey

 Buzz
Covington


Call on Us!

Chairman@chpa‐us.org

 
 President
–
Robert
Frost

 president@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Administration
–
Rich
Miller

 admin@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Membership
–
Rusty
Bourgoyne

 membership@chpa‐us.org



BCovington@chpa‐us.org


Secretary
–
Mick
Tesanovich

 secretary@chpa‐us.org
 
 Treasurer
–
Loren
McAnally

 Treasurer@chpa‐us.org

 
 Executive
Director
–
Jay
Brown
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
 
 
 


Jim
Ferguson
 JFerguson@chpa‐us.org


14
 


Al
Major


 AMajor@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Call
us!
 800•832•5144


Randy
Jones
 RJones@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Fax
us!
 719•687•4167


Randy
Zahn
 RZahn@chpa‐us.org



 
 
 



 
 
 


Write
us!
 CHPA
 PO
Box
42
 Divide,
CO
80814‐0042



 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 


Remember!
 Feel
free
to
contact

 us
any
time.
 
 


John
Fore

 JFore@chpa‐us.org

 
 
 
 
 
 



June 2013 Swash plate