Page 1

HAPPY
VALENTINES
DAY
FROM
CHPA


Presenting!
 • 
 
 • 
 
 • 
 
 • 
 
 • 
 •

“President’s
Message”
 Robert
Frost


January
2013


President’s
Message



Robert
Frost



 This
 is
 my
 first
 message
 of
 the
 New
 “Kimberly’s
Flight”
 Year
 and
 it
 is
 my
 hope
 that
 all
 of
 you
 had
 a
 Book
Review
John
Penny
 wonderful
 holiday
 with
 family
 and
 friends.

 Now
 that
 all
 of
 us
 are
 settling
 back
 into
 a
 ”The
Robert
N.
Tredway
Award”

 Jay
Brown
 more
 normal
 routine
 and
 perhaps
 still
 living
 up
 (or
 perhaps
 not)
 to
 the
 resolutions
 we
 “Caring
For
The
Fallen”
 made,
 it
 is
 time
 think
 about
 our
 CHPA
 Dan
Lamothe
 activities
for
this
year.

Coming
up
March
4‐7
 is
 the
 biggest
 helicopter
 convention
 in
 the
 “Reunions
and
Gatherings”
 
 world,
 Helicopter
 Association
 International’s
 (HAI)
 Heli‐Expo
 in
 Las
 Vegas.
 and
much,
much
more!
 Through
the
generosity
and
hospitality
of
HAI,
the
CHPA
has
been
fortunate
 
 to
 participate
 and
 exhibit
 each
 year.
 
 This
 year
 is
 special
 to
 us
 though,
 because
it
will
be
the
first
time
we
have
our
new
exhibit
booth
on
display.

Our
primary
focus
for
being
there
is
 to
sign
up
new
members,
renew
existing
members
in
attendance,
and
for
the
first
time,
really
concentrate
on
 recruiting
corporate
sponsors.

If
you
attend,
please
stop
by
and
visit
us
at
booth
C
6107.

Right
after
HAI,
the
 CHPA
 will
 be
 participating
 and
 exhibiting
 at
 Quad
 A
 in
 Fort
 Worth.
 
 Again,
 the
 generosity
 and
 hospitality
 of
 Quad
A
has
allowed
us
to
participate
and
exhibit
each
year.

The
dates
this
year
are
April
10‐14.

Quad
A
and
 HAI
are
the
two
best
opportunities
we
have
each
year
to
tell
our
story
and
grow
our
membership
ranks.

 I
know
I
have
mentioned
this
in
some
of
my
earlier
messages
but
I
think
it
always
bears
repeating.

The
 life
blood
of
the
CHPA
is
to
retain
and
renew
existing
members
and
to
recruit
new
members.

 It
is
not
easy,
but
it
is
that
simple.

To
date,
in
our
short
history
we
have
recruited
over
1100
members,
but
we
 are
 just
 barely
 scratching
 the
 surface
 on
 the
 recruiting
 of
 those
 eligible
 for
 membership.
 
 At
 every
 monthly
 meeting
of
the
board,
time
is
set
aside
to
discuss
what
we
can
do
to
be
more
effective
in
our
recruiting
efforts
 and
to
receive
maximum
utility
from
our
very
limited
resources.

I
am
sure
most
of
you
have
at
one
time
or
 another
gone
to
our
website
and
it
is
my
hope
each
of
you
finds
our
newsletter
“The
Swash
Plate”
interesting
 enough
that
you
look
forward
to
receiving
every
month.

For
many
of
you,
that
is
really
the
only
exposure
you
 may
have
had
to
the
CHPA.

It
is
my
hope
you
will
have
the
interest
and
find
the
time
to
get
more
involved
in
 what
 we
 are
 doing.
 
 The
 number
 one
 way
 to
 do
 that
 is
 to
 make
 plans
 to
 attend
 our
 annual
 meeting
 and
 convention
each
fall.

This
year
it
will
be
in
San
Antonio
(date
to
be
determined
soon).

We
always
have
a
great
 time
and
I
believe
most
who
have
attended
look
forward
to
attending
again
and
again.

Another
thing
you
can
 do
is
promote
our
organization
in
your
local
community.

Many
of
you
live
in
areas
near
military
installations
 and
in
 civilian
 communities
 with
a
significant
 number
of
veterans
who
may
qualify
 for
membership.

Please
 pass
the
word
and
let
me
(or
other
board
members)
know
how
we
may
be
of
service
to
you.

As
you
all
know,
 



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


our
dues
are
nominal
at
only
$30
per
year,
but
I
also
know
you
must
be
receiving
value
for
that
$30.

To
that
 end,
we
need
your
feedback
on
what
we
are
doing
right,
what
we
are
doing
wrong,
and
of
equal
importance,
 what
we
should
be
doing
to
make
your
membership
more
valuable
to
you.

If
you
have
ideas,
comments
(pro
 &
con)
please
let
me
know
personally.

Even
though
I
have
a
CHPA
email
address
listed
on
the
CHPA
website,
 please
feel
free
to
contact
me
at
my
personal
address:
 robertfrost75@yahoo.com.

 In
closing
my
column
this
month,
I
want
to
share
a
humorous
poem
I
ran
across
recently.

It
is
called
 “THE
COPILOT”
and
was
written
in
1941
by
Keith
Murray,
who
later
became
a
Captain
with
American
Airlines.

 It
reminds
all
of
us
of
our
“Peter
Pilot”
days.

Here
it
is:
 


The
Copilot



By
Keith
Murray
 
 I
am
the
copilot.

I
sit
on
the
right.
 It’s
up
to
me
to
be
quick
and
bright;
 I
never
talk
back
for
I
have
regrets,
 But
I
have
to
remember
what
the
captain
forgets.
 I
make
out
the
flight
plan
and
study
the
weather,

 Pull
up
the
gear,
stand
by
to
feather;
 Make
out
the
mail
forms
and
do
the
reporting,
 And
fly
the
old
crate
while
the
captain
is
courting.
 I
take
the
readings,
adjust
the
power,

 Put
on
the
heaters
when
we’re
in
a
shower;
 Tell
him
where
we
are
on
the
darkest
night,
 And
do
all
the
bookwork
without
any
light.
 I
call
for
my
captain
and
buy
him
cokes;
 I
always
laugh
at
his
corny
jokes,
 And
once
in
awhile
when
his
landings
are
rusty
 I
always
come
through
with,
“By
gosh,
it’s
gusty!”
 All
in
all,
I’m
a
general
stooge,
 As
I
sit
on
the
right
of
the
man
I
call
“Scrooge”;
 I
guess
you
think
that
is
past
understanding,

 But
maybe
someday
he
will
give
me
a
landing.

 2
 



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


 

 A
Book
Review
by
John
Penny
 
 
 
 Kimberly’s
 Flight
 by
 Anna
 Simon
 and
 Ann
 Hampton
 is
 the
 story
 of
 CPT
 Kimberly
 Hampton,
 America’s
 first
 female
 Army
 Aviator
 killed
 in
 combat.

 Kimberly
 was
 an
 accomplished
 aviator
 and
 CO
 of
 D
 Troop
 1/17th
 Cavalry,
 the
 armed
recon
aviation
squadron
of
the
82nd
Airborne
Division
in
Iraq
when
she
 was
killed
in
action
over
Fallujah,
Iraq
on
2
January
2004
when
her
OH‐58D
was
 hit
 by
 a
 surface
 to
 air
 missile.
 
 This
 book
 is
 Hampton’s
 story
 of
 service
 and
 sacrifice
 and
 a
 mother’s
 story
 of
 love
 for
 her
 daughter
 and
 pride
 in
 her
 achievements.

 Kimberly
could
be
any
one
of
our
daughters,
or
be
the
girl
next
door.

She
 was
born
and
raised
in
the
small
town
of
Easley,
South
Carolina
(12
miles
west
of
Greenville,
SC).

The
book
 follows
 her
 college
 and
 Army
 career,
 culminating
 in
 the
 cockpit
 of
 an
 OH‐58D
 Kiowa
 Warrior
 in
 Iraq.
 
 Mrs.
 Hampton
 describes
 Kimberly
 as
 a
 perfectionist;
 whether
 it
 was
 academics,
 sports,
 flight
 school,
 or
 flying
 helicopters
in
Iraq;
Kimberly
excelled
and
was
respected.
 Kimberly
entered
flight
school
at
Ft.
Rucker
in
1998,
following
in
the
footsteps
of
women
Army
Aviators
 like
COL
Sally
Murphy
who
graduated
from
Army
Flight
School
in
1974.

Since
that
time
the
role
of
women
in
 Army
Aviation
has
expanded
and
women
pilots,
crew
chiefs,
and
medics
serve
in
the
US
Army
in
units
all
over
 the
 world
 and
 in
 combat
 zones
 in
 Iraq,
 and
 Afghanistan.
 
 Though
 it
 is
 still
 a
 man’s
 world
 in
 the
 US
 Army,
 women
 are
 now
 15%
 of
 the
 force
 and
 have
 achieved
 many
 milestones.
 
 Sadly
 the
 casualties
 of
 war
 do
 not
 discriminate
by
gender
and
all
losses
are
the
loss
of
American
treasure.

We
are
all
honored
by
their
service
 and
sacrifice.
 This
story
does
not
end
with
Kimberly’s
death.

Ann
Hampton,
Kimberly’s
mother
has
traveled
to
Iraq
 as
 a
 Gold
 Star
 Mother
 in
 a
 “Hugs
 for
 Healing”
 program
 sanctioned
 by
 the
 State
 Department.
 
 This
 program
 brings
American
and
Iraqi
mothers
who
have
lost
children
during
the
war
together
to
work
on
humanitarian
 projects.

For
more
information
about
this
program
go
to
http://womenforfuture.org/healing.htm.
 Kimberly’s
Flight:

The
Story
of
Captain
Kimberly
Hampton,
America’s
First
Woman
Combat
Pilot
Killed
 in
 Battle
 by
 Anna
 Simon
 and
 Ann
 Hampton
 (240
 pages,
 $21.84,
 $3.99
 Kindle)
 ISBN
 978‐1612001029,
 is
 available
through
your
local
book
store,
casematepublishing.com/,
Amazon,
or
other
book
suppliers.


 The
royalties
for
this
book
benefit
the
Captain
Kimberly
Hampton
Memorial
Foundation
 www.captainkimberlyhampton.org

Kimberly’s
Flight


3



Volume 9, Issue 1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The
Swash!


www.chpa-us.org


[Call
For
Articles]


Once
a
month,
in
each
issue
of
The
Swash
Plate,
we
pass
along
items
of
interest
to
 our
 members.
 
 Things
 like
 the
 President’s
 Message,
 book
 reviews
 and
 notices
 of
 upcoming
 reunions
 and
 gatherings
 come
 together
 pretty
 easy.
 
 What
 we
 don’t
 regularly
 get
 are
 those
 interesting
 stories
 from
 our
 members.
 
 Nobody
 tells
 a
 better
 
 story
 than
 a
 combat
 helicopter
 crewmember,
 whether
 it’s
 the
 truth
 or
 “enhanced
 truth.”
 
 Our
 most
 entertaining
 and
 informative
 stories
 come
 from
 you,
 our
 membership.
 So,
if
you
have
an
idea
for
an
article,
or
if
you
have
a
story
you’d
like
to
submit
it’s
 as
easy
as
sending
it
in.

The
story
can
be
about
anything
from
flight
school
to
real
life
 there‐I‐was
stories.

We’ve
published
several
stories
over
the
years
ranging
from
tales
 of
flight
school
a
long,
long
time
ago
to
“war
stories”
that
we’re
sure
most
of
you
can
 identify
with.


 Take
 a
 moment
 to
 lay
 fingers
 on
 keyboard
 or
 just
 put
 pen
 to
 paper
 and
 send
 in
 those
stories.

You
can
email
them
to
hq@chpa‐us.org
or
through
the
US
Post
Office
to:


 CHPA
•
PO
Box
42
•
Divide,
CO

80814‐0042


 


4
 


CHPA • The Swash Plate


Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

Another
CHPA
Success
 Jay
Brown



 Last
 month
 CHPA
 enjoyed
 another
 successful
 Christmas
 Boxes
 for
 the
 Troops
 Project.

 As
you
all
know,
every
year
we
send
as
many
boxes
 as
we
can
to
Aviation
servicemembers
deployed
to
 Afghanistan
over
the
Christmas
holidays.

Despite
a
 late
 start
 we
 sent
 forty‐four
 boxes
 to
 servicemembers
 who
 would
 be
 away
 from
 family
 and
home
during
Christmas.
 Of
 course
 none
 of
 this
 would
 take
 place
 without
 sponsors
 and
 you
 all
 have
 our
 deepest
 gratitude.
 
 It
 would
 also
 not
 happen
 without
 the
 support
of
many
unsung
heroes
who
give
their
time,
their
effort
and
elbow
grease.

CHPA
member
Pat
Glass
 once
again
went
above
and
beyond
with
his
efforts
to
get
the
boxes
packed
and
shipped
to
arrive
in
country
 on
 time
 for
 Christmas.
 
 Without
 Santa
 Pat
 and
 his
 elves
 this
 would
 not
 be
 a
 success
 story.
 
 The
 “elves”
 are
 cadets
from
McDaniel
College
in
Westminster,
MD.
 CHPA
is
grateful
to
everyone
involved
in
getting
things
done
so
a
hearty
“thank
you”
goes
to
Pat,
LTC
 Paul
Jackson
and
cadets
Joy
Chand,
Rick
Stuart,
Nathan
Ashbaugh,
Nicholas
Mollica,
Stephen
Lariviere,
Ashley
 Meister,
Nick
Smith,
Mike
Nims,
John
Collins
and
Katharine
Armstrong.

Without
the
support
of
folks
like
you
 who
dig
in
and
get
their
hands
dirty,
this
annual
project
would
not
be
the
huge
success
it
always
is.
 
 
 
 


GOT PATCHES?

CHPA continues to receive quite an assortment 
 of patches from our members. These patches are displayed at our booth at HAI, Quad A, and VHPA. Several of you have donated patches, but we’re always looking for more. They are very eye 
 catching and help us garner attention. So please dig through your old patches and if you have some you’d like to share, send them to us at: CHPA • PO Box 42 • Divide, CO
80814‐0042


5



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

The
Robert
N.
Tredway
Award
 Jay
Brown


www.chpa-us.org



 


The
Robert
N.
Tredway
Award
is
given
by
the
Combat
Helicopter
 Pilots
 Association
 in
 recognition
 of
 an
 individual
 or
 corporation
 for
 demonstrated
accomplishments
in
support
of:
 
 • the
United
States
Military
Helicopter
Community;
 • United
 States
 Military
 Veterans
 with
 an
 emphasis
 on
 helicopter
 veterans;
 • for
 an
 individual,
 significant
 accomplishments
 in
 his/her
 professional
area;
 • the
Combat
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
and,
 • the
community
at‐large.
 
 Award
 nominees
 should
 have
 significant
 accomplishments
 in
 at
 least
 two
 of
 the
 above
 areas.
 
 The
 Award
shall
be
given,
if
the
award
committee
determines
there
is
an
appropriate
recipient,
in
odd
numbered
 years
 during
 CHPA’s
 Annual
 Meeting
 weekend.
 
 The
 committee
 is
 to
 make
 an
 award
 selection
 only
 if
 a
 nominee
meets
the
high
level
of
accomplishment
that
would
honor
Bob
Tredway.


 The
Award
recipient
will
be
selected
by
a
committee
appointed
by
the
President
of
CHPA
consisting
of
 either
three
members
or
five
members,
at
the
President’s
discretion.

All
committee
members
must
be
dues
 current
members
of
CHPA.

A
three
member
committee
shall
have
at
least
one
non‐board
member
while
a
five
 member
committee
shall
have
at
least
two
non‐board
members.

The
President
may
appoint
him/herself
to
 the
 committee.
 
 No
 member
 of
 the
 committee
 shall
 be
 eligible
 to
 receive
 the
 award
 in
 the
 year
 in
 which
 he/she
 has
 served
 on
 the
 committee.
 
 No
 member
 of
 the
 committee
 may
 nominate
 an
 individual
 for
 the
 award.

No
member
of
the
Board
of
Directors
of
CHPA
is
eligible
for
the
award
until
two
years
after
serving
on
 the
board.
 The
 President
 of
 CHPA
 shall
 appoint
 the
 committee
 during
 the
 annual
 business
 meeting
 in
 even
 numbered
 years.
 
 The
 committee
 will
 solicit
 nominees
 in
 various
 media
 including
 publication
 in
 The
 Swash
 Plate
 and
 postings
 at
 events
 at
 which
 CHPA
 attends
 such
 as
 the
 Quad‐A
 and
 HAI
 annual
 meetings.
 
 The
 nomination
 must
 be
 in
 writing
 and
 contain
 the
 Name,
 Address
 and
 other
 contact
 information
 for
 both
 the
 nominee
 and
 the
 individual
 making
 the
 nomination.
 
 In
 addition
 the
 nomination
 shall
 include
 a
 written
 narrative
presenting
the
accomplishments
that
qualify
the
nominee
for
the
award.

The
committee
shall
make
 the
 selection
 before
 July
 1
 of
 the
 year
 in
 which
 the
 award
 is
 to
 be
 presented
 and
 the
 selection
 will
 be
 announced
in
the
July
edition
of
The
Swash
Plate.


6
 



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

The
2013
Annual
Convention


www.chpa-us.org


 
 
 The
 CHPA
 Annual
 Convention
 and
 Business
 Meeting
 is
 always
 a
 great
 party.

It
is
always
an
opportunity
to
meet
old
friends
and
make
new
ones
and
 gather
with
fellow
combat
veterans
over
an
adult
beverage.

It
is
also
a
chance
 to
participate
in
the
management
of
your
organization.

There
is
no
other
time
 during
 the
 year
 that
 provides
 such
 an
 opportunity
 to
 talk
 face
 to
 face
 with
 members
of
the
Board
of
Directors,
right
up
to
the
President,
and
provide
your
 thoughts
 and
 suggestions
 directly
 to
 those
 who
 “hold
 the
 reins.”
 
 I
 don’t
 think
 I’ve
 ever
 been
 in
 an
 organization
 where
 access
 to
 the
 officers
 was
 so
 freely
 gained.

This
year
in
San
Antonio
will
be
no
different
but
there
are
a
couple
more
 reasons
to
make
this
year
the
year
you
attend.

Those
reasons
are
the
election
of
the
Board
of
Directors
and
 the
Robert
N.
Tredway
award.
 The
 elections
 are
 governed
 by
 the
 Bylaws,
 which
 are
 available
 online
 at
 www.chpa‐us.org.
 
 The
 only
 positions
not
open
to
any
pilot
or
air
crewmember
member
of
CHPA
are
Chairman
of
the
Board,
President
and
 Vice
Presidents.

The
Chairman
of
the
Board
is
the
immediate
past
President.

The
qualifications
for
President
 and
Vice
Presidents
include,
“The
individual
must
have
served
on
the
Board
of
Directors
for
at
least
a
two
year
 term.”
 
 That
 means
 the
 President
 and
 Vice
 Presidents
 must
 have
 been
 a
 member
 for
 at
 least
 one
 year
 and
 served
 on
 the
 Board
 for
 at
 least
 one
 two–year
 term.
 
 The
 positions
 of
 Secretary,
 Treasurer
 and
 Director
 require
only
membership
for
at
least
one
year.
 Service
on
the
Board
of
Directors
requires
attendance
via
telephone
at
the
monthly
Board
meeting
and
 a
 willingness
 to
 “roll
 up
 your
 sleeves”
 and
 get
 things
 done.
 
 All
 ideas
 are
 welcome
 for
 presentation
 and
 discussion
and
all
Pilot
and
Air
Crewmember
members
are
encouraged
to
“throw
your
hat
into
the
ring.”
 For
those
of
you
who
aren’t
so
sure
you
want
to
serve
on
the
Board
of
Directors,
your
participation
is
 highly
encouraged
in
the
election
process.

Join
us
in
San
Antonio
and
ensure
your
voice
is
heard
through
your
 active
 participation
 in
 the
 voting.
 
 This
 is
 the
 first
 year
 that
 voting
 will
 be
 open
 to
 both
 Pilot
 and
 Air
 Crewmember
members
so
you’ll
be
taking
part
in
an
historic
event.
 This
 year
 we
 may
 also
 name
 the
 second
 recipient
 of
 the
 Robert
 N.
 Tredway
 award.
 
 I
 say
 “may”
 because
 nominations
 must
 meet
 some
 pretty
 stringent
 requirements
 and
 selection
 of
 a
 recipient
 is
 neither
 guaranteed
nor
required.

Everyone
is
encouraged
to
submit
nominations
to
the
Award
Committee
by
sending
 them
 to
 HQ
 either
 by
 email
 to
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
 or
 by
 the
 postal
 system
 to
 CHPA,
 PO
 Box
 42,
 Divide,
 CO

 80814‐0042.
 
 Requirements
 for
 the
 award
 are
 on
 page
 6
 of
 this
 newsletter
 and
 can
 be
 found
 on
 the
 CHPA
 website.

The
Award
Committee
is
made
up
of
Robert
Frost,
Randy
Zahn
and
Mark
Hilton.

Recipients
of
this
 award
 must
 have
 demonstrated
 significant
 accomplishments
 in
 support
 of
 the
 United
 States
 Military
 Helicopter
 Community,
 United
 States
 Military
 Veterans
 with
 an
 emphasis
 on
 helicopter
 veterans,
 for
 an
 individual,
significant
accomplishments
in
his/her
professional
area,
the
Combat
Helicopter
Pilots
Association
 and
 the
 community
 at‐large.
 
 To
 say
 that
 the
 man
 for
 whom
 this
 award
 is
 named
 exemplified
 these
 requirements
 would
 be
 an
 understatement.
 
 COL
 Tredway,
 as
 many
 members
 of
 CHPA
 will
 attest,
 was
 an
 officer
his
men
wanted
to
follow,
always
leading
by
example
even
after
his
tenure
of
military
service
ended.

 The
requirements
for
award
are
set
very
high
and
justifiably
so.

It
would
be
no
small
honor
to
be
nominated
 for
this
award
and
an
even
greater
honor
to
receive
it.
 
 Jay
Brown


7



Volume 9, Issue 1


Caring
For
The
Fallen
 Dan
Lamothe,
Marine
Corps
Times


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org



 
 
 
 



 


On
 chilly
 stainless‐steel
 tables,
 a
 small
 group
 of
 Marines
 perform
 the
 meticulous
 work
 that
 begins
 the
 long
 journey
home
for
dozens
of
US
casualties
of
 war
each
year.
 The
 Personnel
 Retrieval
 and
 Processing
unit
is
best
known
for
conducting
 “dignified
 transfers,“
 ceremonies
 in
 which
 the
 remains
 of
 fallen
 Marines
 and
 other
 US
 forces
 are
 respectfully
 placed
 on
 a
 plane
 to
 begin
 their
 voyage
 home.
 
 It’s
 far
 from
 the
 group’s
only
duty,
though.
 Most
 casualties
 arrive
 by
 helicopter
 at
 Camp
 Bastion’s
 British‐run
 hospital.
 
 The
 landing
zone
is
named
after
famous
battlefield
nurse
Florence
Nightingale.

The
Marines
place
black
shrouds
 over
the
windows
of
the
processing
room
where
they
work,
ensuring
privacy
as
they
search
the
remains
from
 head
to
toe,
they
said.

Jewelry,
family
photographs
and
other
personal
effects
are
cataloged,
and
then
placed
 in
a
plastic
bag
with
a
zipper
that
travels
with
the
fallen
service
member.
 Occasionally,
the
job
is
emotionally
wrenching.
 “Sometimes
they
say
there
might
be
that
one
processing
that
might
bother
you,
and
you
don’t
really
 know
what
it’s
going
to
be
until
it
happens,
“
said
CW5
Kim
Adamson,
who
led
the
14‐member
unit
deployed
 from
March
through
October.

“It
could
be
something
as
simple
as
finding
a
baby
bootie
in
a
pocket,
and
you
 realize
that
here’s
a
Marine
who
never
got
a
chance
to
see
his
child.”
 The
Marines
work
carefully,
but
quickly.

The
time
of
the
casualty’s
arrival
is
documented,
and
the
unit
 makes
arrangements
to
begin
transportation
of
the
remains
back
to
the
US.

The
goal
is
not
only
to
care
for
 fallen
 service
 members,
 but
 also
 to
 put
 them
 into
 refrigeration
 as
 quickly
 as
 possible
 until
 an
 aircraft
 is
 available
to
carry
them
home.
 The
unit
strives
to
ship
the
remains
within
four
hours
of
receiving
them,
and
expects
to
do
so
within
 twelve.

The
fallen
service
member
is
zipped
into
a
black
bag
known
as
a
human‐remains
pouch,
which
is
kept
 cold
inside
the
transfer
case
with
ice.

A
neatly
pressed
US
flag,
5
feet
by
9
½
feet,
blankets
each
case
as
it
is
 flown
from
Camp
Bastion
back
to
the
US.
 “Everyone
always
sees
the
dignified
transfer,
but
that’s
about
10
percent
of
our
job,”
said
SSG
Albert
 Santini,
an
embarkation
specialist
with
the
unit
deployed
this
summer.

“The
actual
processing
is
probably
50
 (percent),
and
the
rest
is
typing
in
forms
so
everything
is
accurate,
so
we
make
sure
we
know
what
is
going
on
 with
this
hero,
and
where
he
goes
and
what
he
has.”
 All
 fallen
 US
 service
 members
 in
 Regional
 Command
 Southwest,
 based
 at
 neighboring
 Camp
 Leatherneck,
 go
 through
 the
 processing
 center
 at
 Bastion.
 
 They
 are
 delivered
 to
 Kandahar
 Airfield,
 a
 Continued
on
Page
9
 sprawling
 base
 to
 the
 east
 that
 serves
 as
 the
 common
 8
 



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org

mortuary
collection
point
for
US
forces
in
Afghanistan,
Adamson
said.

The
remains
are
iced
again
there
and
at
 Ramstein
Air
Base
in
Germany
before
being
delivered
to
the
mortuary
at
Dover
Air
Force
Base,
DE.
 Search
and
Recovery
 
Every
war
has
its
dead,
but
the
Corps’
handling
of
fallen
Marines
has
evolved
in
the
past
decade.

In
 2005,
it
created
the
Personnel
Retrieval
and
Processing
Company,
out
of
Washington,
DC.

Elements
of
about
 100
 Reserve
 Marines
 each
 were
 placed
 there
 and
 in
 Marietta,
 GA.
 
 During
 the
 height
 of
 the
 Iraq
 war,
 they
 deployed
 in
 groups
 of
 up
 to
 about
 80
 to
 handle
 casualties.
 
 Prior
 to
 that,
 a
 unit
 out
 of
 Dayton,
 OH
 sent
 reservists
forward
to
fill
the
job.
 The
mission
was
busier
during
the
Iraq
war.

A
unit
could
handle
hundreds
of
casualties,
both
insurgent
 and
American,
during
a
single
deployment,
said
GSGT
Clinton
Kinley,
who
deployed
to
Iraq
with
PRP
units
four
 times
between
2004
and
2009.

The
units
also
conducted
search‐and‐recovery
missions
in
which
they
left
the
 wire
to
bring
back
remains,
frequently
cutting
open
mangled
vehicles
to
complete
the
job
while
other
Marines
 provided
security.
 “You’ve
got
to
think
about
what
we’re
going
out
there
for,”
said
Kinley,
who
now
serves
at
Manpower
 and
 Reserve
 Affairs
 in
 Quantico,
 VA.
 
 “We’re
 not
 going
 out
 there
 because
 a
 bird
 hit
 the
 windshield.
 
 We’re
 going
out
there
because
a
vehicle
got
blown
up,
or
a
mortar
round
hit,
or
whatever.

Someone
died
there
from
 direct
enemy
action,
so
we’re
going
somewhere
where
it’s
bad.”
 Searches
and
recoveries
also
happen
in
Afghanistan,
but
not
nearly
as
often.

More
operations
there
 are
 dismounted,
 and
 casualties
 declined
 as
 mine‐resistant
 vehicles
 became
 commonplace.
 
 The
 PRP
 unit
 headed
by
Adamson
handled
about
30
casualties
during
its
deployment,
but
performed
only
one
search
and
 recovery,
following
a
helicopter
crash
in
Helmand
Province.
 Still,
PRP
Marines
continue
to
prepare
for
various
missions
and
to
adapt
as
needed
in
the
field.

In
Iraq,
 for
example,
the
unit
oversaw
the
remains
of
more
than
500
insurgents
who
were
collected
at
an
old
potato
 factory
 outside
 Fallujah
 when
 fighting
 was
 heavy
 there
 in
 2004
 and
 2005,
 Kinley
 said.
 
 Like
 many
 other
 US
 forces
at
the
time,
they
needed
to
improvise
to
armor
their
vehicles.
 “We
had
to
up‐armor
our
own
Humvees
with
tie‐straps
and
whatever
armor
we
could
find,”
said
SGT
 Cal
 Swenson,
 a
 personnel
 retrieval
 and
 processing
 specialist
 now
 based
 at
 Quantico.
 
 “We
 had
 open‐back
 Humvees
…
no
ballistic
windows
or
anything.

It
was
good
times.”
 More
 recently,
 the
 Corps
 deployed
 detachments
 to
 Bastion
 and
 Camp
 Dwyer,
 a
 large
 forward‐ operating
 base
 in
 Garmser
 District,
 said
 SSG
 Michael
 Maldini,
 who
 served
 with
 the
 unit
 at
 Dwyer
 in
 2011.

 Commanders
have
since
realigned
deployed
PRP
Marines
so
they
all
work
out
of
Bastion,
consolidating
forces
 and
creating
one
common
facility.
 Preparation
Required
 Marines
who
join
PRP
have
varying
backgrounds
and
rely
heavily
on
training
that
is
passed
down
within
 the
unit.

Some
of
its
personnel
also
attend
the
Joint
Mortuary
Affairs
Center
at
Fort
Lee,
VA,
the
military’s
 mortuary
school.
 Before
deploying,
the
Marines
undergo
pre‐deployment
training
that
includes
not
only
standard
work
 with
weapons
and
patrolling,
but
a
stop
at
the
Los
Angeles
coroner’s
office.

The
visit
was
first
adopted
in
2008
 to
help
Marines
adjust
to
being
around
human
remains.
 “It
was
just
to
give
the
Marines
some
hands‐on
training,”
said
Maldini,
who
was
part
of
the
first
unit
to
 go
through
the
office.

“They
wanted
to
give
us
some
visual
aspects
to
what
we’d
be
handling
in
theater,
and
 now
it
has
evolved
into
an
annual
thing.

It’s
pretty
much
part
of
our
pre‐deployment
training
at
this
point.”
 Marines
 who
 do
 the
 job
 said
 that
 despite
 the
 Concluded
on
Page
10
 difficult
 situations
 they
 must
 face,
 they’re
 drawn
 to
 the
 


9



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


work
 because
 they’re
 able
 to
 take
 care
 of
 fallen
 fellow
 Marines,
 other
 service
 members
 and
 their
 families.

 They
 also
 pay
 attention
 to
 each
 other
 for
 signs
 of
 stress,
 and
 undergo
 a
 post‐deployment
 decompression
 session
–
focused
on
encouraging
them
to
open
up
about
their
deployment
–
in
Germany
on
the
way
back
to
 the
US.
 “All
of
us
live
in
a
tent
together,
so
we
stay
on
top
of
each
other
all
the
time,”
Santini
said
of
his
time
 deployed
at
Bastion.
 
“You
 keep
a
sense
of
humor,
and
when
someone
is
having
a
bad
day,
you
ask
what’s
 bothering
them.

We’re
pretty
open
with
each
other.”
 
 


Submit
Your
 Photos!
 


CHPA
has
a
growing
 collection
of
photos,
from
 flight
school
class
pictures
 like
these,
to
action
photos
to
 helicopter
shots
from
around
 the
world
…
 
 If
you
would
like
to
 contribute
to
the
collection
 please
upload
your
photos
by
 following
the
links
on
the
 CHPA
website
or
click
here!




 
 
 
 
 


10
 



 
 
 



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org


 
 
 
 Are
you
planning
a
reunion
or
event
that
may
be
of
interest
to
our
members?

Let
us
help
you
get
the
 word
out
and
support
veterans
groups
of
all
sizes
and
locations.

Just
send
a
message
with
the
information
to
 HQ@chpa‐us.org.

If
you
have
a
logo,
send
that
along
as
well.


 Be
sure
to
include
accurate
contact
and
registration
information
and
we’ll
take
care
of
the
rest.
 
 


Reunions
and
Gatherings


A
Troop,
1/9
Cavalry,
1
Air
Cav
Division
 
 Apache
 Troop,
 1st
 Squadron,
 9th
 Cavalry,
 1st
 Air
 Cavalry
 Division
 will
 host
 its
 annual
 reunion
 at
 the
 South
 Lake
 Tahoe
 Embassy
 Suites.
 
 Check
 in
 will
 be
 Sunday,
 August
 25,
 2013
 with
 a
 final
 Memorial
 Service
 and
 departure
 on
 Thursday,
August
29,
2013.

This
reunion
is
for
all
former
members,
families
and
 honored
guests.

Special
emphasis
is
for
enlisted
personnel
regardless
of
flight
 status
or
position.

Contact
Jeff
Cromar
at

 apachetroopreunion2013@gmail.com
or
817‐647‐5213
for
more
information.
 
 
 


B
Troop,
7/17th
Cavalry,
1
Air
Cav
Division
 
 B
Troop
7/17th
CAV
Troopers
&
All
Ruthless
Riders
are
invited
to
a
Gathering,
at
 Bally's,
on
the
strip,
in
Las
Vegas,
NV
June
3rd
‐
7th
2013.
 POC(s)
‐
Buddy
Harp:
buddyharp@yahoo.com
or
573‐324‐3924
 














Rich
Hefferman:
r.hefferman@comcast.net
or
412‐771‐8214
 














Johnnie
Griffits:
thegriffits@sbcglobal.net
or
760‐535‐8523
 WEB:

http://www.b717.homestead.com/

 
 


Sponsorship


Please
consider
sponsoring
CHPA’s
 programs.

You
may
make
tax
 deductible
donations
to
support
the
 Goldie
Fund,
CHPA’s
Scholarship
 program,
the
Holiday
Boxes
for
the
 Troops,
T‐shirts
for
Heroes
or
the
 Association.

For
further
information
 please
look
at
Sponsorship
at
the
 website,
http://www.chpa‐us.org.
 


Share
the
“Swash”


Please feel free to forward this issue of “The Swash Plate” to your colleagues, potential members and other interested parties! 11



Volume 9, Issue 1


CHPA
Bylaw
Edit


CHPA • The Swash Plate

www.chpa-us.org



 


Jay
Brown



 At
the
last
Annual
Business
Meeting
in
Washington,
DC,
the
membership
approved
an
amendment
of
 the
Bylaws
that
reduced
the
length
of
membership
for
service
on
the
Board
of
Directors
from
three
years
to
 one
year.

As
sometimes
occurs,
during
the
editing
and
publication
process
the
three
year
requirement
was
 overlooked
in
at
least
one
instance. Article
V,
Qualification
was
changed
to
reflect
the
new
requirement
and
currently
reads,
in
part,
“Only
 Pilot
or
Flight
Crewmembers
in
good
standing,
who
have
been
Pilot
or
Flight
Crewmembers
for
one
or
more
 years,
whether
or
not
consecutive,
may
serve
on
the
Board
of
Directors.”

Article
IX,
Qualifications
for
both
 Secretary
 and
 Treasurer
 currently
 reads,
 in
 part,
 “shall
 be
 a
 Pilot
 or
 Flight
 Crewmember
 of
 CHPA
 for
 a
 minimum
of
three
years.”

This
is
clearly
not
in
agreement
with
Article
V. Since
 the
membership
 approved
 reducing
 the
membership
 requirement
to
 one
 year
and
 Article
IX
 is
 not
 in
 accord
 with
 this
 approved
 amendment
 I
 have,
 with
 Board
 approval,
 edited
 Article
 IX
 to
 bring
 it
 into
 alignment
with
the
approved
text.

Now
the
membership
qualification
for
service
as
Secretary
and
Treasurer
is
 one
year
as
approved
by
the
membership.


Call on Us! Contact Quick Reference 


Chairman
of
the
Board
–
Rhea
Rippey

 Chairman@chpa‐us.org

 
 President
–
Robert
Frost

 president@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Administration
–
Rich
Miller

 admin@chpa‐us.org

 
 VP
Membership
–
Rusty
Bourgoyne

 membership@chpa‐us.org



Buzz
Covington
 BCovington@chpa‐us.org


Secretary
–
Mick
Tesanovich

 secretary@chpa‐us.org
 
 Treasurer
–
Loren
McAnally

 Treasurer@chpa‐us.org

 
 Executive
Director
–
Jay
Brown
 HQ@chpa‐us.org
 
 
 


Jim
Ferguson
 JFerguson@chpa‐us.org


12
 


Al
Major


 AMajor@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Call
us!
 800•832•5144


Randy
Jones
 RJones@chpa‐us.org



 



 


Fax
us!
 719•687•4167


Randy
Zahn
 RZahn@chpa‐us.org



 
 
 



 
 
 


Write
us!
 CHPA
 PO
Box
42
 Divide,
CO
80814‐0042



 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 


Remember!
 Feel
free
to
contact

 us
any
time.
 
 


John
Fore

 JFore@chpa‐us.org

 
 
 
 
 
 


January 2013 Swash Plate  

CHPA Newsletter for January 2013

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