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Annual Report

2011


We Build Success Table of Contents

Mission Community Housing Partnership creates, implements and demonstrates solutions to homelessness in San Francisco by working in partnership with people who would otherwise be without a home. CHP develops and operates high quality permanent affordable housing, integrating optional support services, job training, community organizing, and employment opportunities. We strive to break the cycle of homelessness by strengthening community, encouraging self-determination and involving residents in every aspect of the organization.

Board of Directors

Ramie Dare, President Sean Charpentier, Vice President Steve Wolmark, Treasurer Jackie Jenks, Secretary

Kimberly Alvarenga Lydia Heather Blumberg Steve Bowdry Brian Carr Nicolaas de Ruijg Sarah Karlinsky Keith Kemp

We Build Success...........................................1 Homes, Opportunity, Building Community, Together...................................2 Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments.....................................................3 Our Development Pipeline.........................4 Success Lives Here........................................5 Developing Skills for the Workforce ........6 Solutions that Work.......................................7 Civic Engagement.........................................8 Permanent Housing ......................................9 Financials........................................................10 Our Investors.................................................11 Build With Us Today....................................14

David Elliott Lewis Joel Lipski Bob Offer-Westort Ali Riker Michael Santero Chuck Turner

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A MESSAgE FRoM ouR ExECuTivE DiRECToR

Homes, Opportunity, Building Community, Together

Dear Supporters and Partners, 2011 has been an exciting year for Community Housing Partnership. We furthered our mission by being innovative, continued on our path of growth by expanding existing programs, and we had the flexibility to respond to a changing economy. Community Housing Partnership provides a platform from which individuals and families can rebuild their lives, realize their true potential, and re-engage with their community. Three initiatives truly highlight our work over the last 12 months.

Drs. Julian and Raye Richardson Apartments: This is a historic opening for us. It’s our largest housing development to date, with 120 units of housing for homeless adults with complex medical and mental health issues. This building signifies a partnership between Community Housing Partnership and the Western Addition community.

Expansion of Solutions SF: CHP secured over half a million dollars to expand our social enterprise, Solutions SF. This re-launch and expansion will create over 50 new jobs over the next 12 months. It will position CHP as an economic development engine in San Francisco, providing jobs to hardworking people and strengthening the economy.

Building Together: Our tenants give back through volunteering, taking the time to invest in their community and their homes every day, through mentorship of youth, community beautification projects, and running a food pantry. In 2012 Community Housing Partnership will be expanding this program to our supporters and corporate partners, so that anyone can volunteer with us and partner with our tenants on community projects. Community Housing Partnership works diligently every day to build platforms for success, strengthen communities, and partner with our tenants to rebuild lives. Building Together,

Gail Gilman, Executive Director

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FRoM A RiCh lEgACy, hoPE AnD oPPoRTuniTy

Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments In 2011, Community Housing Partnership completed construction on Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments, a 120 unit building that will provide a permanent home for adults who have been homeless. CHP’s commitment to helping people move beyond homelessness isn’t just about building high quality housing – it’s about giving opportunity to hardworking people. Since February 2010, Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments has created approximately 60 jobs per day for construction workers, with half of those jobs going to San Francisco residents. The building now employs 17 staff members, many of whom were trained by Community Housing Partnership’s nationally recognized program to help formerly homeless adults re-enter the workforce.

See photographs of the building at http://www.facebook.com/media/ set/?set=a.10150352308214210.368798.49095099209&type=3

A Legacy of Transformation

Drs. Julian and Raye Richardson met while at the Tuskegee Institute, a historically black university in Alabama. Settling into San Francisco in 1942, Dr. Julian Richardson worked as the first black typesetter at the SF Chronicle, but soon after started his own printing and publishing business, Success Printing in 1946 with his wife Raye in the Fillmore District. Serious readers and book collectors, Julian and Raye went into the book-selling business when friends

kept borrowing books and neglected to return them, opening Marcus Books in 1960, the oldest black bookstore in the country. Dr. Raye Richardson served as the first interim chair of Black Studies at San Francisco State University, and retired as the first Professor Emerita of the School of Ethnic Studies. Dr. Julian Richardson died in San Francisco on August 21, 2000 at the age of 84, leaving behind a rich legacy as an avid learner and mentor to many.

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CoMMuniTy houSing PARTnERShiP’S CuRREnT PRoJECTS

Our Development Pipeline Rene Cazenave Apartments

Transition-Aged youth housing

Rene Cazenave Apartments will be a 120 unit apartment building in the Transbay Redevelopment area, at the corner of Folsom and Essex Streets. Named after a longtime San Francisco activist who was passionate about social justice, Rene Cazenave was a founding board member of CHP who passed away in June 2010.* Working with development partner BRIDGE Housing, Rene Cazenave Apartments will be an 8 story building with a wide range of programming space, private courtyard, and two retail spaces.

In 2010, the Mayor’s of Housing awarded Community Housing Partnership funds to convert the Edward II Inn (www.edwardii.org) on Lombard Street in Cow Hollow into 24 studios for youth ages 18-24 at risk of homelessness, including youth exiting from foster care. In July 2010, CHP acquired the site, and construction is planned to start in mid 2012. Community Housing Partnership will own and manage the property, and youth-focused on-site support services will be provided by Larkin Street Youth Services, a nationally renowned leader in working with at-risk youth.

Architect: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects & Saida + Sullivan Design Partners; Contractor: Cahill Contractors

Transition-Aged youth housing

Architect: Barcelon & Jang Architects; Contractor: FineLine Construction

Cambridge

San Cristina & iroquois

A funding commitment from the CA Department of Housing and Community Development will allow CHP to acquire and rehabilitate the Cambridge Apartments, a 60-unit residence currently owned by Chinatown Community Development Center. The project has pre-development financing from the San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Housing.

Funding from Enterprise Community Partners will allow Community Housing Partnership to conduct major energy efficiency upgrades and green retrofits of two of our older properties, the San Cristina and Iroquois, first renovated in 1994 and 1996, respectively. The upgrades will reduce CHP’s environmental footprint and position the properties for service in the next century.

Architect: Mock/Wallace Architects; Contractor: FineLine Construction

Rene Cazenave Apartments

Cambridge

San Cristina & iroquois 4

* Read about Rene Cazenave’s life: www.sfbg.com/2010/07/06/rene-cazenave-1941-2010


CoMMuniTy houSing PARTnERShiP’S SuPPoRT SERviCES

Success Lives Here

“I learned a lot and gained inspiration from the stories of other people, which has helped me to work on my own recovery and feel better about myself. My family members have also noticed the positive changes in me since participating in TASH. I have also started working again.” – Donel F., TASH Graduate and Peer Mentor

Supporting youth, Bringing Families Together Over 320 youth (18 and younger) reside in Community Housing Partnership properties, and we offer a comprehensive program for families with children, including after-school academic support, assistance with navigating the public school system, family events and cultural excursions to bring families together in a fun, safe and nurturing environment. Additional programs support teen health, safety and well-being, all designed to address the effects of chronic homelessness.

Treatment and Supportive housing (TASh) In response to resident-identified needs, CHP launched an intensive six-month outpatient substance abuse and mental health treatment program in 2008. The first of its kind in the nation, the program is a sought after model among other housing providers. Through harm reduction groups, 12-step meetings, individual counseling, after-care and peer support, residents identify and address the underlying substance abuse and mental health issues that impact their ability to maintain housing and achieve their life goals. Over the past year, TASH served 50 clients through Intensive Outpatient substance abuse treatment services and trained 5 clients to serve as Peer Mentors.

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A PlATFoRM FoR WoRkFoRCE SuCCESS

Developing Skills for the Workforce Employment training is central to Community Housing Partnership’s work to alleviate homelessness while strengthening local communities. Our job readiness programs provide the tools for formerly homeless adults to successfully return to work. Two of our three programs are accredited by the California Bureau of Private Post-Secondary Education. Approximately 75% of graduates seeking work find it, with placement support from Community Housing Partnership.

CHP Desk Clerk Training Program graduate

Alvin Johnson is a proud graduate of CHP’s Maintenance Training Program and is now part of the Maintenance Team for Solutions SF

ChP’S EMPloyMEnT TRAining PRogRAMS Desk Clerk Training Program

Maintenance Training Program

Hundreds of desk clerks now working throughout San Francisco graduated from this vital training program, which builds on CHP’s core competencies in the recessionresistant property management industry.

CHP’s first employment training program continues to equip participants with the skills they need to begin a career in property maintenance.

Recycling & Environmental Awareness Program (REAP) REAP trains supportive housing residents and staff on environmental stewardship while preparing trainees for jobs in the green economy. Through REAP’s waste diversion efforts and the work of its participants, over 2 million pounds of waste were diverted from landfills at 37 sites throughout San Francisco in the past year.

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SoCiAl vEnTuRE SuBSiDiARy

Solutions that Work

SOLUTIONS SF Solutions SF is a social venture subsidiary that builds on CHP’s expertise in property management and employment training while generating revenue. Graduates of CHP’s Desk Clerk Training and Maintenance Training Programs can apply to Solutions SF for employment with fair wages and health benefits, financial literacy training and employment counseling. Since 2007, Solutions SF has created over 100 new full and part time positions, and we expect to hire 50 additional employees in the next year.

SolutionS SF oFFERS ThREE SERviCE linES: loBBy SERviCES placing trained staff in full or part time front desk positions in apartment buildings and offices MAinTEnAnCE cleaning, painting and repairing vacated units for occupancy gREEn PEST REMEDiATion working in partnership with a licensed pest control company, Solutions SF employees prepare housing units for effective pest remediation services.

To learn more, visit Solutions SF’s website: http://solutionssf.org.

“ With 26 years of experience working in retail, I’ve become really good at making people feel better. Working in a shoe store and working as a desk clerk are no different – I bring the same customer service experience to both clients, treating everyone with dignity, patience, and a bit of humor. Being a native of the Fillmore District, I’m proud to be a Solutions SF employee at Richardson Apartments. I feel like I’m working in the community that has always been my home.” – Quentin H., Solutions SF Desk Clerk at Richardson Apartments

Pamela White is a story of success and the proud recipient of a 2011 Step-Up Award from REDF. Watch video about Pamela: www.youtube.com/user/ CommunityHousingPart#p/ u/9/xW2Pn5iDbCg

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EngAging WiTh ThE CoMMuniTy

Civic Engagement In partnership with our residents and neighbors, the Community Housing Organizing Project (CHOP) builds the platform for formerly homeless people to engage productively in their communities. With the goal of bringing us closer to a vibrant, inclusive and socially just world, CHOP’s activities focus on community building, advocacy, and leadership development, to support civic engagement, communitybased responses to neighborhood issues, voter registration, and participation in the decision-making processes that affect their lives and communities.

Creating Community, Creating Safety Working with residents, neighbors and local businesses, CHOP created and now works to expand the Safe Havens Network of approximately 50 businesses in the Tenderloin and SOMA districts that agree to provide a safe refuge for people experiencing distress on the streets. This community-based response addresses serious neighborhood concerns in a spirit of cooperation that benefits the whole community.

voter Turnout The voter turnout rate among Community Housing Partnership’s residents is consistently twice the city average, and a reflection of the commitment many previously disenfranchised people have to the wellbeing of the city that is their home.

katherine’s Story “My life now is what I want – in the past I just survived, struggling with addiction and living on the streets. But now I’m making the life that I want, staying active and giving back to my community. I help out as an usher at my church, I water the plants in the rooftop garden of my building, and I update the info boards on all floors of my building. I’ve also been up to Sacramento to protest cuts to funding for affordable housing, so I can make sure that the opportunity I had with housing will continue to be given to people like myself in the future – people who want to go from barely surviving to creating a life rich with purpose.” – Katherine F., Resident of Arnett Watson Apartments 8


CoMMuniTy houSing PARTnERShiP’S PRoPERTiES

Permanent Housing ouR ExPAnDing PoRTFolio The foundation of our work is in providing permanent housing for formerly homeless individuals. We own and/or provide property management services at 11 properties in San Francisco with over 900 units of housing. Another 144 units are in the development pipeline, focusing on the needs of formerly homeless seniors, people with disabilities, and youth transitioning out of foster care. All of our buildings are secure with on-site property management and support services.

1992 Senator

renovated in 2005 – 89 units of supportive housing for families and individuals

1994 San Cristina

58 units of supportive housing for individuals

1996 iroquois

74 units of supportive housing for families and individuals

2002 island Bay homes

66 units of supportive housing for families

2006 hamlin

67 units of supportive housing for adults, owned by Chinatown Community Development Center

2006 Cambridge

59 units of supportive housing for adults, owned by Chinatown Community Development Center

2007 Treasure island Supportive housing

66 units of supportive housing for families, owned by Catholic Charities CYO

2008 Essex

84 units of supportive housing for individuals

2009 Arnett Watson Apartments

83 units of supportive housing for families and individuals

2010 Zygmunt Arendt house

47 units of supportive housing for formerly homeless seniors

2011 Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments 120 units of supportive housing for individuals

A tight-knit collaboration between Property Management and Tenant Services ensures that over 98% of CHP’s residents retain their housing each year, building the foundation for their continued success.

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REvEnuE AnD ExPEnSES FiSCAl yEAR July 2010-JunE 2011

Financials

(Preliminary and Unaudited)

2011 REvEnuE

2011 ExPEnSES

Rental Income $4,161,189

Owned & Managed Properties $5,363,439

Government Contracts $3,632,715

Tenant Support Services $2,699,003

Management Fees $2,784,865

Workforce Development $2,119,997

Foundation Grants $1,038,375

Administration $1,153,643

Corporate & Individual Donations $172,177

Housing Development $410,208

Other Income $279,646

Fundraising $290,739

ToTAl $12,068,967

ToTAl $12,037,029

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ThAnkS To ouR 2011 ConTRiBuToRS

Our Investors We thank our many investors and supporters for believing in the value of our work

Foundation Supporters Altamont Education Advisory Board Amgen Foundation Bank of America Foundation Change Happens Foundation Cisco Systems Foundation Citi Enterprise Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund Federal Home Loan Bank AHEAD John Burton Foundation JP Morgan Chase Foundation Louis R. Lurie Foundation Mitchell Kapor Foundation North of Market/TL Community Benefits Corp. San Francisco Office of Community Services REDF San Francisco Beautiful San Francisco Foundation Social Innovation Fund TJX Foundation Union Bank Foundationg Walter & Elise Haas, Sr. Fund Wells Fargo Foundation The Whitman Institute William G. Gilmore Foundation

Corporate and nonprofit Supporters Abbott Consulting Alternative Technologies Arguedas Cassman & Headley LLP Bank of America BAR Architects Barcelon & Jang, Architects Basis Architecture Bay Area Mechanical and Engineering Best Plumbing, Inc. Bhatia Associates Bill Moffett LLC Brayer Electric E. Buenaflor & Sons C. Edwin Baker 2001 Trust Cahill Contractors CAN Insurance Caritas Management Corporation Catholic Charities CYO Center City Housing Corp. Central City Hospitality House Charles Pankow Builders, Ltd. Chinatown Community Development Center City National Bank Cole Hardware Community Economics, Inc. Cypress Private Security Delivering Innovation In Supportive Housing (DISH) Design Studio Gonzalo Castro Dewey Pest Control Dolores St. Community Services

Economic Development Assistance Corporation Elinor Smith Charitable Trust Enterprise Envision Litigation Design Estates Mattress Everest Waterproofing & Restoration Falcon Industrial Supply Farallone Pacific Insurance Services Farella Braun + Martel LLP Fineline Construction Folsom Street Events Ground Floor Public Affairs Gubb & Barshay Herman Coliver Locus: Architecture Inc. HKIT Architects ILWU - Norcal District Council James E. Roberts-Obayashi Corp. Law Offices of Michael Rossoff Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects Lennar Urban Lindquist, Von Husen & Joyce, LLP Majestic Construction McCormack Baron Ragan Mercy Housing California Merritt Community Capital Mock/Wallace Architects National Equity Fund Newport Realty Advisors NonProfit Housing Association of Northern CA Northern California Carpenters Regional Council

Numbers Inc. Okamoto Saijo Architecture Pacific Door Products Paragon Real Estate Group Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP PR for the People Raymond James Tax Credit Funds, Inc. REDF Room And Board Saida + Sullivan Design Partners SEIU Local 1021 Self Help for the Elderly SF Print Silicon Valley Bank Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence SKS Investments Spotlight Design & Printing Studio Kristen Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corp. TICD (Treasure Island Community Development) TIHDI Toolworks U.S. Bank United Way Bay Area Wells Fargo Wired Communications Zhong Flooring Services

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ThAnkS To ouR 2011 ConTRiBuToRS

Our Investors individuals Ahkeyah Ahmad Jason Albertson Justin Albright Scott Anderson Anonymous (8) Margot Antonetty Cynthia Ashley Barbara Backer & Aldo Caccamo Karla Bahamonde Kenneth Baker Roxanne Balousek Wayne Barcelon Nesi Barini Nessie Barnes Sherryl Beamon Lydia Beasley Ray Bernstein Jeffrey Bialik The Blakely Family Natalie Bonnewit Nikee Borden Pati Boyle Graham Brandt Rose Theresa Bravo Anthony & Kathleen Brekke Farren Briggs Tom Britton Vanessa Brown & John Franklin Eric Brown Velina Brown Jonathon Bruck Tom Brutting Jeffrey Buckley Don Burghardt Kevin Caraan

Jonathan Carlson

Charlie Castro Lalo Cervantes Gilbert Chan Linda Chao Michael Chao Sean Charpentier Nell Clement Janet Clyde Christine Comella Anna Conda Juanita Contreras Flora Cortez Ramie Dare Vikki Davis Rodney Davis Dane Dobrinich Ira Dorter Fred Doughty Melanie Doyle William Duncanson Rebecca Dyas Pat Dyas Roma Eisenstark Lydia Eli Neil Elliott John Ellis Lydia Ely Marla Erojo Richard Fairly Terri Feeley Mary Fielder Kathleen Flanagan Rev. Norman Fong Ali Frazzini Linda Frey Jennifer Friedenbach Kendra Fuller

Linda Gallaher-Brown Jonathan Garcia Kelly Garton Michael Gause Joyce Gibson Lena Gilbert Paul Gilman Gail Gilman & Larry Zientarski Abby Ginzberg Sharon Goldstein Carrie Goodspeed Sara Greene Lisa Groover Elizabeth Grossman Jennifer Hatfield John & Laurel Hewson Elizabeth Hewson Jack Hewson Gabriel Heywood Tom Hoglund David & Loretta Hoglund Melissa Howard Jessica Hulce Merrill Hunn Emily Jarosz Cathy Jefferson Jackie Jenks Maurice Johnson Akile Kabir Sarah Karlinsky Gary & Ilene Katz Seth Katzman Rachel & Thomas Kellerman Tricia Kelley Christine Kesler Ella Kikuchi Phil Kim Jane Kim

Rhonda Kingman Alicia Klein & Kellee Fong Gary Koenig Karen Jo Koonan William Kopcyk Jeff & Aileen Kositsky Angela Kray Joseph & Carole La Torre Mar Labonete Kevin Lau Molly Lazarus & Craig Burke Barbara Leahy Olson Lee Nicole Levine Debbie Lewis Sharon Li Lawrence Li Joel Lipski John Litster, Jr. David Loeb Nancy Loewen Carrie & Jessica Love Kathie Lowry Barbara Lubinski Kevin Lui Geoff & Randee MacDonald Sandra Maeshiro Esther Marks Amina Massey Fran Mat Francisco Matos Jason McArthur Kristen McDonnell Benjamin McGriff Rebecca McKee Lita Melendez Barthelemy Menayas Cheryl Mendonsa

The City & County of San Francisco spends approximately $18,000 each year to maintain a homeless individual in shelters and in emergency rooms, while CHP’s comprehensive programs that move people beyond homelessness permanently cost half of that, at approximately $9,000 per year.

A night With the Stars

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ThAnkS To ouR 2011 ConTRiBuToRS

Our Investors Ezra & Carol Ann Mersey Drew Mesomsub Carlin Meyer David Millican Lawrence Mock Bill & Ursula Moffett Kim Nash Gail Neer Christian M. Nelson Peter Neuendorff Phillip Newport Jennifer Norris Carrie Octavio Sharon Papo Mike Papo Leigh Peake & Hershey Hirschkop Marv Peper David Phillips Linda Pierce Gary Plessman Amit Price Patel Jeanne Pritchard Patricia Quant Mara Raider Linda Rapp Krishna Reddy Kenneth Reggio Karen Reynolds Barbara Rhine Murry Richard Ali Riker Tessa Riley Fortino Rivas Kathleen Robinson Marcia Rosen Beth Roy Susan Rutberg

Jasmine Saadatmand Alexander Salazar Michael Santero Maryann Sargent Marvin & Jane Schnur David Schnur & Marke Bieschke Elizabeth Seifel Marcia Seville Kevin Sharps Carole & Douglas Sheft Jennifer Shim Tammy Silas Robert Simms Max & Natalie Siva William Slatkin Andrea Slattery Kathy Smith Sally Smyth Richard Sprott Adrianne Steichen Brianne Steinhauser Anna Stepaniak David Stevens & Paul Zabriskie Victoria Stewart Sarah & Carl Stillwell Beau & Ruth Takahara Ramses Teon-Nichols Mel Terry Sarah Thibault Diane Torkelson Anne Torney Roberta Tracy Chuck Turner Carolyn Tyler James Upchurch Taylor Upchurch Patrick Valentino

Brett Vaughn & Brad Niess Lauren Venell Gerald & Ruth Vurek Marilyn Waller Francesca Wander Robert & Cynthia Weber Julia Weber James Weill Zeke Weiner & Claudia Stillwell Roger Weinman Patti Weiss Amber Weiss Eric Whitney Deborah Whittle Sherry Williams Diane Wilsey Adam Winkler Lynne Winslow Shannon Wise Delene Wolf & Tom Murray Ken Wong Lianne Wong Dianne Wood Benjamin Wu Julia Young Chris Zaccarelli Andrew Zimmerman Irving & Eve Zirker

Drs. Julian & Raye Richardson Apartments

“When our city dollars are invested in supportive housing, effective organizations like Community Housing Partnership are not only transforming lives, they’re helping stimulate San Francisco’s economy.” – Chuck Palley, President Cahill Contractors

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Build With Us Today Community Housing Partnership relies on the generous support of many to sustain our work and help us grow. Leverage your investment to build success.

WAyS To givE

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Donate online

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Donate by Check

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Donate by Phone

Give today!

Make a secure donation online by going to the “Support Us” section of our website: www.chp-sf.org

Mail check made out to “Community Housing Partnership” to: Community Housing Partnership ATTN: Fund Development 280 Turk Street San Francisco, CA 94102

Call us at 415.929.2470 x304 to safely give your credit card information directly to our Director of Fund Development.

Contact us Community Housing Partnership, 280 Turk Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 info@chp-sf.org • 415.929.2470 • www.chp-sf.org

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Annual Report 2010-2011: Community Housing Partnership SF